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burgrave

burgrave Sentence Examples

  • of Hohenzollern, burgrave of Nuremberg.

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  • and was occupied by an imperial burgrave for some fifty years, after which it was retaken by the counts of Flanders.

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  • of Hohenzollern, burgrave of Nuremberg, and in 1391 did the same for the Teutonic Order against Ladislaus V., king of Poland and prince of Lithuania.

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  • JAN DLUGOSZ [JOHANNES LONGINUS] (1415-1480), Polish statesman and historian, was the son of Jan Dlugosz, burgrave of Bozeznica.

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  • (c. 1371-1440), elector of Brandenburg, founder of the greatness of the House of Hohenzollern, was a son of Frederick V., burgrave of Nuremberg, and first came into prominence by saving the life of Sigismund, king of Hungary, at the battle of Nicopolis in 1396.

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  • In 1397 he became burgrave of Nuremberg, and after his father's death in 1398 he shared Ansbach, Bayreuth, and the smaller possessions of the family, with his only brother John, but became sole ruler after his brother's death in 1420.

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  • In 1427 he sold his rights as burgrave to the town of Nuremberg, and he was a prominent member of the band of electors who sought to impose reforms upon Sigismund.

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  • daughter and heiress of Conrad, burgrave of Nuremberg, and about 1192 he succeeded his father-in-law as burgrave, obtaining also some lands in Austria and Franconia.

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  • Conrad became burgrave of Nuremberg, and, receiving the lands which had come into the family through his mother, founded the Franconian branch of the family, which became the more important of the two; while Frederick, receiving the county of Zollern and the older possessions of the family, was the ancestor of the Swabian branch.

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  • The Franconian branch of the Hohenzollerns was represented in 1227 by Conrad, burgrave of Nuremberg, whom the emperor Frederick II.

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  • This burgrave fought for King Albert I.

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  • Since 1397 the office of burgrave of Nuremberg had been held by John's brother, Frederick, who in 1415 received Brandenburg from King Sigismund, and became margrave of Brandenburg as Frederick I.

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  • On his brother's death in 1420 he reunited the lands of his branch of the family, but in 1427 he sold his rights as burgrave to the town of Nuremberg.

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  • In the nth century a burgrave (chatelain, castellanus), who was an episcopal officer, is found exercising jurisdiction in the city as well as the Vogt.

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  • The magistrates, the Schout or high bailiff and his assessors, the Schepenen (scabini, echevins), were nominated by the burgrave from the order of knights.

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  • With the aid of John, burgrave of Montfoort, who had been called in, after the manner of the Italian podestas, and endowed with supreme power for the defence of the town, the Utrechters defeated all the efforts of their bishop, aided by the Hollanders and an aristocratic faction.

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  • Schwabach was purchased in 1364 by the burgrave of Nuremberg.

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  • Down to the I 5th century an episcopal prefect, or burgrave, had his seat in the city, his authority extending over the neighbouring districts known as the Gorecht.

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  • In 1443 he formed a league directed mainly against Nuremberg, over which town members of his family had formerly exercised the rights of burgrave.

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  • At first the bishop ruled through his burgrave, advocate, and nominated jurats (scabini, Scheen).

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  • In 1415 he granted, or rather sold, the mark of Brandenburg to his friend Frederick of Hohen- Brandenzollern, burgrave of Nuremberg, this land thus passing burg and into the hands of the family under whom it was des- the Ifohentined to develop into the kingdom of Prussia.

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  • gave the countship to the bishop and chapter of Utrecht, who governed it through the burgrave, or chatelain, of Koevorden, a dignity which became hereditary after 1143 in the family of Ludolf or Roelof, brother of Heribert of Bierum, bishop of Utrecht (1138-1150).

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  • The office of burgrave dates from the time of Charlemagne, although its holder was not at first called by this name, and it soon became one of great importance.

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  • The burgrave was the king's representative; he was charged with the administration of the royal estates in a given district, and in general with watching the royal interests therein.

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  • Later the overlordship was claimed by the archbishops of Mainz, on the strength of charters granted by the emperor Otto I., and their authority in Erfurt was maintained by a burgrave and an advocatus, the office of the latter becoming in the 12th century hereditary in the family of the counts of Gleichen.

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  • The great Bohemian nobles, and in particular the supreme burgrave, Zdenek Leo, lord of Rozmital, ruled the country almost without control.

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  • He appointed Charles of Miinsterberg, a cousin of Prince Bartholomew and also a grandson of King George, as regent of Bohemia during his absences, and John of Wartenberg as burgrave.

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  • When they returned to Prague, Adam of Sternberg, the burgrave, again informed Budova that the king would grant no concessions in ecclesiastical matters.

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  • The power of the royal officials who constituted the executive government of Bohemia was greatly curtailed, and though the chief representative of the sovereign in Prague continued to bear the ancient title of supreme burgrave, he was instructed to conform in all matters to the orders of the central government of Vienna.

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  • of Hohenzollern, burgrave of Nuremberg, to exercise the Brandenburg vote at the election.

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  • of Hohenzollern, burgrave of Nuremberg.

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  • and was occupied by an imperial burgrave for some fifty years, after which it was retaken by the counts of Flanders.

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    0
  • of Hohenzollern, burgrave of Nuremberg, and in 1391 did the same for the Teutonic Order against Ladislaus V., king of Poland and prince of Lithuania.

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  • JAN DLUGOSZ [JOHANNES LONGINUS] (1415-1480), Polish statesman and historian, was the son of Jan Dlugosz, burgrave of Bozeznica.

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  • (c. 1371-1440), elector of Brandenburg, founder of the greatness of the House of Hohenzollern, was a son of Frederick V., burgrave of Nuremberg, and first came into prominence by saving the life of Sigismund, king of Hungary, at the battle of Nicopolis in 1396.

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    0
  • In 1397 he became burgrave of Nuremberg, and after his father's death in 1398 he shared Ansbach, Bayreuth, and the smaller possessions of the family, with his only brother John, but became sole ruler after his brother's death in 1420.

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    0
  • In 1427 he sold his rights as burgrave to the town of Nuremberg, and he was a prominent member of the band of electors who sought to impose reforms upon Sigismund.

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    0
  • daughter and heiress of Conrad, burgrave of Nuremberg, and about 1192 he succeeded his father-in-law as burgrave, obtaining also some lands in Austria and Franconia.

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    0
  • Conrad became burgrave of Nuremberg, and, receiving the lands which had come into the family through his mother, founded the Franconian branch of the family, which became the more important of the two; while Frederick, receiving the county of Zollern and the older possessions of the family, was the ancestor of the Swabian branch.

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    0
  • The Franconian branch of the Hohenzollerns was represented in 1227 by Conrad, burgrave of Nuremberg, whom the emperor Frederick II.

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  • He died in 1261, when his son and successor, the burgrave Frederick III., had already obtained Bayreuth through his marriage with Elizabeth, daughter of Otto of Meran (d.

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  • This burgrave fought for King Albert I.

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  • Since 1397 the office of burgrave of Nuremberg had been held by John's brother, Frederick, who in 1415 received Brandenburg from King Sigismund, and became margrave of Brandenburg as Frederick I.

    0
    0
  • On his brother's death in 1420 he reunited the lands of his branch of the family, but in 1427 he sold his rights as burgrave to the town of Nuremberg.

    0
    0
  • In the nth century a burgrave (chatelain, castellanus), who was an episcopal officer, is found exercising jurisdiction in the city as well as the Vogt.

    0
    0
  • The magistrates, the Schout or high bailiff and his assessors, the Schepenen (scabini, echevins), were nominated by the burgrave from the order of knights.

    0
    0
  • With the aid of John, burgrave of Montfoort, who had been called in, after the manner of the Italian podestas, and endowed with supreme power for the defence of the town, the Utrechters defeated all the efforts of their bishop, aided by the Hollanders and an aristocratic faction.

    0
    0
  • Schwabach was purchased in 1364 by the burgrave of Nuremberg.

    0
    0
  • Down to the I 5th century an episcopal prefect, or burgrave, had his seat in the city, his authority extending over the neighbouring districts known as the Gorecht.

    0
    0
  • In 1443 he formed a league directed mainly against Nuremberg, over which town members of his family had formerly exercised the rights of burgrave.

    0
    0
  • At first the bishop ruled through his burgrave, advocate, and nominated jurats (scabini, Scheen).

    0
    0
  • In 1415 he granted, or rather sold, the mark of Brandenburg to his friend Frederick of Hohen- Brandenzollern, burgrave of Nuremberg, this land thus passing burg and into the hands of the family under whom it was des- the Ifohentined to develop into the kingdom of Prussia.

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    0
  • gave the countship to the bishop and chapter of Utrecht, who governed it through the burgrave, or chatelain, of Koevorden, a dignity which became hereditary after 1143 in the family of Ludolf or Roelof, brother of Heribert of Bierum, bishop of Utrecht (1138-1150).

    0
    0
  • The office of burgrave dates from the time of Charlemagne, although its holder was not at first called by this name, and it soon became one of great importance.

    0
    0
  • The burgrave was the king's representative; he was charged with the administration of the royal estates in a given district, and in general with watching the royal interests therein.

    0
    0
  • Later the overlordship was claimed by the archbishops of Mainz, on the strength of charters granted by the emperor Otto I., and their authority in Erfurt was maintained by a burgrave and an advocatus, the office of the latter becoming in the 12th century hereditary in the family of the counts of Gleichen.

    0
    0
  • The great Bohemian nobles, and in particular the supreme burgrave, Zdenek Leo, lord of Rozmital, ruled the country almost without control.

    0
    0
  • He appointed Charles of Miinsterberg, a cousin of Prince Bartholomew and also a grandson of King George, as regent of Bohemia during his absences, and John of Wartenberg as burgrave.

    0
    0
  • When they returned to Prague, Adam of Sternberg, the burgrave, again informed Budova that the king would grant no concessions in ecclesiastical matters.

    0
    0
  • The power of the royal officials who constituted the executive government of Bohemia was greatly curtailed, and though the chief representative of the sovereign in Prague continued to bear the ancient title of supreme burgrave, he was instructed to conform in all matters to the orders of the central government of Vienna.

    0
    0
  • of Hohenzollern, burgrave of Nuremberg, to exercise the Brandenburg vote at the election.

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