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burgoyne

burgoyne

burgoyne Sentence Examples

  • He contributed largely to raise troops in 1777 to meet Burgoyne; and he served as a captain at Bennington and at Saratoga.

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  • Burgoyne fortified himself on the site of the action, and on October 7th made another attempt to turn the American left.

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  • In 1777 General Philip Schuyler established his headquarters on Van Schaick's Island in the Mohawk and Hudson, then the principal rendezvous of the army which later met Burgoyne at Saratoga.

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  • He was sent to Congress to report Gates's success against Burgoyne, but his tardiness secured for him a sarcastic reception.

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  • But on the 6th of February 1778, after the news of the defeat and surrender of Burgoyne had reached Europe, a treaty of alliance and a treaty of amity and commerce between France and the United States were signed at Paris by Franklin, Deane and Lee.

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  • In 1777 General John Burgoyne succeeded in taking Ticonderoga, but in the swampy forests southward from Lake Champlain he fought his way against heavy odds, and in the middle of October his campaign culminated disastrously in his surrender at Saratoga.

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  • The British government intended that Howe should co-operate with Burgoyne by fighting his way up the Hudson, but as the secretary of state for the colonies neglected to send him such instructions this was not undertaken until early in October, and then an expedition for the purpose was placed under the command of Sir Henry Clinton.

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  • General (Sir) William Howe, who succeeded Gage in the chief command in October, and Generals (Sir) Henry Clinton and John Burgoyne were sent out at once with reinforcements.

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  • Largely upon the representations of Howe, Burgoyne and others, it was determined to shift the field from Boston to New York city, from there to hold the line of the Hudson river in co-operation with a force to move down from Canada under Carleton and Burgoyne, and thus effectually to isolate New England.

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  • Burgoyne marched from Canada in June 1 777, with a strong expeditionary force, to occupy Albany and put himself in touch with Howe at the other end of the Hudson.

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  • On the 13th of August Burgoyne despatched a force to Bennington, Vermont, under the German colonel Friedrich Baum, to capture stores and overawe the country.

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  • under Colonel Barry St Leger to co-operate with Burgoyne by way of the Mohawk Valley.

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  • Despite these disasters Burgoyne pushed south to Stillwater, where he was defeated by Gates's improvised army of continentals and militia in two battles on the 19.th of September (Freeman's Farm) and the 7th of October (Bemis's Height).

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  • The destruction of his squadron on Lake Champlain in October covered the frontier of Canada, and supplied a basis for the march of General Burgoyne in 1777 which ended in the surrender at Saratoga.

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  • His organization of the military force in London against the Chartists in April 1848, and his letter to Sir John Burgoyne on the defences of the country, proved that the old man had still something of his youth about him.

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  • Lord Howe, commander-in-chief of the British in America, who had received no instructions binding him in detail to co-operate with Burgoyne, moved southward and captured Philadelphia.

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  • Burgoyne pushed down by way of Lakes Champlain and George and approached the American army under General Horatio Gates in its fortified camp near Stillwater on the W.

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  • On the 19th Burgoyne attacked the American left under General Benedict Arnold.

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  • Crippled to an alarming extent, Burgoyne retreated.

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  • John Burgoyne (Albany, 1877).

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  • In 1777 General John Burgoyne succeeded in taking Ticonderoga, but in the swampy forests southward from Lake Champlain he fought his way against heavy odds, and in the middle of October his campaign culminated disastrously in his surrender at Saratoga.

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  • Despite these disasters Burgoyne pushed south to Stillwater, where he was defeated by Gates's improvised army of continentals and militia in two battles on the 19.th of September (Freeman's Farm) and the 7th of October (Bemis's Height).

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  • His organization of the military force in London against the Chartists in April 1848, and his letter to Sir John Burgoyne on the defences of the country, proved that the old man had still something of his youth about him.

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  • In 1779-1780 about 4000 of Burgoyne's troops, surrendered under the "Convention" of Saratoga, were quartered here; in October 1780 part of them were sent to Lancaster, Pa., and later the rest were sent north.

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  • The strategic importance of Albany was fully recognized during the War of Independence, and it was against Albany that Burgoyne's expedition was directed.

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  • In Burgoyne's expedition (1777) Skene and his son, Andrew Philip Skene (1753-1826), served as guides, and Skenesborough was recovered by the British after most of it had been burned by the Americans.

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  • Later in the year, however, he was placed in command (by New Hampshire), with the rank of brigadier-general of militia, of a force of militiamen, with whom, on the 16th of August, near Bennington, Vermont, he defeated two detachments of Burgoyne's army under Colonel Friedrich Baum and Colonel Breyman.

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  • Clinton met with little difficulty from the principal American defences of the Highlands, consisting of Forts Montgomery and Clinton on the western bank, together with a huge chain and boom stretched across the river to a precipitous mountain (Anthony's Nose) on the opposite bank, and ascended as far as Esopus (now Kingston) which he burned, but he was too late to aid Burgoyne.

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  • above Albany, barricading the roads and impeding Burgoyne's progress.

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  • Tarleton's Southern Campaigns, 1780-1781 (London, 1787) � the pamphlet controversy between Sir Henry Clinton and Lord Cornwallis (1783), see Winsor, vi., p. 516, n.; Burgoyne's State of the Expedition from Canada in 1777 (London, 1780).

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  • After the battle of Saratoga some of Burgoyne's officers were housed here.

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  • This was General Burgoyne's force of 7000 men which marched from Canada in June 1777 with the view of reaching the upper Hudson and combining with British troops from New York to isolate New England from the colonies below.

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  • In drawing Washington after him he claimed to be assisting Burgoyne.

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  • It commemorates the success gained on the 16th of August 1777 by a force of nearly 2000 "Green Mountain Boys" and New Hampshire and Massachusetts militia under General John Stark over two detachments of General Burgoyne's army, totalling about 1200 men, under Col.

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  • They are covered by modern works on the north side known as Fort Burgoyne, and additional works extend eastwards towards St Margaret's Bay.

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  • Some of General Burgoyne's troops, surrendered at Saratoga, were confined here after the autumn of 1780.

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  • The use of " wax lights and tapers " formed one of the indictments brought by P. Smart, a Puritan prebendary of Durham, against Dr Burgoyne, Cosin and others for setting up " superstitious ceremonies " in the cathedral " contrary to the Act of Uniformity."

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  • Two years later, when the Family Compact involved Portugal in a war with Spain, Pombal called in Count William of Lippe-Biickeburg to reorganize the army, which was reinforced by a British contingent under Brigadier-General John Burgoyne, and was increased from 5000 to 50,000 men.

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  • In the summer of 1777 he was engaged in minor skirmishes in New Jersey, and early in September joined General Horatio Gates, then engaged in the campaign against General Burgoyne.

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  • In 1777 a British army under Burgoyne capitulated at Saratoga; and early in 1778 France, eager to revenge the disasters of the Seven Years War, formed an alliance with the revolted colonies as free and independent states, and was soon joined by Spain.

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  • Lord Palmerston, speaking in 1845, had declared that steam had bridged theChannel; and the duke of Wellington had addressed a letter to Sir John Burgoyne, in which he had demonstrated that the country was not in a position to resist an.

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  • Here are the Apthorp House (built in 1760), in which General Burgoyne and his officers were lodged as prisoners of war in 1777; the elm under which, according to tradition, Washington took command of the Continental Army on the 3rd of July 1775; the old Vassall or Craigie House (1759), where Washington lived in 1775-1776, and which was later the home of Edward Everett, Joseph E.

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  • In July of that year representatives of the New England States and New York met here in convention to consider plans of co-operation for meeting Burgoyne's invasion.

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  • His imprisonment after the surrender of Charleston (May 1780) lasted until his exchange with others for General Burgoyne in February 1782.

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  • In 1779-1780 about 4000 of Burgoyne's troops, surrendered under the "Convention" of Saratoga, were quartered here; in October 1780 part of them were sent to Lancaster, Pa., and later the rest were sent north.

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  • In 1777 General Philip Schuyler established his headquarters on Van Schaick's Island in the Mohawk and Hudson, then the principal rendezvous of the army which later met Burgoyne at Saratoga.

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  • above tide-level), great fires were kindled at the news of the repeal of the Stamp Act, of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, and of the surrenders of Burgoyne and Cornwallis; beacon fires were burned during the American War of Independence; an "observatory" for tourists was built at an early date; and in 1885 the Blue Hill Observatory for meteorological investigation was established by Abbott Lawrence Rotch (b.

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  • He contributed largely to raise troops in 1777 to meet Burgoyne; and he served as a captain at Bennington and at Saratoga.

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  • The strategic importance of Albany was fully recognized during the War of Independence, and it was against Albany that Burgoyne's expedition was directed.

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  • In Burgoyne's expedition (1777) Skene and his son, Andrew Philip Skene (1753-1826), served as guides, and Skenesborough was recovered by the British after most of it had been burned by the Americans.

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  • Later in the year, however, he was placed in command (by New Hampshire), with the rank of brigadier-general of militia, of a force of militiamen, with whom, on the 16th of August, near Bennington, Vermont, he defeated two detachments of Burgoyne's army under Colonel Friedrich Baum and Colonel Breyman.

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  • For this victory, which did much to bring about the capitulation of General Burgoyne, Stark received the thanks of Congress and a commission as brigadier-general in the Continental Army (Oct.

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  • He was sent to Congress to report Gates's success against Burgoyne, but his tardiness secured for him a sarcastic reception.

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  • But on the 6th of February 1778, after the news of the defeat and surrender of Burgoyne had reached Europe, a treaty of alliance and a treaty of amity and commerce between France and the United States were signed at Paris by Franklin, Deane and Lee.

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  • The British government intended that Howe should co-operate with Burgoyne by fighting his way up the Hudson, but as the secretary of state for the colonies neglected to send him such instructions this was not undertaken until early in October, and then an expedition for the purpose was placed under the command of Sir Henry Clinton.

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  • Clinton met with little difficulty from the principal American defences of the Highlands, consisting of Forts Montgomery and Clinton on the western bank, together with a huge chain and boom stretched across the river to a precipitous mountain (Anthony's Nose) on the opposite bank, and ascended as far as Esopus (now Kingston) which he burned, but he was too late to aid Burgoyne.

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  • General (Sir) William Howe, who succeeded Gage in the chief command in October, and Generals (Sir) Henry Clinton and John Burgoyne were sent out at once with reinforcements.

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  • Largely upon the representations of Howe, Burgoyne and others, it was determined to shift the field from Boston to New York city, from there to hold the line of the Hudson river in co-operation with a force to move down from Canada under Carleton and Burgoyne, and thus effectually to isolate New England.

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  • Burgoyne marched from Canada in June 1 777, with a strong expeditionary force, to occupy Albany and put himself in touch with Howe at the other end of the Hudson.

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  • above Albany, barricading the roads and impeding Burgoyne's progress.

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  • On the 13th of August Burgoyne despatched a force to Bennington, Vermont, under the German colonel Friedrich Baum, to capture stores and overawe the country.

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  • under Colonel Barry St Leger to co-operate with Burgoyne by way of the Mohawk Valley.

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  • Tarleton's Southern Campaigns, 1780-1781 (London, 1787) � the pamphlet controversy between Sir Henry Clinton and Lord Cornwallis (1783), see Winsor, vi., p. 516, n.; Burgoyne's State of the Expedition from Canada in 1777 (London, 1780).

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  • The destruction of his squadron on Lake Champlain in October covered the frontier of Canada, and supplied a basis for the march of General Burgoyne in 1777 which ended in the surrender at Saratoga.

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  • After the battle of Saratoga some of Burgoyne's officers were housed here.

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  • This was General Burgoyne's force of 7000 men which marched from Canada in June 1777 with the view of reaching the upper Hudson and combining with British troops from New York to isolate New England from the colonies below.

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  • Lord Howe, commander-in-chief of the British in America, who had received no instructions binding him in detail to co-operate with Burgoyne, moved southward and captured Philadelphia.

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  • In drawing Washington after him he claimed to be assisting Burgoyne.

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  • Burgoyne pushed down by way of Lakes Champlain and George and approached the American army under General Horatio Gates in its fortified camp near Stillwater on the W.

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  • On the 19th Burgoyne attacked the American left under General Benedict Arnold.

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  • Burgoyne fortified himself on the site of the action, and on October 7th made another attempt to turn the American left.

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  • Crippled to an alarming extent, Burgoyne retreated.

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  • John Burgoyne (Albany, 1877).

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  • It commemorates the success gained on the 16th of August 1777 by a force of nearly 2000 "Green Mountain Boys" and New Hampshire and Massachusetts militia under General John Stark over two detachments of General Burgoyne's army, totalling about 1200 men, under Col.

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  • The victory had an important influence on Burgoyne's campaign (see American War Of Independence), weakening Burgoyne and encouraging the American militia to take the field against him.

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  • They are covered by modern works on the north side known as Fort Burgoyne, and additional works extend eastwards towards St Margaret's Bay.

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  • high, is decorated with eight historical paintings: "Landing of Columbus" (1492),(1492), by John Vanderlyn; "De Soto discovering the Mississippi" (1541),(1541), by William Henry Powell; "Baptism of Pocahontas" (1613), by John Gadsby Chapman; "Embarkation of the Pilgrims from Delft Haven" (1620), by Robert Walter Weir; "Signing the Declaration of Independence" (1776), by John Trumbull; "Surrender of Burgoyne at Saratoga" (1777), by Trumbull; "Surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown" (1781), by Trumbull; and "Washington resigning his Commission at Annapolis" (1783),(1783), by Trumbull.

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  • The treaty of alliance of 1778 with France, following the surrender of Burgoyne, put an end to all such plans.

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  • Some of General Burgoyne's troops, surrendered at Saratoga, were confined here after the autumn of 1780.

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  • The use of " wax lights and tapers " formed one of the indictments brought by P. Smart, a Puritan prebendary of Durham, against Dr Burgoyne, Cosin and others for setting up " superstitious ceremonies " in the cathedral " contrary to the Act of Uniformity."

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  • Two years later, when the Family Compact involved Portugal in a war with Spain, Pombal called in Count William of Lippe-Biickeburg to reorganize the army, which was reinforced by a British contingent under Brigadier-General John Burgoyne, and was increased from 5000 to 50,000 men.

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  • In the summer of 1777 he was engaged in minor skirmishes in New Jersey, and early in September joined General Horatio Gates, then engaged in the campaign against General Burgoyne.

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  • In 1777 a British army under Burgoyne capitulated at Saratoga; and early in 1778 France, eager to revenge the disasters of the Seven Years War, formed an alliance with the revolted colonies as free and independent states, and was soon joined by Spain.

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  • Lord Palmerston, speaking in 1845, had declared that steam had bridged theChannel; and the duke of Wellington had addressed a letter to Sir John Burgoyne, in which he had demonstrated that the country was not in a position to resist an.

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  • Here are the Apthorp House (built in 1760), in which General Burgoyne and his officers were lodged as prisoners of war in 1777; the elm under which, according to tradition, Washington took command of the Continental Army on the 3rd of July 1775; the old Vassall or Craigie House (1759), where Washington lived in 1775-1776, and which was later the home of Edward Everett, Joseph E.

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  • In July of that year representatives of the New England States and New York met here in convention to consider plans of co-operation for meeting Burgoyne's invasion.

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  • His imprisonment after the surrender of Charleston (May 1780) lasted until his exchange with others for General Burgoyne in February 1782.

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  • Nutting had a famous foxhound named Burgoyne--he pronounced it Bugine--which my informant used to borrow.

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  • high, is decorated with eight historical paintings: "Landing of Columbus" (1492),(1492), by John Vanderlyn; "De Soto discovering the Mississippi" (1541),(1541), by William Henry Powell; "Baptism of Pocahontas" (1613), by John Gadsby Chapman; "Embarkation of the Pilgrims from Delft Haven" (1620), by Robert Walter Weir; "Signing the Declaration of Independence" (1776), by John Trumbull; "Surrender of Burgoyne at Saratoga" (1777), by Trumbull; "Surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown" (1781), by Trumbull; and "Washington resigning his Commission at Annapolis" (1783),(1783), by Trumbull.

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  • The name of one of them, Thomas Conway, an Irish soldier of fortune from the French service, is attached to what is called "Conway's Cabal," a scheme for superseding Washington by General Horatio Gates, who in October 1777 succeeded in forcing Burgoyne to capitulate at Saratoga, and who had been persistent in his depreciation of the commander-in-chief and in intrigues with members of Congress.

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  • The treaty of alliance of 1778 with France, following the surrender of Burgoyne, put an end to all such plans.

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  • The name of one of them, Thomas Conway, an Irish soldier of fortune from the French service, is attached to what is called "Conway's Cabal," a scheme for superseding Washington by General Horatio Gates, who in October 1777 succeeded in forcing Burgoyne to capitulate at Saratoga, and who had been persistent in his depreciation of the commander-in-chief and in intrigues with members of Congress.

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  • in 1652, and in the following year was elected to a fellowship. After residing as tutor first in the family of Sir Roger Burgoyne in Warwickshire and then with the Hon.

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  • in 1652, and in the following year was elected to a fellowship. After residing as tutor first in the family of Sir Roger Burgoyne in Warwickshire and then with the Hon.

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