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burghley

burghley

burghley Sentence Examples

  • He must have given general satisfaction, for even before Parker's death two persons so different as Burghley and Dean Nowell independently recommended Grindal's appointment as his successor, and Spenser speaks warmly of him in the Shepherd's Calendar as the "gentle shepherd Algrind."

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  • Burghley wished to conciliate the moderate Puritans and advised Grindal to mitigate the severity which had characterized Parker's treatment of the nonconformists.

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  • He stood firm, and in January 1578 Secretary Wilson informed Burghley that the queen wished to have the archbishop deprived.

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  • Through his friendship with Sir William Hicks Strype obtained access to the papers of Sir Michael Hicks, secretary to Lord Burghley, from which he made extensive transcripts; he also carried on an extensive correspondence with Archbishop Wake and Bishops Burnet, Atterbury and Nicholson.

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  • Theobalds Park was built in the 18th century, but the original mansion was acquired by William Cecil, Lord Burghley, in 1561; being taken in 1607 by James I.

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  • Coligny, Lord Burghley and William the Silent also entered into murder plots.

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  • William Cecil, Baron Burghley >>

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  • The loneliness of a queen who had no husband or children and no relatives to mention must at all times have been oppressive; it grew desolating in old age after the deaths of Leicester, Walsingham, Burghley and Essex, and Elizabeth died, the last of her race, on the 24th of March 1603.

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  • WILLIAM CECIL BURGHLEY, Baron (1521-1598), was born, according to his own statement, on the 13th of September 1521 at the house of his mother's father at Bourne, Lincolnshire.

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  • The connexion with the Herefordshire family is not so impossible as the descent from Sitsyllt; but the earliest authentic ancestor of the lord treasurer is his grandfather, David, who, according to Burghley's enemies, "kept the best inn" in Stamford.

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  • 1554), married Jane, daughter of William Heckington of Bourne, and was father of three daughters and Lord Burghley.

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  • On the 25th of February 1571 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Burghley of Burghley 1 (or Burleigh); the fact that he continued to act as secretary after his elevation illustrates the growing importance of that office, which under his son became a secretaryship of state.

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  • In 1572, however, the marquess of Winchester, who had been lord high treasurer under Edward, Mary and Elizabeth, died, and Burghley succeeded to his post.

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  • It was a signal triumph over Leicester; and, although Burghley had still to reckon with cabals in the council and at court, his hold over the queen strengthened with the lapse of years.

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  • Having survived all his rivals, and all his children except Robert and the worthless Thomas, Burghley died at his London house on the 4th of August 1J98, and was buried in St Martin's, Stamford.

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  • Burghley's private life was singularly virtuous; he was a faithful husband, a careful father and a considerate master.

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  • It was the conscious and unconscious aim of the age to reconstruct a new landed aristocracy on the ruins of the old, and Burghley was a great builder and planter.

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  • All the arts of architecture and horticulture were lavished on Burghley House and Theobalds, which his son exchanged for Hatfield.

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  • On the other hand, principles are valueless without law and order; and Burghley's craft and subtlety prepared a security in which principles might find some scope.

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  • The sources and authorities for Burghley's life are endless.

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  • The most important collection of documents is at Hatfield, where there are some ten thousand papers covering the period down to Burghley's 1 This was the form always used by Cecil himself.

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  • For Burghley's early life, see Cooper's Athenae Cantab.; Baker's St John's Coll., Camb., ed.

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  • No satisfactory life of Burghley has yet appeared; some valuable anonymous notes, probably by Burghley's servant Francis Alford, were printed in Peck's Desiderata Curiesa (1732), i.

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  • Hume's Great Lord Burghley (1898) is largely a piecing together of the references to Burghley in the same author's Calendar of Simancas MSS.

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  • He supplied the momentum which was necessary to counteract the caution of Burghley and Elizabeth; but it was probably fortunate that his headstrong counsels were generally overruled by the circumspection of his sovereign.

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  • As secretary, Walsingham could pursue no independent policy; he was rather in the position of permanent under-secretary of the combined home and foreign departments, and he had to work under the direction of the council, and particularly of Burghley and the queen.

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  • Elizabeth and Burghley were inclined to try an alliance with the Scottish king, and the event justified their policy, which Walsingham did his best to frustrate, although deserted on this occasion by his chief regular supporter, Leicester.

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  • of Scotland, lineally the nearest heir, was proclaimed king of England, in accordance with the arrangements made by Lord Burghley and Elizabeth's other advisers.

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  • From Leiden he wrote (9 June 1585) to Lord Burghley advising the assumption of the protectorate of the Low Countries by Elizabeth.

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  • In the spring of 1583 she retained enough of this saintly resignation to ask for nothing but liberty, without a share in the government of Scotland; but Lord Burghley not unreasonably preferred, if feasible, to reconcile the alliance of her son with the detention of his mother.

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  • Three months after the massacre of St Bartholomew had caused some additional restrictions to be placed upon her freedom of action, Shrewsbury writes to Burghley that "rather than continue this imprisonment she sticks not to say she will give her body, her son, and country for liberty"; nor did she ever show any excess of regard for any of the three.

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  • Shortly of ter he sought the hand of Lady Elizabeth Hatton, daughter of Thomas, second Lord Burghley, and granddaughter of the great Cecil.

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  • Amongst his pupils at St John's were Lord Burghley, who married Cheke's sister Mary, and Roger Ascham, who in The Schoolmaster gives Cheke the highest praise for scholarship and character.

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  • In 1580 he appears to have taken the first step in his career by applying, through his uncle, Burghley, the lord treasurer, for some post at court.

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  • About the same time he made another application to Burghley, apparently with a view to expediting his progress at the bar.

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  • A long and eloquent letter to Burghley 2 throws additional light upon his character, and gives a hint as to the cause of his uncle's slackness in promoting him.

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  • His letter to Burghley,' who had told him of the queen's displeasure with his speech, offers no apology for what he had said, but expresses regret that his motives should have been misunderstood.

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  • Burghley and Sir John Puckering seem to have assisted Bacon honestly, if not overwarmly, in this second application; but the conduct of Cecil had roused suspicions which were not perhaps without foundation.

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  • Having brought out an enlarged and improved edition of the Britannia in 1607, he began to work on a history of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, to which he had been urged by Lord Burghley in 1597.

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  • The Britannia, the first edition of which is dedicated to Burghley, is a survey of the British islands written in elegant Latin.

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  • She sided with the scribes, Burghley and Sir Robert Cecil, against the men of war, Essex and Raleigh; and she abetted Whitgifts rigorous persecution of the Puritans whose discontent with her via media was rancorously expressed in the Martin Marprelate tracts.

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  • Zara Phillips Like her mother, Zara is an accomplished horsewoman, she finished second in the Burghley Horse Trials in 2003.

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  • He must have given general satisfaction, for even before Parker's death two persons so different as Burghley and Dean Nowell independently recommended Grindal's appointment as his successor, and Spenser speaks warmly of him in the Shepherd's Calendar as the "gentle shepherd Algrind."

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  • Burghley wished to conciliate the moderate Puritans and advised Grindal to mitigate the severity which had characterized Parker's treatment of the nonconformists.

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  • He stood firm, and in January 1578 Secretary Wilson informed Burghley that the queen wished to have the archbishop deprived.

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  • Through his friendship with Sir William Hicks Strype obtained access to the papers of Sir Michael Hicks, secretary to Lord Burghley, from which he made extensive transcripts; he also carried on an extensive correspondence with Archbishop Wake and Bishops Burnet, Atterbury and Nicholson.

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  • Theobalds Park was built in the 18th century, but the original mansion was acquired by William Cecil, Lord Burghley, in 1561; being taken in 1607 by James I.

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  • Coligny, Lord Burghley and William the Silent also entered into murder plots.

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  • Between 1580 and 1581, when Browne formed in Norwich the first known church of this order on definite scriptural theory, and October 1585, when, being convinced that the times were not yet ripe for the realization of the perfect polity, and taking a more charitable view of the established Church, he yielded to the pressure brought to bear on him by his kinsman Lord Burghley, so far as partially to conform to parochial public worship as defined by law (see Browne, Robert), the history of Congregationalism is mainly that of Browne and of his writings.

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  • William Cecil, Baron Burghley >>

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  • The loneliness of a queen who had no husband or children and no relatives to mention must at all times have been oppressive; it grew desolating in old age after the deaths of Leicester, Walsingham, Burghley and Essex, and Elizabeth died, the last of her race, on the 24th of March 1603.

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  • WILLIAM CECIL BURGHLEY, Baron (1521-1598), was born, according to his own statement, on the 13th of September 1521 at the house of his mother's father at Bourne, Lincolnshire.

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  • The connexion with the Herefordshire family is not so impossible as the descent from Sitsyllt; but the earliest authentic ancestor of the lord treasurer is his grandfather, David, who, according to Burghley's enemies, "kept the best inn" in Stamford.

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  • 1554), married Jane, daughter of William Heckington of Bourne, and was father of three daughters and Lord Burghley.

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  • On the 25th of February 1571 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Burghley of Burghley 1 (or Burleigh); the fact that he continued to act as secretary after his elevation illustrates the growing importance of that office, which under his son became a secretaryship of state.

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  • In 1572, however, the marquess of Winchester, who had been lord high treasurer under Edward, Mary and Elizabeth, died, and Burghley succeeded to his post.

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  • It was a signal triumph over Leicester; and, although Burghley had still to reckon with cabals in the council and at court, his hold over the queen strengthened with the lapse of years.

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  • Having survived all his rivals, and all his children except Robert and the worthless Thomas, Burghley died at his London house on the 4th of August 1J98, and was buried in St Martin's, Stamford.

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  • Burghley's private life was singularly virtuous; he was a faithful husband, a careful father and a considerate master.

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    0
  • It was the conscious and unconscious aim of the age to reconstruct a new landed aristocracy on the ruins of the old, and Burghley was a great builder and planter.

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  • All the arts of architecture and horticulture were lavished on Burghley House and Theobalds, which his son exchanged for Hatfield.

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  • On the other hand, principles are valueless without law and order; and Burghley's craft and subtlety prepared a security in which principles might find some scope.

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  • The sources and authorities for Burghley's life are endless.

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  • The most important collection of documents is at Hatfield, where there are some ten thousand papers covering the period down to Burghley's 1 This was the form always used by Cecil himself.

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  • For Burghley's early life, see Cooper's Athenae Cantab.; Baker's St John's Coll., Camb., ed.

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  • No satisfactory life of Burghley has yet appeared; some valuable anonymous notes, probably by Burghley's servant Francis Alford, were printed in Peck's Desiderata Curiesa (1732), i.

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  • Hume's Great Lord Burghley (1898) is largely a piecing together of the references to Burghley in the same author's Calendar of Simancas MSS.

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  • He was the anxious fanatic of Elizabeth's advisers; he lacked the patience of Burghley and the cynical coolness of Elizabeth.

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  • He supplied the momentum which was necessary to counteract the caution of Burghley and Elizabeth; but it was probably fortunate that his headstrong counsels were generally overruled by the circumspection of his sovereign.

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  • As secretary, Walsingham could pursue no independent policy; he was rather in the position of permanent under-secretary of the combined home and foreign departments, and he had to work under the direction of the council, and particularly of Burghley and the queen.

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  • Elizabeth and Burghley were inclined to try an alliance with the Scottish king, and the event justified their policy, which Walsingham did his best to frustrate, although deserted on this occasion by his chief regular supporter, Leicester.

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  • of Scotland, lineally the nearest heir, was proclaimed king of England, in accordance with the arrangements made by Lord Burghley and Elizabeth's other advisers.

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  • From Leiden he wrote (9 June 1585) to Lord Burghley advising the assumption of the protectorate of the Low Countries by Elizabeth.

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  • In the spring of 1583 she retained enough of this saintly resignation to ask for nothing but liberty, without a share in the government of Scotland; but Lord Burghley not unreasonably preferred, if feasible, to reconcile the alliance of her son with the detention of his mother.

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  • When Burghley brought against her the unanswerable charge of having at that moment in her service, and in receipt of an annual pension, the instigator of a previous attempt on the life of Elizabeth, she had the unwary audacity to cite in her justification the pensions allowed by Elizabeth to her adversaries in Scotland, and especially to her son.

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  • Three months after the massacre of St Bartholomew had caused some additional restrictions to be placed upon her freedom of action, Shrewsbury writes to Burghley that "rather than continue this imprisonment she sticks not to say she will give her body, her son, and country for liberty"; nor did she ever show any excess of regard for any of the three.

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  • Shortly of ter he sought the hand of Lady Elizabeth Hatton, daughter of Thomas, second Lord Burghley, and granddaughter of the great Cecil.

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  • Amongst his pupils at St John's were Lord Burghley, who married Cheke's sister Mary, and Roger Ascham, who in The Schoolmaster gives Cheke the highest praise for scholarship and character.

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  • In 1580 he appears to have taken the first step in his career by applying, through his uncle, Burghley, the lord treasurer, for some post at court.

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  • About the same time he made another application to Burghley, apparently with a view to expediting his progress at the bar.

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  • A long and eloquent letter to Burghley 2 throws additional light upon his character, and gives a hint as to the cause of his uncle's slackness in promoting him.

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  • His letter to Burghley,' who had told him of the queen's displeasure with his speech, offers no apology for what he had said, but expresses regret that his motives should have been misunderstood.

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  • Burghley, on the other hand, in no way promoted his nephew's interest; he would recommend him for the solicitorship, but not for the attorney-generalship; and it is not improbable that Sir Robert Cecil secretly used his influence against his cousin.

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  • Burghley and Sir John Puckering seem to have assisted Bacon honestly, if not overwarmly, in this second application; but the conduct of Cecil had roused suspicions which were not perhaps without foundation.

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  • Having brought out an enlarged and improved edition of the Britannia in 1607, he began to work on a history of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, to which he had been urged by Lord Burghley in 1597.

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  • The Britannia, the first edition of which is dedicated to Burghley, is a survey of the British islands written in elegant Latin.

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  • She sided with the scribes, Burghley and Sir Robert Cecil, against the men of war, Essex and Raleigh; and she abetted Whitgifts rigorous persecution of the Puritans whose discontent with her via media was rancorously expressed in the Martin Marprelate tracts.

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