Burgh sentence example

burgh
  • Galashiels was created into a burgh of barony in 1599.

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  • Hubert de Burgh was the last of the great justiciars; after his fall (1231) the justiciarship was not again committed to a great baron, and the chancellor soon took the position formerly occupied by the justiciar as second to the king in dignity, as well as in power and influence.

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  • A huge car drawn by oxen, bearing the standard of the burgh, and carrying an altar with the host, this carroccio, like the ark of the Israelites, formed a rallying point in battle, and reminded the armed artisans that they had a city and a church to fight for.

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  • The introduction of the factions into Florence in 1215, owing to a private quarrel between the Buondelmonti, Amidei and Donati, is a celebrated instance of what was happening in every burgh.

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  • There is not a burgh of northern Italy but can trace the rise of a dynastic house to the vicissitudes of this period.

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  • The burgh, which stretches for a mile along the south shore of the Firth of Forth, is intersected by the Esk and embraces the village of Fisherrow on the left bank of the river.

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  • Near the tolbooth stands the market cross, a stone column with a unicorn on the top supporting the burgh arms. At the west end of High Street is a statue of David Macbeth Moir ("Delta," 1798-1851), Musselburgh's most famous son.

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  • Stranraer, originally called St John's Chapel, became a burgh of barony in 1596, and a royal burgh in 1617.

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  • Knaresborough Castle was probably founded in 1070 by Serlo de Burgh.

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  • Knaresborough (Canardesburg, Cnarreburc, Cknareburg), which belonged to the Crown before the Conquest, formed part of William the Conqueror's grant to his follower Serlo de Burgh.

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  • During the 13th and 14th centuries the castle and lordship changed hands very frequently; they were granted successively to Hubert de Burgh, whose son forfeited them after the battle of Evesham, to Richard, earl of Cornwall, whose son Edmund died without issue; to Piers Gaveston, and lastly to John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, and so to the Crown as parcel of the duchy of Lancaster.

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  • As a parliamentary burgh Dumfries includes Maxwelltown, on the opposite side of the river, which otherwise belongs to Kirkcudbrightshire.

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  • From this time to nearly the close of the 16th century the burgh was exposed to frequent raids, both from freebooters on the English side and from partisans of the turbulent chiefsDouglases, Maxwells, Johnstones.

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  • As he was riding from Inverkeithing on the 12th of March 1286 he was thrown by his horse and fell over the cliffs, since called King's Wud End, a little to the west of the burgh, and killed.

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  • Baldwin de Burgh, the future Baldwin II., ruled in Edessa as the vassal of Baldwin I.

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  • The constant pressure of Tancred of Antioch and Baldwin de Burgh of Edessa led to a series of retaliations between 11 io and 1115; Edessa was attacked in 1110, 1111, 1112 and 1114; and in 1113 Maudud of Mosul had even penetrated as far as the vicinity of Acre and Jerusalem.

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  • It was founded by William de Burgh, brother of Hubert de Burgh.

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  • He married a daughter of Henry, earl of Lancaster, and was appointed lieutenant of Ireland in 1331, but was murdered in his 21st year, leaving a daughter, the sole heiress, not only of the de Burgh possessions, but of vast Clare estates.

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  • On the murder of the 3rd earl (1333), his male kinsmen, who had a better right, by native Irish ideas, to the succession than his daughter, adopted Irish names and customs, and becoming virtually native chieftains succeeded in holding the bulk of the de Burgh territories.

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  • The family, which changed its name from Bourke to de Burgh in 1752, and added that of Canning in 1862, still own a vast estate in County Galway.

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  • The lords Burgh or Borough of Gainsborough (1487-1599) were a Lincolnshire family believed to be descended from a younger son of Hubert de Burgh.

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  • It is said to be the Burgh Westra of Sir Walter Scott's Pirate.

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  • The royal burgh of Earlsferry (pop. 317) is situated in the parish of Elie, which it adjoins on the west.

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  • An important accession of territory was gained in 1896, when portions of the parishes of Liberton and Duddingston and the police burgh of Portobello were incorporated.

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  • The Royal high school, the burgh school par excellence, dates from the 16th century, but the beautiful Grecian buildings on the southern face of Calton Hill, opened in 1829, are its third habitation.

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  • The seaport of Leith, though a distinct burgh, governed by its own magistrates, and electing its own representative to parliament, has also on its southern side become practically united to its great neighbour.

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  • The fort, at first called Kilmallie, was built by General Monk in 1655 to hold the Cameron men in subjection, and was enlarged in 1690 by General Hugh Mackay, who renamed it after William III., the burgh then being known as Maryburgh in honour of his queen.

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  • Scarcely anything is left of the old chapel dedicated to St Dennis, which for a time was used as a smithy; and of the chapel of St Serf, the patron saint of the burgh, only the tower remains.

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  • It was a hamlet known as Bridgend up till 1810, in which year it was erected into a burgh of barony under its present name.

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  • The village dates from 1785, and it became a burgh of barony in 1792.

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  • Sir Alexander obtained for it in 1613 a charter as a burgh of royalty, and also in 1592 a charter for the founding of a university.

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  • The public buildings comprise the town hall, county buildings, mechanics' institute, academy, two fever hospitals and free library, the burgh having been the first town in Scotland to adopt the Free Library Act.

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  • The burgh is under the jurisdiction of a provost and council, and unites with Macduff, Elgin, Cullen, Inverurie, Kintore and Peterhead in returning one member to parliament.

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  • Ardglass was a royal burgh and sent a representative to the Irish parliament.

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  • Newton is a burgh or barony of very ancient creation, the charter of which is traditionally said to have been granted by Robert Bruce in favour of forty-eight of the inhabitants who had distinguished themselves at Bannockburn.

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  • Nothing is known of the history of Ayr till the close of the 12th century, when it was made a royal residence, and soon afterwards a royal burgh, by William the Lion.

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  • The fortress was an important bulwark against English invasion, and the town - which was created a royal burgh by David II.

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  • It was created a royal burgh by Robert III.

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  • In the - end the estates of the houses of Lancaster, Kent, Bohun, Burgh and Mortimer swelled the revenues of Edward's children and grandchildren; in whose favour also the new title of duke was introduced.

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  • After the accession of the Whigs to office in 1832 he held various important offices in the ministry, and most of the measures of reform for Scotland, such as burgh reform, the improvements in the law of entail, and the reform of the sheriff courts, owed much to his sagacity and energy.

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  • At the beginning of the 13th century it obtained a charter from the earl of Strathearn, afterwards became a royal burgh for a period, and was represented in the Scottish parliament.

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  • Amongst the principal buildings are the town house (1815), with a tower and spire; the town hall (1873); the library (1887) founded by James Moffat, a merchant of the burgh, and the Carnegie Park Orphanage, also provided from the same bequest.

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  • In 1775 Port Glasgow was created a burgh of barony and since 1832 has formed one of the Kilmarnock parliamentary burghs (with Kilmarnock, Dumbarton, Renfrew and Rutherglen).

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  • The burgh is a considerable centre for agricultural produce.

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  • Bathgate became a burgh of barony in 1824 and a police burgh in 1865.

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  • Between the Conquest and the 14th century the earldom of Kent was held successively by Odo, bishop of Bayeux, William of Ypres and Hubert de Burgh (sheriff of the county in the reign of Henry III.), none of whom, however, transmitted the honour, which was bestowed by Edward I.

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  • Some shipping is carried on at the harbour at the mouth of the Peffery, about a mile below the burgh.

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  • It is curious that while in England the burgage-tenure was deemed a species of socage, to distinguish it from the military holdings, in Scotland it was strictly a military holding, by the service of watching and warding for the defence of the burgh.

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  • By his second wife Walsingham had a daughter who married firstly Sir Philip Sidney, secondly Robert Devereux, second earl of Essex, and thirdly Richard de Burgh, earl of Clanricarde.

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  • It is a place of very considerable antiquity, was created a royal burgh by Alexander I., and received its charter from Alexander II.

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  • The burgh has suffered periodically from fire, notably in 1452, when half of it was burnt by the earl of Huntly.

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  • Orkney unites with Shetland to send one member to parliament, and Kirkwall, the county town and the only royal burgh, is one of the Wick district groups of parliamentary burghs.

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  • Rutherglen was erected into a royal burgh by David I.

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  • There are remains of a strong castle, built by the powerful earl of Ulster, Richard de Burgh, in 1300, and the scene of hostilities in 1641 and 1652.

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  • Its chief industry is the manufacture of tweeds and fine yarns, which, together with the fame of its medicinal springs, brought the burgh into prominence towards the end of the 18th century.

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  • Northallerton (Alvetune, Allerton) is said to have been a Roman station and afterwards a Saxon "burgh," but nothing is known with certainty about it before the account given in the Domesday Survey, which shows that before the Conquest Earl Edwin had held the manor, but that the Normans had destroyed it so utterly that it was still waste in 1086.

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  • At the close of the 12th century what is now the county of Mayo was granted, with other lands, by king John to William, brother of Hubert de Burgh.

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  • After the murder of William de Burgh, 3rd earl of Ulster (1333), the Bourkes (de Burghs) of the collateral male line, rejecting the claim of William's heiress (the wife of Lionel, son of King Edward III.) to the succession, succeeded in holding the bulk of the De Burgh possessions, what is now Mayo falling to the branch known by the name of "MacWilliam Oughter," who maintained their virtual independence till the time of Elizabeth.

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  • Even then he remained for some time under the influence of Hubert de Burgh, whose chief rival, Peter des Roches, found it expedient to quit the kingdom for four years.

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  • Besides the regular elementary schools there are the Perth Academy (1807) with which was subsequently amalgamated the Burgh Grammar.

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  • Perth is stated to have been a burgh in 1106 and was made a royal burgh by William the Lion in 1210.

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  • Peterhead, made a burgh of barony in 1593 by George Keith, fifth earl marischal, was the scene of the landing of the Pretender on Christmas Day 1715.

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  • Hamilton originated in the 15th century under the protecting influence of the lords of Hamilton, and became a burgh of barony in 1456 and a royal burgh in 1548.

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  • The latter rights were afterwards surrendered and it was made the chief burgh of the regality and dukedom of Hamilton in 1668, the third marquess having been created duke in 1643.

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  • It occupies most of the site of the original burgh of Netherton.

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  • It was made a royal burgh by Alexander I.

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  • Before it was known that the chronicle ascribed to Ingulf of Croyland is really a fiction of the 13th or 14th century, the knighting of Heward or Hereward by Brand, abbot of Burgh 1 Comparative Politics, p. 74.

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  • The chief topographical feature of the burgh is its length, from which it is called the "Lang toun."

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  • It became a burgh of barony in 1484 and a royal burgh in 1596, and was the scene of the exhibition of the Covenanters' Declaration, attached to the market cross in 1680 by Richard Cameron and in 1685 by James Renwick.

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  • Among charitable institutions are the Royal Alexandra Infirmary, the Victoria Eye Infirmary (presented by Provost Mackenzie in 1899), the burgh asylum at Riccartsbar, the Abbey Poorhouse (including hospital and lunatic wards), the fever hospital and reception house, the Infectious Diseases Hospital and the Gleniffer Home for Incurables.

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  • Under the Reform Act of 1832 the burgh returns one member to Parliament.

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  • The village grew up round the abbey, and by the 15th century had become sufficiently important to excite the jealousy of the neighbouring burgh of Renfrew.

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  • To protect it from molestation Abbot Schaw (or Shaw) induced James IV., a frequent visitor, to erect it into a burgh of barony in 1488, a charter which gave it the right to return a member to the Scots parliament.

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  • Already famous for its plaids and blankets, the prosperity of the burgh advanced when it took up the manufacture of tweeds.

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  • The burgh consists of the new town, the principal quarter, on the south of the Eddleston, and the old on the north; the Tweed is crossed by a handsome fivearched bridge.

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  • Peebles is a noted haunt of anglers, and the Royal Company of Archers shoot here periodically for the silver arrow given by the burgh.

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  • It probably received its charter from Alexander III., was created a royal burgh in 1367 and was the scene of the poem of Peblis to the Play, ascribed to James I.

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  • In 1776 the site began to be built upon, and in 1802 the town, named after Lady Helen, wife of Sir James Colquhoun of Luss, the ground landlord, was erected into a burgh of barony, under a provost and council.

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  • The public buildings include the burgh hall, municipal buildings, Hermitage schools and two hospitals.

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  • The burgh is one of the Dumfries district group of parliamentary burghs.

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  • The burgh is said to date from the reign of William the Lion (1165-1214); its charter was granted in 1502.

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  • The Education Act of 1872 abolished the old management of the parish schools and provided for the creation of districts (burgh, parish or group of parishes) under the control of school boards, of which there are 972 in Scotland, elected every three years by the ratepayers, male and female.

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  • Government proposed to distribute this money among local authorities and expend the balance in relief rates, but a clause was inserted in this bill giving burgh and county councils the option of spending the balance on technical education as well as in relief of rates.

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  • From two reports printed by the Scottish Burgh Record Society in 1881, it appears that the number of vessels belonging to the principal ports - Leith, Dundee, Glasgow, Kirkcaldy and Montrose - in 1656 was 58, the tonnage being 3140, and that by 1692 they had increased to 97 of 5905 tons.

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  • In olden times there were three classes of burgh.

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  • These nativi were gradually emancipated, partly through the influence of the church, partly for economic reasons, partly through the rule that any vilein became free after a year's residence in a burgh.

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  • When the site of the Great North Road was altered, towards the end of the 11th century, a bridge was built across the Ure, about half a mile above the Roman bridge at Aldborough, and called Burgh bridge or Ponteburgem.

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  • In 1229 Boroughbridge, as part of the manor of Aldborough, was granted to Hubert de Burgh, but was forfeited a few years later by his son who fought against the king at Evesham.

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  • In High Street may be seen the noble hall and truncated fabric of the Maison Dieu founded by Hubert de Burgh in the 13th century for the reception of pilgrims of all nations.

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  • The castle was successfully defended in 1216 against the French under the dauphin Louis by Hubert de Burgh, who was also the founder of the Maison Dieu established for the accommodation of pilgrims. The title of mayor as chief municipal officer first occurs about the middle of the 13th century, when the town was governed by a mayor and twelve jurats.

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  • The Monk's fleet was seen from Dover, where the regent, Hubert de Burgh, lay with a naval force of the Cinque Ports, said to have been very small.

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  • The principal structures include the burgh and county buildings, town hall, the Dollar free library and Camelon fever hospital.

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  • Falkirk was made a burgh of barony in 1600 and a burgh of regality in 1646, but on the forfeiture of the earl of Linlithgow in 1715, its superiority was vested in the crown.

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  • He married Lady Honora de Burgh, by whom he had one son James, who died childless in 1718.

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  • To the east of the burgh is Cromarty House, occupying the site of the old castle of the earls of Ross.

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  • The burgh was originally called Parva Kinghorn and later Wester Kinghorn.

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  • On the left bank of the Ericht, opposite Blairgowrie, with which it is connected by a four-arched bridge, stands the town and police burgh of Rattray (pop. 2019), where there are flax and jute mills.

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  • The justiciar continued to be the chief officer of state, next to the king, until the fall of Hubert de Burgh (in the reign of King John), described by Stubbs as the last of the great justiciars.

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  • From burgh and other local funds the church derives a revenue of £23,501.

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  • This pupil (probably Albert Burgh, who afterwards joined the Church of Rome and penned a foolishly insolent epistle to his former teacher) was the occasion of Spinoza's first publication - the only publication indeed to which his name was attached.

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  • The castle stood on high ground at the south end of the burgh, or "town-head."

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  • Jedburgh was made a royal burgh in the reign of David I., and received a charter from Robert I.

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  • Elder Park (40 acres) presented to the burgh in 1885 contains a statue of John Elder (1824-1869), the pioneer shipbuilder, the husband of the donor.

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  • A statue of Sir William Pearce (1833-1888), another well-known Govan shipbuilder, once M.P. for the burgh, stands at Govan Cross.

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  • The burgh, which is governed by a provost and council, unites with Dumbarton, Port Glasgow, Renfrew and Rutherglen in returning one member to parliament.

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  • It dates from the 15th century, and in 1591 was made a burgh of barony under the Boyds, the ruling house of the district.

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  • Dumbarton was of old the capital of the earldom of Lennox, but was given up by Earl Maldwyn to Alexander II., by whom it was made a royal burgh in 1221 and declared to be free from all imposts and burgh taxes.

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  • The public buildings include the Burgh Hall, the academy (with a graceful steeple), the county buildings, the Denny Memorial, a Literary and a Mechanics' institute, Masonic hall, two cottage hospitals, a fever hospital, a public library and the combination poorhouse.

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  • It is a parliamentary burgh, represented by one member.

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  • Meanwhile Sir John Shaw - to whom and to whose descendants, the Shaw-Stewarts, the town has always been indebted - by charter (dated 1741 and 1751) had empowered the householders to elect a council of nine members, which proved to be the most liberal constitution of any Scots burgh prior to the Reform Act of 1832, when Greenock was raised to the status of a parliamentary burgh with the right to return one member to parliament.

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  • It was constituted a royal burgh by a charter of Robert Bruce in 1306, and had its privileges confirmed by Robert II.

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  • Annan is a burgh of considerable antiquity.

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  • Two of the most eminent natives of the burgh were Dr Thomas Somerville (1741-1830), the historian, and James Wilson (1805-1860), founder of the Economist newspaper and the first financial member of the council for India.

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  • The burgh records are the oldest in Scotland.

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  • The town owes its origin to a Dominican monastery founded in 1244 by Walter de Burgh.

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  • But, as he refused to limit his ministrations to one sect, the Seceders and he parted company, and without their countenance he made a tour through the principal towns of Scotland, the authorities of which in most instances presented him with the freedom of the burgh, in token of their estimate of the benefits to the community resulting from his preaching.

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  • The burgh includes Old Keith and New Keith on the east bank of the Isla, and Fife-Keith on the west bank.

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  • John Brown (1722-1787), a once celebrated dissenting divine, author of the Self-Interpreting Bible, ministered in the burgh for 36 years and is buried there; his son John the theologian (1754-1832), and his grandson Samuel (1817-1856), the chemist, noted for his inquiries into the atomic theory, were natives.

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  • The burgh is the retail centre for a large district, and its grain markets, once the largest in Scotland, are still of considerable importance.

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  • Haddington was created a royal burgh by David I.

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  • After his decease the conduct of the government passed into the hands of the justiciar Hubert de Burgh, and the papal legate Pandulf, to whom the marshal had specially recommended the young king.

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  • From 1219 to 1224 de Burgh was constantly occupied in evicting the old loyalists from castles which they had seized or offices which they had disgraced.

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  • The moment that he had got rid of the honest and capable old justiciar Hubert de Burgh, who had pacified the country during his minority, and set the machinery of government once more in regular order, Henry gave himself over to fostering horde after horde of foreign favorites.

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  • King Henrys personal rule lasted from 1232, the year in which he deprived Hubert de Burgh of his justiciarship and confiscated most of his lands, down to 1258.

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  • The principal buildings comprise the court house, the county hall (with portraits by Raeburn, Romney, Opie and others), the town hall, the Meffan Institute (including the free library), the infirmary, poorhouse and the Reid hall, founded by Peter Reid, a merchant in the burgh who also gave the public park.

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  • The burgh unites with Montrose, Arbroath, Brechin and Inverbervie (the Montrose group of burghs) in returning one member to parliament.

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  • The town, which was created a royal burgh by David I., was burnt down about the middle of the 13th century.

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  • In 1119 it was a royal burgh and under Alexander I.

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  • It was created a burgh of barony in 1451 and a police burgh in 1863.

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  • Dornoch became a royal burgh in 1628, and, as one of the Wick burghs, returns a member to parliament.

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  • Arbroath was created a royal burgh in 1186, and its charter of 1599 is preserved.

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  • Gourock became a burgh of barony in 1694.

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  • In 1333, William de Burgh, the young earl of Ulster, was murdered by the Mandevilles and others; in this case signal vengeance was taken, but the feudal dominion never recovered the blow, and on the north-east coast the English laws and language were soon confined to Drogheda and Dundalk.

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  • A part of the castle of Richard de Burgh, the founder of the friary, still survives, and there are traces of the town fortifications.

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  • The Chalk formation, about equal in breadth to the three preceding, extends from Burgh across the Humber.

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  • Hubert de Burgh, Chief Justice of England, fled for sanctuary when first apprised of the King's displeasure.

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  • Isabella Elder, John's wife, became the burgh's greatest benefactress.

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  • Dalkeith is a burgh of barony; Canongate and Portsburgh burghs of regality; beside which there are about 165 villages and hamlets.

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  • Such an arrangement had already been made for the neighboring burgh of Newport on Tay.

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  • The town became a burgh of barony in 1450.

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  • It was created a burgh of barony by Royal Charter in 1681.

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  • The village of Fordyce was made a burgh of barony in 1499.

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  • Also a royal burgh alone had the right to engage in foreign trade.

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  • The population of the parliamentary burgh of Nairn in 1861 was measured at 3,435.

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  • The design of the town displays several characteristics of a medieval burgh.

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  • Law's Close, Kirkcaldy This remarkable building may be the best preserved 16th century house in any Scottish burgh.

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  • St Andrews is an ancient burgh, unique in Scottish history.

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  • This walk focuses on the distinctive plan of the historic burgh.

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  • Tolbooth - The most important secular building; meeting place of burgh council; collection post for burgh council; collection post for burgh tolls; often housed town jail.

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  • King David I gave the town royal burgh status in 1124.

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  • Here Hubert de Burgh, Chief Justice of England, sled for sanctuary when first apprised of the king's displeasure.

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  • Customary courts are held here occasionally by the earl of Lonsdale, who derived the title of Baron Burgh from this Barony.

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  • Finally he was conveyed beyond the Burgh roods by the common executioner.

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  • A pig farm was established on ground where later the Burgh Caravan site was laid out.

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  • Robert Smith was admitted a freeman of the burgh of Newton in 1801; his eldest son Robert followed him in 1802.

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  • A Spaceman Came Traveling... Chris de Burgh prompts some fictional musings from C. J. Charlton Clzfrwgl decelerated and shifted into sec ond gear.

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  • The first regent was William the Marshall who governed until his death in 1219; the last was Hugh de Burgh.

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  • The Burgh School was situated in the building occupied today by the chemist's shop at 66 High Street.

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  • The name is a corruption of Brugh or Burgh Tay, in allusion to the fortress standing on the rock that juts into the Firth.

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  • Little more than a mile to the west lies the royal and police burgh of Pittenweem (Gaelic, "the hollow of the cave"), a quaint old fishing town (pop. 1863), with the remains of a priory.

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  • Sir Henry Sydney, during his first viceroyalty, after making efforts to improve communications between Dublin and Connaught in 1566, arranged for the shiring of that province, and Mayo was made shire ground, taking its name from the monastery of Maio or Mageo, which was the seat of a bishop. Even after this period the MacWilliams continued to exercise very great authority, which was regularized in 1603, when "the MacWilliam Oughter," Theobald Bourke, surrendered his lands and received them back, to hold them by English tenure, with the title of Viscount Mayo (see Burgh, De).

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  • A burges sal nocht mute oute of burgh; Burgh Laws c. 7 (B).

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  • I think he was a shoemaker by trade and lived in the Lanark Burgh in Glasgow.

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  • A circular walk through the sunken lanes of the Solway Plain, starting at Burgh by Sands.

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  • Sigeberht also founded a school in East Anglia, and on the arrival of an Irish missionary named Furseus he built him a monastery at Cnobheresburg, perhaps to be identified with Burgh Castle.

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