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bulla

bulla

bulla Sentence Examples

  • The bulla was a circular gold locket containing a charm of some kind against evil.'

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  • In connexion with the large size of the ears is the excessive inflation of the auditory bulla of the skull.

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  • Actaeon is prosobranchiate, the visceral commissure is twisted in Actaeon and Chilina, and even slightly still in Bulla and Scaphander; in Actaeon and Limacina the osphradium is to the left, innervated by the supra-intestinal ganglion.

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  • The Thecosomatous Pteropoda are allied to Bulla, the Gymnosomatous forms to Aplysia.

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  • It is one of the more typical Opisthobranchs, that is to say, it belongs to the section Tectibranchia, but other members of the suborder, namely, Bulla and Actaeon (figs.

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  • - Bulla vexillum (Chemnitz), as seen crawling.

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  • Bulla, British.

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  • Tympanics small, not forming a bulla.

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  • Cirta (Constantine) and Bulla Regia (Hammam Darraj), its chief towns, received coloniae of soldiers and veterans, as well as Theveste (Tebessa) and Thamugas (Timgad).

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  • It would be impossible to enumerate here all the monographs describing, for example, the ruins of Carthage, those of the temple of the waters at Mount Zaghuan, the amphitheatre of El Jem (Thysdrus), the temple of Saturn, the royal tomb and the theatre of Dugga (Thugga), the bridge of Chemtu (Simitthu), the ruins and cemeteries of Tebursuk and Medeina (Althiburus), the rich villa of the Laberii at Wadna (Uthina), the sanctuary of Saturn Balcaranensis on the hill called Bu-KornaIn, the ruins of the district of Enfida (Aphrodisium, Uppenna, Segermes), those of Leptis minor (Lemta), of Thenae (near Sfax), those of the island of Meninx (Jerba), of the peninsula of Zarzis, of Mactar, Sbeitla (Sufetula), Gigthis (Bu-Grara), Gafsa (Capsa), Kef (Sicca Veneria), Bulla Regia, &c.

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  • On public or festal occasions the Etruscan noble wore, besides the tebenna, a bulla, or necklace of bullae, and a wreath, corona Etrusca.

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  • Auditory bulla filled with honeycombed bony tissue.

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  • X P11,1x, premaxilla; Mx, maxilla; Ma, malar; Fr, frontal; L, lachrymal; Pa, parietal; Na, nasal; Sq, squamosal; Ty, tympanic; ExO, exoccipital; AS, alisphenoid; OS, orbito-sphenoid; Per, mastoid bulla.

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  • 4, 5, 6); and, with one exception, have rooted cheek-teeth, the premolar-formula being zr 1 The infra-orbital foramen is also narrower, and the tympanic bulla is cellular.

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  • The tibia and fibula are united inferiorly, the tympanic bulla is hollow and the infra-orbital foramen narrow.

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  • The infra-orbital foramen is generally narrow, and the tympanic bulla hollow.

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  • The third sub-family is that of the Microtinae, or voles, which are distributed all over Europe, Northern Asia and North America, and are characterized by the tympanic bulla of the skull being filled with honey-combed bony tissue, the small size of the infra-orbital foramen, and the deep pterygoid fossa on the palatal aspect.

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  • In the skull the tympanic bulla is hollow, the pterygoid fossa shallow and the zygomatic arch slender, with a rudimentary jugal bone.

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  • They have long hind limbs, large eyes and ears; and in correlation with the latter an enlarged auditory bulla to the skull, which is hollow and divided into a tympanic and a mastoid portion.

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  • In the skull the lachrymal bone is large, the paroccipital process is directed vertically downwards and the tympanic bulla is hollow.

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  • The three remaining families of the Hystricoidea, of which one is African while the other two are chiefly South American, are very closely allied and often brigaded in a single family group. In the Capromyidae, which includes only the South American and West Indian hutias, the South American coypu and the African cane-rats, the tympanic bulla of the skull is hollow, the par-occipital process straight, the lachrymal small, and the cheekteeth rooted, with deep enamel-folds; the first front toe Leing occasionally absent.

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  • The Octodontidae, which are exclusively South American, differ from the preceding family by the tympanic bulla being filled with cellular bony tissue, and by the par-occipital process curving beneath it, while the cheek-teeth are almost or completely rootless and composed of parallel plates.

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  • The bull, so called from the leaden seal (bulla), is written on thick parchment; the special writing known as Lombard, which used to be used for bulls, was abolished by Leo XIII., and the leaden seal reserved for the more important letters; on the others it has been replaced by a rest ink stamp bearing both the emblems represented on the leaden seal: the two heads, face to face, of St Peter and St Paul, and the name of the reigning pope.

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  • a, Proboscis; b, bulla; c, neck; d, trunk; e, e, lemnisci.

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  • - In the skull there is a sagittal crest; the tympanic bulla is filled with cancellous tissue; the condyle of the lower jaw is rounded; and the premaxillae, or anterior bones of the upper jaw, have the full number of incisor teeth in the young state, the outermost of these being persistent through life as an isolated tooth.

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  • In the Oreodontinae or typical section of the family, which includes several genera nearly allied to Oreodon, the skull is shorter and higher than in the camels, with a swollen brain-case, a preorbital glandpit, the condyle of the lower jaw transversely elongated, the tympanic bulla hollow, and the orbit surrounded by bone.

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  • bulla, a boss, or circular metal ornament), and necessarily they were in all cases suspended from the documents, and they bore a design on both obverse and reverse.

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  • Hence the leaden bulla was a recognized form of seal during the middle ages in the Peninsula, in southern France, in Italy, and in the Latin East.

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  • The fashion even spread to Britain, as is proved by the existence in the British Museum of a leaden bulla of Ceenwulf of Mercia, A.D.

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  • Such specimens as have descended to us show that the golden bulla of the middle ages was usually hollow, being formed of two thin plates of metal stamped with the designs of obverse and reverse, soldered together at the edges and padded with wax or plaster.

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  • of France, ratifying the treaty with Henry VIII., 1527 (the counterpart with Henry's bulla being in Paris).

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  • It is not dilated into a distinct bulla, but ends in front in a pointed rod-like process.

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  • The date was confirmed when, during the removal of the rammed chalk and clay floor, a papal bulla was found.

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  • bulla formation occurred at the site.

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  • In the skull there are always vacuities, or unossified spaces in the bones of the palate, while the "angle," or lower hind extremity of each half of the lower jaw is strongly bent inwards so as to form a kind of shelf, and the alisphenoid bone takes a share in the formation of the tympanum, or auditory bladder, or bulla.

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  • In connexion with the large size of the ears is the excessive inflation of the auditory bulla of the skull.

    0
    0
  • Actaeon is prosobranchiate, the visceral commissure is twisted in Actaeon and Chilina, and even slightly still in Bulla and Scaphander; in Actaeon and Limacina the osphradium is to the left, innervated by the supra-intestinal ganglion.

    0
    0
  • The Thecosomatous Pteropoda are allied to Bulla, the Gymnosomatous forms to Aplysia.

    0
    0
  • It is one of the more typical Opisthobranchs, that is to say, it belongs to the section Tectibranchia, but other members of the suborder, namely, Bulla and Actaeon (figs.

    0
    0
  • - Bulla vexillum (Chemnitz), as seen crawling.

    0
    0
  • Bulla, British.

    0
    0
  • Tympanics small, not forming a bulla.

    0
    0
  • Cirta (Constantine) and Bulla Regia (Hammam Darraj), its chief towns, received coloniae of soldiers and veterans, as well as Theveste (Tebessa) and Thamugas (Timgad).

    0
    0
  • It would be impossible to enumerate here all the monographs describing, for example, the ruins of Carthage, those of the temple of the waters at Mount Zaghuan, the amphitheatre of El Jem (Thysdrus), the temple of Saturn, the royal tomb and the theatre of Dugga (Thugga), the bridge of Chemtu (Simitthu), the ruins and cemeteries of Tebursuk and Medeina (Althiburus), the rich villa of the Laberii at Wadna (Uthina), the sanctuary of Saturn Balcaranensis on the hill called Bu-KornaIn, the ruins of the district of Enfida (Aphrodisium, Uppenna, Segermes), those of Leptis minor (Lemta), of Thenae (near Sfax), those of the island of Meninx (Jerba), of the peninsula of Zarzis, of Mactar, Sbeitla (Sufetula), Gigthis (Bu-Grara), Gafsa (Capsa), Kef (Sicca Veneria), Bulla Regia, &c.

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  • Of the novels produced by other authors between 1870 and 1880, we may mention A hol az ember kezdodik (Where the Man Begins), by Edward Kavassy (1871), in which he severely lashes the idling Magyar nobility; Az en ismeroseim (My Acquaintances), bi Lewis Tolnai (1871); and Anatol, by Stephen Toldy (1872); the versified romances Deli babok hOse (Hero of the Fata Morgana), generally ascribed to Ladislaus Arany, but anonymously published, A szerelem hOse (Hero of Love), by John Vajda (1873), and Talalkozdsok (Rencounters) by the same (1877), and A Tiinderov (The Fairy Zone), by John Bulla (1876), all four interesting as specimens of narrative poetry; Kalozdy Bela (1875), a tale of Hungarian provincial life, by Zoltan Beothy, a pleasing writer who possesses a fund of humour, and appears to follow the best English models; Edith tortenete (History of Edith), by Joseph Prem (1876); Nyomorusag iskoldja (School of Misery), by the prolific author Arnold Vertesi (1878); Tilkolt szerelem (Secret Love), by Cornelius Abranyi (1879), a social-political romance of some merit; and Uj idOk, avult emberek (Modern Times, Men of the Past), by L.

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  • Perhaps scarcely less remarkable are the modern Magyar lyrists, such as, of the older set, John Bulla (b.

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  • (c) Univalvia spira regulari (= Cochleae): Argonauta, Nautilus, Conus, Cypraea, Bulla, Voluta, Buccinum, Strombus, Murex, Trochus, Turbo, Helix, Nerita, Haliotis.

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  • On public or festal occasions the Etruscan noble wore, besides the tebenna, a bulla, or necklace of bullae, and a wreath, corona Etrusca.

    0
    0
  • The bulla was a circular gold locket containing a charm of some kind against evil.'

    0
    0
  • Auditory bulla simple and hollow within.

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  • Auditory bulla filled with honeycombed bony tissue.

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  • Auditory bulla of skull filled with cancellar tissue.

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  • X P11,1x, premaxilla; Mx, maxilla; Ma, malar; Fr, frontal; L, lachrymal; Pa, parietal; Na, nasal; Sq, squamosal; Ty, tympanic; ExO, exoccipital; AS, alisphenoid; OS, orbito-sphenoid; Per, mastoid bulla.

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  • 4, 5, 6); and, with one exception, have rooted cheek-teeth, the premolar-formula being zr 1 The infra-orbital foramen is also narrower, and the tympanic bulla is cellular.

    0
    0
  • The tibia and fibula are united inferiorly, the tympanic bulla is hollow and the infra-orbital foramen narrow.

    0
    0
  • The infra-orbital foramen is generally narrow, and the tympanic bulla hollow.

    0
    0
  • The third sub-family is that of the Microtinae, or voles, which are distributed all over Europe, Northern Asia and North America, and are characterized by the tympanic bulla of the skull being filled with honey-combed bony tissue, the small size of the infra-orbital foramen, and the deep pterygoid fossa on the palatal aspect.

    0
    0
  • In the skull the tympanic bulla is hollow, the pterygoid fossa shallow and the zygomatic arch slender, with a rudimentary jugal bone.

    0
    0
  • They have long hind limbs, large eyes and ears; and in correlation with the latter an enlarged auditory bulla to the skull, which is hollow and divided into a tympanic and a mastoid portion.

    0
    0
  • In the skull the lachrymal bone is large, the paroccipital process is directed vertically downwards and the tympanic bulla is hollow.

    0
    0
  • The three remaining families of the Hystricoidea, of which one is African while the other two are chiefly South American, are very closely allied and often brigaded in a single family group. In the Capromyidae, which includes only the South American and West Indian hutias, the South American coypu and the African cane-rats, the tympanic bulla of the skull is hollow, the par-occipital process straight, the lachrymal small, and the cheekteeth rooted, with deep enamel-folds; the first front toe Leing occasionally absent.

    0
    0
  • The Octodontidae, which are exclusively South American, differ from the preceding family by the tympanic bulla being filled with cellular bony tissue, and by the par-occipital process curving beneath it, while the cheek-teeth are almost or completely rootless and composed of parallel plates.

    0
    0
  • The bull, so called from the leaden seal (bulla), is written on thick parchment; the special writing known as Lombard, which used to be used for bulls, was abolished by Leo XIII., and the leaden seal reserved for the more important letters; on the others it has been replaced by a rest ink stamp bearing both the emblems represented on the leaden seal: the two heads, face to face, of St Peter and St Paul, and the name of the reigning pope.

    0
    0
  • a, Proboscis; b, bulla; c, neck; d, trunk; e, e, lemnisci.

    0
    0
  • - In the skull there is a sagittal crest; the tympanic bulla is filled with cancellous tissue; the condyle of the lower jaw is rounded; and the premaxillae, or anterior bones of the upper jaw, have the full number of incisor teeth in the young state, the outermost of these being persistent through life as an isolated tooth.

    0
    0
  • In the Oreodontinae or typical section of the family, which includes several genera nearly allied to Oreodon, the skull is shorter and higher than in the camels, with a swollen brain-case, a preorbital glandpit, the condyle of the lower jaw transversely elongated, the tympanic bulla hollow, and the orbit surrounded by bone.

    0
    0
  • bulla, a boss, or circular metal ornament), and necessarily they were in all cases suspended from the documents, and they bore a design on both obverse and reverse.

    0
    0
  • Hence the leaden bulla was a recognized form of seal during the middle ages in the Peninsula, in southern France, in Italy, and in the Latin East.

    0
    0
  • The fashion even spread to Britain, as is proved by the existence in the British Museum of a leaden bulla of Ceenwulf of Mercia, A.D.

    0
    0
  • Such specimens as have descended to us show that the golden bulla of the middle ages was usually hollow, being formed of two thin plates of metal stamped with the designs of obverse and reverse, soldered together at the edges and padded with wax or plaster.

    0
    0
  • of France, ratifying the treaty with Henry VIII., 1527 (the counterpart with Henry's bulla being in Paris).

    0
    0
  • It is not dilated into a distinct bulla, but ends in front in a pointed rod-like process.

    0
    0
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