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bulbs

bulbs Sentence Examples

  • The light flashed away, leaving her in blackness studded with dim bulbs.

  • A good cleaning, a coat of paint and a few working light bulbs might make the place a pleasant neighborhood tavern.

  • In planting, the tops of the bulbs should be kept a little above ground, and it is a commendable plan to draw away the soil surrounding the bulbs when they have got root-hold.

  • Pythium, Peronospore, Completoria, Vol utelta, Botrytis, &c. That such overturgescence should lead to the bursting of fleshy fruits, such as gooseberries, tomatoes and grapes, is not surprising, nor can we wonder that fermentation and mould Fungi rapidly spread in such fruits; and the same is true for bulbs and herbaceous organs generally.

  • It is present also in oranges, citrons, currants, gooseberries and many other fruits, and in several bulbs and tubers.

  • Mole-rats are easily recognized by the peculiarly flattened head, in which the minute eyes are covered with skin, the wart-like ears, and rudimentary tail; they make burrows in sandy soil, and feed on bulbs and roots.

  • The other end is connected with the absorption vessels, which consist of a tube (e) containing calcium chloride, and a set of bulbs (f) containing potash solution.

  • Various forms of potash bulbs are employed; fig.

  • After having previously roasted the tube and copper oxide, and reduced the copper spiral a, the weighed calcium chloride tube and potash bulbs are put in position, the boat containing the substance is inserted (in the case of a difficultly combustible substance it is desirable to mix it with cupric oxide or lead chromate), the copper spiral (d) replaced, and the air and oxygen supply connected up. The apparatus is then tested for leaks.

  • When there is no more absorption in the potash bulbs, the oxygen supply is cut off and air passed through.

  • The increase in weight of the calcium chloride tube gives the weight of water formed, and of the potash bulbs the carbon dioxide.

  • Difficultly volatile liquids may be weighed directly into the boat; volatile liquids are weighed in thin hermetically sealed bulbs, the necks of which are broken just before they are placed in the combustion tube.

  • The oxidation, which is effected by chromic acid and sulphuric acid, is conducted in a flask provided with a funnel and escape tube, and the carbon dioxide formed is swept by a current of dry air, previously freed from carbon dioxide, through a drying tube to a set of potash bulbs and a tube containing soda-lime; if halogens are present, a small wash bottle containing potassium iodide, and a U tube containing glass wool moistened with silver nitrate on one side and strong sulphuric acid on the other, must be inserted between the flask and the drying tube.

  • The increase in weight of the potash bulbs and soda-lime tube gives the weight of carbon dioxide evolved.

  • Latex, though chiefly secreted in vessels or small sacs which reside in the cortical tissue between the outer bark and the wood is also found in the leaves and sometimes in the roots or bulbs.

  • Brazil has three groups of animals similar to the common rat - the Capromydae, Loncheridae and Psammoryctidae- the best known of which is the " tuco-tuco " (Ctenomys brasiliensis), a small burrowing animal of Rio Grande do Sul which excavates long subterranean galleries and lives on roots and bulbs.

  • Martin, they feed chiefly on "succulent bulbs, which they scratch up with the long, curved, black claws on their fore-feet.

  • A large yellow tulip (Homerica pallida) is one of the most abundant flowers on moist vlei lands on the high veld and is occasionally met with in the low veld; slangkop (Urginea Burkei) with red bulbs like a beetroot is a low bush plant apparently restricted to the Transvaal and adjacent Portuguese territory.

  • The glass tubes, therefore, from which the X-ray bulbs are to be fashioned, must not contain any of these oxides, whereas the glass used for making the funnel-shaped shields, which direct the rays upon the patient and at the same time protect the hands of the operator from the action of the rays, must contain a large proportion of lead.

  • The processes employed in the manufacture of the glass bulbs for incandescent electric lamps, are similar to the old- FIG.

  • 3), which is simply a series of bulbs blown on a tube.

  • In the Le Bel-Henninger form a series of bulbs are connected consecutively by means of syphon tubes (b) and having platinum gauzes (a) at the constrictions, so that when a certain amount of liquid collects in any one bulb it syphons over into the next lower bulb.

  • The "pearshaped" form of the same author consists of a series of pear-shaped bulbs, the narrow end of one adjoining the wider end of the next lower one.

  • The vapours rising from the still traverse a tall vertical column, and are then conveyed through a series of bulbs placed in a bath kept at the boiling-point of the most volatile constituent.

  • The more volatile vapours pass over to the condensing plant, while the less volatile ones condense in the bulbs and are returned to the column at varying heights by means of connecting tubes.

  • The small bulbs should be taken up in summer and replanted in autumn and early winter, according to the state of the season.

  • Tazetta itself, the type of the group, succeed in the open borders in light well-drained soil, but the bulbs should be deeply planted, not less than 6 or 8 in.

  • These pheasant's-eye narcissi, of which there are several well-marked varieties, as radiiflorus, poetarum, recurvus, &c., blossom in succession during April and May, and all do well in the open borders as permanent hardy bulbs.

  • Of late years some remarkably fine hybrids have been raised between the various distinct groups of narcissi, and the prices asked for the bulbs in many cases are exceedingly high.

  • 'SNOWDROP,' Galanthus nivalis, the best known representative of a small genus of the order Amaryllidaceae, all the species of which have bulbs, linear leaves and erect flower-stalks, destitute of leaves but bearing at the top a solitary pendulous bell-shaped flower.

  • The mild climate assists the growth of esculent plants and roots; and a considerable trade is carried on with New York, principally in onions, early potatoes, tomatoes, and beetroot, together with lily bulbs, cut flowers and some arrowroot.

  • Market-gardening, especially horticulture, is extensively practised in the vicinity, so that Haarlem is the seat of a large trade in Dutch bulbs, especially hyacinths, tulips, fritillaries, spiraeas and japonicas.

  • All have scaly bulbs, which in three west American species, as L.

  • The bulbs of several species are eaten, such as of L.

  • The bulbs should be planted from 6 to 10 in.

  • Thousands of bulbs of such lilies as longiflorum and speciosum are now retarded in refrigerators and taken out in batches for greenhouse work as required.

  • The spores formed on the delicate grey mould are carried during the summer from one plant to another, thus spreading the disease, and also germinate in the soil where the fungus may remain passive during the winter producing a new crop of spores next spring, or sometimes attacking the scales of the bulbs forming small black hard bodies embedded in the flesh.

  • For prevention, the surface soil covering bulbs should be removed every autumn and replaced by soil mixed with kainit; manure for mulching should also be mixed with kainit, which acts as a steriliser.

  • Rhizopus necans is sometimes the cause of extensive destruction of bulbs.

  • The fungus hibernates in the soil and enters through broken or injured roots, hence care should be taken when removing the bulbs that the roots are injured as little as possible.

  • This prevents infection from outside and also destroys any spores or fungus mycelium that may have been packed away along with the bulbs.

  • Not only are millions of bulbs cultivated in Holland for export every year, but thousands are now also grown for the same purpose in the Channel Islands, more particularly in Guernsey.

  • The enormous prices once given for rare varieties of tulip bulbs no longer obtain, though, even now, two and three guineas are asked for special bulbs.

  • The breeder bulbs and their offsets may grow on for years producing only self-coloured flowers, but after a time, which is varied and indefinite, some of the progeny "break," that is, produce flowers with the variegation which is so much prized.

  • The best time to plant is in September and October, the bulbs being buried about 6 in.

  • Sometimes a little loose earth or sand is put in to the depth of about I in., and the bulbs laid singly thereon, the holes being closed by the dibber and the whole raked over.

  • The tops can then be removed and the bulbs sorted and stored thinly in trays in a cool dry place.

  • Rare bulbs may be wrapped singly in tissue paper for storing.

  • Pot firmly, and plunge the pots in several inches of ashes out of doors, to protect the bulbs from frost.

  • The bulbs are placed in long shallow boxes, plunged in soil or ashes in the open air, and are later introduced as required into heat in semi-darkness, and are afterwards transferred to benches in the forcing houses where they flower.

  • Bulbs which have been forced are of no further value for that particular purpose.

  • The vulva or pudendum comprises all the female external generative organs, and consists of the mons Veneris, labia majora and minora, clitoris, urethral orifice, hymen, bulbs of the vestibule, and glands of Bartholin.

  • Thomson 6 places spherical bulbs inside thick spiral conductors through which the oscillating discharge of a powerful battery is led.

  • About the beginning of September the crop is ripe, which is known by the withering of the leaves; the bulbs are then to be pulled, and exposed on the ground till well dried, and they are then to be put away in a store-room, or loft, where they may be perfectly secured from frost and damp.

  • Those which are not required for the kitchen, if allowed to stand, and if the flower-bud is picked out on its first appearance, and the earth stirred about them, frequently produce bulbs equal in size and quality to the large ones that are imported from the Continent.

  • A crop of very large bulbs may also be secured by sowing about the beginning of September, and transplanting early in spring to very rich soil.

  • Another plan is to sow in May on dry poor soil, when a crop of small bulbs will be produced; these are to be stored in the usual way, and planted in rich soil about February, on ground made firm by treading, in rows about 1 ft.

  • apart, the bulbs being set near the surface, and about 6 in.

  • To obtain a crop of bulbs for pickling, seed should be sown thickly in March, in rather poor soil, the seeds being very thinly covered, and the surface well rolled; these are not to be thinned, but should be pulled and harvested when ripe.

  • aggregatum, is propagated by the lateral bulbs, which it throws out, under ground, in considerable numbers.

  • It is also known as the underground onion, from its habit of producing its bulbs beneath the surface.

  • proliferum, produces small bulbs instead of flowers, and a few offsets also underground.

  • These small stem bulbs are excellent for pickling.

  • It forms no bulbs, but, on account of its extreme hardiness, is sown in July or early in August, to furnish a reliable supply of young onions for use in salads during the early spring.

  • These bulbless onions are sometimes called Scallions, a name which is also applied to old onions which have stem and leaves but no bulbs.

  • On the other hand, a current of dry air may be passed through the series of weighed bulbs containing solution and solvent respectively, and the loss in weight of each determined.

  • The loss in the solution bulbs gives the mass of solvent absorbed from the solution, and the loss in the solvent bulbs the additional mass required to raise the vapour pressure in the air-current to equilibrium with the pure solvent.

  • The relative lowering of vapour pressure of the solution compared with that of the solvent is measured by the ratio of the extra mass absorbed from the solvent bulbs to the total mass absorbed from both series of bulbs.

  • For commercial purposes, crowns of lily of the valley, tulip and other bulbs, and such deciduous woody plants as lilac and deciduous species of rhododendron, while in a state of rest, are packed in wet moss and introduced into coldstorage chambers, where they may be kept in a state of quiescence, if desired, throughout the following summer.

  • River sand and the sharp grit washed up sometimes by the road side are excellent materials for laying around choice bulbs at planting time to prevent contact with earth which is perhaps manure-tainted.

  • Hyacinths and other bulbs derive benefit from slight doses, while to asparagus as much as 20 lb to the rood has been used with beneficial effect.

  • This mode of increase applies specially to bulbous plants, such as the lily and hyacinth, which produce little bulbs on the exterior round their base.

  • Most bulbs do so naturally to a limited but variable extent; when more rapid increase is wanted the heart is destroyed, and this induces the formation of a larger number of offsets.

  • The stem bulbs of lilies are similar in character to the offsets from the parent bulb.

  • The same mode of increase occurs in the gladiolus and crocus, but their bulb-like permanent parts are called corms, not bulbs.

  • This mode of potting does well for bulbs, such as hyacinths, which are either thrown away or planted out when the bloom is over.

  • of this class, with which may be associated hardy subjects which flower during that season or very early spring, as the Christmas rose, and amongst bulbs the crocus and snowdrop. Later the spring garden department is a scene of great attraction; and some of the gardens of this character, as those of Cliveden and Belvoir, are among the most fascinating examples of horticultural art.

  • - ThiS term includes not only those fibrous-rooted plants of herbaceous habit which spring up from the root year after year, but also those old-fashioned subjects known as florists' flowers, and the hardy bulbs.

  • Most of the hardy bulbs will do well enough in the border, care being taken not to disturb them while leafless and dormant.

  • Hardy bulbs of the garlic family, some species of which are ornamental; the inflorescence is umbellate.

  • Noble half-hardy bulbs, for planting near the front wall of a hothouse or greenhouse; the soil must be deep, rich and well drained.

  • bulbs.

  • Showy autumn-blooming bulbs (corms), with crocuslike flowers, all rosy-purple or white.

  • The Snowdrop. Early spring-flowering amaryllidaceous bulbs, with pretty drooping flowers, snow-white, having the tips of the enclosed petals green.

  • Pretty early-blooming bulbs, quite hardy.

  • Pretty dwarf spring-flowering bulbs.

  • A genus of South African plants with fibrous-coated corms or solid bulbs, often known as montbretas.

  • - Charming spring-flowering bulbs, thriving in any good sandy soil.

  • Splendid dwarfish bulbs, thriving in deep, sandy, wellenriched garden soil, and increased by offsets.

  • Besides these there are the various spring-flowering bulbs, such as the varieties of Hyacinthus, Tulipa, Narcissus, Fritillaria, Muscari or Grape Hyacinth, Crocus, Scilla, Chionodoxa and Galanthus or Snowdrop.

  • Few bulbs come into the summer flower gardens, but amongst those which should always be well represented are the Gladiolus, the Lilium, the Tigridia and the Montbretia.

  • A supply of roses, kalmias, rhododendrons, &c., and of hardy flowers and bulbs, as lily of the valley, hyacinths, tulips, daffodils, &c., should be kept up by forcing.

  • - Plant out tubers and bulbs of border flowers, where neglected in autumn, deferring the finer florists' flowers till next month.

  • Take up bulbs and tuberous roots and dry them in the shade before removing them to the store-room.

  • Fill up with annuals and greenhouse plants those beds from which the bulbs and roots have been raised.

  • Pot hyacinths, tulips and other bulbs for forcing; and propagate half-hardy plants by cuttings.

  • Begin to force roses, hyacinths and a few other bulbs, for winter and early spring decoration.

  • Plant the greater part of the common border bulbs, as hyacinths, narcissi, crocuses and early tulips, about the end of the month, with a few anemones for early flowering.

  • Hyacinths and other bulbs that have been kept in a cellar or other dark cool place may now be brought into the light of the greenhouse or sitting-room, provided they have filled the pots with roots.

  • The covering of leaves or litter should be taken off bulbs and tender plants that were covered up for winter, so that the beds can be lightly forked and raked.

  • Hyacinths, tulips and other spring bulbs may be dug up, dried and placed away for next fall's planting, and their places filled with bedding plants, such as coleus, achyranthes, pelargoniums, and the various white and coloured leaf plants.

  • Dutch bulbs, such as hyacinths, tulips, crocus, &c., and most of the varieties of lilies, may be planted.

  • Fall bulbs of all kinds may be planted.

  • Take up summer-flowering bulbs and tubers, such as dahlias, tuberoses, gladioli, cannas, caladiums, tigridias, and dry them off thoroughly, stowing them away afterwards in some place free from frost and moisture during the winter.

  • Cover up all beds in which there are hyacinths, tulips and other bulbs with a litter of leaves or straw to the depth of 2 or 3 in.

  • These papillae form pallial sense-organs, I containing nerve-end bulbs, covered by a dome of cuticle, and innervated from the pallial nervecords.

  • Most genera are saprophytes, but some - Chaetocladium, Piptocephalis - are parasites on other Mucorini, and one or two are associated casually with the rotting of tomatoes and other fruits, bulbs, &c., the fleshy parts of which are rapidly destroyed if once the hyphae gain entrance.

  • The chief difficulty in this method lay in determining the effective distances of the bulbs of the thermometers from the axis of the cylinder, and in ensuring uniformity of flow of heat along different radii.

  • The bulb, which is the only part eaten, has membranous scales, in the axils of which are io or 12 cloves, or snialler bulbs.

  • From these new bulbs can be procured by planting out in February or March.

  • The bulbs are best preserved hung in a dry place.

  • The percentage composition of the bulbs is given by E.

  • The bulbs are large and orbicular, and have a blackish coat; they, as well as the flowers, are reputed to be emetic in properties.

  • Stirring Is Effected By Causing The Water To Circulate Spirally Round The Bulbs Of The Thermometers And The Heating Conductor As Indicated In The Figure.

  • Like other bulbs they are increased by offsets, which should be carefully removed when the plants are at rest, and should be allowed to attain a fair size before removal.

  • These young bulbs should be potted singly in February or March, in mellow loamy soil with a moderate quantity of sand, about two-thirds of the bulb being kept above the level of the soil,.

  • As the bulbs get large they will occasionally need shifting into larger pots.

  • The natives eat extensively the bulbs of the Martagon lily, and weave cloth out of the fibres of the Kamchatka nettle.

  • Agriculture is spreading but slowly among them; they still prefer to plunder the stores of bulbs of Lilium Martagon, Paeonia, and Erythronium Dens canis laid up by the steppe mouse (Mus socialis).

  • The simpler form consists of two bulbs connected at the bottom by a wide tube.

  • Any number of bulbs can be attached to the horizontal capillary; in the form illustrated there are four, the last being a hydrogen pipette in which the palladium is heated in a horizontal tube by a spirit lamp. At the end of the horizontal tube there is a three way cock connecting with the air or an aspirator.

  • completely to fill the bulbs nearer the capillary.

  • CHIVE (Allium Schoenoprasum), a hardy perennial plant, with small narrow bulbs tufted on short root-stocks and long cylindrical hollow leaves.

  • Digging up these bulbs.

  • The light flashed away, leaving her in blackness studded with dim bulbs.

  • A good cleaning, a coat of paint and a few working light bulbs might make the place a pleasant neighborhood tavern.

  • GREEN Using pots of colored plants and bulbs, is very affective against the back drop of a green garden.

  • When garlic bulbs are crushed, alliin is converted into another compound called allicin.

  • Why settle for boring bulbs when you can set your Christmas tree a twinkle with these heavenly angels.

  • arc lamps of such energy include lasers, arc discharge lamps, and tungsten halogen bulbs.

  • These attractive frosted glass bulbs are available in either standard bayonet or standard screw.

  • Hand whisks, basting bulbs, and egg beaters require coordination and are fun to use.

  • bluebell bulbs in an area of woodland on site.

  • bluebell woodlands due to their fondness for the bulbs.

  • bogglemind boggling just what stunning color combinations can be achieved with even just a packet or two of different bulbs.

  • brightness of these bulbs depends on the number of watts they have.

  • For instance, if every household used energy-saving light bulbs, a power station could be closed.

  • Should they need replacing the bulbs are available from all good hardware stores.

  • I was changing incandescent bulbs four times a year.

  • Energy Saving Natural Lighting bulbs Enjoy the benefits of natural daylight indoors with these remarkable fluorescent bulbs.

  • In the autumn of 2000, 70,000 daffodil bulbs were planted on either side of the Broad Walk.

  • The planting time for the earliest flowering bulbs begins in September.

  • Normal light bulbs emit more red then blue light.

  • I have been running with halogen bulbs in my tail lights for about 12 years now.

  • We had an " energy display " too, with leaflets and cheap low-energy bulbs supplied by our local Friends of the Earth group.

  • Bulbs: The bulbs: The bulbs are 20 watt halogen bulbs.

  • Different types of light bulbs for lamps Using filament bulbs The most commonly used bulbs are filament light bulbs.

  • I heard that the Dutch had been eating the tulip bulbs, hunger is a terrible thing.

  • To include color after the salad burnet has finished flowering, plant bulbs and corms such as spring and autumn crocus.

  • Pacific callas Suppliers of premium quality calla lily bulbs from the world's best calla lily growers.

  • Pacific callas Suppliers of premium quality calla lily bulbs from the world's best calla lily growers.

  • The two ' bulbs ' shown here are directly attached to the main cardioid.

  • ceiling features spotlights that are normal tungsten bulbs.

  • No nonsense advice on mini wind turbines, solar panels, energy saving light bulbs and solar mobile phone & ipod chargers.

  • cheaper to run than filament bulbs.

  • These can be split into smaller clumps during Autumn, which is also the time for planting new bulbs.

  • corydalis cashmiriana flowers They are still very welcome at this time of year when we do not have so many bulbs in flower.

  • Spring flowering bulbs were covered too, these lilac and white crocus almost disappeared.

  • crocus bulbs to raise money for Breakthrough Breast Cancer.

  • Finally for more all year color bulbs such as yellow and purple crocuses were added.

  • daffodil bulbs are pushing out their leaves in the middle of the month.

  • The power output of red diodes can be comparable to small incandescent bulbs.

  • discharge lamps, and tungsten halogen bulbs.

  • This does not cover disposables such as bulbs, covers etc.

  • Several Rose sniggers later and the tally was: successful shots 2, prematurely ejaculated bulbs 4, and burnt fingers.

  • fennel bulbs, scatter with garlic and brush with olive oil.

  • Tiny mosses, hardy ferns or miniature bulbs will add extra interest.

  • The thicker filament also means that the bulbs are more robust.

  • flowering bulbs to brighten up an earth bank adjacent to a busy junction.

  • fluorescent lamps are cheaper to run than filament bulbs.

  • fluorescent bulbs, which use less than 25% of the energy of regular tungsten bulbs.

  • fritillaryhs wind between areas where the grass is left unmown for spring bulbs and later flowers to thrive, such as snake's-head fritillaries.

  • Under electric bulbs at night, the reproduction can look a little grainy.

  • halogen bulbs in my tail lights for about 12 years now.

  • Bulbs: The bulbs are 20 watt halogen bulbs.

  • Don't confuse low energy bulbs with low voltage halogen light bulbs.

  • Small plants & hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy orchids & dwarf trees & shrubs.

  • hardy ferns or miniature bulbs will add extra interest.

  • headlamp bulbs.

  • xenon headlamps, whose light output is twice that of halogen bulbs, are also available.

  • headlight bulbs that they're trying to use up.

  • planting the hyacinths I've planted hyacinths every autumn for years, along with loads of other types of bulbs that flower in spring.

  • hyacinth bulbs can grown in water in wide necked bottles or jars.

  • hyacinth glass for growing bulbs in water only.

  • icicle lights include 12 spare bulbs and 4 free gutter hooks.

  • incandescent bulbs four times a year.

  • inefficient light bulbs could save a whole reactor's worth of electricity by 2020.

  • Feeds on tubers, seeds, bulbs, insects and insect larvae.

  • Ten 100-watt light bulbs use one kilowatt of electrical power.

  • Plus, the fluorescent lamps are cheaper to run than filament bulbs.

  • Sources of such energy include lasers, arc discharge lamps, and tungsten halogen bulbs.

  • The church also bought long-life light bulbs for those seeing the debt liberators.

  • lily bulbs in mixed colors from the local hardware store.

  • Narcissus bulbs that I chitted in Log 26.

  • naturalize garden there is a suitable place for naturalizing flower bulbs.

  • The school already has a range of containers and planters in which there are different ornamentals and bulbs.

  • Small plants & hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy orchids & dwarf trees & shrubs.

  • These can be filled with summer bulbs, tender perennials or annuals.

  • photoflood bulbs in!

  • JUNE December 2005 With the last of the bulbs planted, the garden takes on a quiet feel.

  • We would like to fill some wooden planters with Summer plants and bulbs to brighten up our After School Club garden.

  • Ensure that any bulbs that you purchase, especially native species are from a guaranteed source and not plundered from the wild.

  • Two bulbs have succumbed to a rot that luckily did not spread all through the whole potful.

  • projector bulbs, fire drills, etc.

  • Tho I am an ardent proponent of changing to energy efficient light bulbs (as you may have noticed!

  • replaced they need replacing the bulbs are available from all good hardware stores.

  • front sidelights are either small bulbs set in the headlamp reflector, or larger bulbs (around 5 watts) under separate covers.

  • sidelight bulbs.

  • In the woodland this gave Nick a large area for ferns, hellebores, woodland bulbs, camellia and more snowdrops.

  • snowdrop bulbs.

  • England's Greatest snowdrop Garden - Order bulbs & see Colesbourne Park, Gloucestershire during its snowdrop weekends in February.

  • False ceiling features spotlights that are normal tungsten bulbs.

  • spring bulbs.

  • Wealth of exotic plants, Australian tree ferns - Chinese rhododendrons - S African bulbs.

  • Remove them with a sharp upwards tug, you can place your fingers on the gravel to prevent the bulbs being pulled up.

  • tulip bulbs have also been eaten in times of famine.

  • voltage halogen light bulbs.

  • watt halogen bulbs.

  • Lighting increase the wattage on light bulbs in dark areas where slipping or tripping hazards are possible.

  • wattage bulbs can reduce the cost to less than 1p per night Alarms Install an alarm.

  • November Lily bulbs can still be planted if the ground is still workable.

  • xenon headlamps, whose light output is twice that of halogen bulbs, are also available.

  • In planting, the tops of the bulbs should be kept a little above ground, and it is a commendable plan to draw away the soil surrounding the bulbs when they have got root-hold.

  • As already mentioned, Thylacoleo was originally regarded as a carnivorous creature, but this view was subsequently disputed, and its diet supposed to consist of soft roots, bulbs and fruits, with an occasional small bird or mammal.

  • Pythium, Peronospore, Completoria, Vol utelta, Botrytis, &c. That such overturgescence should lead to the bursting of fleshy fruits, such as gooseberries, tomatoes and grapes, is not surprising, nor can we wonder that fermentation and mould Fungi rapidly spread in such fruits; and the same is true for bulbs and herbaceous organs generally.

  • For example, deciduous trees shed their leaves in winter: geophytes go through a period of dormancy by means of bulbs, rhizomes, or other underground organs with buds; whilst annuals and ephemerals similarly protect themselves by means of the seed habit.

  • It is present also in oranges, citrons, currants, gooseberries and many other fruits, and in several bulbs and tubers.

  • Mole-rats are easily recognized by the peculiarly flattened head, in which the minute eyes are covered with skin, the wart-like ears, and rudimentary tail; they make burrows in sandy soil, and feed on bulbs and roots.

  • The other end is connected with the absorption vessels, which consist of a tube (e) containing calcium chloride, and a set of bulbs (f) containing potash solution.

  • Various forms of potash bulbs are employed; fig.

  • After having previously roasted the tube and copper oxide, and reduced the copper spiral a, the weighed calcium chloride tube and potash bulbs are put in position, the boat containing the substance is inserted (in the case of a difficultly combustible substance it is desirable to mix it with cupric oxide or lead chromate), the copper spiral (d) replaced, and the air and oxygen supply connected up. The apparatus is then tested for leaks.

  • When there is no more absorption in the potash bulbs, the oxygen supply is cut off and air passed through.

  • The increase in weight of the calcium chloride tube gives the weight of water formed, and of the potash bulbs the carbon dioxide.

  • Difficultly volatile liquids may be weighed directly into the boat; volatile liquids are weighed in thin hermetically sealed bulbs, the necks of which are broken just before they are placed in the combustion tube.

  • The oxidation, which is effected by chromic acid and sulphuric acid, is conducted in a flask provided with a funnel and escape tube, and the carbon dioxide formed is swept by a current of dry air, previously freed from carbon dioxide, through a drying tube to a set of potash bulbs and a tube containing soda-lime; if halogens are present, a small wash bottle containing potassium iodide, and a U tube containing glass wool moistened with silver nitrate on one side and strong sulphuric acid on the other, must be inserted between the flask and the drying tube.

  • The increase in weight of the potash bulbs and soda-lime tube gives the weight of carbon dioxide evolved.

  • Latex, though chiefly secreted in vessels or small sacs which reside in the cortical tissue between the outer bark and the wood is also found in the leaves and sometimes in the roots or bulbs.

  • Brazil has three groups of animals similar to the common rat - the Capromydae, Loncheridae and Psammoryctidae- the best known of which is the " tuco-tuco " (Ctenomys brasiliensis), a small burrowing animal of Rio Grande do Sul which excavates long subterranean galleries and lives on roots and bulbs.

  • The species of crocus are not very readily obtainable, but those who make a specialty of hardy bulbs ought certainly to search them out and grow them.

  • Martin, they feed chiefly on "succulent bulbs, which they scratch up with the long, curved, black claws on their fore-feet.

  • A large yellow tulip (Homerica pallida) is one of the most abundant flowers on moist vlei lands on the high veld and is occasionally met with in the low veld; slangkop (Urginea Burkei) with red bulbs like a beetroot is a low bush plant apparently restricted to the Transvaal and adjacent Portuguese territory.

  • The glass tubes, therefore, from which the X-ray bulbs are to be fashioned, must not contain any of these oxides, whereas the glass used for making the funnel-shaped shields, which direct the rays upon the patient and at the same time protect the hands of the operator from the action of the rays, must contain a large proportion of lead.

  • The processes employed in the manufacture of the glass bulbs for incandescent electric lamps, are similar to the old- FIG.

  • 3), which is simply a series of bulbs blown on a tube.

  • In the Le Bel-Henninger form a series of bulbs are connected consecutively by means of syphon tubes (b) and having platinum gauzes (a) at the constrictions, so that when a certain amount of liquid collects in any one bulb it syphons over into the next lower bulb.

  • The "pearshaped" form of the same author consists of a series of pear-shaped bulbs, the narrow end of one adjoining the wider end of the next lower one.

  • The vapours rising from the still traverse a tall vertical column, and are then conveyed through a series of bulbs placed in a bath kept at the boiling-point of the most volatile constituent.

  • The more volatile vapours pass over to the condensing plant, while the less volatile ones condense in the bulbs and are returned to the column at varying heights by means of connecting tubes.

  • The small bulbs should be taken up in summer and replanted in autumn and early winter, according to the state of the season.

  • Tazetta itself, the type of the group, succeed in the open borders in light well-drained soil, but the bulbs should be deeply planted, not less than 6 or 8 in.

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