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bulb

bulb

bulb Sentence Examples

  • Yet, there was something about him that attracted her like a June bug to a light bulb.

  • Dean handed the phone to his wife as the light went on like in the comic books—a flashing bulb of inspiration.

  • He ain't the brightest bulb on the Christmas tree, is he?

  • A single bulb dangled from the ceiling, lighting up a wide area but not the entire space.

  • If a loop of very fine platinum wire, prepared by the Wollaston process, is included in an exhausted glass bulb like an incandescent lamp, then when electric oscillations are sent through it its resistance is increased.

  • - Proboscis with stylet, " reserve " sacs and muscular bulb of a Hoplonemertine.

  • It consists of a glass bulb, in which there is a loop of fine wire, and to the bulb is attached a U-tube in which there is some liquid.

  • When a current is passed through the wire, continuous or alternating, it creates heat, which expands the air in the bulb and forces the liquid up one side of the U-tube to a certain position in which the rate of loss of heat by the air is equal to the rate at which it is gaining heat.

  • The apparatus devised by Ramsay and Shields consisted of a capillary tube, on one end of which was blown a bulb provided with a minute hole.

  • Attached to the bulb was a glass rod and then a tube containing iron wire.

  • The plants are generally perennial herbs growing from a bulb or rhizome, sometimes shrubby as in butcher's broom (Ruscus) or tree-like as in species of Dracaena, Yucca or Aloe.

  • The plants generally have a rhizome bearing radical leaves, as in asphodel, rarely a stem with a tuft of leaves as in Aloe, very rarely a tuber (Eriospermum) or bulb (Bowiea).

  • The plants grow from a bulb or short rhizome; the inflorescence is an apparent umbel formed of several shortened monochasial cymes and subtended by a pair of large bracts.

  • In the viscous state a mass of glass can be coiled upon the heated end of an iron rod, and if the rod is hollow can be blown into a hollow bulb.

  • Across the arms he balances the iron rod to which the glass bulb adheres, and rolling it backwards and forwards with the fingers of his left hand fashions the glass between the blades of his sugar-tongs tool, grasped in his right hand.

  • The hollow bulb is worked into the shape it is intended to assume, partly by blowing, partly by gravitation, and partly by the workman's tool.

  • If the blowing iron is held vertically with the bulb uppermost the bulb becomes flattened and shallow, if the bulb is allowed to hang downwards it becomes elongated and reduced in diameter, and if the end of the bulb is pierced and the iron is held horizontally and sharply trundled, as a mop is trundled, the bulb opens out into a flattened disk.

  • During the process of manipulation, whether on the chair or whilst the glass is being reheated, the rod must be constantly and gently trundled to prevent the collapse of the bulb or vessel.

  • A non-spherical form can only be produced by blowing the hollow bulb into a mould of the required shape.

  • Under the old system the form of the bowl is gradually developed by blowing and by shaping the bulb with the sugar-tongs tool.

  • The foot starts as a small independent bulb on a separate blowing iron.

  • One extremity of this bulb is made to adhere to the end of the leg, and the other extremity is broken away from its blowing iron.

  • When the glass is being blown in the mould the blowing iron is twisted round and round so that the finished bulb may not be marked by the joint of the mould.

  • The sheath terminates in an elongated muscular bulb.

  • The substance is heated in a retort a, which consists of a large bulb drawn out at the top to form a long neck; it may also FIG.

  • The thermometer is placed so that the bulb is near the neck of the retort or the side tube of the distilling flask.

  • It generally happens that much of the mercury column is outside the flask and consequently at a lower temperature than the bulb, hence a correction of the observed temperature is necessary.

  • If N be the length of the unheated mercury column in degrees, t the temperature of this column (generally determined by a small thermometer placed with its bulb at the middle of the column), and T the temperature recorded by the thermometer, then the corrected temperature of the vapour is T-+o 000143 (T - t) N (T.

  • Three types of columns are employed: (I) the elongation is simply a straight or bulb tube; (2) the column, properly termed a "dephlegmator," is so constructed that the vapours have to traverse a column of previously condensed vapour; (3) the column is encircled by a jacket through which a liquid circulates at the same temperature as the boiling-point of the most volatile component.

  • In the Le Bel-Henninger form a series of bulbs are connected consecutively by means of syphon tubes (b) and having platinum gauzes (a) at the constrictions, so that when a certain amount of liquid collects in any one bulb it syphons over into the next lower bulb.

  • In all tsetse-flies the proboscis in the living insect is entirely concealed by the palpi, which are grooved in their inner sides and form a closely fitting sheath for the piercing organ; the base of the proboscis is expanded beneath into a large onion-shaped bulb, which is filled with muscles.

  • The act of feeding, in which the proboscis is buried in the skin of the victim nearly up to the bulb, is remarkably quick, and in thirty seconds or less the abdomen of the fly, previously flat, becomes swollen out with blood like a berry.

  • The plants have long narrow leaves springing from the bulb and a central scape bearing one or more generally large, white or yellow, drooping or inclined flowers, which are enveloped before opening in a membranous spathe.

  • It can therefore be employed, instead of that costly metal, in the construction of incandescent lamps where a wire has to be fused into the glass to establish electric connexion between the inside and the outside of the bulb.

  • If the light exerted direct impulsion on the vanes, their motion would gradually drag the case round after them, by reason of the friction of the residual air in the bulb and of the pivot.

  • But at high exhaustions the free path becomes comparable with the dimensions of the glass bulb, and this equalization proceeds slowly.

  • Solids may be directly admitted to the tube from a weighing bottle, while liquids are conveniently introduced by means of small stoppered bottles, or, in the case of exceptionally volatile liquids, by means of a bulb blown on a piece of thin capillary tube, the tube being sealed during the weighing operation, and the capillary broken just before transference to the apparatus.

  • By varying the material of the bulb, this apparatus is rendered available for exceptionally high temperatures.

  • For higher temperatures the bulb of the vapour density tube is made of porcelain or platinum, and is heated in a gas furnace.

  • The vaporizing bulb A has fused about it a jacket B, provided with a condenser c. Two side tubes are fused on to the neck of A: the lower one leads to a mercury manometer M, and to the air by means of a cock C; the upper tube is provided with a rubber stopper through which a glass rod passes - this rod serves FIG.

  • The substance is now placed on the support already mentioned, and the apparatus closed to the air by inserting the cork at D and turning the cock C. By turning or withdrawing the support the substance enters the bulb; and during its vaporization the free limb of the manometer is raised so as to maintain the mercury at a.

  • The capillary hydrometer consists simply of a small pipette with a bulb in the middle of the stem, the pipette terminating in a very fine capillary point.

  • He covered the bulb of the thermometer with layers of non-conducting material and left it immersed at the desired depth for a very long time to enable it to take the temperature of its surroundings.

  • The principle is to have a constriction in the tube above the bulb so proportioned that when the instrument is upright it acts in every way as an ordinary mercurial thermometer, but when it is inverted the thread of mercury breaks at the constriction, and the portion above the point runs down the now reversed tube and remains there as a measure of the temperature at the moment of turning over.

  • This may be done by the method suggested by Arago in 1828, introduced by Aime in 1841 and again suggested by Glaisher in 1858, of sealing up the whole instrument in a glass tube exhausted of air; or, less effectively, by surrounding the bulb alone with a strong outer sheath of glass.

  • In both forms it is usual to have the space between the bulb and the protecting sheath partly filled with mercury or alcohol to act as a conductor and reduce the time necessary for the thermometer to acquire the temperature of its surroundings.

  • In the case of liquids containing strong acids or alkalis, which the paper cannot withstand, a plug of carefully purified asbestos or glass-wool (spun glass) is often employed, contained in a bulb blown as an enlargement on a narrow "filtertube."

  • Humboldti, are remarkable for being somewhat intermediate between a bulb and a creeping rhizome.

  • The diseased stems should be removed and burned before the leaves fall; as the bulb is not attacked the plant will start growth next season free from disease.

  • and afterwards passes into the bulb which becomes brown and finally rots.

  • The species are numerous, and are distinguished one from another by the scales of the bulb being woolly or smooth on the inner surface, by the character of the flower-stalks, by the filaments being hairy or otherwise, and by other characters.

  • A bulb on the posterior aorta.

  • Opening into the spongy urethra where it passes through the bulb are the ducts of two small glands known as Cowper's glands, which lie on each side of the membranous urethra and are best seen in childhood.

  • - Coronal Section through the Pelvis, showing the relations of the bladder above, prostate and bulb below.

  • It is usually made of glass, the lower bulb being loaded with mercury or small shot which serves as ballast, causing the instrument to float with the stem vertical.

  • The quantity of mercury or shot inserted depends upon the density of the liquids for which the hydrometer is to be employed, it being essential that the whole of the bulb should be immersed in the heaviest liquid for which the instrument is used, while the length and diameter of the stem must be such that the hydrometer will float in the lightest liquid for which it is required.

  • The effect of weights placed in such a dish or pan is of course the same as if they were placed within the bulb of the instrument, since they do not alter the volume of that part which is immersed.

  • It is possible by applying a little oil to the upper part of the bulb of a common or of a Sikes's hydrometer, and carefully placing it in pure water, to cause it to float with the upper part of the bulb and the whole of the stem emerging as indicated in fig.

  • IIo, differs from Nicholson's instrument in being constructed of glass, and having a cylindrical bulb about 21 centimetres in length and 22 millimetres in diameter.

  • Between the bulb and counterpoise is placed a thermometer, which serves to indicate the temperature of the liquid, and the instrument is provided with three weights which can be attached to the top of the stem.

  • It is made of brass, and is provided with a spheroidal bulb the axis of which is 2 in.

  • Cronstedt placed a bulb in the centre of his blowpipe.

  • The rapid variation in the intensity of the magnetic field causes a brilliant electrodeless discharge which is seen in the form of a ring passing near the inner walls of the bulb when the pressure is properly adjusted.

  • The stem bulbs of lilies are similar in character to the offsets from the parent bulb.

  • After they have ripened in connexion with the parent bulb, the offsets are taken off, stored in appropriate places, and at the proper season planted out in nursery beds.

  • Such are the scales of a bulb, and the various parts of the flower, and assuming that the structure ordinarily termed a leaf is the typical form, these other structures were designated changed or metamorphosed leaves, a somewhat misleading interpretation.

  • The heat-flow through the central column amounted to about 7.5 calories in 54 seconds, and was measured by continuing the tube through the iron plate into the bulb of a Bunsen ice calorimeter, and observing with a chronometer to a fifth of a second the time taken by the mercury to contract through a given number of divisions.

  • The chief uncertainty of this method is the area from which the heat is collected, which probably exceeds that of the central column, owing to the disturbance of the linear flow by the projecting bulb of the calorimeter.

  • The bulb, which is the only part eaten, has membranous scales, in the axils of which are io or 12 cloves, or snialler bulbs.

  • In the United States the bulb is given in doses of 2-2 drachms in cases of bronchiectasis and phthisis pulmonalis.

  • The muscular wall of the blood-vessels also exhibits tonic contraction, which, however, seems to be mainly traceable to a continual excitation of the muscle cells by nervous influence conveyed to them along their nerves, and originating in the great vaso motor centre in the bulb.

  • In these the rhythmic activity is, however, clearly secondary to rhythmic discharges of the nerve cells constituting the respiratory centre in the bulb.

  • In rare cases the main axis is unbranched and ends in a flower, as, for instance, in the tulip, where scale-leaves, forming the underground bulb, green foliage-leaves and coloured floral leaves are borne on one and the same axis.

  • The members of this order are generally perennial herbs growing from a corm as in Crocus and Gladiolus, or a rhizome as in Iris; more rarely, as in the Spanish iris, from a bulb.

  • b, Oesophageal bulb.

  • The cold water flow is regulated by a tap S with a long handle 0, and its temperature is taken by a delicate thermometer with its bulb at G.

  • The sheath of ice surrounding the bulb must be sufficiently continuous to prevent escape of heat, but it must not be so solid as to produce risk of strain.

  • In the practical use of the instrument it is not necessary to know both the latent heat of fusion of ice and the change of volume which occurs on melting; it is sufficient to determine the change of volume per calorie, or the quantity of mercury which is drawn into the bulb of the apparatus per unit of heat added.

  • If the inner bulb is filled with mercury instead of water and ice, the same arrangement answers admirably as a Favre and Silbermann calorimeter, for measuring small quantities of heat by the expansion of FIG.

  • Surrounded By A Nickel Plated Steel Enclosure B, Forming The Bulb Of A Mercury Thermo Regulator, Immersed In A Large Water Bath Maintained At A Constant Temperature.

  • These young bulbs should be potted singly in February or March, in mellow loamy soil with a moderate quantity of sand, about two-thirds of the bulb being kept above the level of the soil,.

  • The lower bulb is provided with a smaller bulb bearing a capillary through which the gas is led to the apparatus, the higher bulb has a wider outlet tube.

  • Sometimes the small bulb on the left is omitted.

  • phosphorus, the absorbing bulb has a tubulure at the bottom.

  • The clip is removed, the stopcock opened, and the level tube of the measuring apparatus raised, so that the gas passes into the first bulb.

  • At the point of impact a bulb of percussion, which is a somewhat elevated conical mark, is produced.

  • The bulb is evidence of a direct blow, probably intentionally made, and is a point of some importance to archaeologists investigating Palaeolithic implements.

  • Yet, there was something about him that attracted her like a June bug to a light bulb.

  • Dean handed the phone to his wife as the light went on like in the comic books—a flashing bulb of inspiration.

  • He ain't the brightest bulb on the Christmas tree, is he?

  • A single bulb dangled from the ceiling, lighting up a wide area but not the entire space.

  • aspirator bulb fitted with a plastic adapter that fits on the end of his stick.

  • basking light is just a normal ' daytime ' bulb which is blue.

  • Above plus chrome panel bezel, Edison screw bulb & bulb holder - £ 4.00 each.

  • Meanwhile, its owner pedals a bicycle to power a flickering light bulb and blow-dry his hair.

  • brooder light anymore use a regular watt red " party " light bulb.

  • bulb of percussion.

  • Typically, you'll hear people say " imagine trying to see a standard 60W light bulb that is twenty thousand miles away " .

  • bulb thermometer in various locations.

  • bulb filament?

  • bulb planting and litter pick.

  • bulb planter was then used to remove the plug of soil, and the strawberry plant planted with minimum effort.

  • bulb holder insert worked well.

  • The tungsten bulb has a relatively large, tightly wound filament.

  • Mercury thermometer A glass bulb filled with mercury is connected to a narrow evacuated glass capillary tube.

  • In the Coolidge tube, the bulb could be completely evacuated and electrons were liberated from a heated spiral cathode.

  • The bulb consists of several small egg-shaped cloves, enclosed in a white membrane.

  • crocus in pots flower at the time of the Dunblane Early Bulb Display i.e. the 3rd Saturday in February.

  • PLANTING It's bulb time again so start planting crocuses, narcissi, snowdrops in odd number groups.

  • cyclamen intaminatum In the bulb house we have several pots of it growing where we can also appreciate the delicate and very beautiful flowers.

  • How many electrical engineers does it take to change a light bulb?

  • enough energy to light a 100-watt light bulb for four hours.

  • By " onion skin " does you mean onion epidermis or outer leaf of an onion bulb?

  • How many TV evangelists does it take to change a light bulb?

  • A light bulb in your face can cause eyestrain.

  • The 2s were cut from carrot slices, the Os from bulb fennel stalks (Geraldene Holt's suggestion ).

  • filament bulb within a steel casing, which is often stolen or knocked off by passing traffic.

  • filament in a light bulb.

  • filament of a flashlight bulb.

  • It provides excellent lighting for the purpose by using a high intensity flashlight bulb.

  • flashlight bulb.

  • Turn bulb timer to a 12/12 cycle & wait for your buds to start flowering.

  • As a reward for the garage having gasoline, bulb and sandwiches, I bought a celebratory air freshener for the car too.

  • Chinese frit bulb This picture shows very clearly the simple twin scale type of frit bulb This picture shows very clearly the simple twin scale type of fritillaria bulb.

  • We have been known to have a whole bulb diced and mixed with butter spread on a piece of toast then grilled.

  • halide bulb grow area, blowing at the bulb.

  • I am going to attempt this, for the first time ever, with a 500 watt quartz halogen bulb!

  • Plus, the new lower dual bulb headlight offers excellent pathway illumination.

  • A brass tube led from a rubber bulb to a warning klaxon hooter, with even sharper warning provided by a large brass bell.

  • Incandescent lights are horribly inefficient (especially the screw-in " grow bulb " type) and really not an acceptable option for plant growth.

  • inexpensive to run - they use 8 watts of electricity - less than a light bulb.

  • irritant reaction affecting bulb handlers.

  • Jugular venous bulb saturation is the oxygen saturation of venous blood in the jugular venous bulb saturation is the oxygen saturation of venous blood in the jugular bulb which is at the base of the skull.

  • krypton bulb for extra brightness (make sure you're nowhere near Superman ).

  • On a lighter note, how many WA crew members do you think it takes to change a light bulb?

  • macaroon biscuits together with a bulb of Nougat filling cream.

  • swan neck This is a short flexible mount with a conventional tungsten bulb.

  • sunshine Just set the timer and let the sunshine neodymium bulb awaken you nature's way.

  • olfactory bulb, which processes odor information.

  • Some are formed together in one piece, which means when the bulb burns out, the lamp either becomes a paperweight or trash.

  • youth pastors aren't around long enough for a light bulb to burn out.

  • penstock gates, self cleaning trash racks and the first submersible bulb type turbine to be installed in Scotland.

  • phosphor coating at the front of the bulb.

  • Using plastic bulb pipette, remove some yeast suspension from the beaker (below the liquid paraffin layer ).

  • Jim used a bulb planter to remove a plug of soil, which made for very easy planting of the strawberries.

  • A quick puff of breath opens the chamber which is allowed to fall away from the blower to produce this pendant bulb shape.

  • quartz halogen bulb!

  • The bulb partially protruded from the two dome reflectors, and only the light from the very edges was diverted downwards.

  • YOUNG BOY: (singing) Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer had a very shiny nose CHILDREN: Like a light bulb!

  • retrofitted to replace the tungsten bulb.

  • rheostat controlled 6v 20 watt quartz halogen system with full bulb adjustment.

  • To change the bulb, simply remove two tiny grub screws with a hexagonal key.

  • slalom paddlers does it take to change a light bulb?

  • spare bulb is supplied, fitted inside the head unit.

  • Plant with the top of the bulb just breaking the soil surface.

  • swan neck This is a short flexible mount with a conventional tungsten bulb.

  • swan neck This is a short flexible mount with a conventional tungsten bulb.

  • Use the 20ml syringe with a bulb adapter (blob) containing heparin saline.

  • The bulb from a disposable bulb syringe may also be used.

  • The sensible heat of the incoming air, as measured by a dry bulb thermometer, is reduced.

  • These can be measured using a ' wet bulb globe thermometer ' .

  • trimming the stalks to about 3cm above the bulb, if you havenât already done so.

  • The pressure bulb was taped over the left tibial tuberosity.

  • tungsten bulb has a relatively large, tightly wound filament.

  • Pickers range from large plastic tweezers, to bulb pipettes and siphon tubes.

  • The familiar smell originates from a pungent volatile oil and sulfur held within the bulb and leaves.

  • Replacing the high resistance voltmeter with a bulb in the above cells allows a current to flow.

  • warping constant is a function of bulb radius, and of the thicknesses and lengths of the two legs.

  • watts of electricity - less than a light bulb.

  • wattage of bulb for the area you wish to illuminate.

  • Ensure you have the correct wattage of bulb for the area you wish to illuminate.

  • Where light fittings have maximum bulb wattages marked, those bulb sizes must not be exceeded.

  • g, Bulb.

  • If a loop of very fine platinum wire, prepared by the Wollaston process, is included in an exhausted glass bulb like an incandescent lamp, then when electric oscillations are sent through it its resistance is increased.

  • The tentacles also vary considerably in other ways than in number: first, in form, being usually simple, with a basal bulb, but in Cladonemidae they are branched, often in complicated fashion; secondly, in grouping, being usually given off singly, and at regular intervals from the margin of the umbrella, but in Margelidae and in some Trachomedusae they are given off in tufts or bunches (fig.

  • A reservoir, a duct and a muscular bulb in the region (fig.

  • - Proboscis with stylet, " reserve " sacs and muscular bulb of a Hoplonemertine.

  • It consists of a glass bulb, in which there is a loop of fine wire, and to the bulb is attached a U-tube in which there is some liquid.

  • When a current is passed through the wire, continuous or alternating, it creates heat, which expands the air in the bulb and forces the liquid up one side of the U-tube to a certain position in which the rate of loss of heat by the air is equal to the rate at which it is gaining heat.

  • The apparatus devised by Ramsay and Shields consisted of a capillary tube, on one end of which was blown a bulb provided with a minute hole.

  • Attached to the bulb was a glass rod and then a tube containing iron wire.

  • The plants are generally perennial herbs growing from a bulb or rhizome, sometimes shrubby as in butcher's broom (Ruscus) or tree-like as in species of Dracaena, Yucca or Aloe.

  • The plants generally have a rhizome bearing radical leaves, as in asphodel, rarely a stem with a tuft of leaves as in Aloe, very rarely a tuber (Eriospermum) or bulb (Bowiea).

  • The plants grow from a bulb or short rhizome; the inflorescence is an apparent umbel formed of several shortened monochasial cymes and subtended by a pair of large bracts.

  • In the viscous state a mass of glass can be coiled upon the heated end of an iron rod, and if the rod is hollow can be blown into a hollow bulb.

  • Across the arms he balances the iron rod to which the glass bulb adheres, and rolling it backwards and forwards with the fingers of his left hand fashions the glass between the blades of his sugar-tongs tool, grasped in his right hand.

  • The hollow bulb is worked into the shape it is intended to assume, partly by blowing, partly by gravitation, and partly by the workman's tool.

  • If the blowing iron is held vertically with the bulb uppermost the bulb becomes flattened and shallow, if the bulb is allowed to hang downwards it becomes elongated and reduced in diameter, and if the end of the bulb is pierced and the iron is held horizontally and sharply trundled, as a mop is trundled, the bulb opens out into a flattened disk.

  • During the process of manipulation, whether on the chair or whilst the glass is being reheated, the rod must be constantly and gently trundled to prevent the collapse of the bulb or vessel.

  • A non-spherical form can only be produced by blowing the hollow bulb into a mould of the required shape.

  • Under the old system the form of the bowl is gradually developed by blowing and by shaping the bulb with the sugar-tongs tool.

  • The foot starts as a small independent bulb on a separate blowing iron.

  • One extremity of this bulb is made to adhere to the end of the leg, and the other extremity is broken away from its blowing iron.

  • When the glass is being blown in the mould the blowing iron is twisted round and round so that the finished bulb may not be marked by the joint of the mould.

  • The sheath terminates in an elongated muscular bulb.

  • The substance is heated in a retort a, which consists of a large bulb drawn out at the top to form a long neck; it may also FIG.

  • The thermometer is placed so that the bulb is near the neck of the retort or the side tube of the distilling flask.

  • It generally happens that much of the mercury column is outside the flask and consequently at a lower temperature than the bulb, hence a correction of the observed temperature is necessary.

  • If N be the length of the unheated mercury column in degrees, t the temperature of this column (generally determined by a small thermometer placed with its bulb at the middle of the column), and T the temperature recorded by the thermometer, then the corrected temperature of the vapour is T-+o 000143 (T - t) N (T.

  • Three types of columns are employed: (I) the elongation is simply a straight or bulb tube; (2) the column, properly termed a "dephlegmator," is so constructed that the vapours have to traverse a column of previously condensed vapour; (3) the column is encircled by a jacket through which a liquid circulates at the same temperature as the boiling-point of the most volatile component.

  • In the Le Bel-Henninger form a series of bulbs are connected consecutively by means of syphon tubes (b) and having platinum gauzes (a) at the constrictions, so that when a certain amount of liquid collects in any one bulb it syphons over into the next lower bulb.

  • In all tsetse-flies the proboscis in the living insect is entirely concealed by the palpi, which are grooved in their inner sides and form a closely fitting sheath for the piercing organ; the base of the proboscis is expanded beneath into a large onion-shaped bulb, which is filled with muscles.

  • The act of feeding, in which the proboscis is buried in the skin of the victim nearly up to the bulb, is remarkably quick, and in thirty seconds or less the abdomen of the fly, previously flat, becomes swollen out with blood like a berry.

  • The plants have long narrow leaves springing from the bulb and a central scape bearing one or more generally large, white or yellow, drooping or inclined flowers, which are enveloped before opening in a membranous spathe.

  • It can therefore be employed, instead of that costly metal, in the construction of incandescent lamps where a wire has to be fused into the glass to establish electric connexion between the inside and the outside of the bulb.

  • He constructed an apparatus in illustration, which he called a radiometer or lightmill, by pivoting a vertical axle carrying equidistant vertical vanes inside an exhausted glass bulb, one side of each vane being blackened and the other side bright, the blackened sides all pointing the same way round the axle.

  • If the light exerted direct impulsion on the vanes, their motion would gradually drag the case round after them, by reason of the friction of the residual air in the bulb and of the pivot.

  • But at high exhaustions the free path becomes comparable with the dimensions of the glass bulb, and this equalization proceeds slowly.

  • Solids may be directly admitted to the tube from a weighing bottle, while liquids are conveniently introduced by means of small stoppered bottles, or, in the case of exceptionally volatile liquids, by means of a bulb blown on a piece of thin capillary tube, the tube being sealed during the weighing operation, and the capillary broken just before transference to the apparatus.

  • By varying the material of the bulb, this apparatus is rendered available for exceptionally high temperatures.

  • For higher temperatures the bulb of the vapour density tube is made of porcelain or platinum, and is heated in a gas furnace.

  • The vaporizing bulb A has fused about it a jacket B, provided with a condenser c. Two side tubes are fused on to the neck of A: the lower one leads to a mercury manometer M, and to the air by means of a cock C; the upper tube is provided with a rubber stopper through which a glass rod passes - this rod serves FIG.

  • The substance is now placed on the support already mentioned, and the apparatus closed to the air by inserting the cork at D and turning the cock C. By turning or withdrawing the support the substance enters the bulb; and during its vaporization the free limb of the manometer is raised so as to maintain the mercury at a.

  • The capillary hydrometer consists simply of a small pipette with a bulb in the middle of the stem, the pipette terminating in a very fine capillary point.

  • The instrument being filled with distilled water, the number of drops required to empty the bulb and portions of the stem between two marks m and n (fig.

  • He covered the bulb of the thermometer with layers of non-conducting material and left it immersed at the desired depth for a very long time to enable it to take the temperature of its surroundings.

  • The principle is to have a constriction in the tube above the bulb so proportioned that when the instrument is upright it acts in every way as an ordinary mercurial thermometer, but when it is inverted the thread of mercury breaks at the constriction, and the portion above the point runs down the now reversed tube and remains there as a measure of the temperature at the moment of turning over.

  • This may be done by the method suggested by Arago in 1828, introduced by Aime in 1841 and again suggested by Glaisher in 1858, of sealing up the whole instrument in a glass tube exhausted of air; or, less effectively, by surrounding the bulb alone with a strong outer sheath of glass.

  • In both forms it is usual to have the space between the bulb and the protecting sheath partly filled with mercury or alcohol to act as a conductor and reduce the time necessary for the thermometer to acquire the temperature of its surroundings.

  • In the case of liquids containing strong acids or alkalis, which the paper cannot withstand, a plug of carefully purified asbestos or glass-wool (spun glass) is often employed, contained in a bulb blown as an enlargement on a narrow "filtertube."

  • Humboldti, are remarkable for being somewhat intermediate between a bulb and a creeping rhizome.

  • The diseased stems should be removed and burned before the leaves fall; as the bulb is not attacked the plant will start growth next season free from disease.

  • and afterwards passes into the bulb which becomes brown and finally rots.

  • The species are numerous, and are distinguished one from another by the scales of the bulb being woolly or smooth on the inner surface, by the character of the flower-stalks, by the filaments being hairy or otherwise, and by other characters.

  • soon as the perianth has withered, to conserve the strength of the bulb.

  • A bulb on the posterior aorta.

  • The bulbs of the vestibule are two masses of erectile tissue situated one on each side of the vaginal orifice: above they are continued up to the clitoris; they represent the bulb and the corpus spongiosum of the male, split into two, and the fact that they are so divided accounts for the urethra failing to be enclosed in the clitoris as it is in the penis.

  • Opening into the spongy urethra where it passes through the bulb are the ducts of two small glands known as Cowper's glands, which lie on each side of the membranous urethra and are best seen in childhood.

  • Posteriorly, at what is known as the root of the penis, the two corpora cavernosa diverge, become more and more fibrous in structure, and are attached on each side to the rami of the ischium, while the corpus spongiosum becomes more vascular and enlarges to form the bulb.

  • - Coronal Section through the Pelvis, showing the relations of the bladder above, prostate and bulb below.

  • At first it lies in the substance of the bulb and, later, of the corpus spongiosum, while finally it passes through the glans.

  • It is usually made of glass, the lower bulb being loaded with mercury or small shot which serves as ballast, causing the instrument to float with the stem vertical.

  • The quantity of mercury or shot inserted depends upon the density of the liquids for which the hydrometer is to be employed, it being essential that the whole of the bulb should be immersed in the heaviest liquid for which the instrument is used, while the length and diameter of the stem must be such that the hydrometer will float in the lightest liquid for which it is required.

  • The effect of weights placed in such a dish or pan is of course the same as if they were placed within the bulb of the instrument, since they do not alter the volume of that part which is immersed.

  • It is possible by applying a little oil to the upper part of the bulb of a common or of a Sikes's hydrometer, and carefully placing it in pure water, to cause it to float with the upper part of the bulb and the whole of the stem emerging as indicated in fig.

  • IIo, differs from Nicholson's instrument in being constructed of glass, and having a cylindrical bulb about 21 centimetres in length and 22 millimetres in diameter.

  • The hydrometer constructed by Jones, of Holborn, consists of a spheroidal bulb with a rectangular stem (fig.

  • Between the bulb and counterpoise is placed a thermometer, which serves to indicate the temperature of the liquid, and the instrument is provided with three weights which can be attached to the top of the stem.

  • It is made of brass, and is provided with a spheroidal bulb the axis of which is 2 in.

  • Cronstedt placed a bulb in the centre of his blowpipe.

  • The rapid variation in the intensity of the magnetic field causes a brilliant electrodeless discharge which is seen in the form of a ring passing near the inner walls of the bulb when the pressure is properly adjusted.

  • The stem bulbs of lilies are similar in character to the offsets from the parent bulb.

  • After they have ripened in connexion with the parent bulb, the offsets are taken off, stored in appropriate places, and at the proper season planted out in nursery beds.

  • Such are the scales of a bulb, and the various parts of the flower, and assuming that the structure ordinarily termed a leaf is the typical form, these other structures were designated changed or metamorphosed leaves, a somewhat misleading interpretation.

  • The heat-flow through the central column amounted to about 7.5 calories in 54 seconds, and was measured by continuing the tube through the iron plate into the bulb of a Bunsen ice calorimeter, and observing with a chronometer to a fifth of a second the time taken by the mercury to contract through a given number of divisions.

  • The chief uncertainty of this method is the area from which the heat is collected, which probably exceeds that of the central column, owing to the disturbance of the linear flow by the projecting bulb of the calorimeter.

  • The bulb, which is the only part eaten, has membranous scales, in the axils of which are io or 12 cloves, or snialler bulbs.

  • The bulb has a strong and characteristic odour and an acrid taste, and yields an offensively smelling oil, essence of garlic, identical with allyl sulphide (C 3 H 5) 2 S (see Hofmann and Cahours, Journ.

  • In the United States the bulb is given in doses of 2-2 drachms in cases of bronchiectasis and phthisis pulmonalis.

  • The muscular wall of the blood-vessels also exhibits tonic contraction, which, however, seems to be mainly traceable to a continual excitation of the muscle cells by nervous influence conveyed to them along their nerves, and originating in the great vaso motor centre in the bulb.

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