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buildings

buildings Sentence Examples

  • He apparently owned several buildings he was leasing out on the coast - warehouses, maybe?

  • We asked about buildings; there were none, only corn in the four fields separated by the cross roads.

  • I tried to remember names on buildings but just being there was so awesome it was difficult to concentrate.

  • The town was fairly large with a dozen or so business buildings on each side of the street but, as I said, most were closed.

  • Store fronts interspersed with vacant lots lined one side of the street while the other remained absent of any buildings except a closed gas station and a dollar store.

  • Howie bounded out of the car and crossed to the newer side of the street where he had a better view of the few older buildings that remained.

  • Whatever was between those buildings must have burned down.

  • Yes. I'm sorry so many buildings are gone but that one block is enough.

  • There weren't any buildings or people so I 'came back'.

  • Off to one side was an old fire ring but no buildings or people.

  • Images of landmark buildings, of the seven greatest wonders of the ancient world, and city scenes from around the world.

  • She squinted towards the blazing buildings to see a dark figure half-trotting, half-limping towards them.

  • The buildings blocked the sun, and the barrage of sensations overwhelmed her.

  • There were no other buildings, nowhere else to hide that might withstand an angry Gabriel.

  • The earth in flames, with earthquakes swallowing whole towns and buildings burning.

  • It hadn't come from the sky but from one of the buildings across the street, diagonal to her.

  • There were more buildings past the hallway to her right.

  • There was nothing on the red planet, no signs of buildings, no life.

  • They reached the top, where another set of low buildings were carved from the rock, their doors and windows glowing.

  • Several fighter ships lifted off from the valley as they neared another of the buildings beside the meeting hall.

  • Leyon motioned for her to follow him and guided her through the rocky trails to another of the low stone buildings at the base of the hills.

  • It's the base for a state-wide business of storage buildings named—get this, 'Shipton Storage!'

  • I'll bet he's into something illegal, using the buildings to store lord-knows-what.

  • Now it stood empty but for a few derelict buildings.

  • At the far end of the loop, they passed the few remaining structures of the abandoned town of Ironton; empty, ghost-like buildings.

  • In addition to the storage buildings, he owns an insurance agency, a bank and a bunch of commercial real estate.

  • The mountains haven't changed and there are a lot of buildings still standing from the last century.

  • Moonlight spilled over large buildings with triangular roofs into community squares abutting stacked parking lots.

  • The shuttle disappeared behind buildings as it headed towards one of the seven helipads on the compound.

  • Members of the elite federal government and military personnel darted between greencars and buildings, the buzz of radios and shouts adding to the compound's chaos.

  • The dilapidated, abandoned facility fiercely defended by the soldiers in Western uniforms was not worth their efforts when compared to the buildings in much better shape down the road.

  • In the near distance, beyond the other dilapidated buildings on the abandoned street, came the sound of small arms laser fire.

  • Nothing for miles in working condition, except the fed buildings down the road.

  • Gray buildings squatted amid neatly kept green lawns and paved walkways.

  • A moment later, Elise darted by with a hand laser in her grip, disappearing between the same buildings.

  • The general was quiet as he escorted them to one of the squat buildings and inside.

  • I'm thinking someone is destroying the fed buildings in case a certain fed is hiding there.

  • Brady's scouts reported nothing, and they emerged from the cover of nearby buildings.

  • I want to look at the logs for the past few days to see if any of the scouts have reported any other fed buildings going up in flames.

  • People emerged from the buildings that looked abandoned.

  • We divided up the buildings into small apartments.

  • We turned those buildings into a makeshift hospital.

  • Four-story buildings had been built to the ceiling, flanking a narrow pathway and canal of water, siphoned from the Mississippi.

  • The buildings held lights and people, and the canal curved to the left, hiding the size of the city.

  • The soldier led them up a set of stairs winding around smaller buildings and into a building apart from the rest.

  • A handful of people were building an annex onto one of the buildings with their hands rather than with the technological tools she'd seen create structures.

  • It sat between the boardwalk and one of the buildings where the people had dragged it.

  • "We'll have to check the Tesla receivers in all the buildings," she said.

  • By the time Lana caught up, he'd had been lured into one of the buildings by a little girl with a handful of uncooked rice.

  • These buildings here each have a different purpose.

  • Several of the buildings had been stripped of receivers to supply the hospital with extra ones.

  • She'd checked the hospital's first then worked her way down the buildings along the main street.

  • Everyone was going into one of three buildings.

  • Lana glanced at Mike as he released her and dashed into the nearest of the three buildings.

  • World Wide Insurance Company was in the heart of Philadelphia, occupying a towering structure that glared down on city hall and a thousand tired buildings, many dating back to the horse-drawn carriage days.

  • She'd passed the first two buildings before she remembered to look around her.

  • The earth bucked, and two more buildings went down.

  • She gazed at the city around them, startled to see buildings collapsing everywhere she looked.

  • Don't go in any buildings.

  • The closer she got to the overcrowded, poor part of the city, the more people jammed the streets, shoving against her in an effort to escape the collapsing buildings.

  • Unlike the mortal world, everything in the immortal world was alive, even the stones making up the buildings.

  • "You know this is for your own good," the Watcher said, leading her towards one of the only standing buildings she saw.

  • He tied a piece of black cloth around his eyes as the sun's rays peeked over the neighboring buildings.

  • Dwellers of the many buildings around him stirred with the rising sun.

  • The wall warlord had set up a small table in the mouth of an alley between two buildings and was surrounded by several men.

  • A small country store that doubled as a restaurant was one of a few buildings.

  • He led them towards the massive red barn at the center of the buildings.

  • They were somewhere else completely: a sprawling compound with low buildings, a huge barn and a massive, two-story hacienda style house.

  • An abandoned factory was before them, the gates on it locked while the surrounding buildings reflected the same rundown condition.

  • Noteworthy among the buildings within the ancient citadel is a small tetrastyle temple, variously ascribed to Jupiter and Minerva, the portico supported by six monolithic columns of cippolino, four being in front.

  • In all its main features it is essentially a modern town, and few of its principal buildings are older than the 19th century.

  • A large proportion of the most prominent buildings are clustered round the spacious Schlossplatz, with its fine promenades.

  • Among modern buildings may be mentioned the Bakewell and High Peak Institute, and the town hall and museum.

  • A papal bull having also been obtained, on the 28th of August 1425, the archbishop, in the course of a visitation of Lincoln diocese, executed his letters patent founding the college, dedicating it to the Virgin, St Thomas Becket and St Edward the Confessor, and handed over the buildings to its members, the vicar of Higham Ferrers being made the first master or warden.

  • Like the college buildings, they are almost an exact copy of those of New College, mutatis mutandis.

  • Its houses are usually one-storeyed, built of adobe and roofed with red tiles; its public buildings are among the finest in Central America.

  • From the 4th century down to the time of the Mahommedan invasion several ecclesiastical buildings were erected on the spot, but of these no distinct traces remain.

  • Among the public buildings are the town hall, classic in style; the market house, and literary and scientific institution, with a museum containing a fossil collection from the limestone of the locality.

  • Changes in the height or construction of buildings, and a greater readiness to make claims on insurance offices, may be contributory causes.

  • The principal structures include the municipal buildings, corn exchange, library, public hall, and the market cross.

  • The chief part of Waynflete's duties as provost was the financing and completion of the buildings and establishment.

  • No less, indeed, than twenty buildings of ecclesiastical or monastic character have been enumerated in the three islands.

  • It is the headquarters of a military command, and the residence of a Roman Catholic bishop; its principal buildings are the cathedral, military college, arsenal and observatory.

  • to N.E., and passing through the Octagon, which is surrounded by several of the principal buildings.

  • The town hall, Athenaeum and museum are noteworthy buildings, the last having a fine biological collection.

  • Finally, one of the most striking buildings in the city is the high school (1885) with its commanding tower.

  • The white Oamaru stone is commonly used in these buildings.

  • There are several fine public buildings, as the governor's palace, the new opera-house, the public library and museum of Maltese antiquities, and the auberges or lodges of the Knights of Malta (especially the Auberge de Castile) which are now used for military offices, club-rooms, and other purposes.

  • The buildings for which it is famous all belong to the first two centuries of its existence.

  • Foundations of other buildings are to be seen in other parts of the site, but of little interest.

  • It contains many fine stone buildings.

  • Among the public buildings are the Federal building, the city hall and the public library.

  • o), while the rural schools are not buildings adapted for their purpose.

  • In some of the towns, however, and especially at Iglesias, they are good modern buildings.

  • In neither of these cases have the subsidiary buildings been fully traced out.

  • A final argument is the existence in some cases of a village of circular stone buildings of similar construction to the nuraghi, but only 15 to 25 ft.

  • Among the notable buildings are the weigh-house (17th century), the bell-tower (1591), formerly attached to the town-hall before this was destroyed in the 18th century, and the church of St.

  • Among the public buildings are the city hall, the court house, the Federal building, the public library and an auditorium.

  • The site of the arx of the ancient town is probably to be sought on the hill on which lies the Villa Spada, though no traces of early buildings or defences are to be seen: pre-Roman tombs are to be found in the cliffs to the north.

  • Remains of other buildings may also be seen.

  • The other public buildings include two churches, a town hall and a hospital.

  • It is one of the largest buildings of the kind in Germany, covering an area of 15 acres, and having a frontage of about 600 yards.

  • Among the other prominent buildings are the theatre, the arsenal, the synagogue, the "Kaufhaus," the town-hall (Rathaus, 1771) and the observatory.

  • For it was proved that the medieval objects were found in such positions as to be necessarily contemporaneous with the foundation of the buildings, and that there was no superposition of periods of any date whatsoever.

  • Finally from a comparative study of several ruins it was established that the plan and construction of Zimbabwe are by no means unique, and that this site only differs from others in Rhodesia in respect of the great dimensions and the massiveness of its individual buildings.

  • The floor of the enclosure is constituted as in the other Zimbabwe buildings by a thick bed of cement which extends even outside the main wall.

  • Between this and the "elliptical" kraal are the "Valley Ruins," consisting of smaller buildings which may have been the dwellings of those traders who bartered the gold brought in from distant mines.

  • Slight shocks are very frequent, some of them severe enough to cause considerable damage to the buildings.

  • The most noteworthy buildings are the hospital and the observatory.

  • The noble buildings, contrasting strangely with the wharves adjacent and opposite to it, make a striking picture, standing on the low river-bank with a background formed by the wooded elevation of Greenwich Park.

  • in length, stretching along the river side, are the buildings erected in the time of Charles II.

  • from Inigo Jones's designs, and in that of Queen Anne from designs by Sir Christopher Wren; and behind these buildings are on the west those of King William and on the east those of Queen Mary, both from Wren's designs.

  • The course of the road after the first six miles from Rome is not identical with that of any modern road, but can be clearly traced by remains of pavement and buildings along its course.

  • From this period dates the castle, and also the buildings of the university, founded by Gabriel Bethlen, and now used as barracks.

  • It was colonized by Megara, and its constitution and buildings are known from numerous inscriptions.

  • The Italian government, to whom the greater part of it now belongs, laid bare many of the more important buildings in 1880-1889; but much was left undone.

  • There are a few handsome public buildings, such as the hospital, town-hall and theatre.

  • For Pericles' buildings, see C. Wachsmuth, Gesch.

  • The church of St James dates from 1763, and the other numerous places of worship and public buildings are all modern.

  • high, where the white buildings offer a marked contrast to the brown rock which forms their setting.

  • This site of the Prytaneum at Athens cannot be definitely fixed; it is generally supposed that in the course of time several buildings bore the name.

  • At Premontre the buildings of the abbey, which was the cradle of the Premonstratensian order, are occupied by a lunatic asylum.

  • The neighbouring country is pleasant enough, particularly along the river, but the town itself is purely industrial, and contains no pre-eminent buildings.

  • A fine bridge over the Trent, and the municipal buildings, were provided by Lord Burton.

  • Among public buildings, the Stephenson memorial hall (1879), containing a free library, art and science class-rooms, a theatre and the rooms of the Chesterfield Institute, commemorates George Stephenson, the engineer, who resided at Tapton House, close to Chesterfield, in his later life; he died here in 1848, and was buried in Trinity church.

  • The principal buildings are the town hall, the county buildings, the assembly rooms, occupying the site of an old Franciscan monastery, three hospitals, a convalescent home, the Smyllum orphanage and the Queen Victoria Jubilee fountain.

  • Among other buildings are the modern "Phoenix" club-house of the students; the hospital, containing some anatomical pictures, including one by the two Mierevelts.

  • Among the principal buildings are the First National bank, the immense Union station and the Saint Vincent hospital; besides several fine office and school buildings (including the beautiful manual training high school) and churches.

  • Other buildings include the grammar school, founded in 1532 and rebuilt in 1893, a town hall and corn exchange, erected in 1866 in Italian style, with an assembly room.

  • The buildings of Christ's Hospital at West Horsham were opened in 1902, the school being removed hither from London.

  • There are a number of methods available for adoption in the heating of buildings, but it is a matter of considerable difficulty to suit the method of warming to the class of building to be warmed.

  • For large public buildings, factories, &c., heating by steam is generally adopted on account of the rapidity with which heat is available, and the great distance from the boiler at which warming is effected.

  • For large buildings where large quantities of hot water are used an independent boiler of suitable size should be installed.

  • The steam mains to the houses are laid by the supply company; the internal pipes and fittings are paid for or rented by the occupier, costing for an installation from £30 for an ordinary eight-roomed house to £Ioo or more for larger buildings.

  • The principal publications on heating are: Hood, Practical Treatise on Warming Buildings by Hot Water; Baldwin, Hot Water Heating and Fittings; Baldwin, Steam Heating for Buildings; Billings, Ventilation and Heating; Carpenter, Heating and Ventilating Buildings; Jones, Heating by Hot Water, Ventilation and Hot Water Supply; Dye, Hot Water Supply.

  • The monastic buildings have practically disappeared, but the church was a splendid building of various dates from Norman to Decorated, the choir and Lady chapel representing the later period.

  • Architectural variety and solidity are favoured in the buildings of the city by a wealth of beautiful building stones of varied colours (limestones, sandstones, lavas, granites and marbles), in addition to which bricks and Roman tiles are employed.

  • Among the principal buildings are several attractive churches, the city hall, and the club-house of the Woman's Club of Orange.

  • The churches of Notre-Dame des Champs and St Saturnin are modern buildings in the Gothic style.

  • The capital value of land, which greatly decreased during the last twenty years of the i9th century, is estimated at 3,120,000,000, and that of stock, buildings, implements, &c., at 340,000,000.

  • The repairing of highways, the upkeep of public buildings,the support of public education, the remuneration of numerous officials connected with the collection of state taxes, the keeping of the cadastre, &c., constitute the principal objects of communal expenditure.

  • Its chief buildings are the modern hospital and theatre, and the 17th-century church.

  • The four Gothic churches of St Nicholas,' St Mary, with a lofty steeple, St James and The Holy Ghost, and the fine medieval town hall, dating in its oldest part from 1306 and restored in 1882, are among the more striking buildings.

  • The excavations have laid bare several other buildings, including an altar, early propylaea, houses for the priests and remains of an earlier temple.

  • The town hall and the parochial offices are the principal administrative buildings.

  • But his successors did not act with similar leniency; when the city was captured by Ptolemy I., king of Egypt, twelve years later, the fortifications were partially demolished and apparently not again restored until the period of the high priest Simon II., who repaired the defences and also the Temple buildings.

  • Herod adorned the town with other buildings and constructed a theatre and gymnasium.

  • Herod Agrippa, who succeeded to the kingdom, built a third or outer wall on the north side of Jerusalem in order to enclose and defend the buildings which had gradually been constructed outside the old fortifications.

  • The writings of Josephus give a good idea of the fortifications and buildings of Jerusalem at the time of the siege, and his accurate personal knowledge makes his account worthy of the most careful perusal.

  • A temple dedicated to Jupiter Capitolinus was erected on the site of the Temple, and other buildings were constructed, known as the Theatre, the Demosia, the Tetranymphon, the Dodecapylon and the Codra.

  • In 614 Chosroes II., the king of Persia, captured Jerusalem, devastated many of the buildings, and massacred a great number of the inhabitants.

  • Amongst the more important buildings for ecclesiastical and philanthropic purposes erected to the north of the city since 1860 are the Russian cathedral, hospice and hospital; the French hospital of St Louis, and hospice and church of St Augustine; the German schools, orphanages and hospitals; the new hospital and industrial school of the London mission to the Jews; the Abyssinian church; the church and schools of the Church missionary society; the Anglican church, college and bishop's house; the Dominican monastery, seminary and church of St Stephen; the Rothschild hospital and girls' school; and the industrial school and workshops of the Alliance Israelite.

  • Several of the buildings were never finished.

  • Other buildings of note are the massive episcopal palace (1470-1500), afterwards a royal palace, and the old gymnasium founded by Gustavus Adolphus in 1627, which contains the valuable library of old books and manuscripts belonging to the diocese and state college, and collection of coins and antiquities.

  • Eu has three buildings of importance - the beautiful Gothic church of St Laurent (12th and 13th centuries) of which the exterior of the choir with its three tiers of ornamented buttressing and the double arches between the pillars of the nave are architecturally notable; the chapel of the Jesuit college (built about 1625), in which are the tombs of Henry, third duke of Guise, and his wife, Katherine of Cleves; and the château.

  • No trace exists of the splendour of the ancient city, with its regular streets, well-ordered plan and numerous public buildings.

  • The principal buildings which remain are the church of St John, which is become the principal mosque; the hospital, which has been transformed into public granaries; the palace of the grand master, now the residence of the pasha; and the senate-house, which still contains some marbles and ancient columns.

  • On some of these buildings are still seen the arms of the popes and of some of the royal and noble houses of Europe.

  • There is less stone carving on the exterior walls, door jambs and pillars of the buildings than on those of the Yucatan Peninsula; this is due to the harder and more uneven character of the limestone.

  • The so-called Great Palace consists of a group of detached buildings, apparently ten in number, standing on two platforms of different elevations.

  • The buildings appear to have been erected at different periods.

  • It contains few old buildings, though relics of antiquity are often found on the abandoned site of the old city.

  • Among other prominent buildings are the court house, the post office and the city hall.

  • It had in 1909 a property of 2345 acres (of which 1000 were farm lands, 1145 pasture and wood lands, and 200 school campus), and loo buildings, many of brick, and nearly all designed and constructed, even to the making of the bricks, by the teachers and students.

  • The first choir was burned down in 1213, but was rebuilt in 1242 at the same time as the transept, and is a superb specimen of pointed Gothic. There are five towers with spires, which give the outside an impressive appearance, and much has been done towards removing the squalid buildings that formerly concealed the cathedral.

  • The Pont des Trous over the Scheldt, with towers at each end, was built in 1290, and among many other interesting buildings there are some old houses still in occupation which date back to the 13th century.

  • Extending along the front of the town is the boulevard de la Republique, a fine road built by Sir Morton Peto on a series of arches, with a frontage of 3700 ft., and bordered on one side by handsome buildings, whilst a wide promenade overlooking the harbour runs along the other.

  • A large part of the modern town lies south of the square de la Republique; in this quarter are the law courts, hotel de ville, post office and other public buildings.

  • The houses, built of stone and whitewashed, are square, substantial, flat-topped buildings, presenting to the street bare walls, with a few slits protected by iron gratings in place of windows.

  • The public buildings of chief interest are the kasbah, the government offices (formerly the British consulate), the palaces of the governor-general and the archbishop - all these are fine Moorish houses; the "Grand" and the "New" Mosques, the Roman Catholic cathedral of St Philippe, the church of the Holy Trinity (Church of England), and the Bibliotheque Nationale d'Alger - a Turkish palace built in 1799-1800.

  • The college buildings are large and handsome.

  • New buildings, to contain specimens of Moslem art, were added in 1903.

  • Sofia, a circular edifice of about 760, now modernized, the roof of which is supported by six ancient columns, is a relic of the Lombard period; it has a fine cloister of the 12th century constructed in part of fragments of earlier buildings; while the cathedral with its fine arcaded facade and incomplete square campanile (begun in 1279) dates from the 9th century and was rebuilt in 1114.

  • The principal buildings are: the Roman Catholic church, which was completed in 1851; the English church, the theatre, the Kurhaus, built in 1901, and several bathing establishments and hospitals.

  • The public buildings are mostly constructed of broken stone and mortar, plastered outside and covered with red tiles, but the common dwellings are generally constructed of tapiarough trellis-work walls filled in with mud.

  • The principal buildings are the church of St Lawrence in Gothic style, erected in 1821, and the mechanics' institute, a fine building, comprising class-rooms, a library, a.

  • Unlike any other buildings in Abyssinia, the castles and palaces of Gondar resemble, with some modifications, the medieval fortresses of Europe, the style of architecture being the result of the presence in the country of numbers of Portuguese.

  • The most extensive ruins are a group of royal buildings enclosed in a wall.

  • No troops are now stationed here, and the barracks have been utilized for a jail, a lunatic asylum and other civic buildings.

  • It is celebrated for the ruins of early aboriginal buildings still extant, about half a mile from its present site.

  • east to west; its general outline is rectangular, and it appears to have consisted of three separate piles united by galleries or lines of lower buildings.

  • The age of these buildings is unknown, as they were already in ruins at the time of the Spanish Conquest.

  • The public buildings include the town hall, court house and orphan hospital; and the industries are mainly connected with the cattle trade and the distilling of whisky.

  • In cases where the direction of the air motion is always the same, as in the ventilating shafts of mines and buildings for instance, these anemometers, known, however, as air meters, are employed, and give most satisfactory results.

  • Rajputana is of great archaeological interest, possessing some fine religious buildings in ruins and others in excellent preservation.

  • Land was leased for houses or other buildings to be built upon it, the tenant being rent-free for eight or ten years; after which the building came into the landlord's possession.

  • The castle of Helmond, built in 1402, is a beautiful specimen of architecture, and among the other buildings of note in the town are the spacious church of St Lambert, the Reformed church and the town hall.

  • Its grey houses have a neglected, almost a dilapidated appearance, from the friable stone of which they are constructed; and there are no buildings of antiquarian interest or striking architectural beauty, except, perhaps, the ruined citadel and the remnants of the town walls.

  • Another method of distribution, largely adopted, is to run the lead cables into the interior of blocks of buildings, and to terminate them there in iron boxes from which the circuits are distributed to the surrounding buildings by means of rubber-covered wires run along the walls.

  • By this agreement the Postmaster-General agreed to purchase all plant, land and buildings of the National Telephone Company in use at the date of the agreement or constructed after that date in accordance with the specification and rules contained in the agreement, subject to the right of the Postmaster-General to object to take over any plant not suited to his requirements.

  • School buildings have been improved and the qualifications of teachers raised.

  • From the general confiscation were exempted the buildings actually used for public worship, as episcopal residences or seminaries, &c., or which had been appropriated to the use of schools, poorhouses, hospitals, &c.; as well as the buildings, appurtenances, and movable property of the abbeys of Monte Casino, Della Cava dci Tirreni, San Martino della Scala, Monneale, Certosa near Pavia, and other establishments of the same kind of importance as architectural or historical monuments.

  • The monastic buildings required for public purposes have been made over to the communal and provincial authorities, while the same authorities have been entrusted with the administration of the ecclesiastical revenues previously set apart for charity and education, and objects of art and historical interest have been consigned to public libraries and museums. By these laws the reception of novices was forbidden in the existing conventual establishments the extinction of which had been decreed, and all new foundations were forbidden, except those engaged in instruction and the care of the sick.

  • On the 30th of June 1903 the patrimony of the endowment fund amounted to 17,339,040, of which only 264,289 were represented by buildings still occupied by monks or nuns.

  • According to the Italian tributary system, imposts, properly so called are those upon land, T~aUon buildings and personal estate.

  • The buildings impost has been assessed since 1866 upon the basis of 12.50% of taxable revenue.

  • Certain banks make a special business of lending money to owners iif land or buildings (credito fo,zdiario).

  • The banks may buy up mortgages and advance money on current account on the security of land or buildings.

  • The law of the 23rd of January 1887 (still in force) extended the dispositions of the Civil Code with regard to privileges, and established special privileges in regard to harvested produce, produce stored in barns and farm buildings, and in regard to agricultural implements.

  • In addition, the communes have a right to levy a, surtax not exceeding 50% of the quota levied by the state upon lands and buildings; a family tax, or fuocatico, upon the total incomes of families, which, for fiscal purposes, are divided into various categories; a tax based upon the rent-value of houses, and other taxes upon cattle, horses, dogs, carriages and servants; also on licences for shopkeepers, hotel and restaurant keepers, &c.; on the slaughter of animals, stamp duties, one-half of the tax on bicycles, &c. Occasional sources of interest are found in the sale of communal property, the realization of communal credits, and the contraction of debt.

  • Provincial revenues are drawn from provincial property, school taxes, tolls and surtaxes on land and buildings.

  • In 1897 the total provincial revenue was 3,732,253, of which 3,460,000 was obtained from the surtax upon lands and buildings.

  • iid.), an increasedue in great part to the need for improved buildings, hygienic reforms and education, but also attributable in part to the mannerin which the finances of many communes are administered.

  • The sacred palaces, museums and libraries were, by Article 5, exempted from all taxation, and the pope was assured perpetual enjoyment of the Vatican and Lateran buildings and gardens, and of the papal villa at Castel Gandolfo.

  • Despite the prevailing poverty, it has also a real-school with good buildings, founded in 1865, and attended by about 300 pupils in 1900.

  • Among the public buildings are the capitol, the United States government building, a United States mint, and a state orphans' home; in the vicinity are the state prison and a United States government school for Indians.

  • forbid the royal officials to seize the horses or carts of freemen for transport duty, or to take wood for the king's buildings.

  • The chief timber of indigenous growth is padouk (Pterocarpus dalbergioides) used for buildings, boats, furniture, fine joinery and all purposes to which teak, mahogany, hickory, oak and ash are applied.

  • One of the oldest towns in Lower Lusatia, Sorau contains a number of ancient buildings, among which the most prominent are several of the churches (one dating from 1204), the town hall, built in 1260, and the old palace of 1207 (now a prison).

  • The city lies in a fertile valley shut in by vine-clad hills, and the picturesque red sandstone buildings of the old town are interspersed with orchards and gardens.

  • Of modern buildings may be mentioned the University (1826), the Palais de Justice (1844), and the new theatre (1848), all designed by Roelandt, and the Institut des Sciences (1890) by A.

  • The public buildings include the town-hall (dating from 1762 and altered in 1876), the tolbooth (1590), and the grammar school.

  • There were then unearthed remains of several buildings fronting a broad thoroughfare, one of which is the largest Roman building, except the baths at Bath, yet discovered in England.

  • Two of these buildings were granaries, and indicate the importance of Corstopitum as a base of the northward operations of Antoninus Pius.

  • After his conquests had been lost, and Corstopitum ceased to be a military centre, its military buildings passed into civilian occupation, of which many evidences have been found.

  • With the date palm it is believed to have furnished the rafters for the buildings of Nineveh.

  • Queen Street, the principal thoroughfare, leads inland from the main dock, and contains the majority of the public buildings.

  • The government offices, art gallery and exchange, with St Mary's cathedral (Anglican), a building in a combination of native timbers, St Paul's and St Patrick's cathedral (Roman Catholic), are noteworthy buildings.

  • A beautiful house of the 16th century belonged to one Thomas Rogers, whose daughter was mother of John Harvard, the founder of Harvard College, U.S.A. Among public buildings are the town hall, originally dated 1633, rebuilt 1767, and altered 186 3; market house, corn exchange and three hospitals.

  • The task of preserving for modern eyes the buildings which Shakespeare himself saw was not entered upon until much of the visible connexion with his times had been destroyed.

  • The other buildings designed by Wren were very numerous.

  • The abbey buildings of Clairvaux are the type of the Cistercian abbey.

  • Other prominent structures are the U.S. government and the judiciary buildings, the latter connected with the capitol by a stone terrace, the city hall, the county court house, the union station, the board of trade, the soldiers' memorial hall (with a seating capacity of about 4500), and several office buildings.

  • Other institutions of learning are the Capital University and Evangelical Lutheran Theological Seminary (Theological Seminary opened in 1830; college opened as an academy in 1850), with buildings just east of the city limits; Starling Ohio Medical College, a law school, a dental school and an art institute.

  • Of the cluster of buildings in the centre, which are conspicuous from afar, the town hall (Rathaus) and the cathedral are specially noteworthy.

  • In Portland's architecture, both public and private, there is much that is excellent; and there are a number of buildings of historic interest.

  • Of a Benedictine abbey there remain a beautiful Perpendicular gateway, and ruins of buildings called the prior's house, mainly Early English, and the guest house, with other fragments.

  • There may be mentioned further the old buildings of the grammar school, founded in 1563, and of the charity called Christ's Hospital (1583); while the town-hall in the marketplace, dating from 1677, is attributed to Inigo Jones.

  • The grammar school now occupies modern buildings, and ranks among the lesser public schools of England, having scholarships at Pembroke College, Oxford.

  • The buildings lie close to the Thames, and the school is famous for rowing, sending an eight to the regatta at Henley each year.

  • Abbas distinguished himself, not only by his successes in arms, and by the magnificence of his court and of the buildings which he erected, but also by his reforms in the administration of his kingdom.

  • Eger is the see of an archbishopric, and owing to its numerous ecclesiastical buildings has received the name of "the Hungarian Rome."

  • Amongst the principal buildings are the beautiful cathedral in the Italian style, with a handsome dome 130 ft.

  • The buildings of the shrine together with a space extending to about one hundred yards beyond the gates of the shrine on each side is sanctuary (bast).

  • The only other notable buildings in the place are some colleges (medresseh), the oldest being the M.

  • The town has a picturesque inn, adapted from a building dating partly from the 16th century, and market buildings dating from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

  • The most interesting buildings are the old fortified château of the 16th century, with its Gothic chapel restored in 1880; the church of St Bartholomew, dating in its present form from 1538; the new town hall (1894); the Griines Tor, also built in 1538; and the handsome new synagogue.

  • Interesting remains of the substruction wall supporting the ancient road are preserved in Itri itself; and there are many remains of ancient buildings near it.

  • Other old buildings are a church of Our Lady, dating as it stands from 1242, a diocesan library (partly of the, 5th century), royal palace (1733) and institute for daughters of noblemen (1670).

  • Trade flourished; the corporations of bargemen and the like on the Rhone made money; the many towns grew rich and could afford splendid public buildings.

  • The chefs-lieux of the tribes became practically, though not officially, municipalities, and many of these towns reached considerable size and magnificence of public buildings.

  • The public buildings include the palace of the governor-general, situated in a spacious botanical and zoological garden, the large military hospital, the cathedral of St Joseph, the Paul Bert college, and the theatre.

  • The barracks and other military buildings occupy the site of the old citadel, an area of over 300 acres, to the west of the native town.

  • Other noteworthy buildings are the konak or governor's residence, the Roman Catholic and Orthodox cathedrals, the hospital, the townhall and the museum, with fine antiquarian and natural history collections.

  • There are remains of a Moorish fort on the hill commanding the town; and the north gateway - the Puerta del Colegio - is a fine lofty arch, surmounted by an emblematic statue and the city arms. The most prominent buildings are the episcopal palace (1733), with a frontage of a 600 ft.; the town house (1843), containing important archives; and the cathedral, a small Gothic structure built on the site of a former mosque in the 14th century, and enlarged and tastelessly restored in 1829.

  • And the buildings of both lands throw an instructive architec- light on the Norman national character, as we have tune in described it.

  • Few buildings, at least few buildings raised i n any reasonable style of architecture which makes use of the arched construction, can be less like one another Sicily.

  • than the buildings of the Norman kings in England and the buildings of the Norman kings in Sicily.

  • In these buildings, as in those of Aquitaine, the pointed arch is the surest sign of Saracenic influence; it must never be looked on as marking the approach of the Gothic of the North.

  • This Norman form of Romanesque most likely had its origin in the Lombard buildings of northern Italy.

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