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buildings

buildings Sentence Examples

  • The buildings blocked the sun, and the barrage of sensations overwhelmed her.

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  • There weren't any buildings or people so I 'came back'.

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  • These buildings here each have a different purpose.

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  • She squinted towards the blazing buildings to see a dark figure half-trotting, half-limping towards them.

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  • The mountains haven't changed and there are a lot of buildings still standing from the last century.

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  • The earth in flames, with earthquakes swallowing whole towns and buildings burning.

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  • Dwellers of the many buildings around him stirred with the rising sun.

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  • It hadn't come from the sky but from one of the buildings across the street, diagonal to her.

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  • Nothing for miles in working condition, except the fed buildings down the road.

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  • Howie bounded out of the car and crossed to the newer side of the street where he had a better view of the few older buildings that remained.

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  • In addition to the storage buildings, he owns an insurance agency, a bank and a bunch of commercial real estate.

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  • There were more buildings past the hallway to her right.

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  • Four-story buildings had been built to the ceiling, flanking a narrow pathway and canal of water, siphoned from the Mississippi.

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  • Whatever was between those buildings must have burned down.

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  • There were no other buildings, nowhere else to hide that might withstand an angry Gabriel.

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  • By the time Lana caught up, he'd had been lured into one of the buildings by a little girl with a handful of uncooked rice.

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  • The earth bucked, and two more buildings went down.

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  • The buildings, begun under straitened circumstances, were more than simple.

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  • Store fronts interspersed with vacant lots lined one side of the street while the other remained absent of any buildings except a closed gas station and a dollar store.

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  • Yes. I'm sorry so many buildings are gone but that one block is enough.

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  • Off to one side was an old fire ring but no buildings or people.

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  • Images of landmark buildings, of the seven greatest wonders of the ancient world, and city scenes from around the world.

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  • There was nothing on the red planet, no signs of buildings, no life.

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  • They reached the top, where another set of low buildings were carved from the rock, their doors and windows glowing.

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  • Several fighter ships lifted off from the valley as they neared another of the buildings beside the meeting hall.

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  • Leyon motioned for her to follow him and guided her through the rocky trails to another of the low stone buildings at the base of the hills.

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  • It's the base for a state-wide business of storage buildings named—get this, 'Shipton Storage!'

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  • I'll bet he's into something illegal, using the buildings to store lord-knows-what.

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  • Now it stood empty but for a few derelict buildings.

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  • At the far end of the loop, they passed the few remaining structures of the abandoned town of Ironton; empty, ghost-like buildings.

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  • Moonlight spilled over large buildings with triangular roofs into community squares abutting stacked parking lots.

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  • The shuttle disappeared behind buildings as it headed towards one of the seven helipads on the compound.

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  • In the near distance, beyond the other dilapidated buildings on the abandoned street, came the sound of small arms laser fire.

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  • Gray buildings squatted amid neatly kept green lawns and paved walkways.

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  • A moment later, Elise darted by with a hand laser in her grip, disappearing between the same buildings.

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  • The general was quiet as he escorted them to one of the squat buildings and inside.

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  • I'm thinking someone is destroying the fed buildings in case a certain fed is hiding there.

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  • Brady's scouts reported nothing, and they emerged from the cover of nearby buildings.

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  • I want to look at the logs for the past few days to see if any of the scouts have reported any other fed buildings going up in flames.

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  • People emerged from the buildings that looked abandoned.

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  • We turned those buildings into a makeshift hospital.

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  • The buildings held lights and people, and the canal curved to the left, hiding the size of the city.

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  • The soldier led them up a set of stairs winding around smaller buildings and into a building apart from the rest.

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  • A handful of people were building an annex onto one of the buildings with their hands rather than with the technological tools she'd seen create structures.

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  • It sat between the boardwalk and one of the buildings where the people had dragged it.

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  • "We'll have to check the Tesla receivers in all the buildings," she said.

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  • Several of the buildings had been stripped of receivers to supply the hospital with extra ones.

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  • She'd checked the hospital's first then worked her way down the buildings along the main street.

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  • Everyone was going into one of three buildings.

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  • Lana glanced at Mike as he released her and dashed into the nearest of the three buildings.

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  • World Wide Insurance Company was in the heart of Philadelphia, occupying a towering structure that glared down on city hall and a thousand tired buildings, many dating back to the horse-drawn carriage days.

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  • She'd passed the first two buildings before she remembered to look around her.

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  • She gazed at the city around them, startled to see buildings collapsing everywhere she looked.

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  • Don't go in any buildings.

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  • The closer she got to the overcrowded, poor part of the city, the more people jammed the streets, shoving against her in an effort to escape the collapsing buildings.

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  • Unlike the mortal world, everything in the immortal world was alive, even the stones making up the buildings.

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  • "You know this is for your own good," the Watcher said, leading her towards one of the only standing buildings she saw.

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  • He tied a piece of black cloth around his eyes as the sun's rays peeked over the neighboring buildings.

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  • The wall warlord had set up a small table in the mouth of an alley between two buildings and was surrounded by several men.

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  • A small country store that doubled as a restaurant was one of a few buildings.

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  • He led them towards the massive red barn at the center of the buildings.

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  • They were somewhere else completely: a sprawling compound with low buildings, a huge barn and a massive, two-story hacienda style house.

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  • An abandoned factory was before them, the gates on it locked while the surrounding buildings reflected the same rundown condition.

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  • Noteworthy among the buildings within the ancient citadel is a small tetrastyle temple, variously ascribed to Jupiter and Minerva, the portico supported by six monolithic columns of cippolino, four being in front.

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  • In all its main features it is essentially a modern town, and few of its principal buildings are older than the 19th century.

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  • A large proportion of the most prominent buildings are clustered round the spacious Schlossplatz, with its fine promenades.

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  • Among modern buildings may be mentioned the Bakewell and High Peak Institute, and the town hall and museum.

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  • A papal bull having also been obtained, on the 28th of August 1425, the archbishop, in the course of a visitation of Lincoln diocese, executed his letters patent founding the college, dedicating it to the Virgin, St Thomas Becket and St Edward the Confessor, and handed over the buildings to its members, the vicar of Higham Ferrers being made the first master or warden.

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  • Like the college buildings, they are almost an exact copy of those of New College, mutatis mutandis.

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  • Its houses are usually one-storeyed, built of adobe and roofed with red tiles; its public buildings are among the finest in Central America.

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  • From the 4th century down to the time of the Mahommedan invasion several ecclesiastical buildings were erected on the spot, but of these no distinct traces remain.

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  • Among the public buildings are the town hall, classic in style; the market house, and literary and scientific institution, with a museum containing a fossil collection from the limestone of the locality.

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  • Changes in the height or construction of buildings, and a greater readiness to make claims on insurance offices, may be contributory causes.

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  • The principal structures include the municipal buildings, corn exchange, library, public hall, and the market cross.

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  • The chief part of Waynflete's duties as provost was the financing and completion of the buildings and establishment.

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  • No less, indeed, than twenty buildings of ecclesiastical or monastic character have been enumerated in the three islands.

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  • It is the headquarters of a military command, and the residence of a Roman Catholic bishop; its principal buildings are the cathedral, military college, arsenal and observatory.

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  • to N.E., and passing through the Octagon, which is surrounded by several of the principal buildings.

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  • The town hall, Athenaeum and museum are noteworthy buildings, the last having a fine biological collection.

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  • Finally, one of the most striking buildings in the city is the high school (1885) with its commanding tower.

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  • The white Oamaru stone is commonly used in these buildings.

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  • There are several fine public buildings, as the governor's palace, the new opera-house, the public library and museum of Maltese antiquities, and the auberges or lodges of the Knights of Malta (especially the Auberge de Castile) which are now used for military offices, club-rooms, and other purposes.

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  • The buildings for which it is famous all belong to the first two centuries of its existence.

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  • Foundations of other buildings are to be seen in other parts of the site, but of little interest.

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  • It contains many fine stone buildings.

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  • Among the public buildings are the Federal building, the city hall and the public library.

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  • o), while the rural schools are not buildings adapted for their purpose.

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  • In some of the towns, however, and especially at Iglesias, they are good modern buildings.

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  • In neither of these cases have the subsidiary buildings been fully traced out.

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  • A final argument is the existence in some cases of a village of circular stone buildings of similar construction to the nuraghi, but only 15 to 25 ft.

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  • Among the notable buildings are the weigh-house (17th century), the bell-tower (1591), formerly attached to the town-hall before this was destroyed in the 18th century, and the church of St.

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  • Among the public buildings are the city hall, the court house, the Federal building, the public library and an auditorium.

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  • The site of the arx of the ancient town is probably to be sought on the hill on which lies the Villa Spada, though no traces of early buildings or defences are to be seen: pre-Roman tombs are to be found in the cliffs to the north.

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  • Remains of other buildings may also be seen.

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  • The other public buildings include two churches, a town hall and a hospital.

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  • It is one of the largest buildings of the kind in Germany, covering an area of 15 acres, and having a frontage of about 600 yards.

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  • Among the other prominent buildings are the theatre, the arsenal, the synagogue, the "Kaufhaus," the town-hall (Rathaus, 1771) and the observatory.

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  • For it was proved that the medieval objects were found in such positions as to be necessarily contemporaneous with the foundation of the buildings, and that there was no superposition of periods of any date whatsoever.

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  • Finally from a comparative study of several ruins it was established that the plan and construction of Zimbabwe are by no means unique, and that this site only differs from others in Rhodesia in respect of the great dimensions and the massiveness of its individual buildings.

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  • The floor of the enclosure is constituted as in the other Zimbabwe buildings by a thick bed of cement which extends even outside the main wall.

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  • Between this and the "elliptical" kraal are the "Valley Ruins," consisting of smaller buildings which may have been the dwellings of those traders who bartered the gold brought in from distant mines.

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  • Slight shocks are very frequent, some of them severe enough to cause considerable damage to the buildings.

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  • The most noteworthy buildings are the hospital and the observatory.

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  • The noble buildings, contrasting strangely with the wharves adjacent and opposite to it, make a striking picture, standing on the low river-bank with a background formed by the wooded elevation of Greenwich Park.

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  • in length, stretching along the river side, are the buildings erected in the time of Charles II.

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  • from Inigo Jones's designs, and in that of Queen Anne from designs by Sir Christopher Wren; and behind these buildings are on the west those of King William and on the east those of Queen Mary, both from Wren's designs.

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  • The course of the road after the first six miles from Rome is not identical with that of any modern road, but can be clearly traced by remains of pavement and buildings along its course.

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  • From this period dates the castle, and also the buildings of the university, founded by Gabriel Bethlen, and now used as barracks.

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  • It was colonized by Megara, and its constitution and buildings are known from numerous inscriptions.

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  • The Italian government, to whom the greater part of it now belongs, laid bare many of the more important buildings in 1880-1889; but much was left undone.

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  • There are a few handsome public buildings, such as the hospital, town-hall and theatre.

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  • For Pericles' buildings, see C. Wachsmuth, Gesch.

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  • The church of St James dates from 1763, and the other numerous places of worship and public buildings are all modern.

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  • high, where the white buildings offer a marked contrast to the brown rock which forms their setting.

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  • This site of the Prytaneum at Athens cannot be definitely fixed; it is generally supposed that in the course of time several buildings bore the name.

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  • At Premontre the buildings of the abbey, which was the cradle of the Premonstratensian order, are occupied by a lunatic asylum.

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  • The neighbouring country is pleasant enough, particularly along the river, but the town itself is purely industrial, and contains no pre-eminent buildings.

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  • A fine bridge over the Trent, and the municipal buildings, were provided by Lord Burton.

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  • Among public buildings, the Stephenson memorial hall (1879), containing a free library, art and science class-rooms, a theatre and the rooms of the Chesterfield Institute, commemorates George Stephenson, the engineer, who resided at Tapton House, close to Chesterfield, in his later life; he died here in 1848, and was buried in Trinity church.

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  • The principal buildings are the town hall, the county buildings, the assembly rooms, occupying the site of an old Franciscan monastery, three hospitals, a convalescent home, the Smyllum orphanage and the Queen Victoria Jubilee fountain.

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  • Among other buildings are the modern "Phoenix" club-house of the students; the hospital, containing some anatomical pictures, including one by the two Mierevelts.

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  • Among the principal buildings are the First National bank, the immense Union station and the Saint Vincent hospital; besides several fine office and school buildings (including the beautiful manual training high school) and churches.

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  • Other buildings include the grammar school, founded in 1532 and rebuilt in 1893, a town hall and corn exchange, erected in 1866 in Italian style, with an assembly room.

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  • The buildings of Christ's Hospital at West Horsham were opened in 1902, the school being removed hither from London.

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  • There are a number of methods available for adoption in the heating of buildings, but it is a matter of considerable difficulty to suit the method of warming to the class of building to be warmed.

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  • For large public buildings, factories, &c., heating by steam is generally adopted on account of the rapidity with which heat is available, and the great distance from the boiler at which warming is effected.

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  • For large buildings where large quantities of hot water are used an independent boiler of suitable size should be installed.

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  • The steam mains to the houses are laid by the supply company; the internal pipes and fittings are paid for or rented by the occupier, costing for an installation from £30 for an ordinary eight-roomed house to £Ioo or more for larger buildings.

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  • The principal publications on heating are: Hood, Practical Treatise on Warming Buildings by Hot Water; Baldwin, Hot Water Heating and Fittings; Baldwin, Steam Heating for Buildings; Billings, Ventilation and Heating; Carpenter, Heating and Ventilating Buildings; Jones, Heating by Hot Water, Ventilation and Hot Water Supply; Dye, Hot Water Supply.

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  • The monastic buildings have practically disappeared, but the church was a splendid building of various dates from Norman to Decorated, the choir and Lady chapel representing the later period.

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  • Architectural variety and solidity are favoured in the buildings of the city by a wealth of beautiful building stones of varied colours (limestones, sandstones, lavas, granites and marbles), in addition to which bricks and Roman tiles are employed.

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  • Among the principal buildings are several attractive churches, the city hall, and the club-house of the Woman's Club of Orange.

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  • The churches of Notre-Dame des Champs and St Saturnin are modern buildings in the Gothic style.

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  • The capital value of land, which greatly decreased during the last twenty years of the i9th century, is estimated at 3,120,000,000, and that of stock, buildings, implements, &c., at 340,000,000.

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  • The repairing of highways, the upkeep of public buildings,the support of public education, the remuneration of numerous officials connected with the collection of state taxes, the keeping of the cadastre, &c., constitute the principal objects of communal expenditure.

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  • Its chief buildings are the modern hospital and theatre, and the 17th-century church.

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  • The four Gothic churches of St Nicholas,' St Mary, with a lofty steeple, St James and The Holy Ghost, and the fine medieval town hall, dating in its oldest part from 1306 and restored in 1882, are among the more striking buildings.

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  • The excavations have laid bare several other buildings, including an altar, early propylaea, houses for the priests and remains of an earlier temple.

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  • The town hall and the parochial offices are the principal administrative buildings.

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  • But his successors did not act with similar leniency; when the city was captured by Ptolemy I., king of Egypt, twelve years later, the fortifications were partially demolished and apparently not again restored until the period of the high priest Simon II., who repaired the defences and also the Temple buildings.

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  • Herod adorned the town with other buildings and constructed a theatre and gymnasium.

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  • Herod Agrippa, who succeeded to the kingdom, built a third or outer wall on the north side of Jerusalem in order to enclose and defend the buildings which had gradually been constructed outside the old fortifications.

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  • The writings of Josephus give a good idea of the fortifications and buildings of Jerusalem at the time of the siege, and his accurate personal knowledge makes his account worthy of the most careful perusal.

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  • A temple dedicated to Jupiter Capitolinus was erected on the site of the Temple, and other buildings were constructed, known as the Theatre, the Demosia, the Tetranymphon, the Dodecapylon and the Codra.

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  • In 614 Chosroes II., the king of Persia, captured Jerusalem, devastated many of the buildings, and massacred a great number of the inhabitants.

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  • Amongst the more important buildings for ecclesiastical and philanthropic purposes erected to the north of the city since 1860 are the Russian cathedral, hospice and hospital; the French hospital of St Louis, and hospice and church of St Augustine; the German schools, orphanages and hospitals; the new hospital and industrial school of the London mission to the Jews; the Abyssinian church; the church and schools of the Church missionary society; the Anglican church, college and bishop's house; the Dominican monastery, seminary and church of St Stephen; the Rothschild hospital and girls' school; and the industrial school and workshops of the Alliance Israelite.

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  • Several of the buildings were never finished.

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  • Other buildings of note are the massive episcopal palace (1470-1500), afterwards a royal palace, and the old gymnasium founded by Gustavus Adolphus in 1627, which contains the valuable library of old books and manuscripts belonging to the diocese and state college, and collection of coins and antiquities.

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  • Eu has three buildings of importance - the beautiful Gothic church of St Laurent (12th and 13th centuries) of which the exterior of the choir with its three tiers of ornamented buttressing and the double arches between the pillars of the nave are architecturally notable; the chapel of the Jesuit college (built about 1625), in which are the tombs of Henry, third duke of Guise, and his wife, Katherine of Cleves; and the château.

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  • No trace exists of the splendour of the ancient city, with its regular streets, well-ordered plan and numerous public buildings.

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  • The principal buildings which remain are the church of St John, which is become the principal mosque; the hospital, which has been transformed into public granaries; the palace of the grand master, now the residence of the pasha; and the senate-house, which still contains some marbles and ancient columns.

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  • On some of these buildings are still seen the arms of the popes and of some of the royal and noble houses of Europe.

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  • There is less stone carving on the exterior walls, door jambs and pillars of the buildings than on those of the Yucatan Peninsula; this is due to the harder and more uneven character of the limestone.

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  • The so-called Great Palace consists of a group of detached buildings, apparently ten in number, standing on two platforms of different elevations.

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  • The buildings appear to have been erected at different periods.

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  • It contains few old buildings, though relics of antiquity are often found on the abandoned site of the old city.

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  • Among other prominent buildings are the court house, the post office and the city hall.

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  • It had in 1909 a property of 2345 acres (of which 1000 were farm lands, 1145 pasture and wood lands, and 200 school campus), and loo buildings, many of brick, and nearly all designed and constructed, even to the making of the bricks, by the teachers and students.

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  • The first choir was burned down in 1213, but was rebuilt in 1242 at the same time as the transept, and is a superb specimen of pointed Gothic. There are five towers with spires, which give the outside an impressive appearance, and much has been done towards removing the squalid buildings that formerly concealed the cathedral.

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  • The Pont des Trous over the Scheldt, with towers at each end, was built in 1290, and among many other interesting buildings there are some old houses still in occupation which date back to the 13th century.

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  • Extending along the front of the town is the boulevard de la Republique, a fine road built by Sir Morton Peto on a series of arches, with a frontage of 3700 ft., and bordered on one side by handsome buildings, whilst a wide promenade overlooking the harbour runs along the other.

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  • A large part of the modern town lies south of the square de la Republique; in this quarter are the law courts, hotel de ville, post office and other public buildings.

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  • The houses, built of stone and whitewashed, are square, substantial, flat-topped buildings, presenting to the street bare walls, with a few slits protected by iron gratings in place of windows.

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  • The public buildings of chief interest are the kasbah, the government offices (formerly the British consulate), the palaces of the governor-general and the archbishop - all these are fine Moorish houses; the "Grand" and the "New" Mosques, the Roman Catholic cathedral of St Philippe, the church of the Holy Trinity (Church of England), and the Bibliotheque Nationale d'Alger - a Turkish palace built in 1799-1800.

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  • The college buildings are large and handsome.

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  • New buildings, to contain specimens of Moslem art, were added in 1903.

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  • Sofia, a circular edifice of about 760, now modernized, the roof of which is supported by six ancient columns, is a relic of the Lombard period; it has a fine cloister of the 12th century constructed in part of fragments of earlier buildings; while the cathedral with its fine arcaded facade and incomplete square campanile (begun in 1279) dates from the 9th century and was rebuilt in 1114.

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  • The principal buildings are: the Roman Catholic church, which was completed in 1851; the English church, the theatre, the Kurhaus, built in 1901, and several bathing establishments and hospitals.

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  • The public buildings are mostly constructed of broken stone and mortar, plastered outside and covered with red tiles, but the common dwellings are generally constructed of tapiarough trellis-work walls filled in with mud.

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  • The principal buildings are the church of St Lawrence in Gothic style, erected in 1821, and the mechanics' institute, a fine building, comprising class-rooms, a library, a.

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  • Unlike any other buildings in Abyssinia, the castles and palaces of Gondar resemble, with some modifications, the medieval fortresses of Europe, the style of architecture being the result of the presence in the country of numbers of Portuguese.

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  • The most extensive ruins are a group of royal buildings enclosed in a wall.

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  • No troops are now stationed here, and the barracks have been utilized for a jail, a lunatic asylum and other civic buildings.

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  • It is celebrated for the ruins of early aboriginal buildings still extant, about half a mile from its present site.

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  • east to west; its general outline is rectangular, and it appears to have consisted of three separate piles united by galleries or lines of lower buildings.

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  • The age of these buildings is unknown, as they were already in ruins at the time of the Spanish Conquest.

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  • The public buildings include the town hall, court house and orphan hospital; and the industries are mainly connected with the cattle trade and the distilling of whisky.

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  • In cases where the direction of the air motion is always the same, as in the ventilating shafts of mines and buildings for instance, these anemometers, known, however, as air meters, are employed, and give most satisfactory results.

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  • Rajputana is of great archaeological interest, possessing some fine religious buildings in ruins and others in excellent preservation.

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  • Land was leased for houses or other buildings to be built upon it, the tenant being rent-free for eight or ten years; after which the building came into the landlord's possession.

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  • The castle of Helmond, built in 1402, is a beautiful specimen of architecture, and among the other buildings of note in the town are the spacious church of St Lambert, the Reformed church and the town hall.

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  • Its grey houses have a neglected, almost a dilapidated appearance, from the friable stone of which they are constructed; and there are no buildings of antiquarian interest or striking architectural beauty, except, perhaps, the ruined citadel and the remnants of the town walls.

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  • Another method of distribution, largely adopted, is to run the lead cables into the interior of blocks of buildings, and to terminate them there in iron boxes from which the circuits are distributed to the surrounding buildings by means of rubber-covered wires run along the walls.

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  • By this agreement the Postmaster-General agreed to purchase all plant, land and buildings of the National Telephone Company in use at the date of the agreement or constructed after that date in accordance with the specification and rules contained in the agreement, subject to the right of the Postmaster-General to object to take over any plant not suited to his requirements.

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  • School buildings have been improved and the qualifications of teachers raised.

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  • The monastic buildings required for public purposes have been made over to the communal and provincial authorities, while the same authorities have been entrusted with the administration of the ecclesiastical revenues previously set apart for charity and education, and objects of art and historical interest have been consigned to public libraries and museums. By these laws the reception of novices was forbidden in the existing conventual establishments the extinction of which had been decreed, and all new foundations were forbidden, except those engaged in instruction and the care of the sick.

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  • On the 30th of June 1903 the patrimony of the endowment fund amounted to 17,339,040, of which only 264,289 were represented by buildings still occupied by monks or nuns.

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  • According to the Italian tributary system, imposts, properly so called are those upon land, T~aUon buildings and personal estate.

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  • The buildings impost has been assessed since 1866 upon the basis of 12.50% of taxable revenue.

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  • Certain banks make a special business of lending money to owners iif land or buildings (credito fo,zdiario).

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  • The banks may buy up mortgages and advance money on current account on the security of land or buildings.

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  • The law of the 23rd of January 1887 (still in force) extended the dispositions of the Civil Code with regard to privileges, and established special privileges in regard to harvested produce, produce stored in barns and farm buildings, and in regard to agricultural implements.

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  • In addition, the communes have a right to levy a, surtax not exceeding 50% of the quota levied by the state upon lands and buildings; a family tax, or fuocatico, upon the total incomes of families, which, for fiscal purposes, are divided into various categories; a tax based upon the rent-value of houses, and other taxes upon cattle, horses, dogs, carriages and servants; also on licences for shopkeepers, hotel and restaurant keepers, &c.; on the slaughter of animals, stamp duties, one-half of the tax on bicycles, &c. Occasional sources of interest are found in the sale of communal property, the realization of communal credits, and the contraction of debt.

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  • Provincial revenues are drawn from provincial property, school taxes, tolls and surtaxes on land and buildings.

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  • In 1897 the total provincial revenue was 3,732,253, of which 3,460,000 was obtained from the surtax upon lands and buildings.

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  • iid.), an increasedue in great part to the need for improved buildings, hygienic reforms and education, but also attributable in part to the mannerin which the finances of many communes are administered.

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  • The sacred palaces, museums and libraries were, by Article 5, exempted from all taxation, and the pope was assured perpetual enjoyment of the Vatican and Lateran buildings and gardens, and of the papal villa at Castel Gandolfo.

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  • Despite the prevailing poverty, it has also a real-school with good buildings, founded in 1865, and attended by about 300 pupils in 1900.

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  • Among the public buildings are the capitol, the United States government building, a United States mint, and a state orphans' home; in the vicinity are the state prison and a United States government school for Indians.

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  • forbid the royal officials to seize the horses or carts of freemen for transport duty, or to take wood for the king's buildings.

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  • The chief timber of indigenous growth is padouk (Pterocarpus dalbergioides) used for buildings, boats, furniture, fine joinery and all purposes to which teak, mahogany, hickory, oak and ash are applied.

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  • One of the oldest towns in Lower Lusatia, Sorau contains a number of ancient buildings, among which the most prominent are several of the churches (one dating from 1204), the town hall, built in 1260, and the old palace of 1207 (now a prison).

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  • The city lies in a fertile valley shut in by vine-clad hills, and the picturesque red sandstone buildings of the old town are interspersed with orchards and gardens.

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  • Of modern buildings may be mentioned the University (1826), the Palais de Justice (1844), and the new theatre (1848), all designed by Roelandt, and the Institut des Sciences (1890) by A.

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  • The public buildings include the town-hall (dating from 1762 and altered in 1876), the tolbooth (1590), and the grammar school.

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  • There were then unearthed remains of several buildings fronting a broad thoroughfare, one of which is the largest Roman building, except the baths at Bath, yet discovered in England.

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  • Two of these buildings were granaries, and indicate the importance of Corstopitum as a base of the northward operations of Antoninus Pius.

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  • After his conquests had been lost, and Corstopitum ceased to be a military centre, its military buildings passed into civilian occupation, of which many evidences have been found.

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  • With the date palm it is believed to have furnished the rafters for the buildings of Nineveh.

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  • Queen Street, the principal thoroughfare, leads inland from the main dock, and contains the majority of the public buildings.

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  • The government offices, art gallery and exchange, with St Mary's cathedral (Anglican), a building in a combination of native timbers, St Paul's and St Patrick's cathedral (Roman Catholic), are noteworthy buildings.

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  • A beautiful house of the 16th century belonged to one Thomas Rogers, whose daughter was mother of John Harvard, the founder of Harvard College, U.S.A. Among public buildings are the town hall, originally dated 1633, rebuilt 1767, and altered 186 3; market house, corn exchange and three hospitals.

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  • The task of preserving for modern eyes the buildings which Shakespeare himself saw was not entered upon until much of the visible connexion with his times had been destroyed.

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  • The other buildings designed by Wren were very numerous.

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  • The abbey buildings of Clairvaux are the type of the Cistercian abbey.

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  • Other prominent structures are the U.S. government and the judiciary buildings, the latter connected with the capitol by a stone terrace, the city hall, the county court house, the union station, the board of trade, the soldiers' memorial hall (with a seating capacity of about 4500), and several office buildings.

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  • Other institutions of learning are the Capital University and Evangelical Lutheran Theological Seminary (Theological Seminary opened in 1830; college opened as an academy in 1850), with buildings just east of the city limits; Starling Ohio Medical College, a law school, a dental school and an art institute.

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  • Of the cluster of buildings in the centre, which are conspicuous from afar, the town hall (Rathaus) and the cathedral are specially noteworthy.

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  • In Portland's architecture, both public and private, there is much that is excellent; and there are a number of buildings of historic interest.

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  • Of a Benedictine abbey there remain a beautiful Perpendicular gateway, and ruins of buildings called the prior's house, mainly Early English, and the guest house, with other fragments.

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  • There may be mentioned further the old buildings of the grammar school, founded in 1563, and of the charity called Christ's Hospital (1583); while the town-hall in the marketplace, dating from 1677, is attributed to Inigo Jones.

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  • The grammar school now occupies modern buildings, and ranks among the lesser public schools of England, having scholarships at Pembroke College, Oxford.

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  • The buildings lie close to the Thames, and the school is famous for rowing, sending an eight to the regatta at Henley each year.

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  • Abbas distinguished himself, not only by his successes in arms, and by the magnificence of his court and of the buildings which he erected, but also by his reforms in the administration of his kingdom.

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  • Eger is the see of an archbishopric, and owing to its numerous ecclesiastical buildings has received the name of "the Hungarian Rome."

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  • Amongst the principal buildings are the beautiful cathedral in the Italian style, with a handsome dome 130 ft.

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  • The buildings of the shrine together with a space extending to about one hundred yards beyond the gates of the shrine on each side is sanctuary (bast).

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  • The only other notable buildings in the place are some colleges (medresseh), the oldest being the M.

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  • The town has a picturesque inn, adapted from a building dating partly from the 16th century, and market buildings dating from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

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  • The most interesting buildings are the old fortified château of the 16th century, with its Gothic chapel restored in 1880; the church of St Bartholomew, dating in its present form from 1538; the new town hall (1894); the Griines Tor, also built in 1538; and the handsome new synagogue.

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  • Interesting remains of the substruction wall supporting the ancient road are preserved in Itri itself; and there are many remains of ancient buildings near it.

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  • Other old buildings are a church of Our Lady, dating as it stands from 1242, a diocesan library (partly of the, 5th century), royal palace (1733) and institute for daughters of noblemen (1670).

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  • Trade flourished; the corporations of bargemen and the like on the Rhone made money; the many towns grew rich and could afford splendid public buildings.

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  • The chefs-lieux of the tribes became practically, though not officially, municipalities, and many of these towns reached considerable size and magnificence of public buildings.

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  • The public buildings include the palace of the governor-general, situated in a spacious botanical and zoological garden, the large military hospital, the cathedral of St Joseph, the Paul Bert college, and the theatre.

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  • The barracks and other military buildings occupy the site of the old citadel, an area of over 300 acres, to the west of the native town.

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  • Other noteworthy buildings are the konak or governor's residence, the Roman Catholic and Orthodox cathedrals, the hospital, the townhall and the museum, with fine antiquarian and natural history collections.

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  • There are remains of a Moorish fort on the hill commanding the town; and the north gateway - the Puerta del Colegio - is a fine lofty arch, surmounted by an emblematic statue and the city arms. The most prominent buildings are the episcopal palace (1733), with a frontage of a 600 ft.; the town house (1843), containing important archives; and the cathedral, a small Gothic structure built on the site of a former mosque in the 14th century, and enlarged and tastelessly restored in 1829.

    0
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  • And the buildings of both lands throw an instructive architec- light on the Norman national character, as we have tune in described it.

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  • Few buildings, at least few buildings raised i n any reasonable style of architecture which makes use of the arched construction, can be less like one another Sicily.

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  • than the buildings of the Norman kings in England and the buildings of the Norman kings in Sicily.

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  • In these buildings, as in those of Aquitaine, the pointed arch is the surest sign of Saracenic influence; it must never be looked on as marking the approach of the Gothic of the North.

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  • This Norman form of Romanesque most likely had its origin in the Lombard buildings of northern Italy.

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  • A comparison of Norman buildings in England and in Normandy will show that the Norman style in England really was affected by the earlier style of England; but the modification was very slight, and it in no way affected the general character of the style.

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  • The buildings of the latest French style keep a certain purity and sobriety in Normandy which they do not keep elsewhere.

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  • The public buildings and business blocks are built mostly of Indiana building stone.

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  • Other noteworthy buildings are the Federal building (containing post-office, custom-house and Federal court-rooms; erected at a cost of $3,000,000); Tomlinson Hall, capable of seating 3000 persons, given to the city by Daniel Tomlinson; the Propylaeum, a club-house for women; the Commercial club; Das Deutsche Haus, belonging to a German social club; the Maennerchor club-house; the Union railway station; the traction terminal building; the city hall, and the public library.

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  • With the exception of the churches and a few stone buildings, Bulacan was completely destroyed by fire in 1898.

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  • At that time it was a very flourishing city, and contained several stately buildings, among which was especially mentioned a Brahminical temple, not inferior to the largest monastery in Portugal.

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  • The principal industry is coal-mining, and the public buildings include churches, schools and a hall.

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  • One of the former city gates (1615) remains, and there are a town hall, communal buildings (1863), court-house, weigh-house, synagogue and churches of various denominations, in one of which is the tomb of the naval hero of the 16th century, Lange, or Groote Pier (Long or Great Peter).

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  • The public buildings include the cathedral (1760), the government palace, the municipal palace, the episcopal palace, the church of Santa Ana, a national theatre, a school of arts and trades, a foreign hospital, the former administration building of the Canal Company, Santo Tomas Hospital, the pesthouse of Punta Mala and various asylums. The houses are mostly of stone, with red tile roofs, two or three storeys high, built in the Spanish style around central patios, or courts, and with balconies projecting far over the narrow streets; in such houses the lowest floor is often rented to a poorer family.

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  • Other important buildings are the Sobranye, or parliament house, the palace of the synod, the ministries of war and commerce, the university with the national printing press, the national library, the officers' club and several large military structures.

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  • The money which he accumulated he put to good use in the construction of roads and public buildings.

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  • Artels of one or two hundred carpenters, bricklayers, &c., are common wherever new buildings have to be erected, or railways or bridges constructed; the contractors always prefer to deal with an artel, rather than with separate workmen.

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  • There are, however, some traces of earlier buildings at a different orientation.

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  • lies temple D, both having been included in one temenos, with other buildings of less importance: to the E.

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  • from earlier buildings have been used in the construction of these fortifications: from their small size they may be mostly attributed to private houses.

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  • The position of the main buildings - ticket offices, waiting and refreshment-rooms, parcels offices, &c. - relative to the direction of the lines of rails may be used as a means of classifying terminal stations.

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  • Occasionally on a double-track railway one platform placed between the tracks serves both of them; this " island " arrangement, as it is termed, has the advantage that more tracks can be readily added without disturbance of existing buildings, but when it is adopted the exit from the trains is at the opposite side to that which is usual, and accidents have happened through passengers alighting at the usual side without noticing the absence of a platform.

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  • At intermediate stations the roofs are often carried on brackets fixed to the walls of the station buildings, and project only to the edge of the platforms. At larger stations where both the platforms and the tracks are covered in, there are two broad types of construction, with many intermediate variations: the roof may either be comparatively low, of the " ridge and furrow " pattern, borne on a number of rows of pillars, or it may consist of a single lofty span extending clear across the area from the side walls.

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  • This, besides reducing the efficiency of the furnace, introduces the danger of fire to crops and buildings near the line.

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  • To the southeast there are very extensive ruins of subterranean temples and other buildings half-buried in the sand by which the ancient town was overwhelmed.

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  • The principal buildings are the beautiful church of St Mary, dating from the 13th century, the theological seminary established in 1870, the gymnasium and the hospital.

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  • During his short reign Calixtus strengthened the authority of the papacy in southern Italy by military expeditions, and restored several buildings within the city of Rome.

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  • The archiepiscopal palace and Museo Civico, as well as the municipal buildings, have some valuable paintings.

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  • Port Louis, formerly the seat of government, is at the head of Berkeley Sound, but the anchorage there having been found rather too exposed, about the year 1844 a town was laid out, and the necessary public buildings were erected on Stanley Harbour, a sheltered recess within Port William.

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  • In 1909-1910 the institution had 20 buildings, 32 acres of recreation grounds, 16 instructors and 488 students, representing 38 states and territories of the United States and 4 foreign countries.

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  • The buildings may be divided into five groups: (I) a large cistern in five compartments, each measuring 39 by 17 ft.; (2) habitations both for the owners and for slaves, and store-rooms; (3) baths; (4) habitations for slaves; (5) belvedere.

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  • The numerous remains extant, of which the theatre and the buildings partially submerged by the sea are the most noteworthy, all belong to the Roman period.

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  • The buildings of a subsequent period are of minor importance, but the basilica of S.

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  • A long line of houses called Caesarea connected it with Ravenna, and in process of time there was such a continuous series of buildings that the three towns seemed like one.

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  • To the careful restorations of the last named the buildings of Ravenna owe much.

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  • The public buildings are a large plain church with unfinished twin towers, the government palace, the legislative halls, a normal school and public hospital.

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  • The principal public buildings are the Federal building, the city hall, the county court house, a Y.M.C.A.

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  • The principal buildings are the old church of St Vincent, containing the monuments of the lords of Arkel; the town hall, a prison, custom-house, barracks and a military hospital.

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  • Nevertheless, or rather for this very reason, its symbols found their way into the rising literature of the vulgar tongues, and helped to quicken the fancy of the artists employed upon church buildings and furniture.

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  • It is situated in a beautiful country, the buildings extending partly over the hill occupied by the monastery and partly over the valley below.

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  • Thirteen churches, including the Troitskiy (Trinity) and Uspenskiy cathedrals, a bell-tower, a theological academy, various buildings for monks and pilgrims, and a hospital stand within the precincts, which are two-thirds of a mile in circuit.

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  • The chief buildings were destroyed in 1901 in a fire started by a band of thieves.

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  • It concluded an alliance with Rome in 308 B.C. The modern village lies higher than the ancient town, and excavations on the site of the latter in 1775 and following years led to the discovery of the baths, a theatre, a basilica and other buildings.

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  • An amphitheatre is still visible, but the other buildings have in the main been covered up again.

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  • The public buildings include the town hall, a fine and commodious house on the site of the old tolbooth; the Falconer museum, containing among other exhibits several valuable fossils, and named after Dr Hugh Falconer (1808-1865), the distinguished palaeontologist and botanist, a native of the town; the mechanics' institute; the agricultural and market hall; Leanchoil hospital and Anderson's Institution for poor boys.

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  • Close by are two Gothic buildings, the bishop's palace (1264) and the Palazzo dei Papi (begun in 1296), the latter with a huge hall now containing the Museo Civico, with various medieval works of art, and also objects from the Etruscan necropolis of the ancient Volsinii (q.v.).

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  • Among the later buildings, a few may be noted by Sanmicheli of Verona, who was employed as chief architect of the cathedral from 1509 to 1528.

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  • Portions of the abbey buildings, including the Lady chapel of the church, now converted into a dwelling-house, are incoporated in those of Sherborne grammar school, founded (although a school existed previously) by Edward VI.

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  • The employment of Judaeans and Israelites for Solomon's palatial buildings, and the heavy taxation for the upkeep of a court which was the wonder of the world, caused grave internal discontent.

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  • The Temple, palace and city buildings were burned, the walls broken down, the chief priest Seraiah, the second priest Zephaniah, and other leaders were put to death, and a large body of people was again carried away.

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  • But that ability was largely due to his whole-hearted Hellenism, which was shown by the Greek cities which he founded in Palestine and the buildings he erected in Jerusalem.

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  • The buildings of the Benedictine abbey, founded in 1066, are now used as a prison.

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  • It is clear that the later traditions in many respects accurately summed up the performances of the " Minoan " dynast who carried out the great buildings now brought to light.

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  • The buildings themselves, with the usual halls, bath-rooms and magazines, together with a shrine of the Mother Goddess, occupy two sides of a rectangle, enclosing a court at a higher level approached by flights of stairs.

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  • The buildings here show a stratification analogous to that of the palace of Cnossus.

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  • The principal buildings within the parish are the old town hall, now used as a volunteer drill hall and armoury; the county buildings, containing the town hall and court house; the academy; reformatory and the Wigtownshire combination poorhouse.

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  • In the neighbourhood are remains of Coptic buildings, including a subterranean church (discovered 1895) in the desert half a mile beyond the limits of cultivation.

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  • The grammar school dates from 1499, but occupies modern buildings.

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  • being placed in the midst of a forest of tall trees, by which the buildings are so separated from one another, and so concealed,.

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  • There are no public buildings of any importance,, and the only places of interest are the bazars, which extend fully a mile in length, and consist of substantially built ranges of shops covered with roofs.

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  • Among the noteworthy buildings are the "Zwinger," a tower with walls 23 ft.

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  • Other buildings of interest are: - the small chapel which is all that remains since 1820 of the old and famous cathedral of St Simon and St Jude founded by Henry III.

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  • The chief buildings are the town-hall, Anglican church, Masonic temple, and hospital.

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  • It has a fine Federal building, one of the best high-school buildings in Wisconsin, the Vaughn public library (1895), a Roman Catholic hospital, and the Rinehart hospital, and is the seat of the Northland College and Academy (Congregational).

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  • There are traces of monastic buildings near the church, for it belonged to a Benedictine house of early Norman foundation.

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  • By draining the land, by planting millions of trees and by erecting numerous buildings, he greatly improved the condition of his Aberdeenshire estates, and studied continually the welfare of his dependants.

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  • Of the ecclesiastical buildings of Holborn that of first interest is the chapel of St Etheldreda in Ely Place, opening from Holborn Circus.

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  • The chapel, hall and residential buildings surrounding the squares within, are picturesque, but of later date.

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  • Of the former Inns of Chancery attached to these Inns of Court the most noteworthy buildings remaining are those of Staple Inn, of which the timbered and gabled Elizabethan front upon High Holborn is a unique survival of its character in a London thoroughfare; and of Barnard's Inn, occupied by the Mercer's School.

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  • The university, a little farther north, the buildings of which were erected in 1764, has some 240 students.

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  • The northern portion of this, below the castle hill, is the older, while the part near the shore consists mainly of modern buildings of no great interest.

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  • Among interesting ancient buildings may be mentioned the palace within the fort, containing an armoury and fine library; and the Brihadiswaraswami temple, of the r rth century, enclosed in two courts, surmounted by a lofty tower and including the exquisitely decorated shrine of Subrahmanya.

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  • There is a monument at Ottawa to the 1400 soldiers from La Salle county who died in the Civil War, and among the public buildings are the County Court House, the Court House for the second district of the Illinois Appellate Court, and Reddick's Library, founded by William Reddick.

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  • m.) enclosed by the walls is inhabited nor was the whole space ever occupied by buildings, the intention of the founders of the city being to wall in ground sufficient to grow food for the inhabitants during a siege.

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  • The palace consists of a number of buildings covering 33 acres and surrounded by a wall 20 to 30 ft.

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  • At the Reformation the buildings (except the church, now a ruin) passed into the possession of Lord Lovat.

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  • Remains of some ancient buildings, including a bath and gymnasium, can be traced within this area.

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  • The chief buildings are that containing the town hall and the grammar school (a foundation of 1547), the exchange, a theatre, and the customs house and dock offices.

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  • One of the most ancient towns in Thuringia, Saalfeld, once the capital of the extinct duchy of Saxe-Saalfeld, is still partly surrounded by old walls and bastions, and contains some interesting medieval buildings, among them being a palace,, built in 1679 on the site of the Benedictine abbey of St Peter, which was destroyed during the Peasants' War.

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  • The churches and chapels of the Presbyterian and other communions are, many of them, fine buildings.

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  • The county buildings, in Buccleuch Street, are an imposing example of the Scots Baronial style.

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  • Among other public buildings are the assembly rooms, St George's hall, the volunteer drill hall, and the Crichton Institution chapel, completed at a cost of 30,000.

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  • In the West, in the 6th and 7th centuries, besides the original functions of their office, archdeacons had certain well-defined rights of visitation and supervision, being responsible for the good order of the lower clergy, the upkeep of ecclesiastical buildings and the safe-guarding of the church furniture - functions which involved a considerable disciplinary power.

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  • Most of the buildings belong to the Renaissance; except the castle, the 14th-century Palazzo Pubblico, and the portals of two or three churches, especially that of S.

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  • The buildings are modern, but some scanty remains of rock-hewn wine presses and a few scattered sarcophagi mark the antiquity of the site.

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  • Monastic remains are scanty, but there are interesting portions of a priory incorporated with the school buildings at Repton.

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  • He erected many temples and public buildings (amongst them the Odeum, a kind of theatre for musical performances) and restored the temple of the Capitol.

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  • Of Richmond's public buildings, several have great historic interest.

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  • The more modern buildings include the City Hall, a fine granite structure (completed in 1893), with a tower 180 ft.

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  • serious conflagration was under way, which was not extinguished until about one-third of the city, including several of its historic buildings, had been destroyed.

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  • There are several fine public buildings.

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  • Of its old houses, the Tambour mansion, and a portion of that which belonged to the cardinal of Ferrara, both of the 16th century, are still preserved; apart from the palace, the public buildings are without interest.

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  • It consists of a series of courts surrounded by buildings, extending from W.

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  • The creator of the present edifice was Francis I., under whom the architect Gilles le Breton erected most of the buildings of the Cour Ovale, including the Porte Doree, its southern entrance, and the Salle des Fetes, which, in the reign of Henry II., was decorated by the Italians, Francesco Primaticcio and Nicolo dell' Abbate, and is perhaps the finest Renaissance chamber in France.

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  • He spent lavishly on public buildings at home and in the older centres of Hellenism, like Athens.

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  • From 1886 dates the finding of Mycenaean sepulchres outside the Argolid, from which, and from the continuation of Tsountas's exploration of the buildings and lesser graves at Mycenae, a large treasure, independent of Schliemann's princely gift, has been gathered into the National Museum at Athens.

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  • It is the seat of Missouri Valley College (opened 1889; coeducational), which was established by the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and includes a preparatory department and a conservatory of music. The court-house (1883), a Roman Catholic convent and a high school (1907) are the principal buildings.

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  • The other public buildings include railway works, places of worship (Protestant, Roman Catholic, Mahommedan and Hindu) and schools, an Indian bazaar, a general hospital and waterworks - the water being obtained from springs 13 m.

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  • The site of Nairobi was selected as the headquarters of the Uganda railway, and the first buildings were erected in 1899.

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  • It consists of a group of old-fashioned timber and plaster buildings, a tall belfry, and a diminutive church of white marble, founded in 1190 by King Stephen Nemanya, who himself turned monk and was canonized as St Simeon.

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  • The chief buildings are the town-hall, a large theatre, a school of arts and a library; the Christian Brothers College and several handsome churches.

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  • Both the central library and museum and the Akroyd museum and art gallery occupy buildings which were formerly residences, the one of Sir Francis Crossley (1817-1872) and the other of Mr Edward Akroyd.

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  • The Waterhouse charity school occupies a handsome set of buildings forming three sides of a quadrangle, erected in 1855.

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  • Among other public buildings may be noted the Piece-Hall, erected in 1799 for the lodgment and sale of piece goods, now used as a market, a great quadrangular structure occupying more than two acres; the bonding warehouse, court-house, and mechanics' institute.

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  • The soil is an oozy mud which can only be made capable of carrying buildings by the artificial means of pile-driving; there is no land fit for agriculture or the rearing of cattle; the sole food supply is fish from the lagoon, and there is no drinking-water save such as could be stored from the rainfall.

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  • Owing to the marshy site the foundations of buildings in Venice offered considerable difficulties.

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  • During the middle ages the walls of Venetian buildings were constructed invariably of brick.

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  • The church of St Mark's, originally the private chapel of the doge, is unique among the buildings of the world in respect of its unparalleled richness of material and decoration.

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  • It grew with the growing state whose religious centre it was, and was adorned with the spoils of countless other buildings, both in the East and on the Italian mainland.

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  • The buildings were usually battlemented in fantastic form.

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  • Other specimens still in existence are the municipal buildings, Palazzo Loredan and Palazzo Farsetti - if, indeed, these are not to be considered rather as Romanesque - and the splendid Ca' da Mosto, all on the Grand Canal.

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  • - Square of St Mark and surrounding buildings.

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  • The block of buildings in the interior, connecting the Porta della Carta to the Rio wing, was added about 1462 by the doge Cristoforo Moro.

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  • In 1479 a fire consumed the earlier buildings along the Rio, and these were replaced (1480-1550) by the present Renaissance structure.

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  • Not more than eighty years separate these two buildings; the old Procuratie were built by Bartolomeo Buono about 150o, the new by Scamozzi in 1580, yet it is clear that each belongs to an entirely different world of artistic ideas.

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  • The architects Rupolo and Sardi have erected a considerable number of buildings, in which they have attempted, and with considerable success, to return either to Venetian Gothic or to the early Renaissance Lombardesque style.

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  • The most striking of these modern buildings are the new wing of the Hotel d'Italie, San Moise, and the very successful fish market at Rialto, designed by Laurenti and carried out by Rupolo, in which a happy return to early Venetian Gothic has been effected in conjunction with a skilful adaptation of one of the most famous of the old houses of Venice, the Stalon, or palace of the Quirini family.

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  • Among the most remarkable buildings in Venice are the scuole, or gild halls, of the various confraternities.

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  • They contain the voluminous and invaluable records of the Venetian republic, diplomatic, judicial, commercial, notarial, &c. Under the republic the various departments of state stored their records in various buildings, at the ducal palace, at the Scuola di San Teodoro, at the Camerlenghi.

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  • The code was replaced by the Paine Law of 1909, which provided for a board of control (something like that under the "federal plan" in Cleveland, Columbus and Toledo) of three members: the mayor and the directors (appointed and removable by the mayor) of two municipal departments - public service and public safety, the former including public works and parks, and the latter police, fire, charities, correction and buildings.

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  • (g) Corresponding to the personal tutelary spirit (supra, b) we have the genii of buildings and places.

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  • The assignment of genii to buildings and gates is connected with an important class of sacrifices; in order to provide a tutelary spirit, or to appease chthonic deities, it was often the custom to sacrifice a human being or an animal at the foundation of a building; sometimes we find a similar guardian provided for the frontier of a country or of a tribe.

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  • Whole forests, vast quarries of granite, and hills of gravel were used in fringing the water margins, constructing wharves, piers and causeways, redeeming flats, and furnishing piling and solid foundations for buildings.

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  • Other buildings of local importance are the city hall (1865); the United tates government building (1871-1878, cost about $6,000,00); the county court-house (1887-1893, $2,250,000); the custom house (1837-1848); and the chamber of commerce (1892).

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  • Copley Square, in the Back Bay, is finely disti guished by a group of exceptional buildings: Trinity church, th old Museum of Fine Arts, the public library and the new Old South church.

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  • The dignified buildings of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are near.

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  • In Huntington Avenue, at its junction with Massachusetts Avenue, is another group of handsome new buildings, including Horticultural Hall, Symphony Hall (1900) and the New England Conservatory of Music. In the Back Bay Fens, reclaimed swamps laid out by F.

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  • Olmsted, still other groups have formed - among others those of the marble buildings of the Harvard medical school; Fenway Court, a building in the style, internally, of a Venetian palace, that houses the art treasures of Mrs. J.

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  • Throughout the Fens excellently effective use is being made of monumental buildings grouped in ample grounds.

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  • The height of buildings in the business section is limited to 125 ft., and in some places to 90 ft.

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  • The cost of the public schools for the five years from 1901-1902 to 1906-1907 was $27,883,937, of which $7,057,895.42 was for new buildings; the cost of the police department was $11,387,314.66 for the six years 1902-1907; and of the water department $4,941,343.37 for the six years 1902-1907; of charities and social work a much larger sum.

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  • On the 9th-1 oth of November 1872 a terrible fire swept the business part of the city, destroying hundreds of buildings of brick and granite, and inflicting a loss of some $75,000,000.

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  • With the exception of the church and the town-house, the buildings are mostly of wood.

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  • As a rule the buildings of Palmyra do not possess any architectural individuality, but these tombs are an exception.

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  • The site shows a Roman theatre, amphitheatre, temple and other ruins, with part of the city wall, and the moles of the Roman harbour, with a ruined Greek cathedral and other medieval buildings.

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  • The principal Mahommedan public buildings, erected by subsequent governors and now in ruins, are the Katra and the Lal-bagh palace - the former built by Sultan Mahommed Shuja in 1645, in front of the chauk or market place.

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  • Many of the public buildings, including the college, suffered severely from the earthquake of the 12th of June 1897; and great damage was done by tornadoes in April of 1888 and 1902.

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  • It seems to have continued to flourish down into the Christian era; remains of its ecclesiastical buildings still exist.

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  • Amongst its buildings are the Gothic five-naved church of St Barbara, begun in 1368, the Gothic church of St Jacob (14th centur y) and the Late Gothic Trinity church (end of 15th century).

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  • It has two ancient buildings, the Nikolai-turm, built in 1455, and the old castle.

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  • All kinds of interests and property, whether corporeal, such as lands or buildings, or incorporeal, such as rights of common or of way, may be let.

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  • The Conveyancing Act 1881 provides that, as regards conveyances subsequent to 1881, unless a contrary intention is expressed, a lease of " land " is to be deemed to include all buildings, fixtures, easements, &c., appertaining to it; and, if there are houses or other buildings on the land demised, all out-houses, erections, &c., are to pass with the lease of the land.

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  • The tenant may have added to its value by buildings, by labour applied to the land, or by the use of fertilizing manures, but, whatever be the amount of the additional value, he is not entitled to any compensation whatever.

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  • Two buildings were known as "Monumenta Catuli": the temple of Fortuna hujusce diei, to commemorate the day of Vercellae, and the Porticus Catuli, built from the sale of the Cimbrian spoils.

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  • Among the public buildings and places of interest are the three churches on the Green, built in 5854; Center Church (Congregational), in the rear of which is the grave of John Dixwell (1608-1689), one of the regicides; United (formerly known as North) Church (Congregational), and Trinity Church, which belongs to one of the oldest Protestant Episcopal congregations in Connecticut.

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  • Prominent buildings are St Joseph's Cathedral and the buildings of the Berkshire Life Insurance Company, the Agricultural National Bank and the Berkshire County Savings Bank.

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  • The other public buildings include an episcopal palace, a townhall and numerous churches.

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  • The principal public buildings are the Federal building, the court house, an auditorium seating 7000, a Union Station and a public library.

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  • The public buildings include a library and town-hall.

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  • In Germany, the law prescribes a close-test of 21° C., equal to about 70° F., whilst in Russia the standard is 28° C., equal to 84.4° F., by the close-test; in both these countries the weights of petroleum which may be stored in specified buildings are determined by law.

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  • Antioch, adorned with many sumptuous buildings, as the chief town of the provinces of Asia, became in point of size the third city of the empire and an eastern Rome.

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  • The chief buildings are the chateau, mainly of the 15th century, of which the massive donjon of the 11th century known as the Tour de Cesar is the oldest portion; and the abbey-church of Notre-Dame, a building in the Romanesque style of architecture, frequently restored.

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  • Some of the buildings of the Benedictine abbey, to which this church belonged, remain.

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  • Perhaps his most interesting design was that for the mansion of Baron James de Rothschild at Ferribres in France, but he designed many other important buildings.

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  • New towns were founded and old ones restored; new streets were laid out, and aqueducts, temples and magnificent buildings constructed.

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  • Among the magnificent buildings erected by Hadrian mention may be made of the following: In the capital, the temple of Venus and Roma; his splendid mausoleum, which formed the groundwork of the castle of St Angelo; the pantheon of Agrippa; the Basilica Neptuni; at Tibur the great villa 8 m.

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  • I), be reverent in visiting the house of God (the temple and the connected buildings) 1 The clause is obscure; literally" he (or, one) rises at (?) the voice of the bird,"usually understood to refer to the old man's inability to sleep in the morning; but this is not a universal trait of old age, and besides, a reference to affairs in the house is to be expected; the Hebrew construction also is of doubtful correctness.

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  • Among the notable public buildings are the old parish church built at the expense of Charles II.

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  • 29, p. 806) tells us how he saw at Heliopolis large buildings belonging to the priests, which had once been tenanted by men skilled in philosophy and astronomy, who had been consulted by Plato and Eudoxus, but that the o-uanjµa and iaicgats (the very words used by Philo in speaking of the Therapeutae) had then fallen into decay.

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  • in 1460) is the oldest in Switzerland, and of late years has been extended by the construction of detached buildings for the study of the natural sciences, e.g.

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  • The town has no buildings of great antiquity, but the public buildings (1867), in Italian style, are handsome.

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  • By the forms of the letters of the inscriptions, and by the architectural details, the age of the monument has been approximately fixed in the 3rd century B.C. The bas-reliefs give us invaluable evidence of the literature, and also of the clothing, buildings and other details of the social conditions of the peoples of Buddhist India at that period.

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  • Among the principal buildings are the U.S. Government Building, the City Hall and the County Court House; and the city's institutions include the Laredo Seminary (1882) for boys and girls, the Mercy Hospital, the National Railroad of Mexico Hospital and an Ursuline Convent.

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  • This is the last of the buildings and rubbish which encumbered the temple before the expropriation and clearances by the Service des Antiquites began in 1885.

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  • Oberlin is primarily an educational centre, the seat of Oberlin College, named in honour of Jean Frederic Oberlin, and open to both sexes; it embraces a college of arts and sciences, an academy, a Theological Seminary (Congregational), which has a Slavic department for the training of clergy for Slavic immigrants, and a conservatory of music. In 1909 it had twenty buildings, and a Memorial Arch of Indiana buff limestone, dedicated in 1903, in honour of Congregational missionaries, many of them Oberlin graduates, killed in China in 1900.

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  • The monumental work of James Stuart and Nicholas Revett, who spent three years at Athens (1751-1754), marked an epoch in the progress of Athenian topography and is still indispensable to its study, owing to the demolition of ancient buildings which began about the middle of the 18th century.

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  • Here were the various public buildings, which, when the power of the princes on Agora the citadel was transferred to the archons, formed the offices of the administrative magistracy.

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  • The Agora was commonly described as the " Ceramicus," and Pausanias gives it this name; of the numerous buildings which he saw here scarcely a trace remains; their position, for the most part, is largely conjectural, and the exact boundaries of the Agora itself are uncertain.

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  • In 1892 Dorpfeld began a series of excavations in the district between the Acropolis and the Pnyx with the object of determining the situation of the buildings described by Pausanias as existing in the neighbourhood of the Agora, and more especially the position of the Enneacrunus fountain.

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  • 14.1), who never deviates without reason from the topographical order of his narrative, mentions the Enneacrunus in the midst of his description of certain buildings which were undoubtedly in the region of the Agora, and unless he is guilty of an unaccountable digression the Enneacrunus which he saw must have lain west of the Acropolis.

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  • Little was known of the buildings on the Acropolis in the pre-Persian period before the great excavations of 1885-1888, which rank among the most surprising achievements of modern research.

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  • The almost complete destruction of the buildings on the Acropolis and in the lower city, among them many temples and shrines which religious send- the walls of ment might otherwise have preserved, facilitated the Themis- realization of the magnificent architectural designs tocles .

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  • Among the other noteworthy buildings of the Peiraeus were the arsenal (vKEUoOKrl) of Philo and the temples of Zeus Soter, the patron god of the sailors, of the Cnidian Artemis, built by Cimon, and of Artemis Munychia, situated near the fort on the Munychia height; traces of a temple of Asclepius, of two theatres and of a hippodrome remain.

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  • With regard to the buildings on the east end of the Acropolis, where the present museums stand, no certainty exists; among the many statues here were those of Xanthippus, the father of Pericles, and of Anacreon.

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  • buildings destroyed by the Persians were built into it, possibly owing to haste, as in the case of the city walls, but more probably with the design of commemorating the great historic catastrophe, as the wall was visible from the Agora.

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  • The fine walls of the south and east sides were built by Cimon after the victory of the Eurymedon, 468 B.C.; they extend considerably beyond the old Pelasgic circuit, the intervening space being filled up with earth and the debris of the ruined buildings so as to increase the level space of the summit.

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  • To his time may be referred many of the buildings around the Agora (probably rebuilt on the former sites) and elsewhere, and the passage, or 8p4uos, from the Agora to the Dipylon flanked by long porticos.

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  • Among the earlier buildings of this period is the Horologium The Horo- of Andronicus of Cyrrhus (the " Tower of the Winds"), logium of still standing near the eastern end of the Roman Agora.

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  • great buildings, burnt to the ground.

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  • The Stadium had been already completed and the Odeum had not yet been built when Pausanias visited Athens; these buildings were the last important additions to the architectural monuments of the ancient city.

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  • Other public buildings are the Polytechnic Institute, built by contributions from Greeks of Epirus, the theatre, the Arsakeion (a school for girls), the Varvakeion (a gymnasium), the military school (aXoX) EUEX7rLSWv), and several hospitals and orphanages.

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  • The town now possesses an exchange, a large theatre, a gymnasium, a naval school, municipal buildings and several hospitals and charitable institutions erected by private munificence.

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  • Hadrian displayed his special fondness for the city by raising new buildings and relieving financial distress.

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  • Gardner, Plans and Drawings of Athenian Buildings (London, 1900); E.

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  • The city was built by the state on an open plateau, and provided with all necessary public buildings, gas, water and tramway services before the seat of government was transferred from Ouro Preto.

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  • The circuit of the walls measures about 4 m., and scanty traces of them and of Roman buildings within them still exist.

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  • Among other buildings are a picturesque old castle dating from the 13th century, now in ruins with the exception of a few rooms used as a prison; the new castle, used as a fire watch-tower; and the town hall.

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  • Separate school districts were abolished; a new city superintendent, with associate superintendents, was appointed; the scattered and unrelated school agencies were consolidated; new high schools and junior high schools established and buildings erected, such as the Schenley high school, built in 1916 at a cost of $1,500,000 and accommodating 2,000 students.

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  • In Albion are the Western House of Refuge for Women (a state institution established in 1890), a public park, the Swan Library, and the county buildings, including the court house, the jail and the surrogate's office; and about 2 m.

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  • The city is well built, has many fine churches and good public buildings, street cars and electric lights.

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  • The medical school, a department of Washington University, includes laboratory, anatomical, clinical and other buildings.

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  • On new public school buildings, and expansions of old, St.

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  • The more important new buildings of the period 1910-20 with the amounts they cost were: the Statler hotel, $3,000,000; the Warwick hotel, $400,000; the cathedral of St.

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  • The cost of new buildings in 1919 was $20,538,450.

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