Budapest sentence example

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  • In 1893 the construction was completed in Budapest of an underground railway with a thin, flat roof, consisting of steel beams set close together, with small longitudinal jack arches between them, the street pavement .

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  • Budapest hereupon fell to the Turks, who appointed John.

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  • His education was completed at the Calvinist college of Sarospatak and at the university of Budapest.

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  • Supported by the influence of Louis Batthyany, after a keenly fought struggle he was elected member for Budapest in the new Diet.

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  • His complete works were published in Hungarian at Budapest in 1880-1895.

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  • Godollo is a favourite summer resort of the inhabitants of Budapest.

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  • The best life of him is that by the Bohemian historian Anton Gindely, Acta et documents historiam GabrielisBethleni illustrantia (Budapest, 1890).

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  • This work has been largely utilized by Ignae-Acsady in his excellent Gabriel Bethlen and his Court (Hung., Budapest, 1890).

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  • For the Tatar invasion see the contemporary Rogerius, Epistolae super destructione Regni Hungariae per Tartaros facta (Budapest, 1885).

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  • He had already, in 1859, as the result of a visit to Budapest, made certain modifications in the Bach system by way of concession to Magyar sentiment, and in 1861 he had had an interview with Dek, during which, though unconvinced by that statesmans arguments, he had at least assured himself of his loyalty.

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  • In 1867 she accompanied the emperor to Budapest, s nd took much interest in tile reconciliation with the Magyars.

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  • Suspected of intriguing with the revolutionists, Pulszky fled to Budapest to avoid arrest.

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  • Museum at Budapest, where he became distinguished for his archaeological researches.

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  • The Serb and Moslem delegates, who had started on the same day for Budapest, to present their petition to the emperor, learned from the rescript that the government intended to concede to their compatriots "a share in the legislation and administration of provincial affairs, and equal protection for all religious beliefs, languages and racial distinctions."

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  • Meanwhile Ferdinand's troops captured Budapest, driving out Zapolya, who at once appealed to Suleiman for aid.

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  • Zapolya joined the Turks at Mohacs, and a joint attack was made on Budapest.

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  • Friendly relations had subsisted between Suleiman and Ferdinand during the expedition to Persia; but on the death of Zapolya in 1539 Ferdinand claimed Hungary and besieged Budapest with a large force.

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  • At the end of August he appeared before Budapest, the siege of which had already been raised by the defeat of the Austrians; the infant John Sigismund was carried into the sultan's camp, and the queen-mother, Isabella, was peremptorily ordered to evacuate the royal palace, though the sultan gave her a diploma in which he swore only to retain Budapest during the minority of her son.

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  • The attempt of the imperialists, under Joachim of Brandenburg, to retake Budapest (September 15 4 2), failed ignominiously; and in the following year Suleiman in person conducted a campaign which led to the conquest of Siklos, Gran, Szekesf ehervar and Visegrad (1544) Everywhere the churches were turned into mosques; and the greater part of Hungary, divided into twelve sanjaks, became definitively a Turkish province.

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  • In the spring of 1553 the victories of the Persians called for the sultan's presence in the East; a truce for six months was now concluded between the envoys of Ferdinand and the pasha of Budapest, and Austrian ambassadors were sent to Constantinople to arrange a peace.

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  • The campaign of 1598 began with the loss of Raab, and continued unfavourable to the Turks, who lost Totis, Veszprem and Papa, and were hard pressed in Budapest.

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  • The railway from Budapest to Constantinople crosses the Save by a fine bridge on the south-west, above the landing-place for steamers.

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  • After studying law at the university of Budapest he graduated doctor juris.

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  • See Political Correspondence of Stephen Bocskay (Hung.), edited by Karoly Szabo (Budapest, 1882); Jens Thury, Stephen Bocskay's Rebellion (Hung.), Budapest, 1899.

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  • The Bakony Forest, which lies entirely within Hungarian territory, extend to the Danube in the neighbourhood of Budapest, the highest peak being KOroshegy (2320 ft.).

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  • Pigs are reared in large quantities all over the country, but the principal centres for distribution are Debreczen, Gyula, Bares, Szeged and Budapest.

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  • Among the principal in Hungary proper except Transylvania are those of Budapest, Mehadia, Eger, Sztubnya (Turocz county), Szliacs (Zolyom county), Harkany (Baranya county), Pistyan (Nyitra county) and Trencsen-Teplitz, where there are hot springs.

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  • Cold mineral springs are at Bartfa, with alkaline ferruginous waters; Czigelka, with iodate waters; Parad, with ferruginous and sulphate springs; Koritnicza or Korytnica, with strong iron springs; and the mineral springs of Budapest.

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  • The principal steam-mills are at Budapest; large steam-mills are also established in many towns, while there are a great number of water-mills and some wind-mills.

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  • The various industrial establishments are located in the larger towns, but principally at Budapest, the only real industrial town of Hungary.

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  • The first railway in Hungary was the line between Budapest and Vacz (Waitzen), 20 m.

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  • The parliament is summoned annually by the king at Budapest.

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  • There are also a special commercial court at Budapest, a naval court at Fiume, and special army courts.

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  • The Jewish communities are comprised in ecclesiastical districts, the head direction being at Budapest.

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  • The Polytechnicum in Budapest, founded in 1844, which contains four faculties and was attended in 1900 by 1772 pupils, is also considered a high school.

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  • Among special schools the principal mining schools are at Selmeczbanya, Nagyag and Felsobanya; the principal agricultural colleges at Debreczen and Kolozsvar; and there are a school of forestry at Selmeczbanya, military colleges at Budapest, Kassa, Deva and Zagrab, and a naval school at Fiume.

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  • The richest libraries in Hungary are the National Library at Budapest; the University Library, also at Budapest, and the library of the abbey of Pannonhalma.

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  • Besides the museums mentioned in the article Budapest, several provincial towns contain interesting museums, namely, Pressburg, Temesvhr, Deva, Kolozsvar, Nagyszeben; further, the national museum at Zagram, the national (Szekler) museum at Maros-Vasarhely, and the Carpathian museum at Poprad should be mentioned.

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  • At the head of the learned and scientific societies stands the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, founded in 1830; the Kisfaludy Society, the Petofi Society, and numerous societies of specialists, as the historical, geographical, &c., with their centre at Budapest.

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  • What this would mean was pointed out by Mr Kristoffy in an address delivered at Budapest on the 14th of March 1907.

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  • On the 10th of October 1907 there was a great and orderly demonstration at Budapest, organized by the socialists, in favour of reform.

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  • A trial of strength took place between him and Mr de Justh, the champion of the extreme demands in the matter of Hungarian financial and economic autonomy; on the 7th of November rival banquets were held, one at Mako, Justh's constituency, over which he presided, one at Budapest with Kossuth in the chair; the attendance at each foreshadowed the outcome of the general meeting of the party held at Budapest on the 11th, when Kossuth found himself in a minority of 46.

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  • Of modern histories written in Magyar the most imposing is the History of the Hungarian Nation (to vols., Budapest, 1898), issued to commemorate the celebration of the millennium of the foundation of the monarchy, by Sandor Szilagyi and numerous collaborators.

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  • Of importance, too, is Ignacz Acsady's History of the Magyar Empire (2 vols., Budapest, 1904), though its author is too often ultra-chauvinistic in tone.

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  • There are, moreover, HungarianFrench dictionaries by Kiss and Karady (Pest and Leipzig, 18 441848) and Babos and Mole (Pest, 1865), and English-Hungarian dictionaries by Dallos (Pest, 1860) and Bizonfy (Budapest, 1886).

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  • Of the three first-mentioned chronicles Hungarian translations by Charles Szabo appeared at Budapest in 1860, 1861 and 1862.

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  • Both this and the Halotti Beszed (Pray Codex) are preserved in the National Museum at Budapest.

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  • The Evlapok uj folyama, or " New Series of Annuals," from 1860 (Budapest, 1868, &c.), is a chrestomathy of prize orations, and translations and original pieces, both in poetry and prose.

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  • The poems of Count Geza Zichy and Victor Dalmady, those of the latter published at Budapest in 1876, are mostly written on subjects, of a domestic nature, but are conceived in a patriotic spirit.

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  • Rumanian folksongs were Magyarized by George Ember, Julian;Grozescu and Joseph Vulcanu, under the title Roman nepdalok (Budapest, 1877).

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  • As popular plays the Sdrga csiko (Bay Foal) and A giros bugyelldris (The Red Purse), by Francis Csepreghy, have their own special merit, and were often represented in 1878 and 1879 at Budapest and elsewhere.

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  • Within certain limits Croatia's autonomy was respected, but so far from Zagreb being consulted, the terms of the new settlement were in effect dictated from Budapest and only submitted pro forma to a carefully " packed " Croatian Diet, after the bargain between Budapest and Vienna had already made of them an accomplished fact.

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  • The Serbo-Croat coalition, formed on the basis of the Fiume Resolution, at once acquired the mastery in Croatia, and even when its short-lived alliance with the Hungarian coalition - in power in Hungary since April 1906 - was replaced by acute conflict in the summer of 1907, no amount of repression from Budapest could destroy its solid majority in the Croatian diet.

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  • Rauch's position had become untenable, and he was succeeded by the more moderate Dr. Tomasic, who brought with him from Budapest the concession of a somewhat extended franchise (260,000 instead of 50,000 electors).

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  • The diet of Zagreb was allowed to meet, and the Serbo-Croat coalition pursued a policy of pure opportunism, avoiding any pronouncement on matters of high policy, but buying a certain relaxation of regime in Croatia by supporting the Budapest Government and its nominee Skerlecz.

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  • It was left to the Yugoslav Committee abroad to claim independence as well as unity, to repudiate the Habsburgs (in a manifesto on the eve of the Budapest coronation) and to exalt the achievements of Serbia and the Karagjorgjevic dynasty.

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  • During the late summer the authorities in Vienna and Budapest keenly debated rival plans for solving the southern Slav question - in every case, however, in accordance with Austrian or Hungarian rather than Yugoslav interests.

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  • It is also the seat of the common ministries for the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, of the foreign ambassadors and general consuls and the meeting-place, alternately with Budapest, of the AustroHungarian delegations.

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  • While Berlin and Budapest have made the most rapid progress of all European cities, having multiplied their population by nine in the period 1800-90, Vienna - even including the extensive annexations of 1892 - only increased sevenfold.

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  • Many remains from the Roman period have been excavated, such as traces of an amphitheatre, a triumphal arch, the old fortifications, an aqueduct, &c. The remains are preserved partly in the museum at Budapest, and partly in the municipal museum.

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  • General Klapka died at Budapest on the 17th of May 1892.

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  • He died at Budapest on the 13th of July 1880.

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  • Revolutions broke out in Paris, Vienna, Berlin, Madrid, Rome, Naples, Venice, Munich, Dresden and Budapest.

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  • Aerial posts are established with Paris, Warsaw, Berlin, Vienna and Budapest, in addition to which there exist also cross-country services.

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  • See Bela Kerekgyarto, The Hungarian Royal Court under the House of Anjou (Hung.) (Budapest, 1881); Rationes Collectorum Pontif.

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  • See Karoly Szabo, Ladislaus the Cumanian (Hung.), (Budapest, 1886); and Acsady, History of the Hungarian Realm, i.

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  • The delegations are annually summoned by the monarch alternately to Vienna and to Budapest.

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  • The Alpine frontiers, especially those in Tirol, have numerous fortifications, whose centre is formed by Trent and Franzensfeste; while all the military roads leading into Carinthia have been provided with strong defensive works, as at Malborgeth, Predil Pass, &c. The two capitals, Vienna and Budapest, are not fortified.

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  • The natural result was to drive the Slav nationalities to the side of the imperial government, since, whether at Vienna or at Budapest, the radicals were their worst enemies.

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  • An agreement was made by which the emperor was to be crowned at Pest and take the ancient oath to the Golden Bull; Hungary (including Transylvania and Croatia) was to have its own parliament and its own ministry; Magyar was to be the official language; the emperor was to rule as king; there was to be complete separation of the finances; not even a common nationality was recognized between the Hungarians and the other subjects of the emperor; a Hungarian was to be a foreigner in Vienna, an Austrian a foreigner in Budapest.

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  • The Recruits bill and the estimates were adopted, the Delegations were enabled to meet at Budapest - where they voted £2 2,000,000 as extraordinary estimates for the army and navy and especially for the renewal of the field artillery - and the negotiations for new commercial treaties with Germany and Italy were sanctioned, although parliament had never been able to ratify the Szell-Korber compact with the tariff on the basis of which the negotiations would have to be conducted.

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  • On the 15th of September 1905 a huge socialist and workingclass demonstration in favour of universal suffrage took place before the parliament at Budapest.

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  • But his most original creation in this respect was the zone system, which immensely facilitated and cheapened the circulation of all wares and produce, and brought the remotest districts into direct communication with the central point at Budapest.

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  • Budapest is situated nearly in the centre of Hungary, and dominates by its strategical position the approach from the west to the great Hungarian plain.

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  • Budapest covers an area of 78 sq.

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  • Perhaps the most attractive part of Budapest is the line of broad quays on the left bank of the Danube, which extend for a distance of 21 m.

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  • Budapest possesses numerous squares, generally ornamented with monuments of prominent Hungarians, usually the work of Hungarian artists.

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  • Besides several modern churches, Budapest possesses a beautiful synagogue, in the Moorish style, erected in 1861, and another, in the Moorish-Byzantine style, built in 1872, while in 1901 the construction of a much larger synagogue was begun.

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  • The building activity of Budapest since 1867 has been extraordinary, and the town has undergone a thorough transformation.

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  • This process is still going on, and Budapest has become one of the handsomest capitals of Europe.

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  • Budapest is the intellectual capital of Hungary.

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  • The university of Budapest, the only one in Hungary proper, was established at Tyrnau in 1635, removed to Buda in 1777, and transferred to Pest in 1783.

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  • Budapest possesses an adequate number of elementary and secondary schools, as well as a great number of special and technical schools.

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  • Amongst the numerous scientific associations are the central statistical department, and the Budapest communal bureau of statistics, which under the directorship of Dr Joseph de KiirOsy has gained a European reputation.

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  • The artistic life in Budapest is fostered by the academy of music, which once had Franz Liszt as its director, a conservatoire of music, a dramatic school, and a school for painting and for drawing, all maintained by the government.

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  • Budapest possesses, besides an opera house, eight theatres, of which two are subsidized by the government and one by the municipality.

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  • Performances in German are under a popular taboo, and they are never given in a theatre at Budapest.

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  • In commerce and industry Budapest is by far the most important town in Hungary, and in the former, if not also in the latter, it is second to Vienna alone in the Austro-Hungarian monarchy.

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  • The trade of Budapest is mainly in corn, flour, cattle, horses, pigs, wines, spirits, wool, wood, hides, and in the articles manufactured in the town.

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  • The efforts of the Hungarian government to establish a great home industry, and the measures taken to that effect, have benefited Budapest to a greater degree than any other Hungarian town, and the progress made is remarkable.

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  • Budapest owes its great commercial importance to its situation on the Danube, on which the greater part of its trade is carried.

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  • The introduction of steamboats on the Danube in 1830 was one of the earliest material causes of the progress of Budapest, and gave a great stimulus to its corn trade.

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  • Budapest is actually one of the greatest milling centres in the world, possessing a number of magnificent establishments, fitted with machinery invented and manufactured in the city.

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  • Budapest is, besides, connected with all the principal places in Austria and Hungary by a well-developed net of railways, which all radiate from here.

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  • Few European towns grew so rapidly as Budapest generally, and Pest particularly, during the 19th century, and probably none has witnessed such a thorough transformation since 1867.

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  • In 1880 the civil population of Budapest was 360,J51, an increase since 1869 of 32%; and in 1890 it was 49 1, 93 8, an increase of 36.57% in the decade.

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  • In the matter of the increase of its population alone, Budapest has only been slightly surpassed by one European town, namely, Berlin.

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  • According to an interesting and instructive comparison of the growth of twenty-eight European cities made by Dr Joseph de KiirOsy, Berlin in 1890 showed an increase, as compared with the beginning of the century, of 818% and Budapest of 809%.

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  • In 1900 the civil population of Budapest was 716,476 inhabitants, showing an increase of 44.82% in the decade.

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  • A striking feature in the progress of Budapest is the decline in the death-rate, which sank from 43.4 per thousand in 1874 to 20.6 per thousand in 1900.

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  • As Paris is sometimes said to be France, so may Budapest with almost greater truth be said to be Hungary.

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  • Its composite population is a faithful reflection of the heterogeneous elements in the dominions of the Habsburgs, while the trade and industry of Hungary are centralized at Budapest in a way that can scarcely be affirmed of any other European capital.

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  • The movement in favour of Magyarizing all institutions has found its strongest development in Budapest, where the German names have all been removed from the buildings and streets.

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  • The wonderful progress of Budapest is undoubtedly due to the revival of the Hungarian national spirit in the first half of the 19th century, and to the energetic and systematic efforts of the government and people of Hungary since the restoration of the constitution.

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  • So far as Hungary was concerned, Budapest in 1867 at once became the favoured rival of Vienna, with the important additional advantage that it had no such competitors within its own sphere as Vienna had in the Austrian provincial capitals.

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  • The political, intellectual, and social life of Hungary was centred in Budapest, and had largely been so since 1848, when it became the seat of the legislature, as it was that of the Austrian central administration which followed the revolution.

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  • Budapest has profited largely by the encouragement of agriculture, trade and industry, by the nationalization of the railways, by the development of inland navigation, and also by the neglect of similar measures in favour of Vienna.

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  • When it is remembered that the ideal of both the authorities and the people is the ultimate monopoly of the home market by Hungarian industry and trade, and the strengthening of the Magyar influence by centralization, it is easy to understand the progress of Budapest.

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  • It has thus come to pass that there is no anti-Semitism in Budapest, although the Hebrew element is proportionately much larger (21% as compared with 9%) than it is in Vienna, the Mecca of the Jew-baiter.

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  • Budapest has long been celebrated for its mineral springs and baths, some of them having been already used during the Roman period.

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  • The largest and most popular of the parks in Budapest is the Varosliget, on the north-east side of the town.

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  • The history of Budapest consists of the separate history of the two sister towns, Buda and Pest.

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  • The official publications of the Budapest Communal Bureau of Statistics have acquired a European repute for their completeness, and their fearless exposure of shortcomings has been an element in the progress of the town.

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  • See also Die OsterreichischUngarische Monarchie in Wort and Bild (Wien, 1886-1902, 24 vols.); volume xii., published in 1893, is devoted to Budapest.

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  • If his campaigns were not always so wisely and prudently planned as those of some of his predecessors, they were in the main eminently fortunate, and resulted in adding to his dominions Belgrade, Budapest, Temesvar, Rhodes, Tabriz, Bagdad, Nakshivan and Rivan, Aden and Algiers, and in his days Turkey attained the culminating point of her glory.

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  • The subject was discussed at the Penitentiary Congress at Budapest in 1905, and a resolution passed recommending extra-mural employment for prisoners of rural origin, vagrants and drunkards, and those subject to tuberculous disease, "so largely the concomitant of cellular confinement."

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  • The enthusiasm aroused by Liszt's playing and his personality - the two are inseparable - reached a climax at Vienna and Budapest in 1839-1840, when he received a patent of nobility from the emperor of Austria, and a sword of honour from the magnates of Hungary in the name of the nation.

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  • From 1869 onwards Abbe Liszt divided his time between Rome and Weimar, where during the summer months he received pupils - gratis as formerly - and, from 1876 up to his death at Bayreuth on the 31st of July 1886, he also taught for several months every year at the Hungarian Conservatoire of Budapest.

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  • A lofty and magnetic orator, his speeches were published at Budapest in 1896; and he is the author of an interesting dissertation, Esthetics and Politics, the Artist and the Statesman (Hung.) (Budapest, 1895).

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  • See Lajos Merenyi, Prince Paul Esterhazy (Hung.) (Budapest, 1895).

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  • He made at Vienna an important collection of paintings and engravings, which came into the possession of the Hungarian Academy at Budapest in 1865.

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  • See Aus den Papieren des Grafen Aurel Dessewffy (Pest, 1843); Memorial Wreath to Count Aurel Dessewffy (Hung.), (Budapest, 1857); Collected Works of Count Dessewffy, with a Biography (Hung.), (Budapest, 1887).

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  • Zichy, Voyages au Caucase (2 vols., Budapest, 1897).

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  • The terms of Moldavian submission were further regulated by a firman signed by the sultan Suleiman at Budapest in 1529 by which the yearly present or backshish, as the tribute was euphoniously called, was fixed at 4000 ducats, 40 horses and 25 falcons, and the voivode was bound at need to supply the Turkish army with a contingent of r000 men.

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  • Of greater importance was the collection of fables with their " moral " translated and modified from the Servian of Obrenovich - Fabule moralicesti, by Tzikindeal (Budapest, 1814).

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  • Radovici or Dinu din Golesti, an enlightened Walachian boyar, who was one of the first Rumanians to describe a journey in Western Europe, is also the author of a collection of maxims and parables, Adunare de pilde bisericesti filosofesti (Budapest, 1824); he left a larger collection in MS. partly edited by Zane in his Proverbele Romdnilor, vols.

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  • P. Maior published an almost identical history (Budapest, 1812), and it is probable that he had made use of Klain's composition.

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  • George Sincai (1753-1816), who was an intimate friend of Klain and collaborated in most of his works, succeeded him as revisor at the printing office in Budapest.

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  • In 1848-1849 it formed a refuge for the national government and legislature when Budapest fell into the hands of the Austrians; and it was in the great Calvinist church that, on Kossuth's motion (April 14th, 1849) the resolution was passed declaring the house of Habsburg to have forfeited the crown of St Stephen.

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  • From 1888 to 1893 he was consul-general at Budapest, in 1894 secretary of embassy at Constantinople, from 1894 to 1895 agent in Bulgaria, and from 1895 to 1904 minister in Morocco.

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  • This important work, published at Budapest (1856-1860), extends to 1707.

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  • It was now, too, that he published his famous work Stadium, suggesting a whole series of useful and indeed indispensable reforms (1833), which was followed by Hunnia (1834), which advocated the extension and beautifying of Budapest so as to make it the worthy capital of a future great power.

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  • See Life of Szechenyi, by Zsigmond Kemeny (Hung.; Pest, 1870); Aurel Kecskemethy, The Last Years and Death of Count Szechenyi (Hung.; Pest, 1866); Menyhert Lonyai, Count Szechenyi and his Posthumous Writings (Hung.; Budapest, 1875); Max Falk, "Der Graf Stephen Szechenyi and seine Zeit" (in the Oesterreichische Revue, Vienna, 1867); Antal Zichy, Count Szechenyi as a Pedagogue (Hung.; Budapest, 1876); Pal Gyulai, Szechenyi as a Writer (Hung.; Budapest, 1892); Antal Zichy, Biographical Sketch of Count Stephen Szechenyi (Hung.; 2 vols., Budapest, 1896-1897).

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  • Kallay was an honorary member of the Budapest and Vienna academies of science, and attained some eminence as a writer.

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  • See Vilmos Fraknoi, Tamils Bakocz (Hung.) (Budapest, 1889).

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  • The Mortgage Bank (Uprava Fondova), founded in 1862, is a state institution which lends money for agricultural operations, &c. The Export Bank, founded in 1901, is a private bank under state supervision, with branches in Budapest, Vienna, Berlin, &c. Its chief object is the furtherance of Servian foreign commerce.

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  • The first telegraph line was constructed as early as 1855; telegrams between Constantinople, Sofia, Budapest and Vienna pass over lines constructed by the Servian government (under conventions with Austria-Hungary and Turkey) in 1899 and 1906.

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  • The city and territories of Fiume, the sole important harbour on this coast, are included in Hungary proper, and controlled by the Budapest government.

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  • In May 1870 Fiume was annexed to Hungary, but in 1873 the Croats received as compensation an increase of their guaranteed revenue to £350,000, an addition of seven to the number of their representatives at Budapest, and a promise that the military frontier should be incorporated in the existing civil provinces.

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  • The Hungarian government also, throughout the latter half of the 19th century, expended vast sums at Budapest for the improvement of navigation and the protection of the town from inundation, and in the regularization of the Danube down to Orsova.

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  • The problem of draining and utilizing these lands was not the only difficulty to be surmounted by the Hungarian engineers; the requirements of navigation and the necessity in winter of preventing the formation of large ice-fields, such as caused the disastrous floods at Budapest in 1838, had also to be considered.

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  • A less important society is the Rumanian State Navigation Company, possessing a large flotilla of tugs and barges, which run to Budapest, where they have established a combined service with the South Danube German Company for the transport of goods from Pest to Regensburg.

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  • See Edon Hamvay, Life of Janos Damjanich (Hung.), (Budapest, 1904).

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  • After being educated at Berlin, Heidelberg and Budapest, he entered the ministry of the interior for the purpose of studying technical and economical questions at the fountain-head, and soon became a specialist in agrarian matters.

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  • His Magyar agrdrpolitik (Budapest, 1897), authoritative on its subject, was translated into German the same year (Leipzig).

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  • Done in duplicate at Budapest this first day of November 1978, in the English and Hungarian languages, both texts being equally authoritative.

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  • The Danube curves gently and reflects in Budapest's broad avenues, leafy parks and elaborate bathhouses.

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  • Dirty and run down in parts, incredibly chic and modern in places, Budapest has an unshakeable charm.

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  • The mother's first indication of trouble came when she met the plane at the airport in Budapest and Eva did not disembark.

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  • He received his Ph.D. from Budapest in cognitive electrophysiology.

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  • Although criticized at the time for being too garish, it's a far cry from the bleak functionality of today's Budapest malls.

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  • Moog (synthesizer)have a poor quality color Budapest with a censored Martha moog solo.

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  • Catholic and protestant churches and other religious sites are also omnipresent in Budapest.

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  • She lives in Budapest, where apart from writing and translating poetry, she designs and produces stained glass windows.

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  • Having provoked riots in Budapest & Berlin Antheil had exactly the right cachet for them.

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  • Well, next semester my very independent daughter is off to Budapest of all places.

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  • Six months later, Hungary confirms its overwhelming superiority over England with a 7 1 victory in Budapest, Hungary.

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  • The first electric tram opened in Budapest in 1887.

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  • The fullest account of the Revolution is given in Helfert, Geschichte Oesterreichs (Leipzig, 1869, &c.), representing the Austrian view, which may be compared with that of C. Gracza, History of the Hungarian War of Independence, 1848-1849 (in Hungarian) (Budapest, 1894).

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  • Thus eminent servants of the state such as Mustafa Pasha, Sokolli's nephew - who for twelve years had ruled the sanjak of Budapest with conspicuous enlightenment and success - were deposed or executed to make way for the nominees of the harem.

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  • On the ist of January 1897 he was appointed president of the newly created judicial commission at Budapest, and for the next few years held aloof from politics, even under the ex-lex government of Fejervary.

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  • On the sources see Hendrik Marczali, Ungarns Geschichtsquellen im Zeitalter des Arpdden (Berlin, 1882); Kaindl, Studien zu den ungarischen Geschichtsquellen (Vienna, 1894-1902); and, for a general appreciation, Mangold, Pragmatic History of the Hungarians (in Mag., 5th ed., Budapest, 1907).

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  • Yugoslavia consists of the former independent Kingdoms of Serbia and Montenegro; the triune Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia-Dalmatia (of which the first two enjoyed special autonomy under the Kingdom of Hungary, and sent 40 delegates from their own Parliament in Zagreb to that of Budapest, while the third was one of the 17 provinces of the Austrian Empire, with a local diet at Zara); parts of the Banat, Backa and Baranja (which were integral portions of Hungary proper); Slovenia (consisting of portions of Carniola, Carinthia, Styria and Istria, each holding a position in Austria analogous to Dalmatia); and Bosnia-Herzegovina (which was from 1878 to 1918 under the joint administration of Austria and Hungary and had its own diet since 1910).

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  • Our only existing memorials of the great work are a number of small pen-studies of fighting men and horses, three splendid studies in red chalk at Budapest for heads in the principal group, one head at Oxford copied by a contemporary of the size of the original cartoon (above life); a tiny sketch, also at Oxford, by Raphael after the principal group; an engraving done by Zacchia of Lucca in 1558 not after the original but after a copy; a 16th-century Flemish drawing of the principal group, and another, splendidly spirited, by Rubens, both copies of copies; with Edelinck's fine engraving after the Rubens drawing.

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  • When her friend added that some of the pupils he had seen in Budapest had more than one hundred tunes in their heads, she said, laughing, "I think their heads must be very noisy."

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  • Enquire about a tailor-made itinerary to include, Budapest, Prague, or Bratislava.

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  • Zsa Zsa and Eva Gabor - The Gabor sisters were born in Budapest, Hungary, and also have an older sister, Magda.

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  • You can also extend the trip to visit Paris, Brussels, Belgium or Budapest, as well.

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  • You can also add on to the tour package by selecting a three-night extension to Budapest, Hungary, or a four-night extension to Prague, Czech Republic.

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  • Although there are many differences from one cruise company to another, many of these European river cruises start in Hungary and travel through Budapest, Bratislava and Vienna.

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  • Guests spend 12 days on board and travel from Vilshofen to Budapest.

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  • It spread around Moscow and finally made its way to Budapest, Hungary where programmers ported it to various other platforms.

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  • Though Adrienne Vittadini handbags invoke images of contemporary Italian fashion, their designer, Adrienne Vittadini, was actually born in Budapest, Hungary in the year 1945.

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  • Her family left Budapest during the 1965 Hungarian revolution with twelve-year-old Adrienne in tow.

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  • It possesses a Roman Catholic seminary for priests, and was the seat of a university founded in 1635, which was transferred to Budapest in 1777.

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