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buckingham

buckingham

buckingham Sentence Examples

  • He was introduced to public life and to court by his neighbour in Yorkshire, George, 2nd duke of Buckingham, was elected M.P. for York in 1665, and gained the "first step in his future rise" by joining Buckingham in his attack on Clarendon in 1667.

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  • The result was that Shaftesbury, Buckingham, Wharton and Salisbury were sent to the Tower.

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  • Here Morton encouraged Buckingham's designs against Richard, and put him into communication with the queen dowager, Elizabeth Woodville, and with Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond.

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  • He escaped from Brecknock Castle to Flanders, avoided Buckingham's fate, and devoted his energies during the next two years to creating a party in England and abroad in the interests of the earl of Richmond.

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  • An able pamphlet attacking the administration of the marquess of Buckingham in 17 9 0 brought him to the notice of the Whig club; and in September 1791 he wrote a remarkable essay over the signature "A Northern Whig," of which Io,000 copies are said to have been sold.

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  • leaders of the Cabal ministry, Buckingham and Arlington.

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  • Only a few of the principal ones can be mentioned: - the Custom House, the Royal Exchange, Marlborough House, Buckingham House, and the Hall of the College of Physicians - now destroyed; others which exist are - at Oxford, the Sheldonian theatre, the Ashmolean museum, the Tom Tower of Christ Church, and Queen's College chapel; at Cambridge, the library of Trinity College and the chapel of Pembroke, the latter at the cost of Bishop Matthew Wren, his uncle.

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  • This royal bride died of consumption, leaving no living child, and her husband took in 1513, as his second wife, Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of that duke of Buckingham upon whom the old duke of Norfolk, the tears upon his cheeks, was forced to pass sentence of death.

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  • See also the duke of Buckingham and Chandos, Memoirs of the Court and Cabinets of George III.

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  • His eldest son, an officer in the army, was killed in a duel; and his second son, Charles, intended for the church, left Trinity College and became companion and secretary to the duke of Buckingham, at whose house he died.

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  • In some instances colleges are supported entirely by one county, as is the Holmes Chapel College, Cheshire; in others a college is supported by several affiliated counties, as in the case of the agricultural department of the University College, Reading, which acts in connexion with the counties of Berks, Oxon, Hants and Buckingham.

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  • Yorkshire, Somerset, Buckingham, France, Switzer land, Spain, Italy, Lower Austria, Baden, Elsass, Hesse, Hanover, Brunswick, Sizran, Tiflis, Siberia, Persia, Madagascar, Alaska, Wyoming, Colorado, Mexico, Argentina.

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  • The only published collections of documents relating to the state are Buckingham Smith's Collection de varios documentos para la historic de la Florida y tierras adyacentes (London, 1857), and Benjamin F.

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  • He entered parliament in 1741 as member for Buckingham, and continued to represent that borough till his death.

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  • His son, the second Earl Temple, was created marquess, and his grandson duke, of Buckingham.

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  • On the duke of Buckingham's nomination, Wesley was for six years a pupil at Charterhouse.

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  • Buckingham, Travels in Mesopotamia (1827); Sir R.

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  • He also supported the proceedings against the duke of Buckingham.

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  • ARTHUR WILLIAM PATRICK ALBERT, CONNAUGHT Duke Of (1850-), third son and seventh child of Queen Victoria, was born at Buckingham Palace on the 1st of May 1850.

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  • 1743), who married James Annesley, 5th earl of Anglesey, and afterwards John Sheffield, duke of Buckingham and Normanby.

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  • The Marble Arch was intended as a monument to Nelson, and first stood in front of Buckingham Palace, being moved to its present site in 1851.

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  • The present London residence of the sovereign is Buckingham Palace, on the west side of St p James's Park, with beautiful gardens behind it.

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  • Buckingham House was built in 1705 for the duke of Buckinghamshire, and purchased by George III.

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  • In 1663 the duke of Buckingham, although unable to obtain a renewal of the monopoly of glass-making, secured the prohibition of the importation of glass for mirrors, coach plates, spectacles, tubes and lenses, and contributed to the revival of the glass industry in all its branches.

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  • Evelyn notes in his Diary a visit in 1673 to the Italian glass-house at Greenwich, " where glass was blown of finer metal than that of Murano," and a visit in 1677 to the duke of Buckingham's glass-works, where they made huge " vases of mettal as cleare, ponderous and thick as chrystal; also looking-glasses far larger and better than any that came from Venice."

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  • Buckingham, but successfully established by C. W.

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  • She helped to raise Buckingham to power in the place of Somerset, maintained friendly relations with him, and approved of his guidance and control of the king.

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  • She used all her influence in favour of the unfortunate Raleigh, answering his petition to her for protection with a personal letter of appeal to Buckingham to save his life.

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  • On the fall of Bacon in 1621 Williams, who had meantime ingratiated himself with the duke of Buckingham, was appointed lord keeper, and was at the same time made bishop of Lincoln, retaining also the deanery of Westminster.

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  • He warned Buckingham and Prince Charles of the perils of their project for the Spanish marriage, and after their return from Madrid he encountered their resentment by opposing war with Spain.

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  • princess A curious scare was occasioned at Buckingham Palace, royal.

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  • In the spring there was a fancy-dress ball at Buckingham Palace, which remained memorable owing to the offence loyal members of the Southampton Corporation remem sorebered Raleigh, and spread their robes on the ground reigns.

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  • Never again during her reign did the queen live in London, and Buckingham Palace was only used for occasional visits of a few days.

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  • On the 2nd of July she reviewed at Buckingham Palace some 28,000 volunteers of London and the home counties.

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  • In April 1622 Laud, by the king's orders, took part in a controversy with Percy, a Jesuit, known as Fisher, the aim of which was to prevent the conversion of the countess of Buckingham, the favourite's mother, to Romanism, and his opinions expressed on that occasion show considerable breadth and comprehension.

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  • A close and somewhat strange intimacy, considering the difference in the characters and ideals of the two men, between Laud and Buckingham now began, and proved the chief instrument of Laud's advancement.

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  • He supported the king's prerogative throughout the conflict with the parliament, preached in favour of it before Charles's second parliament in 1626, and assisted in Buckingham's defence.

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  • He was far less great as a ruler in the state, showing as a judge a tyrannical spirit both in the star chamber and highcommission court, threatening Felton, the assassin of Buckingham, with the rack, and showing special activity in procuring a cruel sentence in the former court against Alexander Leighton in June 1630 and against Henry Sherfield in 1634.

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  • Laud's complete neglect of the national sentiment, in his belief that the exercise of mere power was sufficient to suppress it, is a principal proof of his total lack of true statesmanship. The hostility to "innovations in religion," it is generally allowed, was a far stronger incentive to the rebellion against the arbitrary power of the crown, than even the violation of constitutional liberties; and to Laud, therefore, more than to Strafford, to Buckingham, or even perhaps to Charles himself, is especially due the responsibility for the catastrophe.

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  • In his own character it produced the somewhat blunted moral sense which led to the few incidents in his career which need moral defence, his performance of the marriage ceremony between his first patron Lord Devonshire and the latter's mistress, the divorced wife of Lord Rich, an act completely at variance with his principles; his strange intimacy with Buckingham; his love of power and place.

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  • The favourite Buckingham stirred the flames of his master's discontent.

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  • After the assassination of Buckingham in 1628 the barrier between the married pair was broken down, and the bond of affection which from that moment united them was never loosened.

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  • Buckingham, a bronze statue by Karl Gerhardt of Nathan Hale, a bronze tablet (also by Karl Gerhardt) in memory of John Fitch (1743-1798), the inventor; a portrait of Washington, purchased by the state in 1800 from the artist, Gilbert Stuart; and a series of oil portraits of the colonial and state governors.

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  • There are several houses of interest, notably the Priory and Dr Awbrey's residence (now called Buckingham House), both built about the middle of the 16th century, but the finest specimen is Newton (about a mile out, near Llanfaes) built in 1582 by Sir John Games (a descendant of Sir David Gam), but now a farmhouse.

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  • Henry Stafford, 2nd duke of Buckingham, resided a good deal at the castle, and Morton, bishop of Ely, whose custody as a prisoner was entrusted to him, plotted with him there for the dethronement of Richard III., for which Stafford was executed in 1483.

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  • 1482), son of Humphrey Stafford, duke of Buckingham, and later Thomas Stanley, afterwards earl of Derby.

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  • Howe enlisted the support of John Bright and other members of parliament, but the imperial government was firm, and the duke of Buckingham, as colonial secretary, soon informed the governor-general in a despatch that consent could not be given for the withdrawal of Nova Scotia from the Dominion.

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  • The John McIntire public library (about 20,000 volumes) is a consolidation of the Zanesville Athenaeum (1827) and the Eunice Buckingham library of the former Putnam Female Seminary (1835) here; Andrew Carnegie contributed $50,000 for the erection of the building.

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  • They travelled, lived in London, saw society, and attended a "Drawing-room" at Buckingham Palace.

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  • THOMAS AUDLEY AUDLEY, Baron (c. 1488-1544), lord chancellor of England, whose parentage is unknown, is believed to have studied at Buckingham College, Cambridge.

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  • In 1542 he re-endowed and re-established Buckingham College, Cambridge, under the new name of St Mary Magdalene, and ordained in the statutes that his heirs, "the possessors of the late monastery of Walden," should be visitors of the college in perpetuum.

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  • Mitchell (" Ik Marvel ") was also born here; and Norwich was the home after 1825 of William Alfred Buckingham (1804-1875), war governor of Connecticut.

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  • In the 15th century Henry Stafford, duke of Buckingham, had a fortified manor-house here, traces of which remain.

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  • He offered his daughter Frances, then little more than a child, in marriage to Sir John Villiers, brother of the favourite Buckingham.

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  • The last act of his public career was to bewail with tears the ruin which he declared the duke of Buckingham was bringing upon the country.

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  • Upon the attainder of Edward, duke of Buckingham, in 1521, the lordship of Brecon with its dependencies became vested in the crown.

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  • The massively moulded ormolu stair balustrade of Northumberland House, now at 49 Prince's Gate; the candelabra at Windsor and Buckingham Palace, produced in Birmingham by the firm of Messenger; the cast-iron railings with javelin heads and lictors' fasces, the tripods, Corinthian column standard lamps and candelabra, boat-shaped oil lamps and tent-shaped lustres with classic mountings, are examples of the metal-work of a style which, outside the eccentric Brighton Pavilion and excursions into Gothic and Elizabethan, was universally accepted in the United Kingdom from the days of the Regency until after the accession of Victoria.

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  • NEWPORT PAGNELL a market town in the Buckingham parliamentary division of Buckinghamshire, England, 56 m.

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  • ALICE MAUD MARY, GRAND-DUCHESS OF HESSE-DARMSTADT (1843-1878), second daughter and third child of Queen Victoria, was born at Buckingham Palace, on the 25th of April 1843.

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  • He entered with great vigour on his new labours, and in less than a month he was able to report to Buckingham that he had cleared off all outstanding chancery cases.

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  • Coke was in disgrace but not in despair; there seemed to be a way whereby he could reconcile himself to Buckingham, through the marriage of his daughter, who had an ample fortune, to Sir John Villiers, brother of the marquess, who was penniless or nearly so.

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  • His reasons for disapproval he explained to the king and Buckingham, but found to his surprise that their indignation was strongly roused against him.

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  • He received from both bitter letters of reproof; it was rumoured that he would be disgraced, and Buckingham was said to have compared his present conduct to his previous unfaithfulness to Essex.

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  • Bacon, who seems to have acted from a simple desire to do the best for Buckingham's own interests, at once changed his course, advanced the match by every means in his power, and by a humble apology appeased the indignation that had been excited against him.

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  • Buckingham, notwithstanding the advice he had received from Bacon himself, was in the habit of addressing letters to him recommending the causes of suitors.

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  • The terms of Buckingham's note' concerning it might easily have aroused doubts; and we find that the further course of the action was to all appearances exactly accommodated to Dr Steward, who 4 A position which Bacon in some respects approved.

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  • It is, of course, dangerous to form an extreme judgment on an isolated and partially understood case, of which also we have no explanation from Bacon himself, but if the interpretation advanced by Heath be the true one, Bacon certainly suffered his first, and, so far as we can see, just judgment on the case to be set aside, and the whole matter to be reopened in obedience to a request from Buckingham.

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  • In November 1620, when a new parliament was summoned to meet on January following, he earnestly pressed that the most obnoxious patents, those of alehouses and inns, and the monopoly of gold and silver thread, should be given up, and wrote to Buckingham, whose brothers were interested, advising him to withdraw them from the impending storm.

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  • This proposal, though pressed by Coke, was allowed to drop; while the king and Buckingham, acting under the advice of Williams, afterwards lord keeper, agreed to give up the monopolies.

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  • The cause of the delay seems to have lain with Buckingham, whose friendship had cooled, and who had taken offence at the fallen chancellor's unwillingness to part with York House.

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  • Earls, marquesses and dukes of Buckingham >>

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  • He received instruction in mathematics from Hobbes, and was early initiated into all the vices of the age by Buckingham and Percy.

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  • He was compelled to dismiss all his followers except Buckingham, and to submit to interminable sermons, which generally contained violent invectives against his parents and himself.

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  • After leading an unsuccessful cavalry charge against the enemy he fled, about 6 P.M., accompanied by Buckingham, Derby, Wilmot, Lauderdale and others, towards Kidderminster, taking refuge at Whiteladies, about 25 m.

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  • To Clarendon now succeeded the ministry of Buckingham and Arlington, who with Lauderdale, Ashley (afterwards Lord Shaftesbury) and Clifford, constituted the so-called Cabal ministry in 1672.

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  • In the second, signed by Arlington, Buckingham, Lauderdale and Ashley on the 31st of December 1670,nothing was said about the conversion,and the pension provided for that purpose was added to the military subsidy, neither of these treaties being communicated to parliament or to the nation.

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  • His second wife, the "wanton Shrewsbury" of Pope, a daughter of the earl of Cardigan, was seduced by the duke of Buckingham, whom the outraged husband challenged to a duel.

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  • The countess, it is said, was present at the scene, and held Buckingham's horse in the disguise of a page, saw her husband killed, and then clasped her lover in her arms, receiving blood-stains upon her dress from the embrace.

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  • FENNY STRATFORD, a market town in the Buckingham Parliamentary division of Buckinghamshire, England, 48 m.

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  • Thus Buckingham appears to be the most inland town in England, being 75 m.

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  • The Jurassic belt is occupied by the counties of Gloucester, Oxford, Buckingham, Bedford, Northampton, Huntingdon, Rutland, Lincoln and the North Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • This effect is well seen in the way in which the wind blowing directly up the Severn estuary is directed along the edges of the Oolitic escarpment north-eastward, thus displacing the centre of cold in winter to the east coast, and the centre of heat in summer to the lower Thames, from the position which both centres would occupy, if calms prevailed, in a beit running from Birmingham to Buckingham.

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  • Aylesbury is the assize town for the county, though Buckingham is the county town.

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  • It thus includes a large number of the finest buildings in London, from the Law Courts in the east to the Imperial Institute in the west, Buckingham and St James's palaces, the National Gallery, and most of the greatest residences of the wealthy classes.

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  • Another branch of the house of York might have given trouble Ursula, married to Henry, Lord Stafford, son of Edward, duke of Buckingham.

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  • The offer was not accepted, and Mr. Law, though he joined the Buckingham Palace Conference in a last hope of aiming at a reasonable settlement, was anticipating the immediate outbreak of civil war in Ireland when the World War supervened.

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  • His Life and Times by William Buckingham and the Hon.

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  • In 914 Buckingham was fortified and the Danes of Bedfordshire submitted.

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  • The duke of Buckingham, who was the chancellor of the university, endeavoured to effect a compromise which, he says, " I hope may for the present satisfy both sides.

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  • These confidants, the duke of Buckingham, the lords Howard and Lovel, and a few more, must have known from an early date that he was aiming at the crown, though it is improbable that they suspected that his plan involved the murder of the rightful heirs as well as mere usurpation.

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  • A few days later, having packed London with his own armed retainers and those of Buckingham and his other confidants, he openly put forward his pretensions to the throne.

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  • This preposterous theory was set forth by Buckingham, first to the mayor and corporation of London, and next day to an assembly of the estates of the realm held in St Pauls.

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  • He paid his adherents lavishly for their support, making Lord Howard duke of Norfolk, and giving Buckingham enormous grants of estates and offices.

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  • Less than three months after his coronation the first insurrection broke out; it was headedstrangely enoughby the Bucking- duke of Buckingham, who seems to have been shocked mffii7on.

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  • He did not take arms in his own cause, though after the house of York the house of Buckingham had the best claim to the throne, as representing Thomas of Woodstock, the youngest son of Edward III.

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  • A number of scattered risings in the south were put down by Richards troops, while Buckingham, who had raised his banner in Wales, was prevented from bringing aid by a week of extraordinary rains which made the Severn impassable.

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  • On Wolseys back also was saddled the most iniquitous of Henrys acts of tyranny against individualsthe judicial murder of the duke of Buckingham, the highest head among the English nobility.

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  • The cardinal bore the blame, because he and Buckingham had notoriously disliked each other; but the deed had really been of the kings own contriving.

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  • Indolent in his temper, James had been in the habit of leaving his patronage in the hands of a confidential favorite, and that position was now filled by George Villiers, marquess and afterwards duke of Buckingham.

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  • The ill-considered journey to Madrid, in which Prince Charles, accompanied by Buckingham, hoped to wring from the Spanish statesmen a promise to restore the Palatinate in compliment for his marriage with the infanta, ended also in total failure.

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  • When the king explained his necessities, they intimated that they had no confidence in Buckingham, and asked that, before they granted further supply, the king would name counsellors whom they could trust to advise him on its employment.

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  • The second parliament of the reign (1626) impeached Buckingham for crimes against the state.

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  • Once more Charles dissolved parliament to save Buckingham.

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  • The House of Commons~ brought fresh charges against Buckingham, whose murder soon after the prorogation removed one subject of dispute.

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  • Now, in 1769, Burke bought an estate at Beaconsfield, in the county of Buckingham.

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  • HOBART, the capital of Tasmania, in the county of Buckingham, on the southern coast of the island.

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  • An invasion of England was planned in 1483 in concert with the duke of Buckingham's rising; but stormy weather at sea and an inundation in the Severn defeated the two movements.

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  • and BUCKINGHAM, FIRST DUKE oF) led to war, for the English court was offended by the Spanish refusal to aid in the restoration of the count palatine, son-in-law of James I., to his dominions.

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  • After being in the possession of the earls of Clare and Hertford, and of the earls of Gloucester, it became the property of the Staffords, and on the attainder of the duke of Buckingham in the reign of Henry VIII.

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  • In February 1782 Grenville was returned to parliament as member for the borough of Buckingham, and in the following September he became secretary to the lord lieutenant of Ireland, who at this time was his brother, Earl Temple, afterwards marquess of Buckingham.

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  • With Henry Stafford, duke of Buckingham, and others he attempted to raise a rebellion against Richard III.

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  • Buckingham (1804-1875), one of the ablest and most zealous of the " war-governors," and afterwards, from 1869 until his death, a member of the United States Senate, issued a call for volunteers in April 1861; and soon 54 companies, more than five times the state's quota, were organized.

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  • Buckingham Joseph R.

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  • Buckingham at 20,000, and the nearer as `Ain Zalkha (i.e.

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  • Buckingham (Travels, pp. 108 -Iio).

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  • The population was estimated by Olivier in 1796 at 20,000 to 24,000, by Buckingham at 50,000, by Chernik in 1873 at 40,000, by Sachau in 1879 at 50,000, in Baedeker's Handbook in 1906 at 30,000.

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  • Buckingham, Travels in Mesopotamia (1827); E.

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  • In a scarcely audible voice Buckingham said " The villain hath killed me!

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  • cadet uniforms, walked back from Buckingham Palace for refreshments at Chelsea Barracks.

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  • Mrs. Thursday - You Don't Have to Book Buckingham Palace A cockney charlady becomes the main beneficiary to a retired tycoon's estate.

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  • In 1958 its sponsored movie in 16mm color about the breeding of welsh corgis was screened privately for the Queen at Buckingham Palace.

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  • Two Queens of Hollywood become dames from the British Queen at Buckingham Palace.

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  • Henry made an unsuccessful attempt to land in England during the abortive revolt (1483) of Henry Stafford, 2d duke of Buckingham.

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  • FA vase record Buckingham Town have had a lot of success in the past in the fa vase record Buckingham Town have had a lot of success in the past in the FA Vase.

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  • gaolout the Museum: One of the first purpose-built county jails in England, it now tells the story of Buckingham.

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  • He was alarmed to see pictures of the giant gerbil sniffing round the Houses of Parliament, the Tower of London and Buckingham Palace.

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  • Owing to her illness, she elected to receive the insignia without a visit to Buckingham Palace.

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  • Tissa and his family have a date to attend an investiture at Buckingham Palace in December 2003.

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  • The Prince of Wales, at a private investiture at Buckingham Palace some 3 years or so ago was created Lord of the Isles.

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  • purpose-built county jails in England, it now tells the story of Buckingham.

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  • Lando relates the furor caused by the reading to widespread resentment of Buckingham.

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  • They drove down to Buckingham Palace in an American sedan, arrived at the gates and demanded to see ' their ' monarch.

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  • sentry on the front gates of Buckingham Palace.

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  • sentry all believed that London had been captured, and that German sentries were outside Buckingham Palace.

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  • His ungainly movement and grinning face were very different from Buckingham's effortlessly suave, understated elegance.

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  • tranquillityft the post-modern suburban utopia of Milton Keynes for the relative country tranquility of Buckingham town.

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  • voluble member of that Committee- John Bercow (Buckingham) (Con ): And valuable.

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  • The new administration was headed by Buckingham, in whose toleration and comprehension principles Ashley shared to the full.

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  • The result was that Shaftesbury, Buckingham, Wharton and Salisbury were sent to the Tower.

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  • Silk Buckingham, and he was a regular contributor for the rest of his life.

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  • He was one of the executors of Edward IV.'s will in 1483, and the story of the future Richard III., while preparing Morton's arrest, joking with him about the strawberries the bishop grew in his garden at Holborn is well known and apparently authentic. Oxford University in vain petitioned for Morton's release, and after some weeks in the Tower he was entrusted to the duke of Buckingham's charge at Brecknock.

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  • Here Morton encouraged Buckingham's designs against Richard, and put him into communication with the queen dowager, Elizabeth Woodville, and with Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond.

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  • He escaped from Brecknock Castle to Flanders, avoided Buckingham's fate, and devoted his energies during the next two years to creating a party in England and abroad in the interests of the earl of Richmond.

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  • An able pamphlet attacking the administration of the marquess of Buckingham in 17 9 0 brought him to the notice of the Whig club; and in September 1791 he wrote a remarkable essay over the signature "A Northern Whig," of which Io,000 copies are said to have been sold.

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  • He was introduced to public life and to court by his neighbour in Yorkshire, George, 2nd duke of Buckingham, was elected M.P. for York in 1665, and gained the "first step in his future rise" by joining Buckingham in his attack on Clarendon in 1667.

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  • leaders of the Cabal ministry, Buckingham and Arlington.

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  • During the brief period of his married life he held the 'appointment of lecturer at Buckingham Hall, now Magdalene College.

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  • Only a few of the principal ones can be mentioned: - the Custom House, the Royal Exchange, Marlborough House, Buckingham House, and the Hall of the College of Physicians - now destroyed; others which exist are - at Oxford, the Sheldonian theatre, the Ashmolean museum, the Tom Tower of Christ Church, and Queen's College chapel; at Cambridge, the library of Trinity College and the chapel of Pembroke, the latter at the cost of Bishop Matthew Wren, his uncle.

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  • This royal bride died of consumption, leaving no living child, and her husband took in 1513, as his second wife, Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of that duke of Buckingham upon whom the old duke of Norfolk, the tears upon his cheeks, was forced to pass sentence of death.

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  • 1 He especially disapproved of another clause in the same bill forbidding the importation of Irish cattle into England, a mischievous measure promoted by the duke of Buckingham, and he opposed again the bill brought in with that object in January 1 Protests of the Lords, by J.

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  • See also the duke of Buckingham and Chandos, Memoirs of the Court and Cabinets of George III.

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  • His eldest son, an officer in the army, was killed in a duel; and his second son, Charles, intended for the church, left Trinity College and became companion and secretary to the duke of Buckingham, at whose house he died.

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  • In some instances colleges are supported entirely by one county, as is the Holmes Chapel College, Cheshire; in others a college is supported by several affiliated counties, as in the case of the agricultural department of the University College, Reading, which acts in connexion with the counties of Berks, Oxon, Hants and Buckingham.

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  • Yorkshire, Somerset, Buckingham, France, Switzer land, Spain, Italy, Lower Austria, Baden, Elsass, Hesse, Hanover, Brunswick, Sizran, Tiflis, Siberia, Persia, Madagascar, Alaska, Wyoming, Colorado, Mexico, Argentina.

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  • The only published collections of documents relating to the state are Buckingham Smith's Collection de varios documentos para la historic de la Florida y tierras adyacentes (London, 1857), and Benjamin F.

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  • He entered parliament in 1741 as member for Buckingham, and continued to represent that borough till his death.

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  • His son, the second Earl Temple, was created marquess, and his grandson duke, of Buckingham.

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  • On the duke of Buckingham's nomination, Wesley was for six years a pupil at Charterhouse.

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  • Buckingham, Travels in Mesopotamia (1827); Sir R.

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  • He also supported the proceedings against the duke of Buckingham.

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  • ARTHUR WILLIAM PATRICK ALBERT, CONNAUGHT Duke Of (1850-), third son and seventh child of Queen Victoria, was born at Buckingham Palace on the 1st of May 1850.

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  • 1743), who married James Annesley, 5th earl of Anglesey, and afterwards John Sheffield, duke of Buckingham and Normanby.

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  • Its lake, the broad Mall leading up to Buckingham Palace, and the proximity of the government buildings in Whitehall, combine to beautify it.

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  • The Marble Arch was intended as a monument to Nelson, and first stood in front of Buckingham Palace, being moved to its present site in 1851.

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  • The present London residence of the sovereign is Buckingham Palace, on the west side of St p James's Park, with beautiful gardens behind it.

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  • Buckingham House was built in 1705 for the duke of Buckinghamshire, and purchased by George III.

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  • In 1663 the duke of Buckingham, although unable to obtain a renewal of the monopoly of glass-making, secured the prohibition of the importation of glass for mirrors, coach plates, spectacles, tubes and lenses, and contributed to the revival of the glass industry in all its branches.

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  • Evelyn notes in his Diary a visit in 1673 to the Italian glass-house at Greenwich, " where glass was blown of finer metal than that of Murano," and a visit in 1677 to the duke of Buckingham's glass-works, where they made huge " vases of mettal as cleare, ponderous and thick as chrystal; also looking-glasses far larger and better than any that came from Venice."

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  • Buckingham, but successfully established by C. W.

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  • She helped to raise Buckingham to power in the place of Somerset, maintained friendly relations with him, and approved of his guidance and control of the king.

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  • She used all her influence in favour of the unfortunate Raleigh, answering his petition to her for protection with a personal letter of appeal to Buckingham to save his life.

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  • On the fall of Bacon in 1621 Williams, who had meantime ingratiated himself with the duke of Buckingham, was appointed lord keeper, and was at the same time made bishop of Lincoln, retaining also the deanery of Westminster.

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  • He warned Buckingham and Prince Charles of the perils of their project for the Spanish marriage, and after their return from Madrid he encountered their resentment by opposing war with Spain.

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  • princess A curious scare was occasioned at Buckingham Palace, royal.

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  • In the spring there was a fancy-dress ball at Buckingham Palace, which remained memorable owing to the offence loyal members of the Southampton Corporation remem sorebered Raleigh, and spread their robes on the ground reigns.

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  • Never again during her reign did the queen live in London, and Buckingham Palace was only used for occasional visits of a few days.

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  • On the 2nd of July she reviewed at Buckingham Palace some 28,000 volunteers of London and the home counties.

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  • He is reported on the 10th of August 1679 as being elected for Amersham (Buckingham) with Sir Roger Hill.

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  • In April 1622 Laud, by the king's orders, took part in a controversy with Percy, a Jesuit, known as Fisher, the aim of which was to prevent the conversion of the countess of Buckingham, the favourite's mother, to Romanism, and his opinions expressed on that occasion show considerable breadth and comprehension.

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  • A close and somewhat strange intimacy, considering the difference in the characters and ideals of the two men, between Laud and Buckingham now began, and proved the chief instrument of Laud's advancement.

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  • He supported the king's prerogative throughout the conflict with the parliament, preached in favour of it before Charles's second parliament in 1626, and assisted in Buckingham's defence.

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  • He was far less great as a ruler in the state, showing as a judge a tyrannical spirit both in the star chamber and highcommission court, threatening Felton, the assassin of Buckingham, with the rack, and showing special activity in procuring a cruel sentence in the former court against Alexander Leighton in June 1630 and against Henry Sherfield in 1634.

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  • Laud's complete neglect of the national sentiment, in his belief that the exercise of mere power was sufficient to suppress it, is a principal proof of his total lack of true statesmanship. The hostility to "innovations in religion," it is generally allowed, was a far stronger incentive to the rebellion against the arbitrary power of the crown, than even the violation of constitutional liberties; and to Laud, therefore, more than to Strafford, to Buckingham, or even perhaps to Charles himself, is especially due the responsibility for the catastrophe.

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  • In his own character it produced the somewhat blunted moral sense which led to the few incidents in his career which need moral defence, his performance of the marriage ceremony between his first patron Lord Devonshire and the latter's mistress, the divorced wife of Lord Rich, an act completely at variance with his principles; his strange intimacy with Buckingham; his love of power and place.

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  • The favourite Buckingham stirred the flames of his master's discontent.

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  • After the assassination of Buckingham in 1628 the barrier between the married pair was broken down, and the bond of affection which from that moment united them was never loosened.

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  • Buckingham, a bronze statue by Karl Gerhardt of Nathan Hale, a bronze tablet (also by Karl Gerhardt) in memory of John Fitch (1743-1798), the inventor; a portrait of Washington, purchased by the state in 1800 from the artist, Gilbert Stuart; and a series of oil portraits of the colonial and state governors.

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  • There are several houses of interest, notably the Priory and Dr Awbrey's residence (now called Buckingham House), both built about the middle of the 16th century, but the finest specimen is Newton (about a mile out, near Llanfaes) built in 1582 by Sir John Games (a descendant of Sir David Gam), but now a farmhouse.

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  • Henry Stafford, 2nd duke of Buckingham, resided a good deal at the castle, and Morton, bishop of Ely, whose custody as a prisoner was entrusted to him, plotted with him there for the dethronement of Richard III., for which Stafford was executed in 1483.

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  • Besides those already mentioned the persons of note born in the town include Henry Stafford, duke of Buckingham; Hugh Price, founder of Jesus College, Oxford; Dr Thomas Coke, the first Wesleyan missionary bishop in America; and Theophilus Jones, the historian of the county.

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  • 1482), son of Humphrey Stafford, duke of Buckingham, and later Thomas Stanley, afterwards earl of Derby.

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  • Howe enlisted the support of John Bright and other members of parliament, but the imperial government was firm, and the duke of Buckingham, as colonial secretary, soon informed the governor-general in a despatch that consent could not be given for the withdrawal of Nova Scotia from the Dominion.

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  • The John McIntire public library (about 20,000 volumes) is a consolidation of the Zanesville Athenaeum (1827) and the Eunice Buckingham library of the former Putnam Female Seminary (1835) here; Andrew Carnegie contributed $50,000 for the erection of the building.

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  • They travelled, lived in London, saw society, and attended a "Drawing-room" at Buckingham Palace.

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  • THOMAS AUDLEY AUDLEY, Baron (c. 1488-1544), lord chancellor of England, whose parentage is unknown, is believed to have studied at Buckingham College, Cambridge.

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  • In 1542 he re-endowed and re-established Buckingham College, Cambridge, under the new name of St Mary Magdalene, and ordained in the statutes that his heirs, "the possessors of the late monastery of Walden," should be visitors of the college in perpetuum.

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  • Mitchell (" Ik Marvel ") was also born here; and Norwich was the home after 1825 of William Alfred Buckingham (1804-1875), war governor of Connecticut.

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  • In the 15th century Henry Stafford, duke of Buckingham, had a fortified manor-house here, traces of which remain.

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  • He offered his daughter Frances, then little more than a child, in marriage to Sir John Villiers, brother of the favourite Buckingham.

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  • The last act of his public career was to bewail with tears the ruin which he declared the duke of Buckingham was bringing upon the country.

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  • Upon the attainder of Edward, duke of Buckingham, in 1521, the lordship of Brecon with its dependencies became vested in the crown.

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  • The massively moulded ormolu stair balustrade of Northumberland House, now at 49 Prince's Gate; the candelabra at Windsor and Buckingham Palace, produced in Birmingham by the firm of Messenger; the cast-iron railings with javelin heads and lictors' fasces, the tripods, Corinthian column standard lamps and candelabra, boat-shaped oil lamps and tent-shaped lustres with classic mountings, are examples of the metal-work of a style which, outside the eccentric Brighton Pavilion and excursions into Gothic and Elizabethan, was universally accepted in the United Kingdom from the days of the Regency until after the accession of Victoria.

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  • NEWPORT PAGNELL a market town in the Buckingham parliamentary division of Buckinghamshire, England, 56 m.

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  • ALICE MAUD MARY, GRAND-DUCHESS OF HESSE-DARMSTADT (1843-1878), second daughter and third child of Queen Victoria, was born at Buckingham Palace, on the 25th of April 1843.

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  • He entered with great vigour on his new labours, and in less than a month he was able to report to Buckingham that he had cleared off all outstanding chancery cases.

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  • Coke was in disgrace but not in despair; there seemed to be a way whereby he could reconcile himself to Buckingham, through the marriage of his daughter, who had an ample fortune, to Sir John Villiers, brother of the marquess, who was penniless or nearly so.

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  • His reasons for disapproval he explained to the king and Buckingham, but found to his surprise that their indignation was strongly roused against him.

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  • He received from both bitter letters of reproof; it was rumoured that he would be disgraced, and Buckingham was said to have compared his present conduct to his previous unfaithfulness to Essex.

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  • Bacon, who seems to have acted from a simple desire to do the best for Buckingham's own interests, at once changed his course, advanced the match by every means in his power, and by a humble apology appeased the indignation that had been excited against him.

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  • Buckingham, notwithstanding the advice he had received from Bacon himself, was in the habit of addressing letters to him recommending the causes of suitors.

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  • The terms of Buckingham's note' concerning it might easily have aroused doubts; and we find that the further course of the action was to all appearances exactly accommodated to Dr Steward, who 4 A position which Bacon in some respects approved.

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  • It is, of course, dangerous to form an extreme judgment on an isolated and partially understood case, of which also we have no explanation from Bacon himself, but if the interpretation advanced by Heath be the true one, Bacon certainly suffered his first, and, so far as we can see, just judgment on the case to be set aside, and the whole matter to be reopened in obedience to a request from Buckingham.

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  • In November 1620, when a new parliament was summoned to meet on January following, he earnestly pressed that the most obnoxious patents, those of alehouses and inns, and the monopoly of gold and silver thread, should be given up, and wrote to Buckingham, whose brothers were interested, advising him to withdraw them from the impending storm.

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  • This proposal, though pressed by Coke, was allowed to drop; while the king and Buckingham, acting under the advice of Williams, afterwards lord keeper, agreed to give up the monopolies.

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  • The cause of the delay seems to have lain with Buckingham, whose friendship had cooled, and who had taken offence at the fallen chancellor's unwillingness to part with York House.

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  • Earls, marquesses and dukes of Buckingham >>

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  • He received instruction in mathematics from Hobbes, and was early initiated into all the vices of the age by Buckingham and Percy.

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  • He was compelled to dismiss all his followers except Buckingham, and to submit to interminable sermons, which generally contained violent invectives against his parents and himself.

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  • After leading an unsuccessful cavalry charge against the enemy he fled, about 6 P.M., accompanied by Buckingham, Derby, Wilmot, Lauderdale and others, towards Kidderminster, taking refuge at Whiteladies, about 25 m.

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  • During his exile he had surrounded himself with young men of the same spirit as himself, such as Buckingham and Bennet, who, without having any claim to statesmanship, inattentive to business, neglectful of the national interests and national prejudices, became Charles's chief advisers.

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  • To Clarendon now succeeded the ministry of Buckingham and Arlington, who with Lauderdale, Ashley (afterwards Lord Shaftesbury) and Clifford, constituted the so-called Cabal ministry in 1672.

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  • In the second, signed by Arlington, Buckingham, Lauderdale and Ashley on the 31st of December 1670,nothing was said about the conversion,and the pension provided for that purpose was added to the military subsidy, neither of these treaties being communicated to parliament or to the nation.

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  • His second wife, the "wanton Shrewsbury" of Pope, a daughter of the earl of Cardigan, was seduced by the duke of Buckingham, whom the outraged husband challenged to a duel.

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  • The countess, it is said, was present at the scene, and held Buckingham's horse in the disguise of a page, saw her husband killed, and then clasped her lover in her arms, receiving blood-stains upon her dress from the embrace.

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  • FENNY STRATFORD, a market town in the Buckingham Parliamentary division of Buckinghamshire, England, 48 m.

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  • Thus Buckingham appears to be the most inland town in England, being 75 m.

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  • The Jurassic belt is occupied by the counties of Gloucester, Oxford, Buckingham, Bedford, Northampton, Huntingdon, Rutland, Lincoln and the North Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • This effect is well seen in the way in which the wind blowing directly up the Severn estuary is directed along the edges of the Oolitic escarpment north-eastward, thus displacing the centre of cold in winter to the east coast, and the centre of heat in summer to the lower Thames, from the position which both centres would occupy, if calms prevailed, in a beit running from Birmingham to Buckingham.

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  • Aylesbury is the assize town for the county, though Buckingham is the county town.

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  • It thus includes a large number of the finest buildings in London, from the Law Courts in the east to the Imperial Institute in the west, Buckingham and St James's palaces, the National Gallery, and most of the greatest residences of the wealthy classes.

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  • Another branch of the house of York might have given trouble Ursula, married to Henry, Lord Stafford, son of Edward, duke of Buckingham.

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  • The offer was not accepted, and Mr. Law, though he joined the Buckingham Palace Conference in a last hope of aiming at a reasonable settlement, was anticipating the immediate outbreak of civil war in Ireland when the World War supervened.

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  • His Life and Times by William Buckingham and the Hon.

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  • In 914 Buckingham was fortified and the Danes of Bedfordshire submitted.

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  • The duke of Buckingham, who was the chancellor of the university, endeavoured to effect a compromise which, he says, " I hope may for the present satisfy both sides.

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  • These confidants, the duke of Buckingham, the lords Howard and Lovel, and a few more, must have known from an early date that he was aiming at the crown, though it is improbable that they suspected that his plan involved the murder of the rightful heirs as well as mere usurpation.

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  • A few days later, having packed London with his own armed retainers and those of Buckingham and his other confidants, he openly put forward his pretensions to the throne.

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  • This preposterous theory was set forth by Buckingham, first to the mayor and corporation of London, and next day to an assembly of the estates of the realm held in St Pauls.

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  • He paid his adherents lavishly for their support, making Lord Howard duke of Norfolk, and giving Buckingham enormous grants of estates and offices.

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  • Less than three months after his coronation the first insurrection broke out; it was headedstrangely enoughby the Bucking- duke of Buckingham, who seems to have been shocked mffii7on.

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  • He did not take arms in his own cause, though after the house of York the house of Buckingham had the best claim to the throne, as representing Thomas of Woodstock, the youngest son of Edward III.

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  • A number of scattered risings in the south were put down by Richards troops, while Buckingham, who had raised his banner in Wales, was prevented from bringing aid by a week of extraordinary rains which made the Severn impassable.

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  • On Wolseys back also was saddled the most iniquitous of Henrys acts of tyranny against individualsthe judicial murder of the duke of Buckingham, the highest head among the English nobility.

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  • The cardinal bore the blame, because he and Buckingham had notoriously disliked each other; but the deed had really been of the kings own contriving.

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  • Indolent in his temper, James had been in the habit of leaving his patronage in the hands of a confidential favorite, and that position was now filled by George Villiers, marquess and afterwards duke of Buckingham.

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  • The ill-considered journey to Madrid, in which Prince Charles, accompanied by Buckingham, hoped to wring from the Spanish statesmen a promise to restore the Palatinate in compliment for his marriage with the infanta, ended also in total failure.

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  • When the king explained his necessities, they intimated that they had no confidence in Buckingham, and asked that, before they granted further supply, the king would name counsellors whom they could trust to advise him on its employment.

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  • The second parliament of the reign (1626) impeached Buckingham for crimes against the state.

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  • Once more Charles dissolved parliament to save Buckingham.

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  • The House of Commons~ brought fresh charges against Buckingham, whose murder soon after the prorogation removed one subject of dispute.

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