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brussels

brussels

brussels Sentence Examples

  • These rules were borrowed almost word for word from the project drawn up at the Brussels international conference of 1874, which, though never ratified, was practically incorporated in the army regulations issued by the Russian government in connexion with the war of 18 77-7 8.

  • Giovanni, dating from 1576, is famous for its rich inlaid marbles, its Brussels tapestries, its roof painted by Matteo Preti (1661-1699), the picture by Michael Angelo da Caravaggio of the beheading of John the Baptist, numerous memorials of the knights and other relics.

  • Baron de Reiffenberg, Le Chevalier au cygne et Godfrey de Bouillon (Brussels, 2 vols., 1846-1848), in Mon.

  • He would have entered Brussels in triumph, but his victorious advance was stayed by the intervention of the French.

  • In recent years attempts have been made by Albanians resident abroad to propagate the national idea among their compatriots at home; committees have been formed at Brussels, Bucharest, Athens and elsewhere, and books, pamphlets and newspapers are surreptitiously sent into the country.

  • During Somerset's protectorate he entered public life and was made a secretary of state, being sent on an important diplomatic mission to Brussels.

  • In London he was attacked and beaten by Messrs Barclay & Perkins' draymen when visiting the brewery, and he was saved from mob violence in Brussels with some difficulty.

  • whose seat was finally fixed at Malines (Mechlin) in 1473; the other the summoning of deputies of all the provincial " states " of the Netherlands to a states-general at Brussels in 1465.

  • took place on the 25th of October 1 555 in the great hall of the palace at Brussels, and Philip II.

  • He himself never felt at home at Brussels, and in August 1559 he set sail for Spain, never again to revisit the Netherlands.

  • Granvelle left Brussels on the 13th of March 1564, never to return.

  • The signatories drew up a petition, known as the " Request," which was presented by the confederates to the regent (April 5, 1566) in the council chamber at Brussels.

  • He dissembled until such time as he could despatch his greatest general, the duke of Alva, to Brussels at the head of a picked force to crush all opposition.

  • But Philip's preparations were now complete, and Alva set out from Italy at the head of a force of some io,000 veteran troops, Spaniards and Italians, afterwards increased by a body of Germans, with which, after marching through Burgundy, Lorraine and Luxemburg, he reached the Netherlands (August 8), and made his entry into Brussels a fortnight later.

  • Before this took place events had been should die before he left Brussels for the campaign in Friesland.

  • Broodhuis at Brussels.

  • On the 18th of December 1573 Alva, who to the end had persisted in his policy of pitiless severity, left Brussels, carrying with him the curses of the people over whom he had tyrannized for six terrible years of misery and oppression.

  • The overtures were favourably received, the council at Brussels was forcibly dissolved, and a congress met at Ghent on the 10th of October to consider what measures must be taken for the pacification of the country.

  • A treaty establishing a firm alliance between the provinces, represented by the states-general, assembled at Brussels on the one part, and on the other by the prince of Orange, and the states of Holland and Zeeland, was agreed upon and ratified under the title of the " Pacification of Ghent."

  • At this crisis the hands of Orange and the patriotic party were greatly strengthened by a new compact entitled " The Union of Brussels," which was extensively signed es eciall in the southern Netherlands.

  • Brussels."

  • The popular support given to the Union of Brussels forced Don John to yield.

  • Don John made his state entry into Brussels on the 1st of May, but only to find that he had no real authority.

  • " The prince of at Orange," he informed the king, " has bewitched the Orange Brussels.

  • Irritated and alarmed, the governor suddenly left Brussels in the month of July with some Walloon troops and went to Namur.

  • He was invited to come to Brussels, and after some hesitation, and not without having first obtained the approval of the states of Holland and Zeeland, he assented.

  • On the 6th of October, at the secret invitation of the Catholic nobles headed by the duke of Aerschot, the archduke Matthias, brother of the emperor, arrived in Brussels to assume the sovereignty of the Netherlands.

  • By this instrument the deputies of Hainault, Artois and Douay formed themselves into a league for the defence of the Catholic religion, and, subject to his observance of the political stipulations of the Union of Brussels, professed loyal allegiance to the king.

  • Tournai carries on a large trade in carpets (called Brussels), bonnet shapes, corsets and fancy goods generally.

  • du Cartesianisme en Belgique (Brussels, 1886); H.

  • On the arrival of Alva at Brussels, Count Louis, with his brother William, withdrew from the Netherlands and raised a body of troops in defence of the patriot cause.

  • There are now four circuits between London and Paris, one between London and Lille, and two between Londofi and Brussels, the last carrying an increasing amount of traffic. Experiments have been made in telephonic communication between London and Rome by way of Paris.

  • The negus, however, conformed to article 17 of the treaty of IJccialli by requesting Italy to represent Ahyssinia at the Brussels anti-slavery conference, an act which strengthened Italian illusions as to Meneleks readiness to submit to their protectorate.

  • de Sismondis Ripubligues ilaliennes (Brussels, I838) and Carlo Trovas Stone d Italia net medio evo are among the most valuable general works, while the large Storia Politica d Italia by various authors, ptiblished at Milan, is also importantF.

  • Of the original 12 panels, taken to France during the Revolutionary Wars, only 4 are now here, 6 being in the Berlin museum and two in that of Brussels.

  • and Liege - Brussels and Maestricht-Antwerp on the W., has favoured its rise to one of the most prosperous commerical towns of Germany.

  • Through Livingston, Legare was appointed American chargé d'affaires at Brussels, where from 1833 to 1836 he perfected himself in civil law and in the German commentaries on civil law.

  • C. Piot (12 vols., Brussels, 1878-1896).

  • Before leaving the subject of classification it may be noted in passing that in 1906 Professor Lameere, of Brussels, proposed a :scheme for the classification of Diptera which as regards both the limits of the families and their grouping into higher categories, differs considerably from that in current use.

  • Schayes, La Belgique et les Pays-Bas avant et pendant la domination romaine (2nd ed., Brussels, 1877); H.

  • A great part of them was published with the works of Gerson (by Ellies du Pin, Antwerp, 1706); another part appeared in the 15th century, probably at Brussels, and there are many treatises and sermons still unpublished.

  • (Brussels, 1880); and article Scholasticism.

  • 396-434, where the terminology is explained; idem, Synaxarium ecclesiae Constantinopolitanae e codice Sirmondiano (Brussels, 1902), forming the volume Propylaeum ad acta sanctorum novembris.

  • from Brussels, where in spite of the great efforts of the English merchants and the appeal of Thomas Cromwell to Archbishop Carandolet, president of the council, and to the governor of the castle, he was tried for heresy and condemned.

  • He represented the United States Bureau of Education at the International Congress of Educators at Brussels in 1880.

  • Besides the State papers, the main sources for his biography are The Life and Death of that renowned John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester (London, 1655), by an anonymous writer, the best edition being that of Van Ortroy (Brussels, 1893) Bridgett's Life of Blessed John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester (London, 1880 and 1890); and Thureau, Le bienheureux Jean Fisher (Paris, 1907).

  • The unfinished state of his Chronique at the time of his death, coupled with political considerations, may possibly account for the fact that it remained unprinted during the century that followed his death, and his historical work was only disinterred from the libraries of Arras, Paris and Brussels by the painstaking researches of M.

  • The known extant fragments of Chastellain's Chroniques with his other works were edited by Kervyn de Lettenhove for the Brussels Academy in 1863-1866 (8 vols., Brussels) as Ouvres de Georges Chastellain.

  • The foreign and colonial clubs which are affiliated to the Kennel Club are: the Guernsey Dog Club, the Italian Kennel Club, the Jersey Dog Club, La Societe Centrale (Paris), Moscow Gun Club of the Emperor Alexander II., New South Wales Kennel Club, Nimrod Club (Amsterdam), Northern Indian Kennel Association, Royal St Hubert's Society (Brussels) and the South African Kennel Club (Cape Town).

  • In 1843 he was sent as nuncio to Brussels, being first consecrated a bishop (19th February), with the title of archbishop of Damietta.

  • At the herbarium in Brussels are the specimens obtained by the traveller Karl Friedrich Philipp von Martius, the majority of which formed the groundwork of his Flora Brasiliensis.

  • See also P. de Laveleye, La Peninsule des Balkans (Brussels, 1886); V.

  • She exulted in the meeting of the states-general, and most of all when her father, after being driven to Brussels by a state intrigue, was once more recalled and triumphantly escorted into Paris.

  • In 1613 he joined the Society of Jesus, and was appointed superior of the English mission at Brussels in 1616, and in 1618 rector of the English college at Rome.

  • The Belgian forces were dispersed, and the Dutch would have entered Brussels in triumph but for the intervention of the French.

  • C. de Gerlache, Histoire du royaume des PaysBas depuis 1814 jusqu'en 1830 (3 vols., Brussels, 1842); W.

  • Juste, Le Soulevement de la Hollande en 1813 et la fondation du ro y aume des Pays-Bas (Brussels, 1870); and P. Blok, Geschiedenis der Nederlandsche Volk, vols.

  • Gentil, Lianes caoutchoutifbres de l'Etat Independant du Congo (Brussels, 1904); C. O.

  • Fraser, The Real Siberia (London, 1902); P. Kropotkin, Orographie de la Siberie (Brussels, 1904); P. Leroy-Beaulieu, La Renovation de l'Asie centrale (Paris, 1900); J.

  • He spent a great part of his time in Brussels, where he was very popular.

  • After the close of the diet the papal nuncio went to the Netherlands, where he kindled the flames of persecution, two monks of Antwerp, the first martyrs of the Reformation, being burnt in Brussels at his instigation.

  • The later years of his life were spent in ardent anti-slavery propaganda, and his eloquence moved large audiences in London, as well as in Paris, Brussels and other parts of the continent.

  • Scheler (Brussels, 1874); Guibert d'Andrenas (13th century); La Prise de Cordres (13th century); La Mort Aimeri de Narbonne, ed.

  • 257-296; Bibliotheca hagiographica Latina (Brussels, 18 99), n.

  • It was held that although generally speaking every sovereign may decide to whom he will accord the right to fly his flag, yet in this case such right was limited by the general act of the Brussels conference of July 1890 relative to the African slave trade, an act which was ratified by France on the 2nd of June 1892; that accordingly the owners and master of dhows who had been authorized by France to fly the French flag before the last-named date retained this authorization TABLE II.

  • See Franz Cumont, Textes et monuments figures relatifs aux mysteres de Mithra (Brussels, 1896, 1899), which has superseded all publications on the subject; Albrecht Dieterich, Eine Mithrasliturgie (Leipzig, 1903).

  • From Amsterdam he walked through Rotterdam to Antwerp, took a boat to Brussels, and on foot again reached Paris.

  • In pursuance of the same object, he identified himself with a series of remarkable peace congresses - international assemblies designed to unite the intelligence and philanthropy of the nations of Christendom in a league against war - which from 1848 to 1851 were held successively in Brussels, Paris, Frankfort, London, Manchester and Edinburgh.

  • of Brussels.

  • He visited Voltaire at Brussels and spent some time in Paris, where he associated with the younger Crebillon, Fontenelle and Montesquieu.

  • Karsten, Xenophanis Colophonii Carminum Reliquiae (Brussels, 1830); F.

  • He founded in 1864 an anti-imperial journal, La Semaine hebdomadaire which appeared at Brussels.

  • Anti-Catholic feeling ran so high that, after the discovery of the Popish Plot, he found it wiser to retire to Brussels (1679), while Shaftesbury and the Whigs planned to exclude him from the succession.

  • Generalstabsbureau fir Kriegsgesch.), Osterreichs Kampfe 1866 (Vienna, 1867; French translation, Les Luttes d'Autriche, Brussels, 1867); Friedjung, Der Kampf urn die Vorherrschaft in Deutschld.

  • of his Histoire des republiques italiennes (Brussels, 1838), gives a good general sketch of the reigns of Charles I.

  • Van Helmont (1578-1644) was a man of noble family in Brussels, who, after mastering all other branches of learning as then understood, devoted himself with enthusiasm to medicine and chemistry.

  • He stayed at Cambrai for some time, where European diplomatists were still in full session, journeyed to Brussels, where he met and quarrelled with Jean Baptiste Rousseau, went on to the Hague, and then returned.

  • He was soon again in trouble, this time for the poem of Le Mondain, and he at once crossed the frontier and then made for Brussels.

  • In April 1739 a journey was made to Brussels, to Paris, and then again to Brussels, which was the headquarters for a considerable time, owing to some law affairs, of the Du Chatelets.

  • Brussels was again the headquarters in 1741, by which time Voltaire had finished the best and the second X XVIII.

  • It was in this same year that he received the singular diplomatic mission to Frederick which nobody seems to have taken seriously, and after his return the oscillation between Brussels, Cirey and Paris was resumed.

  • He died in Brussels on the 31st of May 1827.

  • The following works may also be consulted: Books - Bertolio, Coltivazione delle minere (Milan, 1902); Brown, The Organization of Gold Mining Business (Glasgow, 1897); Brough, Mine Surveying (12th ed., London, 1906); Bulman and Redmayne, Colliery Working and Management (London, 1896); Colomer, Exploitation des mines (Paris, 1899); Curle, The Gold Mines of the World (2nd ed., London, 1902); Demanet, Traite d'exploitation des mines de houille (2nd ed., Brussels, vols.

  • Schuermans has traced Italian glass-workers to Antwerp, Liege, Brussels and Namur.

  • In 1642 Jean Savonetti " gentilhomme Verrier de Murano " obtained a patent for making glass in Brussels.

  • Schuermans, " Muranese and Altarist Glass Workers," eleven letters: Bulletins des commissions royales (Brussels, 1883, 1891).

  • 696-987; Bibliotheca hagiographica graeca, p. 37 (Brussels, 1895); Bibliotheca hagiographica latina, No.

  • 2171-2203 (Brussels, 1899); J.

  • Leuven), a town of Belgium in the province of Brabant, of which it was the capital in the 14th century before the rise of Brussels.

  • Many weavers fled to Holland and England, the duke took up his residence in the strong castle of Vilvorde, and Brussels prospered at the expense of Louvain.

  • Under the Restoration the "amnesty" law of 1816 condemned him as a regicide to exile, and he withdrew to Belgium, to St Jean-Ten-Noode, near Brussels, where he died on the 15th of February 18 20.

  • Its vice-governor-general exercised all the executive functions of the governor-general and corresponded directly with Brussels.

  • Thonissen, L'Organisation judiciaire, le droit penal et la procedure de la loi salique (2nd ed., Brussels and Paris, 1882); P. 'E.

  • At his own request, therefore, he was transferred to Brussels, where he could be of more service to the queen of France.

  • On the afternoon of the 21st he succeeded in paying a third visit to the Tuileries, stayed there till m.idnight and succeeded, with great difficulty, in regaining Brussels on the 27th.

  • Its manufacture was introduced into England many years ago by Messrs Henry Tate & Sons, and they subsequently adopted and use now the improved process and apparatus patented in March 1890 by M Gustave Adant, a foreman sugar refiner of Brussels.

  • In October 1900 a conditional agreement for the reduction of the bounties was made in Paris between France, Germany and Austria-Hungary; in February 1901 the Belgian government proposed a new session of the Conference of 1898, and on the 16th of December following Brussels welcomed once more the delegates of all the powers, with the exception of Russia, to the eighth European Sugar Bounty Conference since that of Paris in 1862.

  • The full text in French, with an English translation, of the Sugar Convention, signed at Brussels on the 5th of March 1902 by the plenipotentiaries of the governments of Germany, AustriaHungary, Belgium, Spain, France, Great Britain, Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden, will be found in a return presented to parliament in April 1902 (Miscellaneous, No.

  • On the 1st of August 1907 the Belgian minister in London transmitted to Sir Edward Grey a draft, additional act prepared by the commission for carrying out the proposal of His Britannic Majesty's government, and on the 28th of August following an additional act was signed at Brussels by the plenipotentiaries of the contracting parties, by which they undertook to maintain the convention of the 5th of March 1902 in force for a fresh period of five years.

  • Bergne wrote to the foreign office from Brussels, reporting that a special session of the permanent commission, established under the sugar bounties convention, had opened on the 18th of November, and the principal matter for its consideration had been the application of Russia to become a party to the convention on special terms. A protocol admitting Russia to the sugar convention was signed at Brussels on the 19th of December 1907.

  • Linguet, however, continued his career of free lance, now attacking and now supporting the government, in the Annales politiques, civiles et litteraires, published from 1777 to 1792, first at London, then at Brussels and finally at Paris.

  • He then went to London, and thence to Brussels, where, for his support of the reforms of Joseph II., he was ennobled and granted an honorarium of one thousand ducats.

  • P. Baron de Barante, Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne, (Brussels, 1835-1836); B.

  • 364, and Carmoly, Itineraires de la Terre Sainte (Brussels, 1847).

  • The Revue belge (1835-1843), in spite of the support of the best writers of the kingdom, as well as its successor the Revue de Liege (1844-1847), the Tresor national (1842-1843), published at Brussels, and the Revue de Belgique (1846-1851) were all short-lived.

  • The Revue trimestrielle was founded at Brussels by Van Bemmel in 1854.

  • Annales des mines belgiques appears quarterly, and L' Art moderne weekly at Brussels.

  • He went to Brussels in 1848, where he met Wiertz and Gallait, and painted some pictures, including "Cimabue finding Giotto," and a portrait of himself.

  • "ADOLPHE MAX (1869-), burgomaster of Brussels at the outbreak of the World War, was born at Brussels Dec. 31 1869, and was educated at the university of his native city.

  • After serving as magistrate, he was elected burgomaster of Brussels Dec. 6 1909, and distinguished himself by his administrative qualities.

  • 20 he met the German army as it approached Brussels, and protested against the conditions imposed by the conquerors on the city.

  • He refused to sign a convention requiring that he should perform his duties only under the authority of the military governor of Brussels, and reserved to himself the rights of a free agent.

  • 26 owing to a difference with the German authorities as to the amount of the war levy to be paid by the city of Brussels.

  • He was received at Brussels with extraordinary enthusiasm; he was appointed a minister of state, named in a national order of the day, and was elected a member of the Academie Royale de Belgique and vicepresident of the Conseil Superieur du Congo.

  • Severin's Catalogue generale des hemiptbres (Brussels 1893, &c.); G.

  • Latina (Brussels, 1899), n.

  • P. Gachard, Actes des etats generaux des Pays Bas, 1576-1585 (Brussels, 1861-1866); and the Calendars of State Papers, Foreign Series, Elizabeth (London, 1863-1901).

  • Scheler (Brussels, 1874); Charlemagne, by Girard d'Amiens, detailed analysis in Paris, Hist.

  • She agreed with their plan of an armed congress, and on this idea both she and Fersen insisted with all their might, Fersen leaving Brussels and going on a mission to the emperor to try and gain support and checkmate the émigrés, whose desertion the queen bitterly resented, and whose rashness threatened to frustrate her plans and endanger the lives of her family.

  • See Peerlkamp, Vitae Belgarum qui latina carmina scripserunt (Brussels, 1822), and J.

  • A survey commission was subsequently despatched, and in 1910 British, Belgian and German delegates met in Brussels to draw up a new frontier line.

  • et du cardinal d'Amboise (Brussels, 1712); L.

  • des musiciens (Brussels, 1837-1844).

  • On the return of the Bourbons the painter was exiled with the other remaining regicides, and retired to Brussels, where he again returned to classical subjects: "Amor quitting Psyche," "Mars disarmed by Venus," &c. He rejected the offer, made through Baron Humboldt, of the office of minister of fine arts at Berlin, and remained at Brussels till his death on the 29th of December 1825.

  • These skeletons, which now form the most striking feature of the Brussels Museum, evidently represent a large troop of animals which were suddenly destroyed and buried in a deep ravine or gully.

  • After the re-establishment of the Society of Jesus in Belgium the work was again taken up in 1837, at the suggestion of the Academie Royale of Belgium and with the support of the Belgian government, and the Bollandists were installed at the college of St Michael in Brussels.

  • in the Bibliotheque Royale at Brussels (2 vols., 1886-1889), to the Latin and Greek MSS.

  • P. Gachard, Mimoire historique sur les Bollandistes (Brussels, 1835); van Hecke, " De ratione operis Bollandiani (A eta Sanctorum Octobris, vii.); and Cardinal J.

  • His information showed that Wellington held the western half of Belgium from the Brussels-Charleroi road to the Scheldt, that his base of operations was Ostend, and that his headquarters were at Brussels.

  • The Anglo-Dutch army of 93,000 with headquarters at Brussels were cantoned:

  • The reserve (under Wellington himself) 25,500, lay around Brussels.

  • Ney pushed on his advance up the Brussels road.

  • Definite news of the French advance only reached Brussels about 3 P.M.

  • Prince Bernard, in command of a brigade at Quatre Bras and Frasnes, recognizing the pressing danger that threatened on the Brussels road, retained his position there to check the French advance, instead of drawing off westwards and massing with the rest of his division at Nivelles; and in this action he was firmly supported by his immediate superiors.

  • Consequently, as Ney's wing advanced northward from Gosselies along the Brussels road, it came upon an advanced detachment 6f this force at Frasnes.

  • Corps, Ath, Grammont and Sotteghem; heavy cavalry at Ninove; Reserve at Brussels.

  • The centre and left wing together would then make a night-march to Brussels.

  • Corps (Lobau), to save it, if possible, from a harassing countermarch, as it appeared likely that it would only be wanted for the march to Brussels.

  • The Dutch-Belgian troops to the east of the Brussels highway were at once forced back by the mass of men moved against them, and it looked as if the whole defence would crumple up. But about 3 P.M.

  • timely succour reached the field - Van Merlen's cavalry from Nivelles, Picton and the 5th division from Brussels - and Wellington returned and took over the command.

  • Corps), a force of 33,000 men and 11o guns, to follow the Prussians, penetrate their intentions and discover if they meditated uniting with Wellington in front of Brussels.

  • The prominence of the township as a manufacturing centre is due to Erastus Brigham Bigelow (1814-1879), one of the incorporators of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who devised power-looms for the weaving of a variety of figured fabrics, - coach-lace, counterpanes, ginghams, silkbrocatel, tapestry carpeting, ingrain and Brussels carpets, - and revolutionized their manufacture.

  • Bigelow established in Clinton the Lancaster Mills for the manufacture of ginghams. From 1845 to 1851 he perfected his loom for the weaving of Brussels and Wilton carpets, the greatest of his inventions; and he established the Bigelow Carpet Mills here.

  • In 181 9 he was appointed professor of mathematics at the athenaeum of Brussels; in 1828 he became lecturer at the newly created museum of science and literature, and he continued to hold that post until the museum was absorbed in the free university in 1834.

  • From 1834 he was perpetual secretary of the Brussels Academy, and published a vast number of articles in its Bulletin, as also in his journal, Correspondance mathematique et physique (11 vols., 1825-39).

  • He died at Brussels on the 17th of February 1874.

  • Mailly, was published at Brussels in 1875.

  • In 1631 Gaston fled to Lorraine and the queen-mother to Brussels.

  • 2 a where he visited Ludlow, and came to Brussels in September, where his portrait was painted by van Egmondt; it is now at Penshurst.

  • BRUSSELS (Fr.

  • Brussels suffered severely in 1695 from the bombardment of the French under Villeroi, who fired into the town with red-hot shot.

  • The only other "hotel" or palace in Brussels is that of the duke d'Arenberg.

  • The improvements effected in Brussels during the 19th century were enormous, and completely transformed the city.

  • Perhaps the memorial that attracts the greatest amount of public interest in Brussels is that to the Belgians who were killed during the fighting with the Dutch in September 1830.

  • Outside Brussels at Evere is the chief cemetery, with fine monuments to the British officers killed at Waterloo (removed from the church in that village), to the French soldiers who died on Belgian soil in 1870-71, and another to the Prussians.

  • Many as were the changes in Brussels during the 19th century, those in progress at its close and at the beginning of the 10th have effected a marked alteration in the town.

  • long) from the Boulevard de Waterloo to the Bois de la Cambre was the first of these efforts to bring the remote suburbs within easy reach, at the same time furnishing an approach to the "bois" of Brussels that might in some degree be compared with the Champs Elysees in Paris.

  • The suburbs on this ridge, from south to north, are Anderlecht, Molenbeek and Koekelberg, and Laeken with its royal château and park forms the northern part of the Brussels conglomeration.

  • Brussels has been growing at such a rapid rate that the inclusion of this ridge, and more particularly at Koekelberg, within the town limits, was contemplated in 1908.

  • The completion of the harbour works, making Brussels a seaport by giving sea-going vessels access thereto, was taken in hand in 1897.

  • There are steamers plying direct from Brussels to London, and 372 vessels of a total tonnage of 76,000 entered and left the port in 1905.

  • of the Netherlands is entitled to the credit of having first thought of converting it into a ship canal from Brussels to the Scheldt.

  • The distance from Brussels to the Ruppel is only 20 m., and thus Brussels is only about 33 m.

  • In addition to the advantages it enjoys from being the seat of the court and the government, Brussels is the centre of many prosperous industries.

  • The town of Brussels has a separate administration, which is directed by a burgomaster and sheriffs at the head of a town council, whose headquarters are in the hotel de ville.

  • In the Brussels agglomeration are nine suburbs or communes, each self-governing with burgomaster and sheriffs located in a Maison Communale.

  • In 1856 the population of Brussels alone was 152,828, and by 1880 it had only increased to 162,498.

  • In 1904 the total was 436,453, thus giving for the whole of Brussels a grand total of 630,649.

  • In the next two centuries Brussels grew in size and importance, and its trade gilds were formed on lines similar to those of Ghent.

  • In 1357 Wenceslas, ordered a new wall embracing a greater area than the earlier one to be constructed round Brussels, and this was practically intact until after the Belgian revolution in 1830-1831.

  • to Brussels, although for some time they did not trust themselves out of the strong castle which they had erected at Vilvorde, half-way between the two turbulent cities.

  • During this period the population of Brussels is supposed to have been 50,000, or one-fifth of that of Ghent.

  • In 1420 the gilds of Brussels obtained a further charter recognizing their status as the Nine Nations, a division still existing.

  • Having fixed their seat of government at Brussels the dukes of Brabant proceeded to build a castle and.

  • In the 17th century Brussels was described (Comte de Segur, quoting the memoirs of M.

  • In the interval between these visits he fought for his country during the war of the second partition, and would subsequently have served under Kosciuszko also had he not been arrested on his way to Poland at Brussels by the Austrian government.

  • Twenty-one powers and states attended a conference held on the question at Brussels in 1863, and on the 15th of July the treaty freeing the Scheldt was signed.

  • Among other important conferences in which Lambermont took a leading part were those of Brussels (1874) on the usages of war, Berlin (1884-1885) on Africa and the Congo region, and Brussels (1890) on Central African Affairs and the Slave Trade.

  • He brought his attainments somehow to the notice of Henry of Bergen, bishop of Cambrai, the leading prelate at, the court of Brussels; and about 1494 permission was obtained for him to leave Steyn and become Latin secretary to the bishop, who was then preparing for a visit to Rome.

  • On the completion of the New Testament in 1516 he returned to his friends in England; but his appointment, then recent, as councillor to the young king Charles, brought him back to Brussels in the autumn.

  • At the restoration he was proscribed as a regicide, and spent the last years of his life at Brussels, where he died on the 24th of March 1829.

  • These he afterwards collected and published as Pages de l'histoire de la revolution de 1848 (Brussels, 1850).

  • Szujski's book has superseded even Joachim Lelewel's learned History of Poland (Pol., Brussels, 1837), of which there are excellent French (Paris, 1844) and German (Leipzig, 1846) editions.

  • Of the numerous works relating to the reign of the heroic Stephen Bathory, 1 5751586, Ignaty Janicki's Acta historica res gestas Stephani Bathorei illustrantia (Cracow, 1881), and Paul Pierling's Un arbitrage pontifical entre la Pologne et la Russie 1581-1582 (Brussels, 1890) can be recommended.

  • On the extinction of the house of Horn in 1540, the countship passed to the famous Philip of Montmorency, who, with the count of Egmont, was executed in Brussels in 1568 by order of the duke of Alva.

  • Park, 1813); The Late News from Brussels unmasked..

  • To the astonishment of his friends, on the 1st of April he fled from Paris before it could be executed, going first to Brussels and then to London.

  • The world was startled, however, on the 30th of September 1891 by hearing that he had committed suicide in a cemetery at Brussels by blowing out his brains on the grave of his mistress, Madame de Bonnemains (née Marguerite Crouzet), who had died in the preceding July.

  • of Brussels and on the Senne.

  • He went to Brussels, where for nearly thirty years he earned a scanty livelihood by his writings.

  • One of his most important publications was La Geographie du moyen age (5 vols., Brussels, 1852-1857), with an atlas (1849) of fifty plates entirely engraved by himself, for he rightly attached such importance to the accuracy of his maps that he would not allow them to be executed by any one else.

  • PHILIPS VAN MARNIX, HEER VAN ST ALDEGONDE (1538-1598), Dutch writer and statesman, was born at Brussels, the son of Jacob van Marnix, baron of Pottes.

  • His complete works, edited by Lacroix and Quinet, were published at Brussels in 7 vols.

  • It was Puylaurens who arranged the escape of Gaston to Brussels in 1632 after the capture of Henri, duc de Montmorency, and then negotiated his return with Richelieu, on condition that he should be reconciled to the king.

  • After six weeks' imprisonment in the Chateau d'If he returned to Paris, escaping, after the proscription of the regicides, to Brussels, where he died on the 15th of January 1827.

  • La cosmogonie manicheisme d'apres Theodore Bar Khoui, by Franz Cumont (Brussels, 1908); H.

  • The forest of Soignies extended in the middle ages over the southern part of Brabant up to the walls of Brussels, and is immortalized in Byron's Childe Harold.

  • The Bois de la Cambre (456 acres) on the outskirts of Brussels was formed out of the forest, and beyond it stretches the Foret de Soignies, still so called, to Tervueren, Groenendael, and Argenteuil close to Mont Saint Jean and Waterloo.

  • His son, the future marquess, began his political life as attaché to a special mission to Brussels in 1849.

  • Bentivoglio in tempo delle sue Nunziature di Fiandria e di Francia (Cologne, 1630); Lettere diplomatiche di Guido Bentivoglio (Brussels, 1631, frequently reprinted, best edition by L.

  • In 1557 Philip appointed him to the archbishopric of Toledo; he accepted with reluctance, and was consecrated at Brussels on the 27th of February '558.

  • Much of the material was incorporated by Bishop Challoner in his Memoir of Missionary Priests (1741), and the MS. is now in the Public Record Office in Brussels.

  • (20) P. Pelseneer, Introduction a l'etude des Mollusques (Brussels, 1894); " Recherches sur les Mollusques archaiques," Mem.

  • Here Wellington supported the proposal for the immediate evacuation of France, and it was owing to his common-sense criticism that the proposal of Prussia, supported by the emperor Alexander and Metternich, to establish an "army of observation" at Brussels, was nipped in the bud.

  • At five the child was taken to Keswick; at six to Paris, Brussels and Waterloo; at seven to Perthshire.

  • In matters of general interest it has frequently called conferences to which the minor states have been invited, such as the West African Conference in Berlin in 1885, and the Anti-Slavery Conference at Brussels in 1889-1890, and the Conference of Algeciras in 1906.

  • See Nys, Droit International (Brussels, 1904), i.

  • Customs tariffs and the monetary unions, however, are centralized at Brussels, France - Sweden and Norway, July 9, 1904.

  • In 1848 a second congress was held at Brussels.

  • 3 The sixteenth conference was held at Brussels in August - September, 1910.

  • At some period (perhaps 1381, perhaps earlier) he paid a visit of some days' duration to the famous mystic Johann Ruysbroeck, prior of the Augustinian canons at Groenendael near Brussels; at this visit was formed Groot's attraction for the rule and life of the Augustinian canons which was destined to bear such notable fruit.

  • Lamont was a member of the academies of Brussels, Upsala and Prague, of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, of the Cambridge Philosophical Society and of many other learned corporations.

  • As nuncio in Brussels he had become acquainted with the trans-Alpine world, and had been initiated into the working of the machinery of modern politics and modern parliamentary government.

  • (Brussels, 188); C. Minieri-Riccio, Alcuni fatti riguardanti Carlo I.

  • After a good private education at Brussels, he was sent to Oxford, and thence to Erlangen; a subsequent residence at Edinburgh and the relations there formed with prominent Whigs profoundly influenced his political views.

  • Lace, somewhat resembling that of Brussels, is made by the women of the mountainous districts.

  • TERVUEREN, a small town of Belgium in the province of Brabant, midway between Brussels and Louvain.

  • The Colonial Museum and World's Colonial School are established here, and Tervueren is connected with Brussels by a fine broad avenue, traversed by an electric tramway as well as by carriage and other roads, and between 6 and 7 m.

  • He entered the ministry at Antwerp, had a hand in the Walloon Confession and gathered a Walloon congregation in Brussels.

  • Accompanying Guyton de Morveau in his expedition, earlier in the year, he was present at the battle of Fleurus, and entered Brussels with the French army.

  • 302), in 1562 Margaret of Parma, the regent, summons them to Brussels to debate the dangerous condition of the provinces (Motley, i.

  • 48), and they were present at the abdication of Charles in the great hall at Brussels in 1555.

  • trans., London, 1635); Michel de Castelnau's Memoires (Brussels, 1731); the Memoires of Brantome (ed.

  • Mignet, Histoire de Marie Stuart (2 vols., Brussels, 1851); Martin Philippson, Histoire du regne de Marie Stuart (3 vols., Paris, 1891); Sir John Skelton, Mary Stuart (London, 1893), Maitland of Lethington and the Scotland of Mary Stuart (2 vols., Edinburgh, 1887), The Impeachment of Mary Stuart (Edinburgh, 1878), and Essays in History and Biography, including the Defence of Mary Stuart (Edinburgh, 1883); Joseph Stevenson, Mary Stuart: The First Eighteen Years of her Life (Edinburgh, 1886); D.

  • See Steichen, Vie et travaux de Simon Stevin (Brussels, 1846); M.

  • The Stanwick nectarine, so apt to crack and not to ripen when worked in the ordinary way, is said to be cured of these propensities by being first budded close to the ground, on a very strong-growing Magnum Bonum plum, worked on a Brussels stock, and by then budding the nectarine on the Magnum Bonum about a foot from the ground.

  • Transplant to the bottom of a south wall a portion of the peas sown in pots in frames in November and January for the first crop. Sow Brussels sprouts in gentle heat for an early crop.

  • Sow carrots, turnips, early celery, also aubergines or egg-plants, capsicums, tomatoes and successional crops of kidney-beans; cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, in gentle heat, to be afterwards planted out.

  • - Sow main crops of wrinkled marrow peas; Longpod and Windsor beans; cabbage, onions, leeks, Early Horn carrots, parsnips, salsafy, scorzonera, Brussels sprouts, borecoles, lettuces and spinach.

  • 25 a [[[Calendar (Great Britain]]) cabbage, savoys and Brussels sprouts for succession.

  • - Sow main crop of beet in the first week, small salads every week, radishes and lettuces thrice, spinach once a fortnight, carrots and onions for late drawing, kidney-beans in the first week and together with scarlet runners in the last fortnight; endive for an early crop; also peas and Longpod and Windsor beans, cauliflowers, Early York or Little Pixie cabbages, Brussels sprouts, borecole, broccoli, savoys and kale for late crops.

  • Plant full crops of broccoli, Brussels sprouts, savoys, kales, leeks and early celery, with successional crops of cabbage and cauliflower.

  • Plums are propagated chiefly by budding on stocks of the Mussel, Brussels, St Julien and Pear plums. The damson, wine-sour and other varieties, planted as standards, are generally increased by suckers.

  • Besides the original meeting of the bishop and Ahasuerus in 1542 and others referred back to 1 575 in Spain and 1599 at Vienna, the Wandering Jew was stated to have appeared at Prague (1602), at Lubeck (1603), in Bavaria 1604), at Ypres (1623), Brussels (1640), Leipzig (1642), Paris (1644, by the " Turkish Spy "),"), Stamford (1658),(1658), Astrakhan (1672),(1672), and Frankenstein (1678).

  • In one of his appearances at Brussels his name is given as Isaac Laquedem, implying an imperfect knowledge of Hebrew in an attempt to represent Isaac " from of old."

  • History From 1 579 To Modern TIMES3 The political compact known as the Union of Utrecht differed from its immediate predecessors, the Pacification of Ghent, the Union of Brussels and the Perpetual Edict, in its permanence.

  • To make head, however, against the victorious advance of Parma, before whose arms all the chief towns of Brabant and Flanders, Bruges, Ghent, Brussels and lastly - after a valiant defence - Antwerp itself had fallen, it was necessary to look for the protection of a foreign ruler.

  • The archdukes (such was their official title) did not make their joyeuse entree into Brussels until the close of 1599.

  • crowned at arrangements made by the treaty of London, and Brussels.

  • was crowned king of the Netherlands at Brussels on the 27th of September 1815.

  • The duet, "Amour sacre de la patrie," was welcomed like a new Marseillaise; sung by Nourrit at Brussels in 1830, it became the signal for the revolution which broke out there.

  • At first only the "Kidderminster" carpets were made, but in 1749 a Brussels loom was set up in the town and Brussels carpets were soon produced in large quantities.

  • These, in their order of interest, are Bruges, Antwerp, Louvain, Brussels, Ghent, Ypres, Courtrai, Tournai, Fumes, Oudenarde and Liege.

  • The prince was proclaimed on the 4th of June 1831 as Leopold I., king of the Belgians, and on the 21st of July 1831 he was solemnly inaugurated in Brussels.

  • Those at Ghent and Liege are state universities; the two others at Brussels and Louvain are free.

  • The number of students inscribed for the academical year 1904-1905 at each university was Ghent 899, Liege 1983, Brussels 1082, and Louvain 2134, or a grand total of 6098.

  • There are also a large number of state-aided schools for special purposes; (1) for military instruction, there are the Ecole Militaire at Brussels, the school of cadets at Namur, and army schools at different stations, e.g.

  • Bouillon, &c. For officers in the army, there are the Ecole de Guerre or staff college at Brussels with an average attendance of twenty, a riding school at Ypres where a course is obligatory for the cavalry and horse artillery, and for soldiers in the army there are regimental schools and evening classes for illiterate soldiers.

  • In music, there are royal conservatoires at Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent, and Liege.

  • There are three courts of appeal, viz, at Brussels, Ghent and Liege.

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