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bruno

bruno

bruno Sentence Examples

  • Finally in 924 Lorraine passed in the reign of Henry the Fowler under German (East Frankish) overlordship. Henry's son, Otto the Great, owing to the disordered state of the country, placed it in 953 in the hands of his able brother, Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, for pacification.

  • Bruno, who kept for himself the title of archduke, divided the territory into the two duchies of Upper and Lower Lorraine.

  • Bruno," as the author of educational books for children.

  • In the system of Giordano Bruno, who sought to construct a philosophy of nature on the basis of new scientific ideas, more particularly the doctrine of Copernicus, we find the outlines of a theory of cosmic evolution conceived as an essentially vital process.

  • Bruno looked on our solar system as but one out of an infinite number of worlds.

  • A word must be given to one of Bruno's contemporary compatriots, namely Campanella, who gave poetic expression to that system of universal vitalism which Bruno developed.

  • Before he reached Rome, Pope John XV., who had invited him to Italy, had died, whereupon he raised his own cousin Bruno, son of Otto duke of Carinthia, to the papal chair as Pope Gregory V., and by this pontiff Otto was crowned emperor on the 21st of May 996.

  • The monument was erected after designs by Bruno Schmidt of Berlin, with fountains at the base said to be among the largest in the world, their capacity being 20,000 gallons per minute.

  • Nicolas's doctrines were of influence upon Giordano Bruno and other physical philosophers of the 15th and 16th centuries.

  • The fine old palace of the Caraffa family, once dukes of Maddaloni, the old college now named after Giordano Bruno, and the institute for the sons of soldiers are the chief points of interest.

  • Strauss, the author of the Leben Jesu, and Bruno Bauer, who like Feuerbach himself had passed over from Hegelianism to a form of naturalism.

  • There is a monument (restored in 1887) to Giordano Bruno, the free-thinker, who was born at Nola in 1548.

  • Alice was followed (in the "Lewis Carroll" series) by Phantasmagoria, in 1869; Through the Looking-Glass, in 1871; The Hunting of the Snark (1876); Rhyme and Reason (1883); A Tangled Tale (1885); and Sylvie and Bruno (in two parts, 1889 and 1893).

  • Clebsch, Theorie der bindren Algebraischen Formen (Leipzig, 1872); Vorlesungen fiber Geometrie (Leipzig, 1875); Faa de Bruno, Theorie des formes binaires (Turin, 1876); P. Gordan, Vorlesungen fiber Invariantentheorie, Bd.

  • Constantine Bruno, baron Kervyn de Lettenhove >>

  • BRUNO PAULIN GASTON PARIS (1839-1903), French scholar, son of Paulin Paris, was born at Avenay (Marne) on the 9th of August 183 9.

  • Otto's brother Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, was successful in restoring the royal authority in Lorraine, so that when Conrad and Frederick soon afterwards submitted to Otto, the struggle was confined to Bavaria.

  • About this time the king seems to have perceived the necessity of living and ruling in closer union with the church, a change of policy due perhaps to the influence of his brother Bruno, or forced upon him when his plans for uniting the duchies with the royal house brought rebellion in their train.

  • As Ludolf had died in 957 and Otto, his only son by Adelaide, had been chosen king at Worms, the government was entrusted to Bruno of Cologne, and Archbishop William of Mainz, a natural son of the king.

  • Although himself a stranger to letters he welcomed scholars to his court and eagerly seconded the efforts of his brother Bruno to encourage learning; and while he neither feared nor shirked battle, he was always ready to secure his ends by peaceable means.

  • GIORDANO BRUNO (c. 1548-1600), Italian philosopher of the Renaissance, was born near Nola in the village of Cicala.

  • Dufour, Giordano Bruno et Geneve, Geneva, 1884), and he travelled on through Lyons, Toulouse and Montpellier, arriving at Paris in 1581.

  • But his own system has a distinct unity and originality; it breathes throughout the fiery spirit of Bruno himself.

  • Bruno had been well received at Toulouse, where he had lectured on astronomy; even better fortune awaited him at Paris, especially at the hands of Henry III.

  • These seem to have been altogether devoted to expositions of a certain logical system which Bruno had taken up with great eagerness, the Ars Magna of Raimon Lull.

  • To many it has seemed a curious freak of Bruno's that he should have so eagerly adopted a view of thought like that of Lull, but in reality it is in strict accordance with the principles of his philosophy.

  • Under the protection of the French ambassador, Michel de Castelnau, sieur de Mauvissiere, Bruno passed over in 1583 to England, where he resided for about two years.

  • Among the moral virtues which take the place of the beasts are Truth, Prudence, Wisdom, Law and Universal Judgment, and in the explanation of what these mean Bruno unfolds the inner essence of his system.

  • Through all this runs the train of thought resulting naturally from Bruno's fundamental principles, and familiar in modern philosophy as Spinozism, the denial of particular providence, the doctrine of the uselessness of prayer, the identification in a sense of liberty and necessity, and the peculiar definition of good and evil.

  • For more than two centuries Bruno received scarcely the consideration he deserved.

  • To Bruno, as to all great thinkers, philosophy is the search for unity.

  • Such is a brief summary of the principal positions of Bruno's philosophy.

  • Bruno's writings had been much neglected when Jacobi brought them into notice in his Briefe fiber die Lehre Spinozas (2nd ed., 1879).

  • So far as Descartes is concerned, it is highly improbable that he had seen any of Bruno's works.

  • Schelling, however, called one of his works after him, Bruno.

  • The chief English work on Giordano Bruno is that of J.

  • Bruno (Paris, 1846-1847); Domenico Berti, Giordano Bruno da Nola (2nd ed., 1889); H.

  • Clemens, Giordano Bruno and Nicolaus von Cusa (Bonn, 1847); Miss I.

  • Frith, Life of Giordano Bruno the Nolan (London, 1887); C. E.

  • Plumptre, Life and Works of Giordano Bruno (London, 1884); Chr.

  • Bruno (1889, ed.

  • Agnes Fry, 1905); Landsbeck, Bruno, der Martyrer der neuen Weltanschauung (1890); Owen, in Sceptics of the Italian Renaissance (London, 1893); C. H.

  • Bruno (1900); R.

  • Bruno, seine Weltanschauung and Lebensauffassung (1900); O.

  • Bruno and die Gegenwart (1902); J.

  • Bruno and seine Weltanschauung (1907).

  • del Bruno (Rome, 1892).

  • Gentile, Giordano Bruno nella Storia della cultura (1907).

  • Saint Bruno of Querfurt >>

  • His proper name was Bruno; the family to which he belonged was of noble rank, and through his father he was related to the emperor Conrad II.

  • On the death of Damasus II., Bruno was in December 1048, with the concurrence both of the emperor and of the Roman delegates, selected his successor by an assembly at Worms; he stipulated, however, as a condition of his acceptance that he should first proceed to Rome and be canonically elected by the voice of clergy and people.

  • About 850, however, he appointed a margrave to defend the Limes Saxoniae, a narrow strip of land on the eastern frontier, and this office was given to one Liudolf who had large estates in Saxony, and who was probably descended from an Engrian noble named Bruno.

  • He died in 866, and was succeeded by his son Bruno, who was killed fighting the Normans in 880.

  • Thus, the Lent lily is Narcissus Pseudonarcissus; the African lily is Agapanthus umbellatus; the Belladonna lily is Amaryllis Belladonna (q.v.); the Jacobaea lily is Sprekelia formosissima; the Mariposa lily is Calochortus; the lily of the Incas is Alstroemeria pelegrina; St Bernard's lily is Anthericum Liliago; St Bruno's lily is Anthericum (or Paradisia) Liliastrum; the water lily is Nymphaea alba; the Arum lily is Richardia africana; and there are many others.

  • In the 10th century learning flourished at Aachen under Bruno, brother of Otto I.

  • PIERRE ANTOINE NOEL BRUNO DARU, Count (1767-1829), French soldier and statesman, was born at Montpellier on the r 2th of January 1767.

  • In Bruno, and in Philos.

  • 1799); System des transcendentalen Idealismus (Tubingen, 1800); Bruno, oder fiber das gottliche and natiirliche Prinzip der Dinge (Berlin, 1802, ed.

  • He quotes indeed the opinion of Giordano Bruno to that effect, but with dissent.

  • BRUNO (BRUN, BRUNS) OF QUERFURT, Saint (c. 9751009), German missionary bishop and martyr, belonged to the family of the lords of Querfurt in Saxony.

  • When the news reached Rome of the martyrdom of Adalbert, bishop of Prague (997), Bruno determined to take his place, and in 1004, after being consecrated by the pope as archbishop of the eastern heathen, he set out for Germany to seek aid of the emperor Henry II.

  • During his stay in Hungary (1004) Bruno wrote a life of St Adalbert, the best of the three extant biographies of the saint (in Pertz, Mon.

  • A life of St Bruno was written by Dietmar, bishop of Merseburg (976-1019).

  • He received a good education under the care of his uncle, Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, and his illegitimate half-brother, William, archbishop of Mainz.

  • Empedocles, Plato and Aristotle; Telesio, Bruno and Campanella; Leibnitz; the idealists, Schopenhauer and Hartmann, Fechner and Paulsen; and the materialist, Haeckel - all have agreed in according some sort of appetition to Nature.

  • peopled the gardens of Versailles rather than by the lessons of his masters, delighted Pope Clement XIV., who, on seeing the St Bruno executed by Houdon for the church of St Maria degli Angeli, said "he would speak, were it not that the rules of his order impose silence."

  • The Carthusian order, on its establishment by St Bruno, about A.D.

  • This plan, which was first adopted by St Bruno and his twelve companions at the original institution at Chartreux, near Grenoble, was maintained in all the Carthusian establishments throughout Europe, even after the ascetic severity of the order had been to some extent relaxed, and the primitive simplicity of their buildings had been exchanged for the magnificence of decoration which characterizes such foundations as the Certosas of Pavia and Florence.

  • According to the rule of St Bruno, all the members of a Carthusian brotherhood lived in the most absolute solitude and silence.

  • So Bruno constructed a personified nature, and the scientific and humanistic era began.

  • Liliastrum, St Bruno's Lily, I ft., bears pretty white sweet-scented flowers in May; A.

  • HANS BRUNO GEINITZ (1814-1900), German geologist, was born at Altenburg, the capital of the duchy of Saxe-Altenburg, on the 16th of October 1814.

  • Of his successors o'ne of the most illustrious was Bruno, brother of the emperor Otto I., archbishop from 953 to 965, who was the first of the archbishops to exercise temporal jurisdiction, and was also "archduke" of Lorraine.

  • In Lorraine, of which duchy Otto made his brother Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, Tb 111 administrator, his cause was triumphant; but every- wa~r.e where else dark clouds gathered over his head.

  • Lorrairn was given to Bruno; but Conrad, its former duke, aithougi thus punished, was not disgraced, for Otto needed his service~ in the war with the Magyars.

  • Lambert, a monk of Hersfeld, and Widukinds countryman, Bruno, in his De bello Saxonico, tell the story of the great contest between the emperor Henry IV.

  • Yet in this latter sense it would seem to have been assumed by Bruno of Saxony, archbishop of Cologne, and duke of Lorraine (953-965), when he divided his duchy into the dukedoms of Upper and Lower Lorraine.

  • His chief philosophical doctrine was taken up and developed more than a hundred years later by Giordano Bruno, who calls him the divine Cusanus.

  • Clemens, Giordano Bruno and Nikolaus Cusanus (Bonn, 1847); R.

  • Telesio was the head of the great South Italian movement which protested against the accepted authority of abstract reason, and sowed the seeds from which sprang the scientific methods of Campanella and Bruno, of Bacon and Descartes, with their widely divergent results.

  • Concreteness, therefore, is the one demand which Hamann expresses, and as representing his own thought he used to refer to Giordano Bruno's conception (previously held by Nicolaus Curanus) of the identity of contraries.

  • These preceptors included the German priest Bruno, the Czech priest Radla, and an Italian knight, Theodate of San Severino, who taught him arms and letters (a holograph epistle by Stephen existed in the Vatican Library as late as 1513).

  • During this century the best histories - Bruno's and Poggio's annals of Florence, for example - were composed in Latin after the manner of Livy.

  • The thinkers of southern Italy, Telesio, Bruno and Campanella, at last opened the two chief lines on which modern speculation has since moved.

  • Bruno was the precursor of the idealistic schools.

  • We do not know whether his influence was brought to bear in this sense upon Spinoza; but it has been suggested that the writings of Bruno, whose spirit of enthusiastic naturalism and fervid revolt against the Church would be especially dear to a man of Van den Ende's leanings, may have been put into the pupil's hand by the master.

  • The term "Nature" is put more into the foreground in the Treatise, a point which might be urged as evidence of Bruno's influence - the dialogues, moreover, being specially concerned to establish the unity, infinity and selfcontainedness of Nature 2; but the two opposed Cartesian attributes, thought and extension, and the absolutely infinite substance whose attributes they are - substance constituted by infinite attributes - appear here as in the Ethics.

  • 2 The fact that Spinoza nowhere mentions Bruno would not imply, according to the literary habits of those days, that he was not acquainted with his speculations and even indebted to them.

  • Accordingly, full weight must be allowed to the internal evidence brought forward by Sigwart, Avernarius and others to prove Spinoza's acquaintance with Bruno's writings.

  • In philosophy, Campanella was, like Giordano Bruno, a follower of Nicolas of Cusa and Telesio.

  • Pereira de Sampaio (" Bruno ") A Geracao Nova (1886).

  • His philosophical treatises abound with incoherent formulae to which, according to their inventor, every demonstration in every science may be reduced, and posterity has ratified Bacon's disdainful verdict on Lull's pretensions as a thinker; still the fact that he broke away from the scholastic system has recommended him to the historians of philosophy, and the subtle ingenuity of his dialectic has compelled the admiration of men so far apart in opinion as Giordano Bruno and Leibniz.

  • Originally erected in 1557 for the use of the Jesuits, the university buildings are regarded as the best work of Marco di Pino; the quadrangle, surrounded by a simple but effective peristyle, contains statues of Pietro della Vigna (Frederick's chancellor), Thomas Aquinas and Giordano Bruno.

  • The original settlement here was founded by St Bruno about 1084, and derived its name from the small village to the S.E., formerly known as Cartusia, and now as St Pierre de Chartreuse.

  • Some way farther the Guiers Mort is crossed by the modern bridge of St Bruno, the older bridge of Parant being still visible higher up the stream.

  • In the following year Bruno Heceta landed off what is now called Point Grenville and took formal possession of the country, and later, in lat.

  • Cassian speaks of an abbot in Egypt doing this; and in later times we have another example in the case of St Bruno.

  • (Bruno), pope from 996 to 999, a great-grandson of the emperor Otto the Great, succeeded John XV.

  • BRUNO BAUER (1809-1882), Germantheologianand historian, was born on the 6th of September 1809, the son of a painter in a porcelain factory, at Eisenberg in Saxe-Altenburg.

  • Not twenty years after Luther's defiance of the pope, the startling thesis " that all that Aristotle taught was false " was prosperously maintained by the youthful Ramus before the university of Paris; and almost contemporaneously the group of remarkable thinkers in Italy who heralded the dawn of modern physical science - Cardanus, Telesio, Patrizzi, Campanella, Bruno - began to propound their Aristotelian theories of the constitution of the physical universe.

  • (Wismar, 1898); and Bruno Schmidt, Der Schwedisch-mecklenburgische Pfandvertrag fiber Stadt and Herrschaft Wismar (Leipzig, 1901).

  • LOTHAIR (941-986), king of France, son of Louis IV., succeeded his father in 954, and was at first under the guardianship of Hugh the Great, duke of the Franks, and then under that of his maternal uncle Bruno, archbishop of Cologne.

  • Thanks to Hughs support and to the good offices of Otto and his brother Bruno, archbishop of Cologne and duke of Lorraine, Lothair was chosen king and crowned at Reims. Hugh exacted, as payment for his disinterestedness and fidelity, a renewal of his sovereignty over Burgundy with that of Aquitaine as well; he was in fact the viceroy of the kingdom, and others imitated him by demanding indemnities, privileges and confirmation of rights, as was customary at the beginning of a reign.

  • For nine years (956965) Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, was regent of France, and thanks to him there was a kind of entente cordiale between the Carolingians and the Robertinians and Otto.

  • Bruno made Lothair recognize Hugh as duke of France and Eudes as duke of Burgundy; but the sons preserved the fathers enmity towards king Louis, despite the archbishops repeated efforts.

  • On her departure the pope, whose venality and nepotism had made him very unpopular with the citizens, died of fever before the arrival of Otto III., who elevated his own kinsman Bruno to the papal dignity under the name of Gregory V.

  • Even in the time of Copernicus some well-meaning persons, especially those of the reformed persuasion, had suspected a discrepancy between the new view of the solar system and certain passages of Scripture - a suspicion strengthened by the antiChristian inferences drawn from it by Giordano Bruno; but the question was never formally debated until Galileo's brilliant disclosures, enhanced by his formidable dialectic and enthusiastic zeal, irresistibly challenged for it the attention of the authorities.

  • Since 1896 an indispensable guide is the periodical review Kantstudien (Hamburg and Berlin, thrice yearly), edited by Hans Vaihinger and Bruno Bauch, which contains admirable original articles and notices of all important books on Kant and Kantianism.

  • bemoaned the absence of Frank Bruno's Boxing from the charts.

  • Meanwhile, Bruno said Tuesday he would indefinitely delay filing church charges against a retired episcopal bishop in Texas, the Rt.

  • However, it's poor old Randy Quaid (as the robot bodyguard Bruno) that I feel sorry for.

  • National title for his word on most active press latour Bruno.

  • Their lives are full of violence, wild sex, and general debauchery as Bruno and Michael try to find happiness.

  • disclosed the identity of the hunter or hunters who shot Bruno.

  • fresh from a one year stint in Australia, previously he cooked under Bruno Loubet in London.

  • geezer with the gray beard operated Bruno's arm (and voice) as well as playing Justice Dunn.

  • Madame Souza and her faithful hound Bruno leave to track them down.

  • Either runs weren't made (Halle, Maybury) or runs came infield (Bruno) and left them too few options.

  • insane genius that is Bruno.

  • But Bruno is proceeding with the civil lawsuits seeking to regain control over the parishes.

  • Larry Stammer of the Los Angeles Times reports that Bishop Jon Bruno has said he will observe a personal moratorium on blessing same-sex unions.

  • orthopedics 1991;14:1269-1276. [Lincolnshire Library Full Text] Bruno RL, Frick NM.

  • Photo courtesy of Sunpath by Bruno Brokken But don't expect becoming a reserve packer to make you a fortune.

  • Bruno arrives, a loose-fitting shirt hanging on his still considerable frame outside black slacks.

  • Finally in 924 Lorraine passed in the reign of Henry the Fowler under German (East Frankish) overlordship. Henry's son, Otto the Great, owing to the disordered state of the country, placed it in 953 in the hands of his able brother, Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, for pacification.

  • Bruno, who kept for himself the title of archduke, divided the territory into the two duchies of Upper and Lower Lorraine.

  • Bruno," as the author of educational books for children.

  • The failure of the conciliation movement left profound irritation between Vatican and Quirinal, an irritation which, on the Vatican side, found expression in vivacious protests and in threats of leaving Rome; and, on the Italian side, in the deposition of the syndic of Rome for having visited the cardinal-vicar, in the anti-clerical provisions of the new penal code, and in the inauguration (9th June 1889) of a monument to Giordano Bruno on the very site of his martyrdom.

  • In the system of Giordano Bruno, who sought to construct a philosophy of nature on the basis of new scientific ideas, more particularly the doctrine of Copernicus, we find the outlines of a theory of cosmic evolution conceived as an essentially vital process.

  • Bruno looked on our solar system as but one out of an infinite number of worlds.

  • A word must be given to one of Bruno's contemporary compatriots, namely Campanella, who gave poetic expression to that system of universal vitalism which Bruno developed.

  • Before he reached Rome, Pope John XV., who had invited him to Italy, had died, whereupon he raised his own cousin Bruno, son of Otto duke of Carinthia, to the papal chair as Pope Gregory V., and by this pontiff Otto was crowned emperor on the 21st of May 996.

  • The monument was erected after designs by Bruno Schmidt of Berlin, with fountains at the base said to be among the largest in the world, their capacity being 20,000 gallons per minute.

  • Nicolas's doctrines were of influence upon Giordano Bruno and other physical philosophers of the 15th and 16th centuries.

  • The fine old palace of the Caraffa family, once dukes of Maddaloni, the old college now named after Giordano Bruno, and the institute for the sons of soldiers are the chief points of interest.

  • Strauss, the author of the Leben Jesu, and Bruno Bauer, who like Feuerbach himself had passed over from Hegelianism to a form of naturalism.

  • Broecking, " Bruno von Angers and Berengar von Tours," in Deutsche Zeitschrift fiir Geschichtswissenschaft (vol.

  • There is a monument (restored in 1887) to Giordano Bruno, the free-thinker, who was born at Nola in 1548.

  • Alice was followed (in the "Lewis Carroll" series) by Phantasmagoria, in 1869; Through the Looking-Glass, in 1871; The Hunting of the Snark (1876); Rhyme and Reason (1883); A Tangled Tale (1885); and Sylvie and Bruno (in two parts, 1889 and 1893).

  • Clebsch, Theorie der bindren Algebraischen Formen (Leipzig, 1872); Vorlesungen fiber Geometrie (Leipzig, 1875); Faa de Bruno, Theorie des formes binaires (Turin, 1876); P. Gordan, Vorlesungen fiber Invariantentheorie, Bd.

  • The Kleine Schriften contains valuable criticisms on Paracelsus and Bruno.

  • Constantine Bruno, baron Kervyn de Lettenhove >>

  • BRUNO PAULIN GASTON PARIS (1839-1903), French scholar, son of Paulin Paris, was born at Avenay (Marne) on the 9th of August 183 9.

  • Otto's brother Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, was successful in restoring the royal authority in Lorraine, so that when Conrad and Frederick soon afterwards submitted to Otto, the struggle was confined to Bavaria.

  • About this time the king seems to have perceived the necessity of living and ruling in closer union with the church, a change of policy due perhaps to the influence of his brother Bruno, or forced upon him when his plans for uniting the duchies with the royal house brought rebellion in their train.

  • As Ludolf had died in 957 and Otto, his only son by Adelaide, had been chosen king at Worms, the government was entrusted to Bruno of Cologne, and Archbishop William of Mainz, a natural son of the king.

  • Although himself a stranger to letters he welcomed scholars to his court and eagerly seconded the efforts of his brother Bruno to encourage learning; and while he neither feared nor shirked battle, he was always ready to secure his ends by peaceable means.

  • In the great division of the Hegelian school, he, in company with Michelet and others, formed the "centre," midway between Erdmann and Gabler on the one hand, and the "extreme left" represented by Strauss, Feuerbach and Bruno Bauer.

  • GIORDANO BRUNO (c. 1548-1600), Italian philosopher of the Renaissance, was born near Nola in the village of Cicala.

  • Dufour, Giordano Bruno et Geneve, Geneva, 1884), and he travelled on through Lyons, Toulouse and Montpellier, arriving at Paris in 1581.

  • But his own system has a distinct unity and originality; it breathes throughout the fiery spirit of Bruno himself.

  • Bruno had been well received at Toulouse, where he had lectured on astronomy; even better fortune awaited him at Paris, especially at the hands of Henry III.

  • These seem to have been altogether devoted to expositions of a certain logical system which Bruno had taken up with great eagerness, the Ars Magna of Raimon Lull.

  • To many it has seemed a curious freak of Bruno's that he should have so eagerly adopted a view of thought like that of Lull, but in reality it is in strict accordance with the principles of his philosophy.

  • Under the protection of the French ambassador, Michel de Castelnau, sieur de Mauvissiere, Bruno passed over in 1583 to England, where he resided for about two years.

  • In 1584 also appeared the strange dialogue, Spaccio della Bestia Trionfante (Expulsion of the Triumphant Beast), an allegory treating chiefly of moral philosophy, but giving the essence of Bruno's philosophy.

  • Among the moral virtues which take the place of the beasts are Truth, Prudence, Wisdom, Law and Universal Judgment, and in the explanation of what these mean Bruno unfolds the inner essence of his system.

  • Through all this runs the train of thought resulting naturally from Bruno's fundamental principles, and familiar in modern philosophy as Spinozism, the denial of particular providence, the doctrine of the uselessness of prayer, the identification in a sense of liberty and necessity, and the peculiar definition of good and evil.

  • For more than two centuries Bruno received scarcely the consideration he deserved.

  • To Bruno, as to all great thinkers, philosophy is the search for unity.

  • Such is a brief summary of the principal positions of Bruno's philosophy.

  • Bruno's writings had been much neglected when Jacobi brought them into notice in his Briefe fiber die Lehre Spinozas (2nd ed., 1879).

  • So far as Descartes is concerned, it is highly improbable that he had seen any of Bruno's works.

  • Schelling, however, called one of his works after him, Bruno.

  • The chief English work on Giordano Bruno is that of J.

  • Bruno (Paris, 1846-1847); Domenico Berti, Giordano Bruno da Nola (2nd ed., 1889); H.

  • Clemens, Giordano Bruno and Nicolaus von Cusa (Bonn, 1847); Miss I.

  • Frith, Life of Giordano Bruno the Nolan (London, 1887); C. E.

  • Plumptre, Life and Works of Giordano Bruno (London, 1884); Chr.

  • Bruno (1889, ed.

  • Agnes Fry, 1905); Landsbeck, Bruno, der Martyrer der neuen Weltanschauung (1890); Owen, in Sceptics of the Italian Renaissance (London, 1893); C. H.

  • Bruno (1900); R.

  • Bruno, seine Weltanschauung and Lebensauffassung (1900); O.

  • Bruno and die Gegenwart (1902); J.

  • Bruno and seine Weltanschauung (1907).

  • The most important critical works are perhaps those of Felice Tocco, Le Opere Latine di Giordano Bruno (Florence, 1889), Le Opere Inedite di Giordano Bruno (Naples, 1891), Le Fonti piu recenti della fibs.

  • del Bruno (Rome, 1892).

  • Gentile, Giordano Bruno nella Storia della cultura (1907).

  • Saint Bruno of Querfurt >>

  • His proper name was Bruno; the family to which he belonged was of noble rank, and through his father he was related to the emperor Conrad II.

  • On the death of Damasus II., Bruno was in December 1048, with the concurrence both of the emperor and of the Roman delegates, selected his successor by an assembly at Worms; he stipulated, however, as a condition of his acceptance that he should first proceed to Rome and be canonically elected by the voice of clergy and people.

  • About 850, however, he appointed a margrave to defend the Limes Saxoniae, a narrow strip of land on the eastern frontier, and this office was given to one Liudolf who had large estates in Saxony, and who was probably descended from an Engrian noble named Bruno.

  • He died in 866, and was succeeded by his son Bruno, who was killed fighting the Normans in 880.

  • Thus, the Lent lily is Narcissus Pseudonarcissus; the African lily is Agapanthus umbellatus; the Belladonna lily is Amaryllis Belladonna (q.v.); the Jacobaea lily is Sprekelia formosissima; the Mariposa lily is Calochortus; the lily of the Incas is Alstroemeria pelegrina; St Bernard's lily is Anthericum Liliago; St Bruno's lily is Anthericum (or Paradisia) Liliastrum; the water lily is Nymphaea alba; the Arum lily is Richardia africana; and there are many others.

  • In the 10th century learning flourished at Aachen under Bruno, brother of Otto I.

  • PIERRE ANTOINE NOEL BRUNO DARU, Count (1767-1829), French soldier and statesman, was born at Montpellier on the r 2th of January 1767.

  • See Bruno Weiss, Funfzig Jahre auf Chatham Island (Berlin, 1 900); H.

  • In Bruno, and in Philos.

  • 1799); System des transcendentalen Idealismus (Tubingen, 1800); Bruno, oder fiber das gottliche and natiirliche Prinzip der Dinge (Berlin, 1802, ed.

  • He quotes indeed the opinion of Giordano Bruno to that effect, but with dissent.

  • BRUNO (BRUN, BRUNS) OF QUERFURT, Saint (c. 9751009), German missionary bishop and martyr, belonged to the family of the lords of Querfurt in Saxony.

  • When the news reached Rome of the martyrdom of Adalbert, bishop of Prague (997), Bruno determined to take his place, and in 1004, after being consecrated by the pope as archbishop of the eastern heathen, he set out for Germany to seek aid of the emperor Henry II.

  • In 1008 Bruno went to the court of Boleslaus, and, after a vain effort to persuade the emperor to end the war between Germans and Poles, determined at all hazards to proceed with his mission to the Prussians.

  • During his stay in Hungary (1004) Bruno wrote a life of St Adalbert, the best of the three extant biographies of the saint (in Pertz, Mon.

  • A life of St Bruno was written by Dietmar, bishop of Merseburg (976-1019).

  • He received a good education under the care of his uncle, Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, and his illegitimate half-brother, William, archbishop of Mainz.

  • Empedocles, Plato and Aristotle; Telesio, Bruno and Campanella; Leibnitz; the idealists, Schopenhauer and Hartmann, Fechner and Paulsen; and the materialist, Haeckel - all have agreed in according some sort of appetition to Nature.

  • peopled the gardens of Versailles rather than by the lessons of his masters, delighted Pope Clement XIV., who, on seeing the St Bruno executed by Houdon for the church of St Maria degli Angeli, said "he would speak, were it not that the rules of his order impose silence."

  • The Carthusian order, on its establishment by St Bruno, about A.D.

  • This plan, which was first adopted by St Bruno and his twelve companions at the original institution at Chartreux, near Grenoble, was maintained in all the Carthusian establishments throughout Europe, even after the ascetic severity of the order had been to some extent relaxed, and the primitive simplicity of their buildings had been exchanged for the magnificence of decoration which characterizes such foundations as the Certosas of Pavia and Florence.

  • According to the rule of St Bruno, all the members of a Carthusian brotherhood lived in the most absolute solitude and silence.

  • So Bruno constructed a personified nature, and the scientific and humanistic era began.

  • Liliastrum, St Bruno's Lily, I ft., bears pretty white sweet-scented flowers in May; A.

  • HANS BRUNO GEINITZ (1814-1900), German geologist, was born at Altenburg, the capital of the duchy of Saxe-Altenburg, on the 16th of October 1814.

  • Of his successors o'ne of the most illustrious was Bruno, brother of the emperor Otto I., archbishop from 953 to 965, who was the first of the archbishops to exercise temporal jurisdiction, and was also "archduke" of Lorraine.

  • In Lorraine, of which duchy Otto made his brother Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, Tb 111 administrator, his cause was triumphant; but every- wa~r.e where else dark clouds gathered over his head.

  • Lorrairn was given to Bruno; but Conrad, its former duke, aithougi thus punished, was not disgraced, for Otto needed his service~ in the war with the Magyars.

  • Lambert, a monk of Hersfeld, and Widukinds countryman, Bruno, in his De bello Saxonico, tell the story of the great contest between the emperor Henry IV.

  • Yet in this latter sense it would seem to have been assumed by Bruno of Saxony, archbishop of Cologne, and duke of Lorraine (953-965), when he divided his duchy into the dukedoms of Upper and Lower Lorraine.

  • His chief philosophical doctrine was taken up and developed more than a hundred years later by Giordano Bruno, who calls him the divine Cusanus.

  • Clemens, Giordano Bruno and Nikolaus Cusanus (Bonn, 1847); R.

  • Telesio was the head of the great South Italian movement which protested against the accepted authority of abstract reason, and sowed the seeds from which sprang the scientific methods of Campanella and Bruno, of Bacon and Descartes, with their widely divergent results.

  • Concreteness, therefore, is the one demand which Hamann expresses, and as representing his own thought he used to refer to Giordano Bruno's conception (previously held by Nicolaus Curanus) of the identity of contraries.

  • These preceptors included the German priest Bruno, the Czech priest Radla, and an Italian knight, Theodate of San Severino, who taught him arms and letters (a holograph epistle by Stephen existed in the Vatican Library as late as 1513).

  • During this century the best histories - Bruno's and Poggio's annals of Florence, for example - were composed in Latin after the manner of Livy.

  • The thinkers of southern Italy, Telesio, Bruno and Campanella, at last opened the two chief lines on which modern speculation has since moved.

  • Bruno was the precursor of the idealistic schools.

  • The autos da f e of Seville and Madrid, the flames to which Bruno, Dolet and Paleario were flung, the dungeon of Campanella and the seclusion of Galileo, the massacre of St Bartholomew and the faggots of Smithfield, the desolated plains of Germany and the cruelties of Alva in the Netherlands, disillusioned Europe of those golden dreams which had arisen in the earlier days of humanism, and which had been so pleasantly indulged by Rabelais.

  • This blind dualism found its natural consequence in the revolt of the Renaissance thinkers, Bruno and Paracelsus, who asserted the unity of mind and matter in all existence and were the precursors of the more intelligent monism of Leibnitz and the scientific metaphysics of his successors.

  • We do not know whether his influence was brought to bear in this sense upon Spinoza; but it has been suggested that the writings of Bruno, whose spirit of enthusiastic naturalism and fervid revolt against the Church would be especially dear to a man of Van den Ende's leanings, may have been put into the pupil's hand by the master.

  • The term "Nature" is put more into the foreground in the Treatise, a point which might be urged as evidence of Bruno's influence - the dialogues, moreover, being specially concerned to establish the unity, infinity and selfcontainedness of Nature 2; but the two opposed Cartesian attributes, thought and extension, and the absolutely infinite substance whose attributes they are - substance constituted by infinite attributes - appear here as in the Ethics.

  • 2 The fact that Spinoza nowhere mentions Bruno would not imply, according to the literary habits of those days, that he was not acquainted with his speculations and even indebted to them.

  • Accordingly, full weight must be allowed to the internal evidence brought forward by Sigwart, Avernarius and others to prove Spinoza's acquaintance with Bruno's writings.

  • In philosophy, Campanella was, like Giordano Bruno, a follower of Nicolas of Cusa and Telesio.

  • Pereira de Sampaio (" Bruno ") A Geracao Nova (1886).

  • His philosophical treatises abound with incoherent formulae to which, according to their inventor, every demonstration in every science may be reduced, and posterity has ratified Bacon's disdainful verdict on Lull's pretensions as a thinker; still the fact that he broke away from the scholastic system has recommended him to the historians of philosophy, and the subtle ingenuity of his dialectic has compelled the admiration of men so far apart in opinion as Giordano Bruno and Leibniz.

  • Originally erected in 1557 for the use of the Jesuits, the university buildings are regarded as the best work of Marco di Pino; the quadrangle, surrounded by a simple but effective peristyle, contains statues of Pietro della Vigna (Frederick's chancellor), Thomas Aquinas and Giordano Bruno.

  • The original settlement here was founded by St Bruno about 1084, and derived its name from the small village to the S.E., formerly known as Cartusia, and now as St Pierre de Chartreuse.

  • Some way farther the Guiers Mort is crossed by the modern bridge of St Bruno, the older bridge of Parant being still visible higher up the stream.

  • In the following year Bruno Heceta landed off what is now called Point Grenville and took formal possession of the country, and later, in lat.

  • Cassian speaks of an abbot in Egypt doing this; and in later times we have another example in the case of St Bruno.

  • (Bruno), pope from 996 to 999, a great-grandson of the emperor Otto the Great, succeeded John XV.

  • BRUNO BAUER (1809-1882), Germantheologianand historian, was born on the 6th of September 1809, the son of a painter in a porcelain factory, at Eisenberg in Saxe-Altenburg.

  • Not twenty years after Luther's defiance of the pope, the startling thesis " that all that Aristotle taught was false " was prosperously maintained by the youthful Ramus before the university of Paris; and almost contemporaneously the group of remarkable thinkers in Italy who heralded the dawn of modern physical science - Cardanus, Telesio, Patrizzi, Campanella, Bruno - began to propound their Aristotelian theories of the constitution of the physical universe.

  • (Wismar, 1898); and Bruno Schmidt, Der Schwedisch-mecklenburgische Pfandvertrag fiber Stadt and Herrschaft Wismar (Leipzig, 1901).

  • LOTHAIR (941-986), king of France, son of Louis IV., succeeded his father in 954, and was at first under the guardianship of Hugh the Great, duke of the Franks, and then under that of his maternal uncle Bruno, archbishop of Cologne.

  • Thanks to Hughs support and to the good offices of Otto and his brother Bruno, archbishop of Cologne and duke of Lorraine, Lothair was chosen king and crowned at Reims. Hugh exacted, as payment for his disinterestedness and fidelity, a renewal of his sovereignty over Burgundy with that of Aquitaine as well; he was in fact the viceroy of the kingdom, and others imitated him by demanding indemnities, privileges and confirmation of rights, as was customary at the beginning of a reign.

  • For nine years (956965) Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, was regent of France, and thanks to him there was a kind of entente cordiale between the Carolingians and the Robertinians and Otto.

  • Bruno made Lothair recognize Hugh as duke of France and Eudes as duke of Burgundy; but the sons preserved the fathers enmity towards king Louis, despite the archbishops repeated efforts.

  • On her departure the pope, whose venality and nepotism had made him very unpopular with the citizens, died of fever before the arrival of Otto III., who elevated his own kinsman Bruno to the papal dignity under the name of Gregory V.

  • Even in the time of Copernicus some well-meaning persons, especially those of the reformed persuasion, had suspected a discrepancy between the new view of the solar system and certain passages of Scripture - a suspicion strengthened by the antiChristian inferences drawn from it by Giordano Bruno; but the question was never formally debated until Galileo's brilliant disclosures, enhanced by his formidable dialectic and enthusiastic zeal, irresistibly challenged for it the attention of the authorities.

  • in 1612) would have appeared incredibly lax, nay, its religious character almost doubtful, to Bruno, Stephen Harding, Francis or Dominic. It admits only priests aged at least thirty-six, or ecclesiastics who have completed their studies and are ready for ordination.

  • Since 1896 an indispensable guide is the periodical review Kantstudien (Hamburg and Berlin, thrice yearly), edited by Hans Vaihinger and Bruno Bauch, which contains admirable original articles and notices of all important books on Kant and Kantianism.

  • Bruno manages to rip apart the US fashion industry like a knife through butter.

  • For calling Bruno bonkers I hope you rot in hell.

  • Bruno arrives, a loose-fitting shirt hanging on his still considerable frame outside black slacks.

  • Bruno RL, Johnson JC, Berman WS: Vasomotor abnormalities as Post-Polio Sequelae: Functional and clinical implications.

  • Da Ali G Show took the cable network by storm, and introduced Americans to Ali G, Borat and Bruno.

  • In addition to rapper Ali G, Baron Cohen also introduced audiences to Borat (a Kazakhstan reporter) and Bruno (a flamboyantly gay Austrian fashion presenter).

  • A film based on his character Bruno is in the works, with Cohen being paid $13 million upfront, as well as receiving 15% of the box office sales.

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