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browne

browne

browne Sentence Examples

  • To establish the exact relationship it is necessary not only to breed but to rear the medusa, which cannot always be done in 1 In some cases hydroids have been reared in aquaria from ova of medusae, but these hydroids have not yet been found in the sea (Browne [Io a]).

  • A further After Hincks, Forbes, and Browne.

  • T, Browne, from Proc. Zool.

  • Browne [10]).

  • Browne, Proc. Zool.

  • Cunoctantha fowleri Browne, buds are formed from the sub-umbrella on the under side of the stomach pouches, where later the gonads are developed.

  • (Browne [10] and [loci].) Order Vi.

  • Browne, " On British Hydroids and Medusae," Proc. Zool.

  • 58), was sent to him by Sir Thomas Browne.

  • Browne's Literary History of Persia, i., ii.

  • Browne, Life of Alexander H.

  • No real second edition ever appeared, but in anticipation of it Sir Thomas Browne prepared in or about 1671 (?) his " Account of Birds found in Norfolk," of which the draft, now in the British Museum, was printed in his collected works by Wilkin in 1835.

  • PETER BROWNE (?166 51 735), Irish divine and bishop of Cork and Ross, was born in Co.

  • Browne holds that not only God's essence, but his attributes are inexpressible by our ideas, and can only be conceived analogically.

  • Browne was a man of abstemious habits, charitable disposition, and impressive eloquence.

  • Robert Browne >>

  • EDWARD HAROLD BROWNE (1811-1891), English bishop, was born at Aylesbury and educated at Eton and Cambridge.

  • Hablot Knight Browne >>

  • Browne).

  • Browne, Literary History of Persia, ii.

  • The genus Pelecanus as instituted by Linnaeus included the 1 This caution was not neglected by the prudent, even so long ago as Sir Thomas Browne's days; for he, recording the occurrence of a pelican in Norfolk, was careful to notice that about the same time one of the pelicans kept by the king (Charles II.) in St James's Park, had been lost.

  • Browne, A Literary History of Persia (London, 1902), pp. 387 f.

  • Browne, The Catholicos of the East and his People (London, 1892); G.

  • Browne, Bacon, Bulwer, &c., use it to explain a material pointed shape.

  • For fuller details and explanations of the elements of the subject, the reader must be referred to general treatises such as Baynes's Thermodynamics (Oxford), Tait's Thermodynamics (Edinburgh), Maxwell's Theory of Heat (London), Parker's Thermodynamics (Cambridge), Clausius's Mechanical Theory of Heat (translated by Browne, London), and Preston's Theory of Heat (London).

  • Browne, Persian Literat.

  • He sold it to Sir William Fitz-William, from whom it passed to Sir Anthony Browne and descended to the viscounts Montague.

  • Such a " gathered church " emerges as the great desideratum with Robert Browne, between 1572, when he graduated at Cambridge, and 1580-1581, when he first defined his Separatist theory.

  • It has been debated how far Browne derived this idea from Dutch Anabaptists in Norwich and elsewhere.

  • But they connected it closely with adult baptism, whereas Browne enjoined baptism for the children of those already in covenant, and in no case taught re-baptism.

  • From Browne's idea of a holy people, covenanted to walk after Christ's mind and will, all else flowed, as is set forth in his Book which sheweth the life and manners of all true Christians.

  • Such were the leading features of Browne's Congregationalism, as a polity distinct from both Episcopacy and Presbyterianism.

  • This sentence from Browne's spiritual autobiography contains the root of the whole matter, and explains the title of his other chief work, also of 1582, A Treatise of Reformation without tarrying for any, and of the wickedness of those Preachers which will not reform till the Magistrate command or compel them.

  • Here Browne distinguishes acceptance of the covenant relation with God (religion) and the forming or " planting " of churches on the basis of God's covenant (with its laws of government), from the enforcing of the covenant voluntarily accepted, whether by church-excommunication or by civil penalties - the latter only in cases of flagrant impiety, such as idolatry, blasphemy or Sabbath-breaking.

  • As, however, the prince might approve a false type of Church, in spite of what they 2 both assumed to be the clear teaching of Scripture, and should so far be resisted, Browne and Barrow found themselves practically in the same attitude towards the prince's religious coercion.

  • It was practically identical with that set forth by Browne in 1582, though they were at pains to deny personal connexion with him whom they now regarded as an apostate.

  • Browne, History of Cong.

  • In 1874 and again in 1875, he presided over the Reunion Conferences held at Bonn and attended by leading ecclesiastics from the British Isles and from the Oriental Church, among whom were Bishop Christopher Wordsworth of Lincoln; Bishop Harold Browne of Ely; Lord Plunket, archbishop of Dublin; Lycurgus, archbishop of Syros and Tenos; Canon Liddon; and Professor Ossinine of St Petersburg.

  • In 1523 the princes of Germany protested to the Pope in language almost equally strong (Browne, Fasciculus, i.

  • Browne, Maryland: the History of a Palatinate (Boston, 188 4 and 1895), an excellent outline of the colonial history; N.

  • He travelled in France and visited the cities of Italy, returning in the autumn of 1646 to Paris, where he became intimate with Sir Richard Browne, the English resident at the court of France.

  • In June of the following year he married Browne's daughter and heiress, Mary, then a child of not more than twelve years of age.

  • He went in 1652 to Sayes Court at Deptford, a house which Sir Richard Browne had held on a lease from the crown.

  • Numerous other papers and letters of Evelyn on scientific subjects and matters of public interest are preserved, a collection of private and official letters and papers (1642-1712) by, or addressed to, Sir Richard Browne and his son-in-law being in the British Museum (Add.

  • Browne, History of the Bible Society (London, 18 59); Bertram, Geschichte der Cansteinschen Bibelanstalt (Halle, 1863); E.

  • Browne (1892); Reports H.M.

  • Harold Browne (1811-1891), bishop of Ely; Christopher Wordsworth, bishop of Lincoln; and Lord Arthur Hervey (1808 1 A reprint of this edition has been published by the Clarendon Press (Oxford, 1833).

  • - English Law: Balfour Browne and Allan, Compensation (2nd ed., London, 1903); Cripps, Compensation (5th edition, London, 1905); Hudson, Compensation (London, 1906); Boyle and Waghorn, Compensation (London, 1903); Lloyd, Compensation (6th ed.

  • He took Sir William Browne's medal for a Greek ode in 1846 and 1847, the Members' Prize for a Latin essay in 1847 as an undergraduate and in 1849 as a bachelor.

  • Among his publications are Characters and Characteristics of William Law (1893); Bunyan Characters (3 vols., 1894); Samuel Rutherford (1894); An Appreciation of Jacob Behmen (1895) Lancelot Andrewes and his Private Devotions (1895); Bible Characters (7 vols., 1897); Santa Teresa (1897); Father John of Cronstadt (1898); An Appreciation of Browne's Religio Medici (1898); Cardinal Newman, An Appreciation (1901).

  • Browne (Cambridge, 1891).

  • More recent works are: - Browne, The New History of the Bdb (Cambridge, 1893) and " Catalogue and Description of the 27 Babi Manuscripts," Journal of R.

  • Browne (New York, 2903); Isabella Brittingham, The Revelations of Bala u'lldh, in a Sequence of Four Lessons (2902); Laura Clifford Burney, Some Answered Questions Collected [in Acre, 1904-1906] and Translated from the Persian of `Abdu'l-Bahl [i.e.

  • Browne, who sent a picture of it with an account that is given more fully in J.

  • Browne, its original discoverer, cannot be restored.

  • Browne, Off the Mill (1895); Mrs H.

  • Cave Browne, Infanticide, its Origin, Progress and Suppression (1857); T.

  • this, it brought to the attention of a few men in Egypt a keen sense of the great advantage of an orderly government, and a warm appreciation of the advance that science and learning had made in Europe (Hajji Browne, Bonaparte in Egypt and the ~gyptians of to-day, 1907, p. 268).

  • JOHN WINTHROP (1588-1649), a Puritan leader and governor of Massachusetts, was born in Edwardston, Suffolk, on the 12th of January (O.S.) 1588, the son of Adam Winthrop of Groton Manor, and Anne (Browne) Winthrop. In December 1602 he matriculated at Trinity College, Cambridge, but he did not graduate.

  • Browne, Report on " Mineral Resources of the States and Territories west of the Rocky Mountains " (United States Treasury, 2 vols., Washington, 1867-1868); United States Geological Survey, Annual Reports, Mineral Resources; consult also the bibliographies of, publications of the Survey, issued as Bulletins; California State Mining Bureau, Bulletins from 1888, note especially No.

  • Browne, A Year amongst the Persians, p. 391 f.).

  • Browne, The Persian Revolution of 190509 (London, 1910); A.

  • In 1893 serious differences arose between the khan of Kalat and Sir James Browne, who succeeded Sir Robert Sandeman as agent to the governor-general in Baluchistan, arising out of Mir Khodadad Khan's outrageous conduct in the management of his own court, and the treatment of his officials.

  • i.; Browne, An Illustration of Stonehenge and Abury (1823); Fergusson, Rude Stone Monuments (1872); Long, Stonehenge and its Barrows (1876); Gidley, Stonehenge viewed in the Light of Ancient History and Modern Observation (1877); W.

  • 2 See Sir Thomas Browne's Works, vol.

  • Browne finds that after smoking " chandoo," containing 8.98% of morphine, 7.63% was left in the dross, so that only 1.35% of morphia was carried over in the smoke or decomposed by the heat.

  • p. 355; Frank Browne, Report on Opium (Hong-Kong, 1908); G.

  • Browne, " Variation in Aurelia aurita," Biometrika, i.

  • Parker (Elementary Biology) cites a passage from Alexander Ross, who, commenting on Sir Thomas Browne's doubt as to "whether mice may be bred by putrefaction," gives a clear statement of the common opinion on abiogenesis held until about two centuries ago.

  • Ross wrote: "So may he (Sir Thomas Browne) doubt whether in cheese and timber worms are generated; or if beetles and wasps in cows' dung; or if butterflies, locusts, grasshoppers, shell-fish, snails, eels, and such like, be procreated of putrefied matter, which is apt to receive the form of that creature to which it is by formative power disposed.

  • Browne, On the XXXIX.

  • It was first made known from having been met with on New-Year Island, off the coast of Staten Land, where Cook anchored on New Year's eve 1774.5 A few days 1 Meaning, no doubt, skimming or "hovering," the latter the word used by Browne in his Account of Birds found Norfolk (Mus.

  • Dictionary) as to the alliance between the words shear and scrape it may be that Browne's hesitation as to the derivation of "shearwater" had more ground than at first appears.

  • Sir Thomas Browne, too, while he denies the capacity of the astrologers of his day, does not venture to dispute the reality of the science.

  • The cathedral church which he built at Sherborne, though replaced later by a i For the disputed etymology of Malmesbury, which some connect with Aldhelm's name, see Bishop Browne, St Aldhelm: his Life and Times, p. 73.

  • Browne, bishop of Bristol, St Aldhelm; his Life and Times (1903); and W.

  • Peter Browne, or H.

  • Browne, Amer.

  • Browne and F.

  • benny Browne & co.

  • Yesterday morning, Anthony Browne was interviewed on the Today program along with Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, the independent columnist.

  • Browne generally conformed to Henry's will during the upheavals of the early Reformation but remained at heart a religious conservative.

  • The society is currently compiling a full discography of Sam Browne.

  • Skellig Michael Dingle Peninsula On the way we will visit the largest dolmen in Europe - the 100-ton Browne's Hill Dolmen.

  • Browne, Maitland A stone headstone of Gothic design with a delicately carved inscription.

  • iodine prophylaxis during cataract surgery, in collaboration with Dr. Ben Browne at Glasgow Royal Infirmary.

  • Browne use of the suggestion that this is in some way a move toward Shariah Law in the UK is palpable nonsense.

  • This offers itself as precisely the sort of pc quandary that Anthony Browne highlights in his slim volume.

  • For millionaireâs daughter Polly Browne this is made more difficult as her father fears some young rapscallion will take her for a ride.

  • In the absence of Mr Browne, a junior understrapper, Tom Watson, was sent over the top.

  • To establish the exact relationship it is necessary not only to breed but to rear the medusa, which cannot always be done in 1 In some cases hydroids have been reared in aquaria from ova of medusae, but these hydroids have not yet been found in the sea (Browne [Io a]).

  • A further After Hincks, Forbes, and Browne.

  • T, Browne, from Proc. Zool.

  • Browne [10]).

  • As has been described above, the endoderm may also contribute to the sense-organs, but such contributions are always of an accessory nature, for instance, concrement-cells in the otocysts, pigment in the ocelli, and never of sensory nature, sense-cells being Hydromedusae are of separate sexes, the only known exception being Amphogona apsteini, one of the Trachomedusae (Browne [9]).

  • Browne, Proc. Zool.

  • Cunoctantha fowleri Browne, buds are formed from the sub-umbrella on the under side of the stomach pouches, where later the gonads are developed.

  • (Browne [10] and [loci].) Order Vi.

  • Browne, " On British Hydroids and Medusae," Proc. Zool.

  • 58), was sent to him by Sir Thomas Browne.

  • Browne's Literary History of Persia, i., ii.

  • Browne, Life of Alexander H.

  • No real second edition ever appeared, but in anticipation of it Sir Thomas Browne prepared in or about 1671 (?) his " Account of Birds found in Norfolk," of which the draft, now in the British Museum, was printed in his collected works by Wilkin in 1835.

  • PETER BROWNE (?166 51 735), Irish divine and bishop of Cork and Ross, was born in Co.

  • Browne holds that not only God's essence, but his attributes are inexpressible by our ideas, and can only be conceived analogically.

  • Browne was a man of abstemious habits, charitable disposition, and impressive eloquence.

  • Robert Browne >>

  • EDWARD HAROLD BROWNE (1811-1891), English bishop, was born at Aylesbury and educated at Eton and Cambridge.

  • Hablot Knight Browne >>

  • Browne, Literary History of Persia, ii.

  • The genus Pelecanus as instituted by Linnaeus included the 1 This caution was not neglected by the prudent, even so long ago as Sir Thomas Browne's days; for he, recording the occurrence of a pelican in Norfolk, was careful to notice that about the same time one of the pelicans kept by the king (Charles II.) in St James's Park, had been lost.

  • Browne, A Literary History of Persia (London, 1902), pp. 387 f.

  • Browne, The Catholicos of the East and his People (London, 1892); G.

  • Browne, Bacon, Bulwer, &c., use it to explain a material pointed shape.

  • For fuller details and explanations of the elements of the subject, the reader must be referred to general treatises such as Baynes's Thermodynamics (Oxford), Tait's Thermodynamics (Edinburgh), Maxwell's Theory of Heat (London), Parker's Thermodynamics (Cambridge), Clausius's Mechanical Theory of Heat (translated by Browne, London), and Preston's Theory of Heat (London).

  • Browne, Persian Literat.

  • He sold it to Sir William Fitz-William, from whom it passed to Sir Anthony Browne and descended to the viscounts Montague.

  • " Reformation without tarrying for Anie " was the burden laid on the heart of the Congregational pioneers in 1567-1571; and it continued to press heavily on many, both " Separatists " and conforming " Puritans " (to use the nicknames used by foes), before it became written theory in Robert Browne's work under that title, published at Middelburg in Holland in 1582 (see Browne, Robert).

  • It seemed to them impossible that vital religion could be inculcated, unless there were other guarantee for ministerial fitness than episcopal licensing, unless in fact the godly in each parish had a voice in deciding whether a man was called of God to minister the Word of God (see C. Burrage, The True Story of Robert Browne, pp. 7, i i f.).

  • Such a " gathered church " emerges as the great desideratum with Robert Browne, between 1572, when he graduated at Cambridge, and 1580-1581, when he first defined his Separatist theory.

  • It has been debated how far Browne derived this idea from Dutch Anabaptists in Norwich and elsewhere.

  • But they connected it closely with adult baptism, whereas Browne enjoined baptism for the children of those already in covenant, and in no case taught re-baptism.

  • From Browne's idea of a holy people, covenanted to walk after Christ's mind and will, all else flowed, as is set forth in his Book which sheweth the life and manners of all true Christians.

  • Such were the leading features of Browne's Congregationalism, as a polity distinct from both Episcopacy and Presbyterianism.

  • This sentence from Browne's spiritual autobiography contains the root of the whole matter, and explains the title of his other chief work, also of 1582, A Treatise of Reformation without tarrying for any, and of the wickedness of those Preachers which will not reform till the Magistrate command or compel them.

  • Here Browne distinguishes acceptance of the covenant relation with God (religion) and the forming or " planting " of churches on the basis of God's covenant (with its laws of government), from the enforcing of the covenant voluntarily accepted, whether by church-excommunication or by civil penalties - the latter only in cases of flagrant impiety, such as idolatry, blasphemy or Sabbath-breaking.

  • As, however, the prince might approve a false type of Church, in spite of what they 2 both assumed to be the clear teaching of Scripture, and should so far be resisted, Browne and Barrow found themselves practically in the same attitude towards the prince's religious coercion.

  • Between 1580 and 1581, when Browne formed in Norwich the first known church of this order on definite scriptural theory, and October 1585, when, being convinced that the times were not yet ripe for the realization of the perfect polity, and taking a more charitable view of the established Church, he yielded to the pressure brought to bear on him by his kinsman Lord Burghley, so far as partially to conform to parochial public worship as defined by law (see Browne, Robert), the history of Congregationalism is mainly that of Browne and of his writings.

  • But of organized churches we can trace none in England, until we come in 1586 to Greenwood and Barrow, the men whose devotion to a cause in which they felt the imperative call of God seems to have rallied into church-fellowship the Separatists in London, whether those of Fytz's day or those later convinced by the failure of the Puritan efforts at reform and by the writings of Browne.

  • It was practically identical with that set forth by Browne in 1582, though they were at pains to deny personal connexion with him whom they now regarded as an apostate.

  • Association for mutual help and counsel, contemplated in some degree in the early days, from Browne to the Savoy Declaration of 1658, but thereafter forced into abeyance, began early in the 19th century to find expression in County Unions on a voluntary basis, especially for promoting home missionary work.

  • Browne, History of Cong.

  • In 1874 and again in 1875, he presided over the Reunion Conferences held at Bonn and attended by leading ecclesiastics from the British Isles and from the Oriental Church, among whom were Bishop Christopher Wordsworth of Lincoln; Bishop Harold Browne of Ely; Lord Plunket, archbishop of Dublin; Lycurgus, archbishop of Syros and Tenos; Canon Liddon; and Professor Ossinine of St Petersburg.

  • In 1523 the princes of Germany protested to the Pope in language almost equally strong (Browne, Fasciculus, i.

  • Browne, Maryland: the History of a Palatinate (Boston, 188 4 and 1895), an excellent outline of the colonial history; N.

  • He travelled in France and visited the cities of Italy, returning in the autumn of 1646 to Paris, where he became intimate with Sir Richard Browne, the English resident at the court of France.

  • In June of the following year he married Browne's daughter and heiress, Mary, then a child of not more than twelve years of age.

  • He went in 1652 to Sayes Court at Deptford, a house which Sir Richard Browne had held on a lease from the crown.

  • Numerous other papers and letters of Evelyn on scientific subjects and matters of public interest are preserved, a collection of private and official letters and papers (1642-1712) by, or addressed to, Sir Richard Browne and his son-in-law being in the British Museum (Add.

  • Browne, History of the Bible Society (London, 18 59); Bertram, Geschichte der Cansteinschen Bibelanstalt (Halle, 1863); E.

  • Browne (1892); Reports H.M.

  • Harold Browne (1811-1891), bishop of Ely; Christopher Wordsworth, bishop of Lincoln; and Lord Arthur Hervey (1808 1 A reprint of this edition has been published by the Clarendon Press (Oxford, 1833).

  • - English Law: Balfour Browne and Allan, Compensation (2nd ed., London, 1903); Cripps, Compensation (5th edition, London, 1905); Hudson, Compensation (London, 1906); Boyle and Waghorn, Compensation (London, 1903); Lloyd, Compensation (6th ed.

  • He took Sir William Browne's medal for a Greek ode in 1846 and 1847, the Members' Prize for a Latin essay in 1847 as an undergraduate and in 1849 as a bachelor.

  • Among his publications are Characters and Characteristics of William Law (1893); Bunyan Characters (3 vols., 1894); Samuel Rutherford (1894); An Appreciation of Jacob Behmen (1895) Lancelot Andrewes and his Private Devotions (1895); Bible Characters (7 vols., 1897); Santa Teresa (1897); Father John of Cronstadt (1898); An Appreciation of Browne's Religio Medici (1898); Cardinal Newman, An Appreciation (1901).

  • Browne) is based on Mirth Jani's work, but many important passages which did not accord with later Babi doctrine or policy have been suppressed or modified, while some additions have been made.

  • Browne (Cambridge, 1891).

  • More recent works are: - Browne, The New History of the Bdb (Cambridge, 1893) and " Catalogue and Description of the 27 Babi Manuscripts," Journal of R.

  • Browne (New York, 2903); Isabella Brittingham, The Revelations of Bala u'lldh, in a Sequence of Four Lessons (2902); Laura Clifford Burney, Some Answered Questions Collected [in Acre, 1904-1906] and Translated from the Persian of `Abdu'l-Bahl [i.e.

  • Browne, who sent a picture of it with an account that is given more fully in J.

  • Browne, its original discoverer, cannot be restored.

  • Browne, Off the Mill (1895); Mrs H.

  • Cave Browne, Infanticide, its Origin, Progress and Suppression (1857); T.

  • this, it brought to the attention of a few men in Egypt a keen sense of the great advantage of an orderly government, and a warm appreciation of the advance that science and learning had made in Europe (Hajji Browne, Bonaparte in Egypt and the ~gyptians of to-day, 1907, p. 268).

  • Churchill followed by Lord Arthur Browne, Chief Cable Censor, and Col.

  • JOHN WINTHROP (1588-1649), a Puritan leader and governor of Massachusetts, was born in Edwardston, Suffolk, on the 12th of January (O.S.) 1588, the son of Adam Winthrop of Groton Manor, and Anne (Browne) Winthrop. In December 1602 he matriculated at Trinity College, Cambridge, but he did not graduate.

  • Browne, Report on " Mineral Resources of the States and Territories west of the Rocky Mountains " (United States Treasury, 2 vols., Washington, 1867-1868); United States Geological Survey, Annual Reports, Mineral Resources; consult also the bibliographies of, publications of the Survey, issued as Bulletins; California State Mining Bureau, Bulletins from 1888, note especially No.

  • Browne, A Year amongst the Persians, p. 391 f.).

  • Browne, The Persian Revolution of 190509 (London, 1910); A.

  • Browne, Literary History of Persia (1902, seq.), and Hermann Eth, in vol.

  • In 1893 serious differences arose between the khan of Kalat and Sir James Browne, who succeeded Sir Robert Sandeman as agent to the governor-general in Baluchistan, arising out of Mir Khodadad Khan's outrageous conduct in the management of his own court, and the treatment of his officials.

  • i.; Browne, An Illustration of Stonehenge and Abury (1823); Fergusson, Rude Stone Monuments (1872); Long, Stonehenge and its Barrows (1876); Gidley, Stonehenge viewed in the Light of Ancient History and Modern Observation (1877); W.

  • 2 See Sir Thomas Browne's Works, vol.

  • Browne finds that after smoking " chandoo," containing 8.98% of morphine, 7.63% was left in the dross, so that only 1.35% of morphia was carried over in the smoke or decomposed by the heat.

  • p. 355; Frank Browne, Report on Opium (Hong-Kong, 1908); G.

  • The church of St Martin was built (c. 1730) on the site of an older church at the instance of Dr Browne Willis, an eminent antiquary (d.

  • Browne, " Variation in Aurelia aurita," Biometrika, i.

  • Parker (Elementary Biology) cites a passage from Alexander Ross, who, commenting on Sir Thomas Browne's doubt as to "whether mice may be bred by putrefaction," gives a clear statement of the common opinion on abiogenesis held until about two centuries ago.

  • Ross wrote: "So may he (Sir Thomas Browne) doubt whether in cheese and timber worms are generated; or if beetles and wasps in cows' dung; or if butterflies, locusts, grasshoppers, shell-fish, snails, eels, and such like, be procreated of putrefied matter, which is apt to receive the form of that creature to which it is by formative power disposed.

  • Browne, On the XXXIX.

  • It was first made known from having been met with on New-Year Island, off the coast of Staten Land, where Cook anchored on New Year's eve 1774.5 A few days 1 Meaning, no doubt, skimming or "hovering," the latter the word used by Browne in his Account of Birds found Norfolk (Mus.

  • Dictionary) as to the alliance between the words shear and scrape it may be that Browne's hesitation as to the derivation of "shearwater" had more ground than at first appears.

  • Sir Thomas Browne, too, while he denies the capacity of the astrologers of his day, does not venture to dispute the reality of the science.

  • The cathedral church which he built at Sherborne, though replaced later by a i For the disputed etymology of Malmesbury, which some connect with Aldhelm's name, see Bishop Browne, St Aldhelm: his Life and Times, p. 73.

  • Browne, bishop of Bristol, St Aldhelm; his Life and Times (1903); and W.

  • Peter Browne, or H.

  • Browne, Amer.

  • Browne and F.

  • This offers itself as precisely the sort of PC quandary that Anthony Browne highlights in his slim volume.

  • For millionaireâs daughter Polly Browne this is made more difficult as her father fears some young rapscallion will take her for a ride.

  • Judging by Browne 's speech last week, some of the oil majors appear to be singing from the same hymn sheet.

  • In the absence of Mr Browne, a junior understrapper, Tom Watson, was sent over the top.

  • Browne, Kevin, et al. Early Prediction and Prevention of Child Abuse: A Handbook.

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