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brougham

brougham

brougham Sentence Examples

  • In 1799 he was induced by his fellow-student, Henry Brougham, to study the diffraction of light.

  • Mr Brougham; Sir Samuel Romilly; Mr Mill, author of the well-known work on India; M.

  • To the original members were afterwards added several remarkable persons, amongst whom were Josiah Wedgwood, Bennet Langton (Dr Johnson's friend), and, later, Zachary Macaulay, Henry Brougham and James Stephen.

  • Accordingly, in 1811, Brougham carried through parliament a bill declaring the traffic to be a felony punishable with transportation.

  • The question, however, made little progress in parliament for some years, though Buxton, William Smith, Lushington, Brougham, Mackintosh, Butterworth, and Denman, with the aid of Z.

  • His main object, however, like that of Brougham, was the amelioration of the law, more by the abolition of cumbrous technicalities than by the assertion of new and striking principles.

  • Following in the path struck out by Miss Strickland in her Lives of the Queens of England, and by Lord Brougham's Lives of Eminent Statesmen, he at last produced, in 1849, The Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of England, from the earliest times till the reign of King George IV., 7 vols.

  • These faults are painfully apparent in the lives of Hardwicke, Eldon, Lyndhurst and Brougham, and they have been pointed out by the biographers of Eldon and by Lord St Leonards.'

  • See Misrepresentations in Campbell's "Lives of Lyndhurst and Brougham" corrected by St Leonards (London, 1869).

  • For thirty-six years Creevey had kept a "copious diary," and had preserved a vast miscellaneous correspondence with such people as Lord Brougham, and his step-daughter, Elizabeth Ord, had assisted him, by keeping his letters to her, in compiling material avowedly for a collection of Creevey Papers in the future.

  • At his death it was found that he had left his mistress, with whom he had lived for four years, his sole executrix and legatee, and Greville notes in his Memoirs the anxiety of Brougham and others to get the papers into their hands and suppress them.

  • The diary, mentioned above, did not survive, perhaps through Brougham's success, and the papers from which Sir Herbert Maxwell made his selection came into his hands from Mrs Blackett Ord, whose husband was the grandson of Creevey's eldest step-daughter.

  • To Edinburgh is also due the first high-class critical journal, the Edinburgh Review, established in October 1802 by Jeffrey, Scott, Horner, Brougham and Sydney Smith.

  • Among its more famous contributors were Lord Brougham, Sir Walter Scott, Carlyle, Hazlitt and Macaulay.

  • The work, he says, is the "production of a decided partisan," who "rakes in the ashes of long-forgotten and a thousand times buried slanders, 1 Lord Brougham, overlooking the constitutional chapter in the Middle Ages, censured Hallam for making an arbitrary beginning at this point, and proposed to write a more complete history himself.

  • (London, 1867) and that of Lord Brougham in Historical Sketches of Statesmen, 3 vols.

  • The occurrence marked him out for promotion by a Liberal Government, and in the autumn he received from Lord Brougham as chancellor the living of Kirby-underDale in Yorkshire.

  • Henry Brougham Loch, 1st baron Loch >>

  • He became a member of the speculative society, where he measured himself in debate with Scott, Brougham, Francis Horner, the marquess of Lansdowne, Lord Kinnaird and others.

  • P. Brougham (afterwards Lord Brougham), Francis Horner and others; and the scheme resulted in the appearance on the 10th of October 1802 of the first number of the Edinburgh Review.

  • Additional particulars are given in Brougham's Men of Letters and Science, Burton's Life of Hume and Alexander Carlyle's Autobiography; and some characteristic anecdotes of him will be found in Memoirs of the Life and Works of Sir John Sinclair (1837).

  • See Brougham's Statesmen of the Reign of George III.; Foss's Judges; Campbell's Lives of Lord Chancellors.

  • Forts in plenty can be detected along it, notably Manchester (Mancunium or Mamucium), Ribchester (Bremetennacum), Brougham Castle (Brocavum), Old Penrith (Voreda), and on a western branch, Watercrook near Kendal, Waterhead near the hotel of that name on Ambleside, Hardknott above Eskdale, Maryport (Uxellodunum), and Old Carlisle (possibly Petriana).

  • A visit paid by this famous orator to Lord Brougham in 1865 was made the occasion of a banquet given in his honour by the benchers of the Temple and of Lincoln's Inn.

  • Among his pupils were Sir Walter Scott, Jeffrey, Cockburn, Francis Horner, Sydney Smith, Lord Brougham, Dr Thomas Brown, James Mill, Sir James Mackintosh and Sir Archibald Alison.

  • Edmund Law, Dugald Stewart, Lord Brougham, and many other writers, have, in consequence, represented Clarke as arguing from the existence of time and space to the existence of Deity.

  • Mill and Henry Brougham in the organization of the new "university" in Gower Street.

  • In 1849 he was re-elected to the council, in 1860 he became treasurer, and on the death of Brougham (1868) president.

  • The work began in May 1860 at the York- a congress held at Glasgow, under the presidency of Antwerp Lord Brougham, assisted by Lord Neaves.

  • He made considerable contributions to scientific literature, and among his publications were: An Analytical View of Newton's Principia, with Lord Brougham (1855); an Essay on the Stability of a given State of Motion, which won the Adams' prize in 1877; and treatises on the Dynamics of Rigid Bodies, on Analytical Statics, and on the Dynamics of a Particle.

  • *loge of James Watt, by James Muirhead (London, 1839); also translated, with notes, by Lord Brougham; Popular Lectures on Astronomy, by Walter Kelly and Rev. L.

  • He was educated at the high school and the university of Edinburgh; and he was a member of the famous Speculative Society, to which Sir Walter Scott, Brougham and Jeffrey belonged.

  • We there learn that the following place-names are ultimately of Celtic origin: - Brougham, Catterick, York, Lincoln (Lindum), Manchester (Mancunium), Doncaster (Danum), Wroxeter (Viroconium), Lichfield (Letocetum), Gloucester (Glevum), Cirencester (Corinium), Colchester (Camulodunum), London, Reculver, Richborough (Rutupiae), Dover, Lymne, Isle of Wight, Dorchester (Durnovaria), Sarum, Exeter (Isca), Brancaster (Branodunum), Thanet.

  • Lord Brougham declared that he " had never met with any man of Sumner's age of such extensive legal knowledge and natural legal intellect."

  • Lord Brougham, in delivering the judgment, speaks of the " common law prevailing for 1400 years over Christian Europe," and (p. 137) says that " nothing but express enactment can abrogate the common law of all Christendom before the Reformation of the Anglican Church."

  • In the vaults repose Sir Robert and other Logans, besides several of the lords Balmerino, and Lord Brougham's father lies in the kirkyard.

  • Along with Lord Brougham he annotated and illustrated an edition of Paley's Natural Theology, published in 1836.

  • 1893); Lord Brougham and Routh's Analytical View of Sir Isaac Newton's Principia (1855); S.

  • Henry Brougham, afterwards lord chancellor, was married in this clandestine way, though in an inn and not at the bridge, in 1821.

  • And good-night, Watson, " he added, as the wheels of the royal brougham rolled down the street.

  • Any offer of further help was held at arm's length: Had a jaunt in Sousie's electric brougham the other morning.

  • The Old Smokehouse - Brougham Hall Fine smoked meat, poultry, fish, game and cheese and hand-made chocolates.

  • In 1799 he was induced by his fellow-student, Henry Brougham, to study the diffraction of light.

  • Mr Brougham; Sir Samuel Romilly; Mr Mill, author of the well-known work on India; M.

  • To the original members were afterwards added several remarkable persons, amongst whom were Josiah Wedgwood, Bennet Langton (Dr Johnson's friend), and, later, Zachary Macaulay, Henry Brougham and James Stephen.

  • Accordingly, in 1811, Brougham carried through parliament a bill declaring the traffic to be a felony punishable with transportation.

  • Martial law was proclaimed; the disturbances were repressed with great severity; and the treatment of the missionary Smith, which was taken up and handled with great ability by Brougham, awakened strong feeling in England against the planters.

  • The question, however, made little progress in parliament for some years, though Buxton, William Smith, Lushington, Brougham, Mackintosh, Butterworth, and Denman, with the aid of Z.

  • His main object, however, like that of Brougham, was the amelioration of the law, more by the abolition of cumbrous technicalities than by the assertion of new and striking principles.

  • Following in the path struck out by Miss Strickland in her Lives of the Queens of England, and by Lord Brougham's Lives of Eminent Statesmen, he at last produced, in 1849, The Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of England, from the earliest times till the reign of King George IV., 7 vols.

  • These faults are painfully apparent in the lives of Hardwicke, Eldon, Lyndhurst and Brougham, and they have been pointed out by the biographers of Eldon and by Lord St Leonards.'

  • He assisted in the reforms of special pleading at Westminster, and had a recognized place with Brougham and Lyndhurst in legal discussions in the House of Lords.

  • See Misrepresentations in Campbell's "Lives of Lyndhurst and Brougham" corrected by St Leonards (London, 1869).

  • For thirty-six years Creevey had kept a "copious diary," and had preserved a vast miscellaneous correspondence with such people as Lord Brougham, and his step-daughter, Elizabeth Ord, had assisted him, by keeping his letters to her, in compiling material avowedly for a collection of Creevey Papers in the future.

  • At his death it was found that he had left his mistress, with whom he had lived for four years, his sole executrix and legatee, and Greville notes in his Memoirs the anxiety of Brougham and others to get the papers into their hands and suppress them.

  • The diary, mentioned above, did not survive, perhaps through Brougham's success, and the papers from which Sir Herbert Maxwell made his selection came into his hands from Mrs Blackett Ord, whose husband was the grandson of Creevey's eldest step-daughter.

  • To Edinburgh is also due the first high-class critical journal, the Edinburgh Review, established in October 1802 by Jeffrey, Scott, Horner, Brougham and Sydney Smith.

  • Among its more famous contributors were Lord Brougham, Sir Walter Scott, Carlyle, Hazlitt and Macaulay.

  • The work, he says, is the "production of a decided partisan," who "rakes in the ashes of long-forgotten and a thousand times buried slanders, 1 Lord Brougham, overlooking the constitutional chapter in the Middle Ages, censured Hallam for making an arbitrary beginning at this point, and proposed to write a more complete history himself.

  • In private life his ease of bearing, friendliness, and, above all, his inexhaustible fund of humour and irony, won him a large circle of friends; and judges so exacting as Mmes de Stael and de Remusat and Lord Brougham avowed their delight in his society.

  • (London, 1867) and that of Lord Brougham in Historical Sketches of Statesmen, 3 vols.

  • The occurrence marked him out for promotion by a Liberal Government, and in the autumn he received from Lord Brougham as chancellor the living of Kirby-underDale in Yorkshire.

  • Henry Brougham Loch, 1st baron Loch >>

  • He became a member of the speculative society, where he measured himself in debate with Scott, Brougham, Francis Horner, the marquess of Lansdowne, Lord Kinnaird and others.

  • P. Brougham (afterwards Lord Brougham), Francis Horner and others; and the scheme resulted in the appearance on the 10th of October 1802 of the first number of the Edinburgh Review.

  • Additional particulars are given in Brougham's Men of Letters and Science, Burton's Life of Hume and Alexander Carlyle's Autobiography; and some characteristic anecdotes of him will be found in Memoirs of the Life and Works of Sir John Sinclair (1837).

  • See Brougham's Statesmen of the Reign of George III.; Foss's Judges; Campbell's Lives of Lord Chancellors.

  • Forts in plenty can be detected along it, notably Manchester (Mancunium or Mamucium), Ribchester (Bremetennacum), Brougham Castle (Brocavum), Old Penrith (Voreda), and on a western branch, Watercrook near Kendal, Waterhead near the hotel of that name on Ambleside, Hardknott above Eskdale, Maryport (Uxellodunum), and Old Carlisle (possibly Petriana).

  • A visit paid by this famous orator to Lord Brougham in 1865 was made the occasion of a banquet given in his honour by the benchers of the Temple and of Lincoln's Inn.

  • Among his pupils were Sir Walter Scott, Jeffrey, Cockburn, Francis Horner, Sydney Smith, Lord Brougham, Dr Thomas Brown, James Mill, Sir James Mackintosh and Sir Archibald Alison.

  • Edmund Law, Dugald Stewart, Lord Brougham, and many other writers, have, in consequence, represented Clarke as arguing from the existence of time and space to the existence of Deity.

  • Mill and Henry Brougham in the organization of the new "university" in Gower Street.

  • In 1849 he was re-elected to the council, in 1860 he became treasurer, and on the death of Brougham (1868) president.

  • The work began in May 1860 at the York- a congress held at Glasgow, under the presidency of Antwerp Lord Brougham, assisted by Lord Neaves.

  • He made considerable contributions to scientific literature, and among his publications were: An Analytical View of Newton's Principia, with Lord Brougham (1855); an Essay on the Stability of a given State of Motion, which won the Adams' prize in 1877; and treatises on the Dynamics of Rigid Bodies, on Analytical Statics, and on the Dynamics of a Particle.

  • *loge of James Watt, by James Muirhead (London, 1839); also translated, with notes, by Lord Brougham; Popular Lectures on Astronomy, by Walter Kelly and Rev. L.

  • He was educated at the high school and the university of Edinburgh; and he was a member of the famous Speculative Society, to which Sir Walter Scott, Brougham and Jeffrey belonged.

  • We there learn that the following place-names are ultimately of Celtic origin: - Brougham, Catterick, York, Lincoln (Lindum), Manchester (Mancunium), Doncaster (Danum), Wroxeter (Viroconium), Lichfield (Letocetum), Gloucester (Glevum), Cirencester (Corinium), Colchester (Camulodunum), London, Reculver, Richborough (Rutupiae), Dover, Lymne, Isle of Wight, Dorchester (Durnovaria), Sarum, Exeter (Isca), Brancaster (Branodunum), Thanet.

  • Lord Brougham declared that he " had never met with any man of Sumner's age of such extensive legal knowledge and natural legal intellect."

  • Lord Brougham, in delivering the judgment, speaks of the " common law prevailing for 1400 years over Christian Europe," and (p. 137) says that " nothing but express enactment can abrogate the common law of all Christendom before the Reformation of the Anglican Church."

  • In the vaults repose Sir Robert and other Logans, besides several of the lords Balmerino, and Lord Brougham's father lies in the kirkyard.

  • Along with Lord Brougham he annotated and illustrated an edition of Paley's Natural Theology, published in 1836.

  • 1893); Lord Brougham and Routh's Analytical View of Sir Isaac Newton's Principia (1855); S.

  • Having been requested by Lord Brougham to translate for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge the Mecanique Celeste of Laplace, she greatly popularized its form, and its publication in 1831, under the title of The Mechanism of the Heavens, at once made her famous.

  • Henry Brougham, afterwards lord chancellor, was married in this clandestine way, though in an inn and not at the bridge, in 1821.

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