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brooches

brooches Sentence Examples

  • brooches (fibulae), pins, razors, tweezers, &c., often found as dedications to a deity, e.g.

  • George Low (1747-1795), the naturalist and historian of Orkney, who made a tour through Shetland in 1774, described a Runic monument which he saw in the churchyard of Crosskirk, in Northmavine parish (Mainland), and several fragments of Norse swords, shield bosses and brooches have been dug up from time to time.

  • Their fair or red hair was brought forward from the crown of the head towards the forehead, leaving the nape of the neck uncovered; they shaved the face except the upper lip. They wore fairly close breeches reaching to the knee and a tunic fastened by brooches.

  • - All articles of Greek costume belong either to the class of vhuµara, more or less close-fitting, sewn garments, or of irepc/3MhuaTa, loose pieces of stuff draped round the body in various ways and fastened with pins or brooches.

  • The back and front were then pulled up over the shoulders and fastened together with brooches like safety-pins (irepovat).

  • The chiton, xcrcww, was formed by sewing together at the sides two pieces of linen, or a double piece folded together, leaving spaces at the top for the arms and neck, and fastening the top edges together over the shoulders and upper arm with buttons or brooches; more rarely we find a plain sleeveless chiton.

  • Aegina), the details of which are to all appearance legendary, in order to account for a change in the fashion of female dress which took place at Athens in the course of the 6th century B.C. Up to that time the " Dorian dress " had been universal, but the Athenians now gave up the use of garments fastened with pins or brooches, and adopted the linen chiton of the Ionians.

  • For necklaces (ip,uoc), bracelets Was), brooches (irEpovac), and fingerrings (baKTUAtm.

  • It was fastened with brooches (fibulae) anch appears to have been worn by the equites, e.g.

  • Women's ornaments consisted of brooches (fibulae), bracelets (armillae), armlets (armillae, bracchialia), ear-rings (inliures), necklaces (monilia), wreaths (coronae) and hair-pins (crinales).

  • It was a very richly decorated object of coloured threads interwoven with gold, worn outside the luxurious mantle or robe; it was kept in place by a girdle, and by shoulder-pieces (?), to which were attached brooches of onyx (fastened to the robe) and golden rings from which hung the "breastplate" (or rather pouch) containing the sacred lots, Urim and Thummim.

  • The dress of the upper classes must have been of a somewhat gorgeous character, especially when account is taken of the brooches and other ornaments which they wore.

  • The nature of the imports during the heathen period may be learned chiefly from the graves, which contain many brooches and other ornaments of continental origin, and also a certain number of silver, bronze and glass vessels.

  • - Of these the most interesting are the brooches which were worn by both sexes and of which large numbers have been found in heathen cemeteries.

  • In later times we hear of brooches worth as much as six mancusas, i.e.

  • The inscriptions which have come down to us are engraved partly on memorial stones, which are not uncommon in the north of England, and partly on various metal objects, ranging from swords to brooches.

  • Valuable brooches and other ornaments are often found.

  • The ornaments are beads, earrings, brooches, rings, bracelets, &c., thickly studded with precious stones.

  • The vases were of the last red figure style, and were mostly imported from Greece or Magna Graecia, while the bronze objects came from Etruria, and the brooches (fibulae) from Gaul.

  • They brought with them iron, which they used for their long swords and for their cutting implements; the costume of both sexes was distinct from that of the Pelasgians; they used round shields with a central boss instead of the 8-shaped or rectangular shields of the latter; they fastened their garments with brooches, and burned their dead instead of burying them as did the Pelasgians.

  • The graves at Hallstatt were partly inhumation partly cremation; they contained swords, daggers, spears, javelins, axes, helmets, bosses and plates of shields and hauberks, brooches, various forms of jewelry, amber and glass beads, many of the objects being decorated with animals and geometrical designs.

  • Brooches are found in great numbers, both those derived from the primitive safety-pin ("Peschiera" type) and the "spectacle" or "Hallstatt" type found all down the Balkans and in Greece.

  • The latter are formed of two spirals of wire, sometimes four such spirals being used, whilst there were also brooches in animal forms, one of the latter being found with a bronze sword.

  • Besides the implements and weapons of iron there are fibulae and brooches of bronze, weaving combs and spindle-whorls, a bronze mirror and tweezers, wheel-made pottery as well as hand-made, ornamented with Late Celtic patterns, a bowl of thin bronze decorated with bosses, the nave of a wooden wheel with holes for twelve spokes, and a dug-out canoe.

  • It is significant that the first iron swords in Cyprus are of a type characteristic of the lands bordering the Adriatic. Gold and even silver become rare; 5 foreign imports almost cease; engraved cylinders and scarabs are replaced by conical and pyramidal seals like those of Asia Minor, and dress-pins by brooches (fibulae) like those of south-eastern Europe.

  • Among the places where these have been found, special mention should be made of the large cremation cemetery at Borgstedterfeld, between Rendsburg and EckernfOrde, which has yielded many urns and brooches closely resembling those found in heathen graves in England.

  • Of bronze (the chief material) axes, daggers, swords, razors and knives are found, as also minor implements, such as sickles, needles, pins, brooches, &c. There are also objects of bone and wood, besides pottery (both coarse and fine: see Ceramics), amber and glass-paste.

  • Our product range includes bangles, bracelet s, brooches, celtic jewelry, earrings, pendants, necklaces and more.

  • Read more... Anglo Saxon brooches 10:00 am, Saturday, 13 May, 2006 An opportunity to make an Anglo-Saxon style plate brooch.

  • However, recent archeological excavations show Saxon women are more often buried with pairs of saucer brooches.

  • fastened with bronze brooches.

  • lovely to see Richard Burton well enough to be back selling his brooches for charity.

  • oval brooches.

  • plaid brooches could be made of gold, silver or brass.

  • Inside are the enameled busts of the Queen and her mother, Anne Boleyn, wearing ruby and diamond brooches respectively.

  • Our product range includes bangles, bracelet s bangles, bracelet s, brooches, celtic jewelry, earrings, pendants, necklaces and more.

  • Our product range includes bangles, bracelet s bangles, bracelet s, brooches, celtic jewelry, earrings, pendants, necklaces and more.

  • More personal items include tweezers, brooches and hairpins carefully carved from bone fragments.

  • zoomorphic brooches are the stag and fish.

  • brooches (fibulae), pins, razors, tweezers, &c., often found as dedications to a deity, e.g.

  • George Low (1747-1795), the naturalist and historian of Orkney, who made a tour through Shetland in 1774, described a Runic monument which he saw in the churchyard of Crosskirk, in Northmavine parish (Mainland), and several fragments of Norse swords, shield bosses and brooches have been dug up from time to time.

  • Their fair or red hair was brought forward from the crown of the head towards the forehead, leaving the nape of the neck uncovered; they shaved the face except the upper lip. They wore fairly close breeches reaching to the knee and a tunic fastened by brooches.

  • It is not until the latest Mycenaean period that we find brooches, such as were used in historical Greece, to fasten woollen garments, and their presence in the tombs of the lower city of Mycenae indicates the coming of a northern race.

  • - All articles of Greek costume belong either to the class of vhuµara, more or less close-fitting, sewn garments, or of irepc/3MhuaTa, loose pieces of stuff draped round the body in various ways and fastened with pins or brooches.

  • The back and front were then pulled up over the shoulders and fastened together with brooches like safety-pins (irepovat).

  • The chiton, xcrcww, was formed by sewing together at the sides two pieces of linen, or a double piece folded together, leaving spaces at the top for the arms and neck, and fastening the top edges together over the shoulders and upper arm with buttons or brooches; more rarely we find a plain sleeveless chiton.

  • Aegina), the details of which are to all appearance legendary, in order to account for a change in the fashion of female dress which took place at Athens in the course of the 6th century B.C. Up to that time the " Dorian dress " had been universal, but the Athenians now gave up the use of garments fastened with pins or brooches, and adopted the linen chiton of the Ionians.

  • For necklaces (ip,uoc), bracelets Was), brooches (irEpovac), and fingerrings (baKTUAtm.

  • It was fastened with brooches (fibulae) anch appears to have been worn by the equites, e.g.

  • Women's ornaments consisted of brooches (fibulae), bracelets (armillae), armlets (armillae, bracchialia), ear-rings (inliures), necklaces (monilia), wreaths (coronae) and hair-pins (crinales).

  • It was a very richly decorated object of coloured threads interwoven with gold, worn outside the luxurious mantle or robe; it was kept in place by a girdle, and by shoulder-pieces (?), to which were attached brooches of onyx (fastened to the robe) and golden rings from which hung the "breastplate" (or rather pouch) containing the sacred lots, Urim and Thummim.

  • The dress of the upper classes must have been of a somewhat gorgeous character, especially when account is taken of the brooches and other ornaments which they wore.

  • The nature of the imports during the heathen period may be learned chiefly from the graves, which contain many brooches and other ornaments of continental origin, and also a certain number of silver, bronze and glass vessels.

  • - Of these the most interesting are the brooches which were worn by both sexes and of which large numbers have been found in heathen cemeteries.

  • In later times we hear of brooches worth as much as six mancusas, i.e.

  • The inscriptions which have come down to us are engraved partly on memorial stones, which are not uncommon in the north of England, and partly on various metal objects, ranging from swords to brooches.

  • Valuable brooches and other ornaments are often found.

  • The ornaments are beads, earrings, brooches, rings, bracelets, &c., thickly studded with precious stones.

  • The vases were of the last red figure style, and were mostly imported from Greece or Magna Graecia, while the bronze objects came from Etruria, and the brooches (fibulae) from Gaul.

  • They brought with them iron, which they used for their long swords and for their cutting implements; the costume of both sexes was distinct from that of the Pelasgians; they used round shields with a central boss instead of the 8-shaped or rectangular shields of the latter; they fastened their garments with brooches, and burned their dead instead of burying them as did the Pelasgians.

  • The graves at Hallstatt were partly inhumation partly cremation; they contained swords, daggers, spears, javelins, axes, helmets, bosses and plates of shields and hauberks, brooches, various forms of jewelry, amber and glass beads, many of the objects being decorated with animals and geometrical designs.

  • Brooches are found in great numbers, both those derived from the primitive safety-pin ("Peschiera" type) and the "spectacle" or "Hallstatt" type found all down the Balkans and in Greece.

  • The latter are formed of two spirals of wire, sometimes four such spirals being used, whilst there were also brooches in animal forms, one of the latter being found with a bronze sword.

  • The Hallstatt culture is that of the Homeric Achaeans (see Achaeans), but as the brooch (along with iron, cremation of the dead, the round shield and the geometric ornament) passed down into Greece from central Europe, and as brooches are found in the lower town at Mycenae, 1350 B.C., they must have been invented long before that date in central Europe.

  • Besides the implements and weapons of iron there are fibulae and brooches of bronze, weaving combs and spindle-whorls, a bronze mirror and tweezers, wheel-made pottery as well as hand-made, ornamented with Late Celtic patterns, a bowl of thin bronze decorated with bosses, the nave of a wooden wheel with holes for twelve spokes, and a dug-out canoe.

  • It is significant that the first iron swords in Cyprus are of a type characteristic of the lands bordering the Adriatic. Gold and even silver become rare; 5 foreign imports almost cease; engraved cylinders and scarabs are replaced by conical and pyramidal seals like those of Asia Minor, and dress-pins by brooches (fibulae) like those of south-eastern Europe.

  • Among the places where these have been found, special mention should be made of the large cremation cemetery at Borgstedterfeld, between Rendsburg and EckernfOrde, which has yielded many urns and brooches closely resembling those found in heathen graves in England.

  • One of the earliest movements after this discovery was probably that of the Achaeans of Homer, who about 1450 B.C. invaded Greece (see Achaeans), bringing with them the use of iron and brooches, the practice of cremating the dead, and the style of ornament known as Geometric. Later the Cimmerians (see Scythia and Cimmerii) passed down from the Cimbric Chersonese, doubtless following the amber routes, and then turned east along the Danube, some of their tribes, e.g.

  • Of bronze (the chief material) axes, daggers, swords, razors and knives are found, as also minor implements, such as sickles, needles, pins, brooches, &c. There are also objects of bone and wood, besides pottery (both coarse and fine: see Ceramics), amber and glass-paste.

  • Inside are the enameled busts of the Queen and her mother, Anne Boleyn, wearing ruby and diamond brooches respectively.

  • More personal items include tweezers, brooches and hairpins carefully carved from bone fragments.

  • They produced many of the brooches during the white waistcoat era and 1970s.

  • Examples of these zoomorphic brooches are the stag and fish.

  • Pasarel has an eclectic selection of opal rings, pendants and brooches with antique designs.

  • Special brooches are also a wonderful gift.

  • Brooches are a piece of jewelry that can look stunning when paired with a lacy or Victorian style wedding dress.

  • Rings, Earrings, brooches, necklaces and pendants in this collection are at once delicate in their design and bold in their use of diamonds.

  • Pendants, brooches, cuff links, anklets, and earrings are also available, integrating the symbolism of the claddagh into anyone's jewelry preferences.

  • The firm also made jewelry, including lockets, brooches, and earrings.

  • It is important that earrings, rings, pendants, brooches and other types of jewelry are well stored.

  • Small brooches or pins can be used to decorate a hat and can turn even a plain knitted hat into something a little special.

  • Brooches were very popular during the Victorian (1840 to 1900) and the Edwardian (1901 to 1910) periods.

  • In fact, a large number of moonstone brooches were created in the Nouveau (1890 to 1914) era, which overlapped the two periods.

  • Throughout the years, moonstone brooches kept appearing in jewelry stores.

  • However, many jewelry artists create moonstone pendants with pins, worn as necklaces or brooches.

  • Moonstone brooches come in a variety of styles with different colors and metal settings.

  • Brooches often have a stickpin, a clip-on or safety catch fastenings.

  • Antique modern brooches range in design from butterflies to dragons.

  • Many modern brooches are moonstone cabochons set with other smaller gemstones and metals in a less structured design.

  • During the Art Nouveau era, women generally wore brooches at the waist.

  • In later years, women began wearing brooches on scarves and collars.

  • Moonstone brooches are harder to find than pendants.

  • Many jewelry stores on college campuses also sell moonstone pendants and brooches.

  • If you love traditional brooches, consider getting a Victorian crown brooch with diamond.

  • However, these types of brooches were also worn regularly during the Art Nouveau movement which crossed both Victorian and Edwardian eras.

  • During this time period brooches of mermaids, flower forms and dragons were more common than the rigid lines of a crown.

  • Today we can still find vintage Victorian and Edwardian crown brooches.

  • The best places to search for vintage crown brooches from various eras are antique stores, thrift stores, consignment shops, antique shows and flea markets.

  • Victorian crown brooches with diamonds are hard to find.

  • Antique Jewelry Exchange: Antique Jewelry Exchange offers vintage Victorian crown brooches in several styles for sale.

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