How to use Bronze-age in a sentence

bronze-age
  • Objects of the Bronze age too have only been found sporadically.

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  • These ancient indications of a Minoan connexion with Sicily have now received interesting confirmation in the numerous discoveries, principally due to the recent excavations of P. Orsi, of arms and painted vases of Late Minoan fabric in Bronze Age tombs of the provinces of Syracuse and Girgenti (Agrigentum) belonging to the late Bronze Age.

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  • Yet throughout the bronze age it is possible to trace a fairly well-defined group of antiquities covering the basin of the Elbe, Mecklenburg, Holstein, Jutland, southern Sweden and the islands of the Belt, and archaeologists have conjectured with much probability that these antiquities represent the early civilization of the Teutonic peoples.

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  • We have evidence, both archaeological and linguistic, that the cultivation of cereals in Teutonic lands goes back to a very remote period, while the antiquity even of the ox-plough is attested by the rock-carvings at Tegneby in Bohuslan (Sweden), which are believed to date from early in the bronze age.

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  • As regards north Germany, Muller puts the Northern Bronze age 500 years later than the Southern, but a recent find in Sweden bears out Monteliuss view that southern influence made itself rapidly felt in the North.

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  • In Brandenburg, Lusatia, Silesia, Posen and Saxony, where there was no strong Bronze age tradition, Hallstatt influence is very noticeable.

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  • Fibulae, often of the kettle-drum form, take the place of the Bronze age pin.

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  • This people had dwelt in the Aegean from the Stone Age, and, though still in the Bronze Age at the Achaean conquest, had made great advances in the useful and ornamental arts.

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  • The dead were buried in an extended position, while in the preceding Bronze Age cremation had been the rule.

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  • But as they are found in the late Bronze Age and early Iron Age, the early iron culture of Hallstatt must have originated long before 1350 B.C., a conclusion in accord with the absence of silver at Hallstatt itself.

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  • Another site in Holderness, Yorkshire, examined by Mr Boynton in 1881, yielded evidence of fascine construction, with suggestions of occupation in the latter part of the Bronze Age.

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  • The Bronze Age culture of Cyprus falls into three main stages.

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  • Diimmler opened tombs at Dali, Alambra and elsewhere, and laid the foundations of knowledge of the Bronze Age and Early Iron Age; 17 and Richter, on behalf of officials and private individuals, excavated parts of Frangissa (Tamassus), Episkopi and Dali.18 In the same year, 1885, and in 1886, a syndicate opened many tombs at Poli-tis-Khrysochou (Marium, Arsinoe), and sold the contents by auction in Paris.

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  • Its alloy with tin (bronze) was the first metallic compound in common use by mankind, and so extensive and characteristic was its employment in prehistoric times that the epoch is known as the Bronze Age.

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  • The antiquities of the Bronze Age are much more widely distributed and reach as far as the north of Helsingland.

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  • But there is evidence that from the Bronze Age there had been settlers in northern Britain who were broad-skulled and cremated their dead, a practice which had arisen in south Germany in the early Bronze Age or still earlier.

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  • Until comparatively recent times the surrounding district was in a state of nature with merely a thin coating of turf interspersed with tufts of heath and dwarf thistles, but bare of trees and shrubs and altogether devoid of the works of man, with the exception of a series of prehistoric barrows of the Bronze Age which, singly and in groups, studded the landscape.

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  • Lord Avebury regards it as a temple of the Bronze Age (150o - 1000 B.C.), though apparently it was not all erected at one time, the inner circle of small unwrought, blue stones being probably older than the rest (Prehistoric Times).

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  • It does not follow, however, from the fact that only stone tools were found at the bottom of the trenches that the monument was constructed when metal tools were unknown, because none of the Stonehenge tools have the characteristic forms of Neolithic implements, so that they might have been specially improvised for the purpose of roughly hewing these huge stones, for which, indeed, they were really better adapted, and more easily procured, than the early and very costly metal tools of the Bronze Age.

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  • From the similarity of types of weapons and implements of the period found throughout Europe a relatively synchronous commencement has been inferred for the Bronze Age in Europe, fixed by most authorities at between 2000 B.C. to 1800 B.C. But it must have been earlier in some countries, and is certainly known to have been later in others; while the Mexicans and Peruvians were still in their bronze age in recent times.

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  • Not a few archaeologists have denied that there ever was a distinct Bronze Age.

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  • The beginning, the prevalence and duration of the Bronze Age in each country would have been ordered by the accessibility of the metals which form the alloy.

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  • Another curious fact has been seized on by those who argue against the existence of a Bronze Age.

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  • We may conclude then that there was a Bronze Age in most countries; that it was the direct result of increasing intercommunication of races and the spread of commerce; and that the discovery of metals was due to information brought to Stone-Age man in Europe by races which were already skilful metallurgists.

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  • The Bronze Age in Europe is characterized by weapons, utensils and implements, distinct in design and size from those in use in the preceding or succeeding stage of man's civilization.

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  • The implements of the Bronze Age include swords, awls, knives, gouges, hammers, daggers and arrow-heads.

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  • A remarkable confirmation of the theory that the Bronze Age culture came from the East is to be found in the patterns of the arms, which are distinctly oriental; while the handles of swords and daggers are so narrow and short as to make it unlikely that they would be made for use by the large-handed races of Europe.

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  • The Bronze Age is also characterized by the fact that cremation was the mode of disposal of the dead, whereas in the Stone Age burial was the rule.

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  • Barrows and sepulchral mounds strictly of the Bronze Age are smaller and less imposing than those of the Stone Age.

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  • The Bronze Age had its most important place among ancient nations of Asia and Europe, and among them was only succeeded after many centuries by the Iron Age; while in other districts, such as Polynesia and Central and South Africa, and America (except Mexico and Peru), the native tribes were moved directly from the Stone to the Iron Age without passing through the Bronze Age at all.

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  • The majority of antiquaries, however, see no reason for dissociating its chronological horizon from that of the numerous other analogous monuments found in Great Britain, many of which have been shown to be burial places of the Bronze Age.

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  • This latter type scarcely goes back to the round shield of the Bronze age.

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  • There are 2 stone buildings dating from the Bronze Age.

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  • These type of chambered Bronze Age cist burials are known as segmented cists.

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  • Bear right with the track and follow the waymarks up to another Bronze Age curb cairn.

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  • During the Bronze Age the same areas included carvings of ships.

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  • The high light is a view of the huge underground cavern which has recently been proved to be Bronze Age.

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  • Were the Wessex chieftains the ` barrow boys ' of the Bronze Age economy?

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  • The skull was excavated from cist no.1 and is an example of a Bronze Age short cist within a cairn.

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  • Following this industrial archeology, phase B is a Bronze Age cairn with a central cist.

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  • These bronze Age people made flint and bronze daggers - often placed in their graves.

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  • Twelve ring ditches excavated are interpreted as Bronze Age by association with the ring ditches excavated during the 1980's.

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  • In addition, small-scale excavation on some of the sites has identified important sites of Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age date.

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  • Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age all left their mark, however faint, on the area.

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  • More permanent settlements away from the coast began to appear in the Bronze Age with small dispersed farmsteads in new areas.

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  • By following the leat you come to the best example of a small bronze age farmstead in the Kestor settlement.

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  • Apart from several struck flints, of possible Neolithic / Bronze Age date, the only material recorded was Romano-British.

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  • Cursus monuments of the middle Neolithic have been identified as have henges and stone circles of the later Neolithic and Earlier Bronze Age.

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  • It seems that the earliest structure, a Bronze Age house, was built on this small holm in the loch around 600BC.

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  • A relatively homogeneous culture united the Bronze Age elite through much of China around the 14th century BC.

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  • Bronze Age village found with buried megalith A complete Middle Bronze Age village has been excavated in Essex.

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  • There is evidence of copper mining in the Bronze Age.

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  • The early burial monument was enlarged in successive stages during the Early Bronze Age.

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  • There is an reconstructed bronze age roundhouse in one of the fields.

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  • In a spectacular position, this is an unusual Bronze Age chambered tomb with a complex layout.

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  • This leaves us with a fragmented and heavily truncated perspective on the Neolithic and Bronze Age phases of the site.

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  • To some, the Horse seems so typical of La Tène art that a Bronze Age dating de-stabilised some widely held cultural assumptions.

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  • In 2000, a bronze age inverted cremation urn was noted about a meter down in the cliff face.

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  • Archaeological evidence points clearly now to the conclusion that the splendid but overgrown civilization of the Mycenaean or " late Minoan " period of the Aegean Bronze Age collapsed rather suddenly before a rapid succession of assaults by comparatively barbarous invaders from the European mainland north of the Aegean; that these invaders passed partly by way of Thrace and the Hellespont into Asia Minor, partly by Macedon and Thessaly into peninsular Greece and the Aegean islands; that in east Peloponnese and Crete, at all events, a first shock (somewhat later than i soo B.C.) led to the establishment of a cultural, social and political situation which in many respects resembles what is depicted in Homer as the " Achaean " age, with principal centres in Rhodes, Crete, Laconia, Argolis, Attica, Orchomenus and south-east Thessaly; and that this regime was itself shattered by a second shock or series of shocks somewhat earlier than boo B.C. These latter events correspond in character and date with the traditional irruption of the Dorians and their associates.

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  • The improved cultural conditions become apparent in the multiplication of the varieties of tools, weapons and ornaments made possible by the more adaptable qualities of the new material; and that the development of the Bronze age culture in the lake dwellings followed the same course as in the surrounding regions where the people dwelt on the dry land is evident from the correspondence of the types of implements, weapons, ornaments and utensils common to both these conditions of life.

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  • The extensive Bronze Age reave system on Dartmoor is testament to how long cattle have been grazing the moor.

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  • Two years later, the ruts left by a light, two-wheeled Bronze Age cart were found nearby at Welland Bank Quarry.

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  • In many areas, this social stratification increased in the Bronze Age with the elite buried in single tombs with all their finery.

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  • Dating back to the Bronze Age (3500-2000 BC), rug making is the most ancient traditions of the Persian culture.

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  • During the Bronze Age in Scandinavia and throughout pre-Colombian America, crosses represented themes of protection and safety.

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  • Swords, magical and historical, have held a special place in the esteem of their wielders since their invention in the Bronze Age.

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  • It is thus clear that in the Bronze Age Sardinia was fairly thickly populated over by far the greater part of its extent; this may explain the lack of Greek colonies, except for Olbia, the modern Terranova, and Neapolis on the cians.

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  • A remarkably fine cup turned in amber from a bronze-age barrow at Hove is now in the Brighton Museum.

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  • One has hitherto supposed that he was related to the Mediterraneans, the race to which the Bronze Age Greeks and Italians belonged; but this supposed connexion may well break down in the matter of skull form, as the Hittite skull, like that of the modern Anatolian, probably inclined to be brachycephalic. whereas that of the Mediterranean inclined in the other direction, And now the Bohemian Assyriologist Prof. Hrozny has brought forward evidence s that the cuneiform script adopted by the Hittites from the Mesopotamians expressed an Indo-European tongue, nearly akin to Latin!

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  • This style and the types of dagger, cauldron, bit and twolooped socketed axehead run right across from Hungary to the upper Yenisei, where a special Bronze Age culture seems to have developed them.

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  • The settlement of Auvernier in the Lake of Neuchatel is one of the richest and most considerable stations of the Bronze age.

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  • The Lac de Bourget, in Savoy, has eight settlements, all of the Bronze age.

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  • It has been found in Mycenaean tombs; it is known from lake-dwellings in Switzerland, and it occurs with neolithic remains in Denmark, whilst in England it is found with interments of the bronze age.

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