Brittany sentence example

brittany
  • To the north as far as the rocky point of St Gildas, sheltering the mouth of the Loire, the shore, often occupied by salt marshes (marshes of Poitou and Brittany), is low-lying and hollowed by deep bays sheltered by large islands, those of Olron and Re lying opposite the ports of Rochefort and La Rochelle, while Noirmoutier closes the Bay of Bourgneuf.
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  • Buckwheat is cultivated mainly in Brittany.
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  • Of the former the remnants are now seen in Brittany and the Ardennes; of the latter the Cvennes and the Montagne Noire are the last traces visible on the surface.
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  • The oldest rocks, the gneisses and schists of the Archean period, form nearly the whole of the Central Plateau, and are also exposed in the axes of the folds in Brittany.
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  • The earlier deposits of that sea now rise to the surface in Brittany, the Ardennes, the Montagne Noire and the Cvennes, and in all these regions they arc intensely folded.
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  • Beginning with the Aptian and Albian the sea again gradually spread over the country and attained its maximum in the early part of the Senonian epoch, when once more the ancient massifs of the Central Plateau, Brittany and the Ardennes, alone rose above the waves.
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  • Rye, on the other hand, one of the least valuable of the cereals, is grown chiefly in the poor agricultural territories of the central plateau and western Brittany.
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  • The vine grows generally in France, except in the extreme north and in Normandy and Brittany.
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  • The poorer grazing lands on the upper levels of the Alps, Pyrenees, Jura and Vosges, the Landes, the more outlying regions of the central plateau, southern Brittany, Sologne, Berry, ChampagnePouilleuse, the Crau and the Carnargue, these districts being given over for the most part to sheep-raising.
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  • Included therein are the dairying and horse-raising district of northern Brittany and the dairying regions of Jura and Savoy.
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  • The Ouest-Etat, a combination of the West and state systems. The former traversed Normandy in every directionand connected Paris with thetowns of Brittany.
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  • His father, John Bouguer, one of the best hydrographers of his time, was regius, professor of hydrography at Croisic in lower Brittany, and author of a treatise on navigation.
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  • In 1199 she crushed an Angevin rising in favour of John's nephew, Arthur of Brittany.
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  • Dr Phene visited Armorica (Brittany) with a view of investigating these matters, and brought thence fruits of a small berry-like pear, which were identified with the Pyrus cordata of western France.
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  • Early in January 1813 the senate promised that 350,000 conscripts should be enrolled; but 150,000 of them were under twenty years of age, and mobile columns had to be used to sweep in the recruits, especially in Brittany, the Netherlands and the newly annexed lands of North Germany.
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  • Strabo himself talks of Armoric Heneti, and supposes them to have come from the neighbourhood of Brittany; another theory gives us Sarmatian Heneti, from the Baltic provinces; while the most widely accepted view was that they reached Italy from Paphlagonia.
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  • After being twice imprisoned during the Terror he retired to Brittany, where he devoted himself to literature till 1814.
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  • He died at Croisic in Brittany on the 25th of August 1908.
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  • This acquisition brought the Norman frontier almost to the Loire and isolated Brittany, long coveted by the Norman dukes, from the rest of France.
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  • In 1076 he invaded Brittany to get possession of the fugitive earl of Norfolk; but Philip of France came to the aid of the Bretons, and William gave way before his suzerain.
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  • Caussin was sent into Brittany, and the judicious and learned Jesuit, Jacques Sirmond, who succeeded him, kept clear of politics.
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  • The family was one of those which had been introduced into France by Catherine de' Medici, but it acquired great estates in Brittany and became connected with the noblest houses of the kingdom.
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  • Ralph forfeited his English lands, and took refuge in Brittany on his wife's estate.
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  • In 1076, having plotted against Duke Hoel of Brittany, he was besieged at Dol, and the Conqueror came to Hoel's aid; but Ralph finally made his peace.
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  • Although they made some concessions, .the Beaujeus succeeded in maintaining the results of the previous reign, and in triumphing over the feudal intrigues and coalitions, as was seen from the meeting of the estates general in 1484, and the results of the "Mad War" (1485) and the war with Brittany (1488); and in spite of the efforts of Maximilian of Austria they concluded the marriage of Charles VIII.
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  • He voted for the death of Louis XVI., and as a member of the committees of national defence and of public safety he was despatched in October 1793 to Brittany, where he established the Terror.
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  • It is recorded that in the 7th century the abbot of Wearmouth in England obtained artificers in glass from France; and there is a tradition that in the 11th century glass-workers migrated from Normandy and Brittany and set up works at Altare near Genoa.
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  • Constance profited by his absence by governing the duchy, and in 1194 she had Arthur proclaimed duke of Brittany by an assembly of barons and bishops.
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  • Richard invaded Brittany in 1196, but was defeated in 1197 and became reconciled to Constance.
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  • The king of France recognized Arthur's right to Brittany, Anjou, Maine and Poitou.
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  • With the object of combating the duke of Burgundy's preponderant influence, a league was formed at Gien, including the duke of Orleans and his father-inlaw, the dukes of Berry, Bourbon and Brittany, the count of Alengon and all the other discontented nobles.
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  • By his wife, Margaret of Bavaria, he had one son, Philip the Good, who succeeded him; and seven daughters - Margaret, who married in 1404 Louis, son of Charles VI., and in 1423 Arthur, earl of Richmond and afterwards duke of Brittany; Mary, wife of Adolph of Cleves; Catherine, promised in 1410 to a son of Louis of Anjou; Isabella, wife of Olivier de Chatillon, count of Penthievre; Joanna, who died young; Anne, who married John, duke of Bedford, in 1423; and Agnes, who married Charles I., duke of Bourbon, in 1425.
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  • The bishopric of Dol had been raised to the rank of an archbishopric during the 10th century by Nomenoe, king of Brittany, but this step had been objected to by the archbishops of Tours.
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  • He appears to have striven earnestly to do something for the education of the ignorant inhabitants of Brittany but his efforts were not very successful, and he soon abandoned the task.
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  • This Neolithic race has consequently been nicknamed " Iberians," and it is now common to speak of the " Iberian " ancestry of the people of Britain, recognizing the racial characteristics of " Iberians " in the" small swarthy Welshman," the " small dark Highlander," and the " Black Celts to the west of the Shannon," as well as in the typical inhabitants of Aquitania and Brittany.
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  • From Madrid he was suddenly summoned to the governorship of Brittany, and in 1787 was appointed by the king to succeed Vergennes in the ministry of foreign affairs.
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  • The original Welsh legend was spread by British refugees in Brittany, and was thus celebrated by both English and French Celts.
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  • From a literary point of view, however, it is chiefly French and forms " the matter of Brittany.
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  • Lancelot, son of Ban king of Brittany, a creation of chivalrous romance, who only appears in Arthurian literature under French influence, known chiefly from his amour with Guinevere, perhaps in imitation of the story of Tristan and Iseult.
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  • Yet in 1173 Richard joined with the young Henry and Geoffrey of Brittany in their rebellion; Aquitaine was twice invaded by the old king before the unruly youth would make submission.
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  • During the differences that arose in 1485 between the regent, Anne of Beaujeu, and the dukes of Orleans, Brittany and Alengon, Imbert de Batarn y kept the inhabitants of Orleans faithful to the king.
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  • She lived henceforth in fear lest Louis should have a son; and in consequence there was a secret rivalry between her and the queen, Anne of Brittany.
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  • In the, 6th century they had many names, Cagots, Gahets, Gafets in France; Agotes, Gafos in Spain; and Cacons, Cahets, Caqueux and Caquins in Brittany.
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  • Before the truce expired a disputed succession to the duchy of Brittany gave Edward an excuse for renewing hostilities with France.
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  • In 1342 he went to Brittany and fought an indecisive campaign against the French.
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  • Other victories in Gascony and Brittany further emphasized his power.
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  • This he left about 1567, and somewhat later we find him at Rennes as a councillor of the parlement of Brittany.
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  • Besides homagium ligeum, there was a kind of homage which imposed no feudal duty; this was homagium per paragium, such as the dukes of Normandy rendered to the kings of France, and as the dukes of Normandy received from the dukes of Brittany.
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  • But his eldest son, the dauphin, died in April 1711; his eldest grandson the duke of Burgundy in February 1712; and his great-grandson the duke of Brittany in March 1712.
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  • He and his bastard brother, Alexander, were joined by the former favourite, Georges de la Tremoille, John V., duke of Brittany, who allied himself with the English, the duke of Alencon, the count of Vendome, and captains of mercenaries like Antoine de Chabannes, or Jean de la Roche.
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  • Sand may be taken as the predominating deposit on the continental shelves, often with a large admixture of remains of calcareous organisms, for instance the deposits of marl made up of nullipores off the coasts of Brittany and near Belle Isle.
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  • Brittany, belonged in early times to a house which bore its name, and of which the eldest branch became extinct in the 13th century in the Chabot family.
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  • Lambert, a former count of Nantes, after devastating Anjou in concert with Nominoe, duke of Brittany, had by the end of the year 851 succeeded in occupying all the western part as far as the Mayenne.
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  • The principality, which he thus carved out for himself, was occupied, on his death, by Erispoe, duke of Brittany; by him it was handed down to his successors, in whose hands it remained till the beginning of the 10th century.
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  • Grisegonelle (Greytunic) (c. 960-21st of July 987), who inaugurated a policy of expansion, having as its objects the extension of the boundaries of the ancient countship and the reconquest of those parts of it which had been annexed by the neighbouring states; for, though western Anjou had been recovered from the dukes of Brittany since the beginning of the 10th century, in the east all the district of Saumur had already by that time fallen into the hands of the counts of Blois and Tours.
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  • In the war which followed between Charles of Blois and John de Montfort, for the possession of the duchy of Brittany, he served his apprenticeship as a soldier (1341).
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  • In 1354, having shortly before been made a knight, he was sent into England with the lords of Brittany to treat for the ransom of Charles of Blois, who had been defeated and captured by the English in 1347.
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  • In 1373, when the duke of Brittany sought English aid against a threatened invasion by Charles V., Du Guesclin was sent at the head of a powerful army to seize the duchy, which he did; and two years later he frustrated the attempt of the duke with an English army to recover it.
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  • Although not mentioned in Domesday, Boston was probably granted as part of Skirbeck to Alan, earl of Brittany.
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  • In 1257 a market was granted to the abbot of Crowland and in 1308 to John, earl of Brittany.
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  • The institution of this strange matrimonial prize - which had its parallel at Whichanoure (or Wichnor) in Staffordshire, at St Moleine in Brittany, and apparently also at Vienna - appears to date from the reign of John.
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  • He entered the army of Henry IV., and served in Brittany under Jean d'Aumont, Francois de St Luc and Charles de Brissac. When the army of the League was disbanded he accompanied his uncle, who had charge of the ships in which the Spanish allies were conveyed home, and on reaching Cadiz secured (1599) the command of one of the vessels about to make an expedition to the West Indies.
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  • There has also been a mission in Brittany since 1842.
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  • In the neighbourhood is the church of Sainte Anne d'Auray, one of the principal places of pilgrimage in Brittany.
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  • In 1793 he became commissary to the army, protecting the coasts of Brittany from projected descents of the British, or of French royalists.
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  • It was to his keeping that the king first entrusted the captive Arthur of Brittany.
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  • In 56 B.C., however, the Veneti of Brittany threw off the yoke and detained two of Crassus's officers as hostages.
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  • He escaped to Normandy to join Buzot, and after the defeat of the Girondists at Pacy-sur-Eure he found shelter in Brittany.
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  • She was in constant communication with her son, the future king, during his exile in Brittany, and with her husband, Lord Stanley, aided him to gain the crown in 1485.
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  • They are a distinct breed of Jersey and Brittany type, and are stated to be descended from animals imported from France by the early settlers.
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  • Soon after the king's departure for the Holy Land it became known that he had designated his nephew, the young Arthur of Brittany, as his successor.
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  • England and Normandy, after some hesitation, recognized John's title; the attempt of Anjou and Brittany to assert the rights of Arthur ended disastrously by the capture of the young prince at Mirebeau in Poitou (1202).
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  • Their descent is traced to a Breton immigrant, Alan the son of Flaald, which Flaald was a brother of Alan, steward (or seneschal) of Dol in Brittany.
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  • By this time, with the exce p tion of Brittany and the southern part of the Balkan peninsula, practically the whole of southern and western Europe was under Teutonic government.
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  • In Spain, Gaul, Brittany and the provinces of the Danube, similar political changes took place.
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  • The family were nobles in Brittany, and their name was so spelt by themselves.
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  • But in 1184 Geoffrey of Brittany and John combined with their father's leave to make war upon Richard, now the heir-apparent.
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  • Granites, porphyries and porphyrites belonging to this period occur in the Saxon Erzgebirge, the Harz, Thiiringerwald, Vosges, Brittany, Cornwall and Christiania.
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  • At the death of Geoffrey's grandson, Richard I., the succession was in doubt, John's elder brother Geoffrey having left, by the heiress of Brittany, a son and a daughter.
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  • By a treaty concluded by Philip at Amiens in April 1423 with the dukes of Brittany and Bedford, John, duke of Bedford, married Philip's sister Anne, and Arthur of Brittany, earl of Richmond, became the husband of Philip's sister Margaret.
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  • She sought the alliance of John V., duke of Brittany, who, however, vacillated throughout his life between the English and French alliance, concerned chiefly to maintain the independence of his duchy.
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  • His brother, Arthur of Brittany, earl of Richmond (comte de Richemont), was reconciled with the king, and became constable in 1425, with the avowed intention of making peace between Charles VII.
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  • The ash of seaweeds, known in Scotland as kelp, and in Brittany as varec, was formerly used as a source of iodine to a greater extent than is at present the case.
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  • Pytheas's notice of the depth of the Bay of Biscay, of the length of the projection of Brittany, of Ushant under the name of Uxisama, and of three promontories of Britain, two of which seem to correspond to Land's End (Beler'ion), and North Foreland (Kantion), must not be forgotten.
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  • In Brittany, where it scarcely ripens the grain, it furnishes a strong crop in the autumn upon sandy soil where clover and lucerne will yield but a poor produce.
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  • Charles, the king's brother, was given Normandy as an apanage, thus joining the territories of the rebellious duke of Brittany with those of Charles the Bold.
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  • Two months after he had granted Normandy to Charles, he took advantage of a quarrel between the duke of Brittany and his brother to take it again, sending the duke of Bourbon "to aid" Charles, while Dunois and Chabannes prepared for the struggle with Burgundy.
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  • This unification was completed (except for Brittany) and the frontiers enlarged by the acquisition, upon the death of Rene of Anjou in 1480, of the duchies of Anjou and Bar, and in 1481 of Maine and Provence upon the death of Charles II., count of Maine.
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  • During the 14th and 15th centuries there was a regular trade with Bordeaux and Brittany, and complaints of piracies by Dartmouth men were frequent.
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  • In France the title duke at one time implied vast territorial power, as with the dukes of Burgundy, Normandy, Aquitaine and Brittany, who asserted a practical independence against the crown, though it was not till the 12th century that the title duke was definitely regarded as superior to others.
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  • John renounced his suzerainty over Brittany and the guardianship of his nephew, Arthur; he engaged not to aid the count of Flanders or Otto IV.
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  • Brittany, Aquitaine and Anjou were conferred on Arthur.
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  • In 1206 he marched through Brittany and divided it amongst his adherents.
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  • A truce for two years was made on the 26th of October 1206 by which John renounced all claims in Normandy, Maine, Brittany, Touraine and Anjou, but it did not last six months.
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  • Among the most important are the Sacro Monte (1486) at Varallo in Piedmont, and those at Guimiliau (1581), Plougastel (1602), St Thegonnec (1610), and Pleyben near Quimper (1670), in Brittany, all in good preservation.
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  • In the Cambrian of Brittany there are acid lavas and tuffs.
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  • Compared with some other periods, the Cambrian was free from extensive volcanic disturbances, but in Wales and in Brittany the earlier portions of this period were marked by voluminous outpourings; a condition that was feebly reflected in central and southern Europe.
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  • Nothing could be more striking than the difference between the thicknesses in western and eastern Europe; in Brittany the deposits are over 24,000 ft.
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  • In 843 Brittany took from Neustria the countships of Rennes and Nantes; and gradually the term Neustria came to be restricted to the district which was later called Normandy, Dudo of Saint Quentin, who flourished about the year 1000, gives the name Neustria to the lands ceded to Rollo and his followers during the loth century.
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  • Following Chram into Brittany, where the rebel had taken refuge, Clotaire shut him up with his wife and children in a cottage, to which he set fire.
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  • Hermann makes St Ursula a native of Brittany, and so approximates to the version of the story given by Geoffrey of Monmouth (Historia Britonum), according to whom Maximian, after fleeing from Rome and acquiring Britain by marriage, proceeds to conquer Brittany and settle it with men from the island opposite.
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  • Although the name (which apparently had its origin in Britannia Major, the name given to the island to distinguish it from Britannia Minor or Brittany) had, in earlier times, been often used both by English and by foreign writers, especially for rhetorical and poetical purposes, it was not till after the accession of James I.
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  • The first son had died in 1705, and in 1712 the second son, the duke of Brittany, as well as his father and mother, was carried off by a mysterious disease.
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  • The chief centres or regions of oyster production are two, (i) Arcachon, (2) Brittany.
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  • In Brittany the chief seat of oyster production is the gulf of Morbihan, where the estuaries of numerous small rivers furnish fore-shores suitable to the industry.
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  • After the siege of Tournai a truce was arranged on the 25th of September 1340; but the next year the armies of England and France were again at war in Brittany on account of the rival pretensions of Charles of Blois and John of Montfort to the succession of that duchy.
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  • The defeat of Sir Thomas Kyriel, one of Bedford's veteran captains, at Formigny in 1450, and the taking of Cherbourg, completed the conquest of the 1 Arthur, earl of Richmond, afterwards Arthur III., duke of Brittany.
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  • His intelligence was mediocre, his character weak, and he allowed himself to be dominated by his wife, Anne of Brittany, and his favourite the Cardinal d'Amboise.
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  • After his accession he had divorced his virtuous and ill-favoured queen, Joan, and had married, in 1499, Anne of Brittany, the widow of Charles VIII.
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  • The premature royalist rising, however, in August 1659 was defeated, and Charles, who had awaited the result on the coast of Brittany, proceeded to Fuenterrabia on the Spanish frontier, where Mazarin and Luis de Haro were negotiating the treaty of the Pyrenees, to induce both powers to support his cause; but the failure of the attempt in England ensured the rejection of his request, and he returned to Brussels in December, visiting his mother at Paris on the way.
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  • From Lower Maine the insurrection soon spread to Brittany, and throughout the west of France.
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  • The succession is similar to that of Brittany and Spain.
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  • This race is often termed `` Celtic " or " Alpine " from the fact of its occurrence all along the great mountain chain from south-west France, in Savoy, in Switzerland, the Po valley and Tirol, as well as in Auvergne, Brittany, Normandy, Burgundy, the Ardennes and the Vosges.
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  • It is popularly divided into Upper or Western, and Lower or Eastern Brittany.
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  • The waterways of Brittany are for the most part of little value owing to their torrent-like character.
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  • Thus nature itself condemned Brittany to remain for a long time shut out from civilization.
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  • But in the 19th century the development of railways and other means of communication drew Brittany from its isolation.
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  • The Celtic language is still spoken in lower Brittany.
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  • Nowhere has the taste for marvellous legends been kept so green as in Brittany; and an entire folkliterature still flourishes there, as is manifested by the large number of folk-tales and folk-songs which have been collected of late years.
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  • The whole duchy was formerly divided into nine bishoprics Rennes, Dol, Nantes, St Malo and St Brieuc, in Upper Brittany, and Treguier, Vannes, Quimper and St Pol de Leon in Lower.
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  • Of Brittany before the coming of the Romans we have no exact knowledge.
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  • Roman civilization was then established for several centuries in Brittany.
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  • The Celts sustained a long struggle against the Frankish kings, who only nominally occupied Brittany.
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  • Louis the Pious placed a native chief Nomenoe at the head of Brittany.
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  • There was then a fairly long period of peace; but Nomenoc rebelled against Charles the Bald, defeated him, and forced him, in 846, to recognize the independence of Brittany.
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  • In the second half of the 10th century and in the 11th century the counts of Rennes were predominant in Brittany.
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  • Geoffrey, son of Conan, took the title of duke of Brittany in 992.
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  • But in the following century the Plantagenets succeeded in establishing themselves in Brittany.
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  • From that moment the ducal power gained strength in Brittany and succeeded in curbing the feudal nobles.
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  • For more than a century peace reigned undisturbed in Brittany.
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  • The dukes formed a standing army, and succeeded in levying hearth taxes (fouages) throughout Brittany.
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  • Thus the reunion of Brittany and France was prepared.
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  • Until the Revolution Brittany retained its own estates.
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  • After his second marriage with Jeanne de Laval, daughter of Guy XIV., count of Laval, and Isabel of Brittany, Rene took a less active part in public affairs, and devoted himself more to artistic and literary pursuits.
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  • His only surviving male descendant was then Rene II., duke of Lorraine, son of his daughter Yolande, comtesse de Vaudemont, who was gained over to the party of Louis XI., who suspected the king of Sicily of complicity with his enemies, the duke of Brittany and the Constable SaintPol.
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  • In the 11th and 12th centuries the countship of Penthievre in Brittany (dep. of Cotes-du-Nord) belonged to a branch of the sovereign house of Brittany.
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  • Henry d'Avaugour, heir of this dynasty, was dispossessed of the countship in 1235 by the duke of Brittany, Pierre Mauclerc, who gave it as dowry to his daughter, Yolande, on her marriage in 1238 to Hugh of Lusignan, count of La Marche.
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  • In 1337 Joan of Brittany brought Penthievre to her husband, Charles de Chatillon-Blois.
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  • In 1437 Nicole de Blois, a descendant of this family, married Jean de Brosse, and was deprived of Penthievre by the duke of Brittany, Francis II., in 1465.
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  • In 1489 the French army invaded Brittany.
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  • The two sovereigns made a reciprocal arrangement as to their rights and pretensions to the crown of Brittany, but in the event of Charles predeceasing her, Anne undertook to marry the heir to the throne.
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  • The marriage contract was ostensibly directed in favour of the independence of Brittany, for it declared that Brittany should revert to the second son or to the eldest daughter of the two sovereigns, and, failing issue, to the natural heirs of the duchess.
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  • In 1504 she caused the treaty of Blois to be concluded, which assured the hand of her daughter, Claude of France, to Charles of Austria (the future emperor, CharlesV.), and promised him the possession of Brittany,Burgundy and the county of Blois.
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  • Thus the definitive reunion of Brittany and France was prepared.
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  • The peace concluded between the duke of Brittany and the English in September 1427 led to his expulsion from the court, where Georges de la Tremoille, whom he himself had recommended to the king, remained supreme for six years, during which Richmond tried in vain to overthrow him.
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  • In alliance with his nephew, the duke of Brittany, he reconquered, during September and October 1449, nearly all the Cotentin; on the 15th of April 1450 he gained over the English the battle of Formigny; and during the year he recovered for France the whole of Normandy, which for the next six or seven years it was his task to defend from English attacks.
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  • On the death of his nephew Peter II., on the 22nd of September 1457, he became duke of Brittany, and though retaining his office of constable of France, he refused, like his predecessors, to do homage to the French king for his duchy.
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  • Thereupon Heloise found herself pregnant, and was carried off by her lover to Brittany, where she gave birth to a son.
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  • Upon the return of new dangers, or at least of fears, Abelard left the Paraclete to make trial of another refuge, accepting an invitation to preside over the abbey of St Gildas-de-Rhuys, on the far-off shore of Lower Brittany.
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  • In the war time, Boudin was in Brittany and then in the Low Countries.
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  • He gathered beneath his banner thousands of adventurers not only from France, Brittany and Flanders, but even from distant regions such as Aragon, Apulia and Germany.
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  • In 1166 Henry got practical possession of the duchy of Brittany, the only remaining large district of western France which was not already in his hands.
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  • The old king very naturally preferred to keep his dominions united under his own immediate government, but he had designated his eldest sonas his successor in England and Normandy, while Richard was to have his mothers heritage of Aquitaine, and Geoffreys wifes dowry, the duchy of Brittany, was due to him, now that he had reached the verge of manhood.
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  • The best proof that King Henrys orderly if autocratic rgime was appreciated at its true value by his English subjects, is that when the second series of rebellions raised by his undutiful sons began In 1182, there was no stir whatever in England, though in Normandy, Brittany and Aquitaine the barons rose in full force to support the young princes, whose success would mean the triumph of particularism and the destruction of the Angevin empire.
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  • The death of the younger Henry had made Richard heir to all his fathers lands from the Tweed to the Bidassoa save Brittany, Richard!.
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  • At the moment of his premature death his nearest kinsmen were his worthless brother John, and the boy Arthur of Brittany, the heir of Geoffrey, the third son Accession of John.
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  • The dowager duchess Constance of Brittany raised her sons claim,, and sent an army into Anjou, and all down the Loire many of the nobles adhered to his cause.
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  • It seemed for a space as if the new king would succeed in retaining the whole of his brothers inheritance, for King Philip very meanly allowed himself to be bought off by the cession of the county of Evreux, and, when his troops were withdrawn, the Angevin rebels were beaten down, and the duchess of Brittany had to ask for peace for her son.
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  • He enlisted Arthur of Brittany in Aulgistus.
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  • It was a different thing for John and his successors to undertake the long voyage to Bordeaux, around the stormy headlands of Brittany and across the Bay of Biscay.
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  • The sheriffdoms and most of the ministerial posts were left in the hands of Scots, though the supreme executive authority was put in.the hands of John of Brittany, earl of Richmond, the kings nephew.
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  • The war did not entirely cease, but became local and spasmodic. In Brittany the factions which supported the two claimants to the ducal title were so embittered that they never laid down their arms. In 1351 the French noblesse of Picardy, apparently without their masters knowledge or consent, made an attempt to surprise Calais, which was beaten off with some difficulty by King Edward in person.
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  • This did not prevent Bertrand du Guesclin from expelling from his dominions John of Brittany, the one ally whom King Edward possessed in France, or from pursuing a consistent career of petty conquest in the heart of Aquitaine.
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  • Thomas of Woodstock, the youngest son of Edward III., took a powerful army to Calais, and marched through Picardy and Champagne, past Orleans, and finally to Rennes in Brittany, but accomplished nothing save the ruin of his own troops and the wasting of a vast sum of money.
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  • Meanwhile Richmonds little fleet was dispersed by the same storms that scattered Buckinghams army, and he was forced to return to Brittany without having landed in England.
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  • He allied himself with Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain and with Maximilian of Austria, who was ruling the Netherlands in behalf of his young son, Philip, the heir of the Burgundian inheritance, for the purpose of preventing France from annexing Brittany, the last great fief of the crown which had not yet been absorbed into the Valois royal domain.
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  • This struggle, the only continental war in which the first of the Tudors risked his fortunes, was not prosecuted with any great energy, and came to a necessary end when Anne, duchess of Brittany, in whose behalf it was being waged, disappointed her allies by marrying Charles VIII.
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  • In 1359 he was one of the leaders of an expedition into France, in 1360 he took the fortress of Chaven in Brittany, and was present at Calais when peace was made between England and France in October 1360.
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  • The authority of the new king was quickly recognized in his kingdom, which covered the greater part of France north of the Loire with the exception of Brittany, and in a shadowy fashion he was acknowledged in Aquitaine; but he was compelled to purchase the allegiance of the great nobles by large grants of royal lands, and he was hardly more powerful as king than he had been as duke.
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  • After a severe defeat at Cholet on the 6th of October the Royalists determined to cross the Loire and raise Brittany and Anjou, where the Chouans, or Royalist partisans, were already stirring.
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  • Norse versions of Mary of Brittany's Lays, the stories of Brutus and of Troy, and part of the Pharsalia translated are also found.
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  • In 1514 he was given 12,000 German mercenaries ostensibly for the defence of Brittany, but really for an invasion of England.
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  • Richard was a member of parliament in 1467; afterwards he joined Henry, earl of Richmond, in Brittany, returned with the earl to England, and fought at Bosworth, where he was knighted.
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  • He received rich rewards from Henry, now King Henry VII., who also sent him on errands to Scotland, to Ireland and to Brittany, and he died at Morlaix on the 8th of September 1489.
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  • The abbey church is now used as a market, and the abbey, which was founded by Judith of Brittany early in the 11 th century, and underwent a restoration in the 17th century, serves for municipal and legal purposes.
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  • Then for a time he was made a prisoner; but ultimately he was taken abroad by his uncle Jasper, who found refuge in Brittany.
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  • At one time the duke of Brittany was nearly induced to surrender him to Edward IV.; but he remained safe in the duchy till the cruelties of Richard III.
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  • Anxious as Henry was to avoid being involved in foreign wars, it was not many years before he was committed to a war with France, partly by his desire of an alliance with Spain, and partly by the indignation of his own subjects at the way in which the French were undermining the independence of Brittany.
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  • Henry gave Brittany defensive aid; but after the duchess Anne had married Charles VIII.
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  • All these Cronus swallowed; and this " swallow-myth " occurs in Australia, among the Bushmen, in Guiana, in Brittany (where Gargantua did the swallow-trick) and elsewhere.
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  • Brittany; and carried on among the Danes the work of evangelization begun among the Slays.
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  • Before long, too, Louis the German actually allied himself with the people of Brittany and Aquitaine, and invaded France at the summons of Charles the Balds own vassals.
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  • His own son Charles, king of Aquitaine, revolted, and Salomon proclaimed himself king of Brittany in succession to Erispo, who had been assassinated.
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  • Aquitaine and Brittany were almost independent, Burgundy was in full revolt, and within thirty years Rollo, a Norman leader, was to be master of the whole of the lower Seine from the Cotentin to the Somme.
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  • It is extraordinary that Louis should have escaped final destruction, considering that Henry had subdued Scotland, retaken Anjou from his brother Geoffrey, won a hold over Brittany, and schemed successfully for Languedoc. But the Church once more came to the rescue of her devoted son.
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  • The quarrel between John and his and John nephew Arthur of Brittany gave Philip Augustus Lackland.
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  • When Thibaud (Theobald), count of Champagne, attempted to marry the daughter of Pierre Mauclerc, duke of Brittany, without the kings consent, Louis IX., who held the county of Champagne at his mercy, contented himself with exacting guarantees of peace.
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  • But this young king, aged only twenty, very much in love with his young wife and excessively fond of pleasure, soon wrecked the delicate poise of his mental faculties in the festivities of the Hotel SaintPaul; and a violent attack of Pierre de Craon on the constable de Clisson having led to an expedition against his accomplice, the duke of Brittany, Charles was seized by insanity on the road.
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  • On three different occasions (in 1465, 1467 and 1472), Louis XI.s own brother, the duke of Berry, urged by the duke of Brittany, the count of Charolais, the duke of Bourbon, and the other feudal lords, attempted to set up six kingdoms in France instead of one, and to impose upon Louis XI.
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  • The duke of Brittany, Francis II., was defeated; Charles the Bold, having failed at Beauvais in his attempt to recapture the towns of the Somme which had been.
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  • In vain did the malcontent princes attempt to set up a new League of Public Weal, the Guerre folle (Mad War), in which the duke of Brittany, Francis II., played the part of Charles the Bold, dragging in the people of Lorraine and the king of Navarre, In vain did Charles VIII., his majority attained, at once abandon in the treaty of Sable the benefits gained by the victory of Saint-Aubin du Cormier (1488).
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  • It now remained to consolidate the later successes attained by the policy of the Valoisthe acquisition of the duchies of Burgundy and Brittany; but instead there was a sudden change and that policy seemed about to be lost in dreams of recapturing the rights of the Angevins ficence.
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  • The regent, Anne of Beaujeu, worked in her daughters interest to the detriment of the kingdom, by means of a special treaty destined to prevent the property of the Bourbons from reverting to the crown; while Anne of Brittany did the like for her daughter Claude.
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  • Jeanne of France in order to marry Anne, the widow of his predecessor, so that he might keep Brittany.
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  • Soubise had begun the revolt (January 1625) by seizing Port Blavet in Brittany, with the royal squadron that lay there, and in command of the ships thus acquired, combined with those of La Rochelle, he ranged the western coast, intercepting commerce.
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  • In the Angevin Vendee the incapable leaders let themselves be beaten at Aubiers, Beauprau and Thouars, at a time when Cathelineau was taking possession of Saumur and threatening Nantes, the capture of which would have permitted the insurgents in La Vende to join those of Brittany and receive provisions from England; Meanwhile, the remnants of the Girondin federalists were overcome by the disguised royalists, who had aroused the whole of the Rhne valley from Lyons to Marseilles, had called in the Sardinians, and handed over the fleet and the arsenal at Toulon to the English, whilst Paoli left Corsica at their disposal.
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  • A premature attempt to amalgamate the duchy of Brittany with the French crown failed.
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  • Jean de Beaumanoir, marshal of Brittany for Charles of Blois, and captain of Josselin, is remembered for his share in the famous battle of the Thirty.
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  • This battle, sung by an unknown trouvere and retold with variations by Froissart, was an episode in the struggle for the succession to the duchy of Brittany between Charles of Blois, supported by the king of France, and John of Montfort, supported by the king of England.
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  • It seems probable that it is the lesser or French Brittany from which the stories were derived, though something may be due to Welsh and Cornish sources.
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  • Eliduc is more elaborately planned than any of these, and the action is divided between Exeter and Brittany.
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  • In 1076 Philip forced him to raise the siege of Dol in Brittany.
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  • The fire-bringer in Brittany is the golden or fire-crested wren.
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  • Born in Britain, he went to Brittany where he became abbot of a monastery he had founded.
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  • He received an amberjack last Thursday that was caught off Brest, Brittany and he has identified it as a Guinean amberjack.
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  • A holy virgin who left Ireland for Brittany and became an anchoress in a hermitage near Brieuc.
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  • General Patton's 3rd Army was diverted from Brittany to help exploit the breakthrough at St Lò .
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  • La Grande Maison is a family run guesthouse situated in the center of rural Brittany.
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  • Outside Brittany, another outpost of folk music is central France.
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  • The Life in the Book of Landaff describes Teilo's flight to Brittany in AD 547, to escape the Yellow pestilence.
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  • The moth brought fear and panic in Brittany when large numbers appeared at the time of a widespread pestilence.
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  • We could almost have been in a French seafood restaurant in Brittany, what with the wonderful array of fresh shellfish on display.
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  • The peninsula of Brittany and the coasts of Normandy on both sides of the Seine estuary are watered b numerous independent streams., Amongst these the Vilaine, whic passes Rennes and Redon, waters, with its tributaries, an area of 4200 sq.
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  • The Permian and Triassic deposits were also, for the most part, of continental origin; but with the formation of the Rhaetic beds the sea again began to spread, and throughout the greater part of the J ueassic period it covered nearly the whole of the country except the Central Plateau, Brittany and the Ardennes.
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  • Loire-Infi populated regions include the coast of the depart- Loiret ment of Seine-Infrieure and Brittany, the wine-grow- Lot -
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  • Vineyards (see WINE).The vine grows generally in France, except in the extreme north and in Normandy and Brittany.
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  • Swine, bred all over France, are more numerous in Brittany, Anjou (whence comes the well-known breed of Craon), Poitou, Burgundy, the west and north of the central plateau and Beam.
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  • On the 1st of October he set forth for France with a magnificent retinue as papal legate to Louis XII., to bring him the pope's bull annulling his marriage with Jeanne of France (Louis wished to marry Anne of Brittany).
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  • Thus, besides such forms as Evan, Aune, Anne, Ive, Auney, Inney, &c., in the British Islands, Aff, Aven, Avon, Aune appear in Brittany and elsewhere in France, Avenza and Avens in Italy, Avia in Portugal, and Avono in Spain; while the terminal syllable of a large proportion of the Latinized names of French rivers, such as the Sequana, the Matrona and the Garumna, seems originally to have been the same word.
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  • At first the utmost efforts of the republic failed to avert disaster; for the intensely royalist district of la Vendee, together with most of Brittany, burst into revolt, and several of the northern, central and southern departments rose against the Jacobin rule.
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  • The Eneti of Paphlagonia, the Veneti of Brittany and the Venedi of the Baltic, are probably quite distinct, and the similarity of name is merely a coincidence.
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  • Carnac has a handsome church in the Renaissance style of Brittany, but it owes its celebrity to the stone monuments in its vicinity, which are among the most extensive and interesting of their kind (see Stone Monuments).
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  • This famous work, which the author has the audacity to place on the same level with the histories of William of Malmesbury and Henry of Huntingdon, professes to be a translation from a Celtic source; "a very old book in the British tongue" which Walter, archdeacon of Oxford, had brought from Brittany.
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  • The last duke of Charost, Armand Joseph de Bethune (1738-1800), French economist and philanthropist, served in the army during the Seven Years' War, after which he retired to his estates in Berry, where, and also in Brittany and Picardy, he sought to ameliorate the lot of his peasants by abolishing feudal dues, and introducing reforms in agriculture.
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  • Caesar, who had been hastily summoned from Illyricum, crossed the Loire and invaded Brittany, but found that he could make no headway without destroying the powerful fleet of high, flat-bottomed boats like floating castles possessed by the Veneti.
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  • In Brittany the people flock into the cemeteries at nightfall to kneel bare-headed at the graves of their loved ones, and to fill the hollow of the tombstone with holy water or to pour libations of milk upon it, and at bedtime the supper is left on the table for the soul's refreshment.
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  • On the death of John III., duke of Brittany, in April 1341, his brother John, count of Montfortl'Amaury, and his niece Jeanne, wife of Charles of Blois, disputed the succession.
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  • The ' Brittany ' sage still has flowers while the Erica December Red is now in good flower on the rockery bank.
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  • New England Patriots Cheerleader Brittany Medeiros poses for the 2006-07 Patriots Cheerleaders swimsuit calendar.
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  • You can buy a small turreted castle in Brittany for £ 10,000.
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  • Other companies, such as Brittany and Coggs of New Hampshire paint their tiles in layers, rubbing off the top layer of glaze from the relief portion of the tiles to allow the base layer to show through.
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  • Three-dimensional handmade tiles such as those made by Pratt and Larson or Brittany and Coggs are a great way to make a sunflower statement in your kitchen.
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  • Brittany Murphy died after suffering a full cardiac arrest on Sunday, December 20, 2009.
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  • As it is a shock to Brittany Murphy fans around the globe, it is an extraordinary shock to those that knew and loved the 32-year-old actor.
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  • Brittany Murphy's husband, Simon Monjack told the coroner's office that he did not want an autopsy performed on his wife.
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  • Brittany Murphy died on December 20, 2009 after suffering a heart attack and collapsing in the bathroom of her Hollywood Hills home.
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  • There were many rumors surrounding the death of Brittany Murphy.
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  • Early reports in her death noted there were several prescription drug bottles in Brittany and husband Simon Monjack's home at the time of her death.
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  • Recently, the Brittany has decided that he is unhappy in the crate and begins barking almost immediately.
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  • When we speak of the Celts we are referring to the people who once inhabited Ireland, Scotland, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, Wales and Brittany, all of whom spoke Celtic languages.
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  • The Celtic cross hails from the Celtic lands of Ireland, Scotland, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, Wales and Brittany, where it has been used since Christianity took hold in those lands, around 1300 years ago.
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  • The tribal culture lived in parts of Eastern and Western Europe, with large settlements in Ireland, Scotland, Wales as well as in Cornwall, England and Brittany, France.
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  • Though the program focused heavily on the family as a unit, its protagonist was American Bandstand dancer Meg Pryor, played by actress Brittany Snow.
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  • Coastal areas, such as those found in Normandy and Brittany, are very popular with tourists who arrive from across the channel.
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  • Glee cheerleaders Santana, Brittany and Quinn also provide entertaining interludes throughout the show.
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  • Brittany Brower - Former contestant on America's Next Top Model and once voted "The Hottest Girls of Reality T.V." by Maxim magazine.
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  • Regional variations exist from the Highlands of Scotland, to the Republic of Ireland, to areas with large Celtic immigrant communities, like Brittany and Canada.
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  • Again in the Netherlands, he made a treaty with Francis II., duke of Brittany, whose independence was threatened by the French regent, Anne of Beaujeu, and the struggle with France was soon renewed.
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  • Early in 1490 he took a further step and was betrothed to the duchess, and later in the same year the marriage was celebrated by proxy; but Brittany was still occupied by French troops, and Maximilian was unable to go to the assistance of his bride.
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  • On the death of this general Descartes quitted the imperial service, and in July 1621 began a peaceful tour through Moravia, the borders of Poland, Pomerania, Brandenburg, Holstein and Friesland, from which he reappeared in February 1622 in Belgium, and betook himself directly to his father's home at Rennes in Brittany.
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  • A short visit to Brittany enabled him, with his father's consent, to arrange for the sale of his property in Poitou.
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