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britons

britons Sentence Examples

  • The Picts and Britons now recovered their independence; for Aldfrith, apparently an illegitimate son of Oswio, who succeeded, made no attempt to reconquer them.

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  • Finally in 756, having now allied himself with Ongus king of the Picts, he successfully attacked Dumbarton (Alcluith), the chief town of the Britons of Strathclyde.

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  • The Parthians had at the best been beaten, not subdued; the Britons threatened revolt; there were signs that various tribes beyond the Alps intended to break into Italy.

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  • They have been called the Britons of the south, and their courage in defending their country and their intelligence amply justify the compliment.

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  • 636), he defeated the advancing Britons at Bampton in Oxfordshire in 614, and Cwichelm sought to arrest the growing power of the Northumbrian king Eadwine by procuring his assassination; the attempt, however, failed, and in 626 the West Saxons were defeated in battle and forced to own Eadwine's supremacy.

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  • Wolf-hunting was a favourite pursuit of the ancient Britons as well as of the Anglo-Saxons.

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  • Its capital was Dumbarton (fortress of the Britons), then known as Alclyde.

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  • Of the origin of the kingdom of the North Britons we have no information, but there seems little reason to doubt that they were the dominant people in southern Scotland before the Roman invasion.

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  • After the withdrawal of the Romans in the 5th century the northern Britons seem to have shown greater determination in maintaining their independence than any of the southern kingdoms and, according to Welsh tradition, Cunedda, the ancestor of the kings of Gwynedd, had himself come from the north.

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  • In the Historia brittonum we read of several princes of the northern Britons.

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  • It is probable that the Britons were allied with the Scots when Aidan, the king of the latter, invaded Northumbria in A.D.

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  • In 642, however, we find the two Celtic peoples at war with one another, for in that year the Britons under their king Owen defeated and slew the Scottish king Domnall Breac. In the same year they came into conflict with the Northumbrian king Oswio.

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  • In 649 there appears to have been a battle between the Britons and the Picts, but about this time the former must have become subject to the Northumbrian kingdom.

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  • In 711 and again in 717 we hear of further wars between the Britons and the Scots of Dalriada, the former being defeated in both years.

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  • In 756 the North Britons are said to have been forced into submission and from this time onwards we hear very little of their history, though occasional references to the deaths of their kings show that the kingdom still continued to exist.

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  • At the end of the reign of Edward the Elder (925) the Britons of Strathclyde submitted to that king together with all the other princes of the north.

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  • The fall of the kingdom was only temporary, for we hear of a defeat of the Scottish king Cuilean by the Britons in 97 1.

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  • Although Dumfries was the site of a camp of the Selgovian Britons, nothing is known of its history until long after the withdrawal of the Romans.

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  • The courage of the Romans, however, soon overcame such fears; the Britons were put to flight; and the groves of Mona, the scene of many a sacrifice and bloody rite, were cut down.

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  • It is from an incidental remark of his own, namely, that the year of the siege of Mount Badon - one of the battles fought between the Saxons and the Britons - was also the year of his own nativity, that the date of his birth has been derived; the place, however, is not mentioned.

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  • Among other matters reference is made to the introduction of Christianity in the reign of Tiberius; the persecution under Diocletian; the spread of the Arian heresy; the election of Maximus as emperor by the legions in Britain, and his subsequent death at Aquileia; the incursions of the Picts and Scots into the southern part of the island; the temporary assistance rendered to the harassed Britons by the Romans; the final abandonment of the island by the latter; the coming of the Saxons and their reception by Guortigern (Vortigern); and, finally, the conflicts between the Britons, led by a noble Roman, Ambrosius Aurelianus, and the new invaders.

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  • Thus it is on his sole, though in this instance perhaps trustworthy, testimony that the famous letter rests, said to have been sent to Rome in 446 by the despairing Britons, commencing: - "To Agitius (Aetius), consul for the third time, the groans of the Britons."

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  • York is known to have been occupied by the Britons, and was chosen by the Romans as their most important centre in north Britain and named Eboracum or Eburacur.

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  • The southern Picts ultimately subdued the Britons, and the castle became their chief stronghold until they were overthrown in 617 (or 629) by the Saxons under Edwin, king of Northumbria, from whom the name of Edinburgh is derived.

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  • In the year 556 Banbury (Beranbyrig, Banesberie) was the scene of a battle between Cynric and Ceawlin and Britons.

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  • One of the most important questions in the history of London that requires settlement is the date of the building of the first bridge, that is whether it was constructed by Britons or by Romans.

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  • If the Britons had not already made he bridge before the Romans arrived it must have been one of the first Roman works.

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  • 120), but Dr Guest was not prepared to allow that the Britons were able to construct a bridge over a tidal river such as the Thames, some 300 yds.

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  • It needs some temerity to differ from so great an authority as Dr Guest, but it strikes one as surprising that, having accepted the fact of a bridge made by the Britons, he should deny that these Britons possessed a town or village in the place to which he supposes that Aulus Plautius retired.

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  • If so, the word " pont " may have been borrowed by the Britons before the commencement of the Roman occupation.

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  • 449 or 450 the invaders settled in Britain, and in 457 Hengist and Aesc fought against the Britons at Crayford, driving them out of Kent.

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  • In this, the earliest period of Saxon history recorded, there appears to be no relic of the Christianity of the Britons, which at one time was well in evidence.

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  • The Saxons had become law-abiding, and the fierce Danes treated them in the same way as in former days they had treated the Britons.

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  • There is no doubt, however, that the net result was the expulsion of the Britons from Kent.

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  • He is first spoken of in Nennius's History of the Britons (9th century), and at greater length in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain (12th century), at the end of which the French Breton cycle attained its fullest development in the poems of Chretien de Troyes and others.

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  • There are various unsatisfactory accounts of the early history of Oswestry (Blaneminster, or Album Monasterium), as that it was called Trer Cadeirau by the Britons and Osweiling after Cunelda Wledig, prince of North Wales, had granted it to his -son Osweil.

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  • For, in view of the facts above stated, it was of small significance that in Britain Christianity was driven back into the western portion of the island still held by the Britons, and that in the countries of the Rhine and!Danube a few bishoprics disappeared.

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  • In this role he slays monsters, the boar Twrch Trwyth, the giant of Mont St Michel and the Demon Cat of Losanne (Andre de Coutances tells us that Arthur was really vanquished and carried off by the Cat, but that one durst not tell that tale before Britons!).

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  • About 115 or r20 the northern Britons rose in revolt and destroyed the Ninth Legion, posted at York, which would bear the brunt of any northern trouble.

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  • The coherent civilization of the Romans was accepted by the Britons, as it was by the Gauls, with something like enthusiasm.

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  • Romanized Britons must now have begun to be numerous.

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  • According to Gildas it was for protection against these incursions that the Britons decided to call in the Saxons.

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  • Their allies soon obtained a decisive victory; but subsequently they turned their arms against the Britons themselves, alleging that they had not received sufficient payment for their services.

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  • Eventually, however, they overcame the Britons through treachery, by inducing the king to allow them to send for large bodies of their own countrymen.

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  • Bede declares that Oswald ruled over "all the peoples and provinces of Britain, which includes four languages, those of the Britons, Picts, Scots and Angles."

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  • The Britons and Irish, whose remoteness made them free from restriction, developed still more decided individuality.

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  • We may note with interest that the three great iron producers so closely related by blood-Great Britain, the United States and Germany and Luxemburg-made in 1907 81% of the world's pig iron and 83% of its steel; and that the four great processes by which nearly all steel and wrought iron are made-the puddling, crucible and both the acid and basic varieties of the Bessemer and open-hearth processes, as well as the steam-hammer and grooved rolls for rolling iron and steel-were invented by Britons, though in the case of the openhearth process Great Britain must share with France the credit of the invention.

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  • It appears in several variant forms (brytenwalda, bretenanwealda, &c.), and means most probably "lord of the Britons" or "lord of Britain"; for although the derivation of the word is uncertain, its earlier syllable seems to be cognate with the words Briton and Britannia.

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  • Another theory is that Bretwalda refers to a war-leadership, or imperium, over the English south of the Humber, and has nothing to do with Britons or Britannia.

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  • Cynric defeated the Britons at Salisbury in 552 and again in conjunction with his son Ceawlin at Beranburh, probably Barbury Hill, in 55 6.

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  • 2.) In accordance with tradition this has been thought to mark the burial-place of Catigern, who was slain here in a battle between the Britons and Saxons in A.D.

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  • Among the Persians, again, and more remarkably among the ancient Britons, there was a class of chariot having the wheels mounted with sharp, sickle-shaped blades, which cut to pieces whatever came in their way.

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  • Ludlow is supposed to have existed under the name of Dinan in the time of the Britons.

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  • According to Strabo (p. 200) the Britons also bred dogs well adapted for hunting purposes.

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  • Saffron Walden (Waledana) was almost certainly fortified by the Britons, and probably by some earlier race.

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  • VORTIGERN (GUORTHIGIRNUS, WYRTGEORN), king of the Britons at the time of the arrival of the Saxons under Hengest and Horsa.

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  • Later we find the Britons at war with the new-comers, now established in Kent, and four battles are fought, in the last of which, according to the Historia Brittonum, the king's son Vortemir, their leading opponent, is slain.

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  • This war may have been due partly to Æthelfrith's persecution of Edwin, but it had a strategic importance in the separation of the North Welsh from the Strathclyde Britons.

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  • London first, and then Verulam, were abandoned to the Britons.

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  • Welsh, the Celtic language spoken by the ancient Britons, is the domestic tongue of the majority of the inhabitants of the Principality.

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  • 593), king of the West Saxons, first mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 556 as fighting with his father Cynric against the Britons at the battle of Beranbyrig or Barbury Hill.

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  • Uriconium, a town near the Wrekin, and Pengwyrn, the modern Shrewsbury, were destroyed; but soon Ceawlin was defeated by the Britons at Fethanleag or Faddiley, near Nantwich, and his progress was effectually checked.

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  • The population of the north shore of the Solway Firth at the beginning of the 5th century were probably either Picts or Goidels or a blend of both, and naturally hostile to the Romanized Britons.

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  • The Alcluith ("hill of the Clyde")- of the Britons, and Dunbreatan ("fort of the Britons") of the Celts, it was the capital of the district of Strathclyde.

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  • According to the Scalacronica of Sir Thomas Gray he drove the Angles and Britons over the Tweed, reduced the land as far as that river, and first called his kingdom Scotland.

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  • Gildas, writing in the 6th century, speaks of the twentyeight cities of the Britons.

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  • The Britons burnt the Roman municipalities of Verulam and Colchester, the mart of London, and several military posts, massacred "over 70,000" Romans and Britons friendly to Rome, and almost annihilated the Ninth Legion marching from Lincoln to the rescue.

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  • At last Paulinus, who seems to have rejoined his army, met the Britons in the field.

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  • Boadicea took poison; thousands of Britons fell in the fight or were hunted down in the ensuing guerrilla.

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  • The great magazine was gallantly defended for a time by nine Britons under Lieutenant Willoughby, and was blown up by them when all hope of relief had vanished.

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  • But even before he could arrive, the outspread of the Mutiny had already been checked by the gallantry and skill of a mere handful of Britons and their faithful native allies.

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  • AMBROSIUS AURELIANUS, leader of the Britons against the Saxons in the 5th century, was, according to the legends preserved in Gildas and the Historia Brittonum, of Roman extraction.

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  • In S71 Cuthwulf inflicted a severe defeat on the Britons at Bedford and took four towns.

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  • ~thelfrith, the last heathen among the Northumbrian kings, cut off the Britons of the North from those of the West, by winning the battle of Chester (AD.

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  • The coracle forms a unique link between the modern life of Wales and its remote past; for this primitive type of boat was in existence amongst the Britons at the time of the invasion of Julius Caesar, who has left a description of it, and even employed it in his Spanish campaign.

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  • The latter was driven out of the country by Domnall, whereupon Congal collected an army of foreign adventurers made up of Saxons, Dalriadic Scots, Britons and Picts to regain his lands and to avenge himself on the high-king.

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  • He was deputed by a synod of the church in Wessex to remonstrate with the Britons of Domnonia (Devon and Cornwall) on their differences from the Roman practice in the shape of the tonsure and the date of Easter.

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  • The letter to Geraint, king of Domnonia, was supposed to have been destroyed by the Britons (W.

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  • Napoleon on his side required Persia to declare war against Great Britain, to expel all Britons from her territory, and to come to an understanding with the Afghans with a view to a joint Franco-Perso-Afghan invasion of India.

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  • The shah, however, promised to expel Britons and to grant to France a commercial treaty.

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  • Low-carb eating is popular, with around 3 million Britons having counted carb eating is popular, with around 3 million Britons having counted carbs, not calories, to manage their weight.

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  • Credit monitoring service MyCallcredit says it indicates Britons are becoming more comfortable with debt.

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  • The Britons, dependent for centuries on the protection of Rome, were left defenseless.

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  • As for having sympathy with the three Britons who were found among the Afghan detainees.

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  • Elton's openness extends beyond finance, into his emotional life, a place which, again, tradition demands we Britons keep discreet.

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  • flattering shape to the history of the Britons.

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  • On entering a full room of people, Britons don't shake hands or greet everyone in the room.

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  • horsemanclass="ex">Expert horsemen, the Britons can throw spears from horseback, or from chariots.

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  • And yet the majority of Britons hold firm and, as the poll showed, factually incorrect, beliefs about asylum seekers.

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  • The Ancient Britons live in splendid isolation from the rest of Europe.

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  • millions of ordinary decent Britons think.

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  • patriotism by the majority of Britons.

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  • The Greatest Britons of all Time In November 2002, the British public voted to find the Greatest Briton of all time.

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  • The new gold rush Expat South Africans and Britons alike have been quick to capitalize on the weak rand.

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  • Gildas chastens his fellow Britons for rebellions that he regards as sinful.

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  • Expert horsemen, the Britons can throw spears from horseback, or from chariots.

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  • Why would you want to start a thread about worst Britons?

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  • three-quarters of Britons are now prepared to buy a home that needs major renovations.

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  • Britons begin to learn Latin and wear togas Approx 79 AD.

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  • The Picts and Britons now recovered their independence; for Aldfrith, apparently an illegitimate son of Oswio, who succeeded, made no attempt to reconquer them.

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  • Finally in 756, having now allied himself with Ongus king of the Picts, he successfully attacked Dumbarton (Alcluith), the chief town of the Britons of Strathclyde.

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  • He succeeded in making the majority of the Britons, Picts and Scots tributary to him.

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  • The Parthians had at the best been beaten, not subdued; the Britons threatened revolt; there were signs that various tribes beyond the Alps intended to break into Italy.

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  • They have been called the Britons of the south, and their courage in defending their country and their intelligence amply justify the compliment.

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  • 636), he defeated the advancing Britons at Bampton in Oxfordshire in 614, and Cwichelm sought to arrest the growing power of the Northumbrian king Eadwine by procuring his assassination; the attempt, however, failed, and in 626 the West Saxons were defeated in battle and forced to own Eadwine's supremacy.

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  • Wolf-hunting was a favourite pursuit of the ancient Britons as well as of the Anglo-Saxons.

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  • Its capital was Dumbarton (fortress of the Britons), then known as Alclyde.

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  • Of the origin of the kingdom of the North Britons we have no information, but there seems little reason to doubt that they were the dominant people in southern Scotland before the Roman invasion.

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  • After the withdrawal of the Romans in the 5th century the northern Britons seem to have shown greater determination in maintaining their independence than any of the southern kingdoms and, according to Welsh tradition, Cunedda, the ancestor of the kings of Gwynedd, had himself come from the north.

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  • In the Historia brittonum we read of several princes of the northern Britons.

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  • It is probable that the Britons were allied with the Scots when Aidan, the king of the latter, invaded Northumbria in A.D.

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  • In 642, however, we find the two Celtic peoples at war with one another, for in that year the Britons under their king Owen defeated and slew the Scottish king Domnall Breac. In the same year they came into conflict with the Northumbrian king Oswio.

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  • In 649 there appears to have been a battle between the Britons and the Picts, but about this time the former must have become subject to the Northumbrian kingdom.

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  • In 711 and again in 717 we hear of further wars between the Britons and the Scots of Dalriada, the former being defeated in both years.

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  • In 756 the North Britons are said to have been forced into submission and from this time onwards we hear very little of their history, though occasional references to the deaths of their kings show that the kingdom still continued to exist.

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  • At the end of the reign of Edward the Elder (925) the Britons of Strathclyde submitted to that king together with all the other princes of the north.

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  • The fall of the kingdom was only temporary, for we hear of a defeat of the Scottish king Cuilean by the Britons in 97 1.

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  • Although Dumfries was the site of a camp of the Selgovian Britons, nothing is known of its history until long after the withdrawal of the Romans.

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  • The courage of the Romans, however, soon overcame such fears; the Britons were put to flight; and the groves of Mona, the scene of many a sacrifice and bloody rite, were cut down.

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  • It is from an incidental remark of his own, namely, that the year of the siege of Mount Badon - one of the battles fought between the Saxons and the Britons - was also the year of his own nativity, that the date of his birth has been derived; the place, however, is not mentioned.

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  • Among other matters reference is made to the introduction of Christianity in the reign of Tiberius; the persecution under Diocletian; the spread of the Arian heresy; the election of Maximus as emperor by the legions in Britain, and his subsequent death at Aquileia; the incursions of the Picts and Scots into the southern part of the island; the temporary assistance rendered to the harassed Britons by the Romans; the final abandonment of the island by the latter; the coming of the Saxons and their reception by Guortigern (Vortigern); and, finally, the conflicts between the Britons, led by a noble Roman, Ambrosius Aurelianus, and the new invaders.

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  • Thus it is on his sole, though in this instance perhaps trustworthy, testimony that the famous letter rests, said to have been sent to Rome in 446 by the despairing Britons, commencing: - "To Agitius (Aetius), consul for the third time, the groans of the Britons."

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  • York is known to have been occupied by the Britons, and was chosen by the Romans as their most important centre in north Britain and named Eboracum or Eburacur.

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  • The southern Picts ultimately subdued the Britons, and the castle became their chief stronghold until they were overthrown in 617 (or 629) by the Saxons under Edwin, king of Northumbria, from whom the name of Edinburgh is derived.

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  • James Grant's view that it may have been the earlier name of the castle, from dun (" the fort "), and edin (" on the slope "), conflicts with the more generally received opinion that the Britons knew the fortress as Castelh Mynedh Agnedh (" the hill of the plain "), a designation once wrongly interpreted as the " castle of the maidens " (castrum puellarum), in allusion to the supposed fact that the Pictish princesses were lodged within it during their education.

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  • In the year 556 Banbury (Beranbyrig, Banesberie) was the scene of a battle between Cynric and Ceawlin and Britons.

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  • One of the most important questions in the history of London that requires settlement is the date of the building of the first bridge, that is whether it was constructed by Britons or by Romans.

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  • If the Britons had not already made he bridge before the Romans arrived it must have been one of the first Roman works.

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  • 120), but Dr Guest was not prepared to allow that the Britons were able to construct a bridge over a tidal river such as the Thames, some 300 yds.

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  • It needs some temerity to differ from so great an authority as Dr Guest, but it strikes one as surprising that, having accepted the fact of a bridge made by the Britons, he should deny that these Britons possessed a town or village in the place to which he supposes that Aulus Plautius retired.

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  • As the Welsh word for " bridge " is " pont," and this was taken directly from the Latin, the inference is almost conclusive that the Britons acquired their knowledge of bridges from the Romans.

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  • Looking at the stage of culture which the Britons had probably reached, it would further be a natural inference that there was no such thing as a bridge anywhere in Britain before the Roman occupation; but, if Dion's statement is correct, it may be suggested as a possible explanation that the increased intercourse with Gaul during the hundred years that - elapsed between Julius Caesar's raids and Claudius Caesar's invasion may have led to the construction of a bridge of some kind across the Thames at this point, through the influence and under the guidance of Roman traders and engineers.

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  • If so, the word " pont " may have been borrowed by the Britons before the commencement of the Roman occupation.

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  • 449 or 450 the invaders settled in Britain, and in 457 Hengist and Aesc fought against the Britons at Crayford, driving them out of Kent.

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  • In this, the earliest period of Saxon history recorded, there appears to be no relic of the Christianity of the Britons, which at one time was well in evidence.

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  • The Saxons had become law-abiding, and the fierce Danes treated them in the same way as in former days they had treated the Britons.

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  • There is no doubt, however, that the net result was the expulsion of the Britons from Kent.

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  • He is first spoken of in Nennius's History of the Britons (9th century), and at greater length in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain (12th century), at the end of which the French Breton cycle attained its fullest development in the poems of Chretien de Troyes and others.

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  • There are various unsatisfactory accounts of the early history of Oswestry (Blaneminster, or Album Monasterium), as that it was called Trer Cadeirau by the Britons and Osweiling after Cunelda Wledig, prince of North Wales, had granted it to his -son Osweil.

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  • For, in view of the facts above stated, it was of small significance that in Britain Christianity was driven back into the western portion of the island still held by the Britons, and that in the countries of the Rhine and!Danube a few bishoprics disappeared.

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  • In this role he slays monsters, the boar Twrch Trwyth, the giant of Mont St Michel and the Demon Cat of Losanne (Andre de Coutances tells us that Arthur was really vanquished and carried off by the Cat, but that one durst not tell that tale before Britons!).

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  • About 115 or r20 the northern Britons rose in revolt and destroyed the Ninth Legion, posted at York, which would bear the brunt of any northern trouble.

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  • The coherent civilization of the Romans was accepted by the Britons, as it was by the Gauls, with something like enthusiasm.

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  • Romanized Britons must now have begun to be numerous.

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  • According to Gildas it was for protection against these incursions that the Britons decided to call in the Saxons.

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  • Their allies soon obtained a decisive victory; but subsequently they turned their arms against the Britons themselves, alleging that they had not received sufficient payment for their services.

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  • Eventually, however, they overcame the Britons through treachery, by inducing the king to allow them to send for large bodies of their own countrymen.

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  • Bede declares that Oswald ruled over "all the peoples and provinces of Britain, which includes four languages, those of the Britons, Picts, Scots and Angles."

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  • The Britons and Irish, whose remoteness made them free from restriction, developed still more decided individuality.

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  • We may note with interest that the three great iron producers so closely related by blood-Great Britain, the United States and Germany and Luxemburg-made in 1907 81% of the world's pig iron and 83% of its steel; and that the four great processes by which nearly all steel and wrought iron are made-the puddling, crucible and both the acid and basic varieties of the Bessemer and open-hearth processes, as well as the steam-hammer and grooved rolls for rolling iron and steel-were invented by Britons, though in the case of the openhearth process Great Britain must share with France the credit of the invention.

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  • It appears in several variant forms (brytenwalda, bretenanwealda, &c.), and means most probably "lord of the Britons" or "lord of Britain"; for although the derivation of the word is uncertain, its earlier syllable seems to be cognate with the words Briton and Britannia.

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  • Another theory is that Bretwalda refers to a war-leadership, or imperium, over the English south of the Humber, and has nothing to do with Britons or Britannia.

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  • Cynric defeated the Britons at Salisbury in 552 and again in conjunction with his son Ceawlin at Beranburh, probably Barbury Hill, in 55 6.

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  • 2.) In accordance with tradition this has been thought to mark the burial-place of Catigern, who was slain here in a battle between the Britons and Saxons in A.D.

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  • Among the Persians, again, and more remarkably among the ancient Britons, there was a class of chariot having the wheels mounted with sharp, sickle-shaped blades, which cut to pieces whatever came in their way.

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  • Ludlow is supposed to have existed under the name of Dinan in the time of the Britons.

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  • According to Strabo (p. 200) the Britons also bred dogs well adapted for hunting purposes.

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  • Saffron Walden (Waledana) was almost certainly fortified by the Britons, and probably by some earlier race.

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  • VORTIGERN (GUORTHIGIRNUS, WYRTGEORN), king of the Britons at the time of the arrival of the Saxons under Hengest and Horsa.

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  • Later we find the Britons at war with the new-comers, now established in Kent, and four battles are fought, in the last of which, according to the Historia Brittonum, the king's son Vortemir, their leading opponent, is slain.

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  • This war may have been due partly to Æthelfrith's persecution of Edwin, but it had a strategic importance in the separation of the North Welsh from the Strathclyde Britons.

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  • London first, and then Verulam, were abandoned to the Britons.

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  • Welsh, the Celtic language spoken by the ancient Britons (see Celt: Language), is the domestic tongue of the majority of the inhabitants of the Principality.

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  • 593), king of the West Saxons, first mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 556 as fighting with his father Cynric against the Britons at the battle of Beranbyrig or Barbury Hill.

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  • Uriconium, a town near the Wrekin, and Pengwyrn, the modern Shrewsbury, were destroyed; but soon Ceawlin was defeated by the Britons at Fethanleag or Faddiley, near Nantwich, and his progress was effectually checked.

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  • The population of the north shore of the Solway Firth at the beginning of the 5th century were probably either Picts or Goidels or a blend of both, and naturally hostile to the Romanized Britons.

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  • By the Britons the spot seems to have been called Ynys yr Afalon (latinized as Avallonia) or Ynysvitrin (see Avalon), and it became the local habitation of various fragments of Celtic romance.

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  • The Alcluith ("hill of the Clyde")- of the Britons, and Dunbreatan ("fort of the Britons") of the Celts, it was the capital of the district of Strathclyde.

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  • According to the Scalacronica of Sir Thomas Gray he drove the Angles and Britons over the Tweed, reduced the land as far as that river, and first called his kingdom Scotland.

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  • Gildas, writing in the 6th century, speaks of the twentyeight cities of the Britons.

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  • The Britons burnt the Roman municipalities of Verulam and Colchester, the mart of London, and several military posts, massacred "over 70,000" Romans and Britons friendly to Rome, and almost annihilated the Ninth Legion marching from Lincoln to the rescue.

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  • At last Paulinus, who seems to have rejoined his army, met the Britons in the field.

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  • Boadicea took poison; thousands of Britons fell in the fight or were hunted down in the ensuing guerrilla.

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  • The great magazine was gallantly defended for a time by nine Britons under Lieutenant Willoughby, and was blown up by them when all hope of relief had vanished.

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  • But even before he could arrive, the outspread of the Mutiny had already been checked by the gallantry and skill of a mere handful of Britons and their faithful native allies.

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  • AMBROSIUS AURELIANUS, leader of the Britons against the Saxons in the 5th century, was, according to the legends preserved in Gildas and the Historia Brittonum, of Roman extraction.

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  • In S71 Cuthwulf inflicted a severe defeat on the Britons at Bedford and took four towns.

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  • ~thelfrith, the last heathen among the Northumbrian kings, cut off the Britons of the North from those of the West, by winning the battle of Chester (AD.

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  • The coracle forms a unique link between the modern life of Wales and its remote past; for this primitive type of boat was in existence amongst the Britons at the time of the invasion of Julius Caesar, who has left a description of it, and even employed it in his Spanish campaign.

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  • The latter was driven out of the country by Domnall, whereupon Congal collected an army of foreign adventurers made up of Saxons, Dalriadic Scots, Britons and Picts to regain his lands and to avenge himself on the high-king.

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  • He was deputed by a synod of the church in Wessex to remonstrate with the Britons of Domnonia (Devon and Cornwall) on their differences from the Roman practice in the shape of the tonsure and the date of Easter.

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  • The letter to Geraint, king of Domnonia, was supposed to have been destroyed by the Britons (W.

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  • Napoleon on his side required Persia to declare war against Great Britain, to expel all Britons from her territory, and to come to an understanding with the Afghans with a view to a joint Franco-Perso-Afghan invasion of India.

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  • The shah, however, promised to expel Britons and to grant to France a commercial treaty.

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  • The new gold rush Expat South Africans and Britons alike have been quick to capitalize on the weak rand.

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  • Gildas chastens his fellow Britons for rebellions that he regards as sinful.

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  • Why would you want to start a thread about worst Britons?

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  • For these reasons, almost three-quarters of Britons are now prepared to buy a home that needs major renovations.

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  • Britons begin to learn Latin and wear togas Approx 79 AD.

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  • Soap The Romans are famous for their baths, but the Britons washed with soap long before the Romans did !

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  • Classical authors have written about tattoos used by the Thracians, Greeks, Romans, ancient Germans, ancient Celts, and ancient Britons.

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  • Isatis - A small group of perennials, with little garden value; the Dyers Woad, a native plant (Isatis tinctoria) is interesting as yielding the blue dye with which the ancient Britons painted their bodies.

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  • Prior to that prim reign, Britons had enjoyed masquerade balls like their Italian friends.

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  • He succeeded in making the majority of the Britons, Picts and Scots tributary to him.

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