This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

brine

brine

brine Sentence Examples

  • In the neighbourhood are brine springs and a spa (Wilhelmsbad).

    28
    17
  • In the neighbourhood are brine springs and a spa (Wilhelmsbad).

    27
    17
  • Many brine springs also occur in a more or less saturated condition.

    15
    11
  • Salt, in the form of brine, is sometimes present in coal.

    9
    7
  • One difference between the manufacture of salt from rock-salt brine as carried on in Britain and on the Continent lies in the use in the latter case of closed or covered pans, except in the making of fine salt, whereas in Britain open ones are employed.

    8
    4
  • One difference between the manufacture of salt from rock-salt brine as carried on in Britain and on the Continent lies in the use in the latter case of closed or covered pans, except in the making of fine salt, whereas in Britain open ones are employed.

    7
    4
  • Brine wells have been mentioned above; the salt industry is still carried on in Mason county, and in 1908 145,157 bbls.

    5
    6
  • At times sodium sulphate is added to the brine, producing sodium chloride and magnesium sulphate by double decomposition with the magnesium chloride.

    4
    2
  • The principal occupation is the manufacture of the salt obtained from the brine springs or wyches, to which the town probably owes both its name and its origin.

    4
    3
  • South America possesses several salt deposits and brine springs.

    4
    4
  • South America possesses several salt deposits and brine springs.

    4
    4
  • Owing to the pumping of the brine for the salt-works there is a continual subsidence of the ground, detrimental to the buildings, and new houses are mostly built in the suburbs.

    3
    3
  • A Roman villa, with various relics, has been discovered here, but it is doubtful how far the Romans made use of the brine springs.

    3
    3
  • Its brine springs, known as early as the 15th century, are still frequented.

    3
    3
  • In Britain the brine is so pure that, keeping a small stream of it running into the pan to replace the losses by evaporation and the removal of the salt, it is only necessary occasionally (not often) to reject the mother-liquor when at last it becomes too impure with magnesium chloride; but in some works the mother-liquor not only contains more of this impurity but becomes quite brown from organic matter on concentration, and totally unfit for further service after yielding but two or three crops of salt crystals.

    3
    3
  • Jn 1841 natural gas was found with salt brine in a well on the Kanawha, and was used as a fuel to evaporate the salt water.

    3
    4
  • Though this industry has lapsed, there are brine baths, much used in cases of rheumatism, gout and general debility, and the former private mansion of Shrewbridge Hall is converted into a hotel with a spa.

    3
    4
  • 69-79) the distinctive 2 " The soil of this marsh [east of Palmyra] is so impregnated with salt that a trench or pit sunk in it becomes filled in a short time with concentrated brine, the water of which evaporates in the intense sunshine and leaves an incrustation of excellent salt."

    3
    4
  • the artesian well system previously adopted for obtaining brine and water.

    3
    4
  • There are Royal Brine baths, supplied with water of extreme saltness, St Andrew's baths, and a private bath hospital.

    3
    4
  • Reichenhall is the centre of the four chief Bavarian salt-works, which are connected with each other by brine conduits having an aggregate length of 60 m.

    3
    4
  • Reichenhall is the centre of the four chief Bavarian salt-works, which are connected with each other by brine conduits having an aggregate length of 60 m.

    3
    4
  • The brine conduit to Traunstein dates from 1618.

    2
    2
  • The freezing is effected by circulating brine (calcium chloride solution) cooled to 5° F.

    2
    2
  • The chilled brine enters through a central tube of small diameter, passes to the bottom of the outer one and rises through the latter to the surface, each system of tubes being connected above by a ring main with the circulating pumps.

    2
    2
  • The place is resorted to for its salt, mud and brine baths, and its koumiss cures.

    2
    2
  • C'est par elle que notre philosophie, nos lettres et nos arts ont brine d'un si vif eclat; c'est par elle que notre influence morale s'est exercee en souveraine dans le monde.

    2
    2
  • Antimony, quicksilver, stone, marble, slate and potter's clay are also worked, and there are brine springs in the Hellweg and mineral springs at Lippspringe, Oynhausen, &c.

    2
    2
  • Owing to the pumping of the brine, large tracts of land have been submerged, and there is thus a constant danger to houses.

    2
    2
  • It is much frequented as a health and summer resort, and has a variety of lake, brine, vegetable and pine-cone baths, a hydropathic establishment, inhalation chambers, whey cure, &c. There are a great number of excursions and points of interest round Gmunden, specially worth mentioning being the Traun Fall, 10 m.

    2
    2
  • In the former case it is often difficult to obtain the brine at a density even approaching saturation, and chambers and galleries are sometimes excavated within the saliferous beds to increase the dissolving surface, and water let down fresh is pumped up as brine.

    2
    2
  • Sometimes, to get rid of these impurities, the brine is treated in a large tub-`(bessoir) with lime; on settling it becomes clear and colourless, but the dissolved lime forms a skin on its surface in the pan, retards the evaporation and impedes the crystallization.

    2
    2
  • The brine springs of Reichenhall are mentioned in a document of the 8th century and were perhaps known to the Romans; but almost all trace of antiquity of the town was destroyed by a conflagration in 1834.

    1
    1
  • Among other things Hales invented a "sea-gauge" for sounding, and processes for distilling fresh from sea water, for preserving corn from weevils by fumigation with brimstone, and for salting animals whole by passing brine into their arteries.

    1
    1
  • It distils salt from the brine of Reichenhall, whence (22 m.

    1
    1
  • The best known mineral springs are the alkaline springs of Rohitsch and Gleichenberg, the brine springs of Aussee, and the thermal springs of Tiiffer, Neuhaus and Tobelbad.

    1
    1
  • During the rapid formation of ice the still unfrozen brine is often imprisoned between the little plates of frozen water; hence without some special treatment sea-ice is not suitable as a source of drinking water.

    1
    1
  • After long continued frost the last of the included brine may be frozen and the salts driven out in crystals on the surface; these crystals are known to polar explorers by the Siberian name of rassol.

    1
    1
  • The brine is cooled in a tank filled with spiral pipes, in which anhydrous ammonia, previously liquefied by compression, is vaporized in vacuo at the atmospheric temperature by the sensible heat of the returncurrent of brine, whose temperature has been slightly raised in its passage through the circulating tubes.

    1
    1
  • The solubility of the gas in various liquids, as given by different observers, is zoo Volumes of Brine Water Alcohol Paraffin Carbon disulphide Fusel oil Benzene Chloroform Acetic acid Acetone It will be seen from this table that where it is desired to collect and keep acetylene over a liquid, brine, i.e.

    1
    1
  • The state sank wells and built and maintained tanks from which brine was delivered to lessees.

    1
    1
  • The salinometer is a hydrometer originally intended to indicate the strength of the brine in marine boilers in which sea-water is employed.

    1
    1
  • Its brine springs, with a hydropathic establishment attached, are specific in cases of gout, obesity and liver disorders.

    1
    1
  • The province contains scarcely any salt or brine springs, but there are well-known mineral springs at Warmbrunn, Salzbrunn and several other places.

    1
    1
  • It has saline and sulphureous drinking springs and numerous brine and brine-vapour baths.

    1
    1
  • The brine used at Ischl contains about 25% of salt and there are also mud, sulphur and pine-cone baths.

    1
    1
  • There are brine baths supplied from wells near Middlesbrough, a pier, gardens and promenades.

    1
    1
  • Salt is obtained on a large scale partly from brine springs and partly from mines, the principal centres being Halle, Berchtesgaden, Traunstein and Rosenheirn.

    1
    1
  • Oil and gas are of importance in the Lower Carboniferous Pocono sandstone of West Virginia and in the Berea grit of Ohio, where brine also occurs.

    1
    1
  • With the exception of sealskins, which are pickled in brine, all raw skins come to the various trade markets simply dried like this.

    1
    1
  • In northern Russia and in Siberia sea water is concentrated by freezing, the ice which separates containing little salt; the brine is then boiled down when an impure sea salt is deposited.

    1
    1
  • The mineral occurs generally in lenticular deposits, which may reach a thickness of more than loo ft.; but it is mined only to a limited extent, most of the salt being obtained from brine springs and wells which derive their saline character from deposits of salts.

    1
    1
  • Much salt is obtained from north Lancashire, as also from the brine pits of Staffordshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire, Durham and the Isle of Man (Point of Ayre).

    1
    1
  • Although brine springs have been known to exist in both these counties ever since the Roman occupation, and salt had been made there from time immemorial, it was not till 1670 that rock-salt about 30 yds.

    1
    1
  • This is the brine which is raised at the various pumping stations in Northwich and elsewhere around, and which serves to produce white salt.

    1
    1
  • In Cheshire the surface-water trickling through the overlying strata dissolves the salt, which is subsequently pumped as brine, but at Middlesbrough the great depth and impermeability of the strata precludes this, so another method has been resorted to.

    1
    1
  • Through this space the fresh surface water finds its way, and dissolving the salt below rises in the inner tube as brine, but only to such a level that the two columns bear to one another the relation of ten to twelve, this being the inverse ratio of the respective weights of saturated brine and fresh water.

    1
    1
  • For the remaining distance the brine is raised by a pump. The fresh water, however, as it descends rises to the surface of the salt, tending rather to dissolve its upper layers and extend superficially, so that after a time the superincumbent soil, being without support, falls in.

    1
    1
  • The purer rock-salt is often simply ground for use, as at Wieliczka and elsewhere, but it is more frequently pumped as brine, produced either by artificial solution as at Middlesbrough and other places, or by natural means, as in Cheshire and Worcestershire.

    1
    1
  • A slight degree of acidity seems more favourable to the crystallization of salt than alkalinity; thus it is a practice to add a certain amount of alum, 2 to 12 lb per pan of brine, especially when, as in fishery salt, fine crystals are required.

    1
    1
  • Among other things Hales invented a "sea-gauge" for sounding, and processes for distilling fresh from sea water, for preserving corn from weevils by fumigation with brimstone, and for salting animals whole by passing brine into their arteries.

    1
    1
  • Much salt is obtained from north Lancashire, as also from the brine pits of Staffordshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire, Durham and the Isle of Man (Point of Ayre).

    1
    1
  • A slight degree of acidity seems more favourable to the crystallization of salt than alkalinity; thus it is a practice to add a certain amount of alum, 2 to 12 lb per pan of brine, especially when, as in fishery salt, fine crystals are required.

    1
    1
  • In 1771 Thomas Jefferson described a " burning spring " in the Kanawha Valley, and when wells were drilled for salt brine near Charleston petroleum and natural gas were found here before there was any drilling for oil in Pennsylvania.

    1
    2
  • The chief interest of the place centres in its brine springs which are largely impregnated with carbonic acid gas and oxide of iron, and are efficacious in chronic catarrh of the respiratory organs, in liver and stomach disorders and women's diseases.

    1
    2
  • Either common salt or strong brine in measured quantity is added to the charge, and, the soap being insoluble in such salt solution, a separation of constituents takes place: the soap collects on the surface in an open granular condition, and the spent lye sinks to the bottom after it has been left for a short time to settle.

    1
    2
  • A brine spring (Soolquelle) at the foot of the neighbouring Domberg is said to have given name to the town.

    1
    2
  • The surplus brine of Berchtesgaden is conducted to Reichenhall, and thence, in increased volume, to Traunstein and Rosenheim, which possess larger supplies of timber for use as fuel in the process of boiling.

    1
    2
  • The term 1 is not limited to underground operations, but includes also surface excavations, as in placer mining and open-air workings of coal and ore deposits by methods similar to quarrying, and boring operations for oil, natural gas or brine.

    0
    0
  • Methylamine, CH 3 NH 2, occurs in Mercurialis perennis, in bone-oil, and herring brine.

    0
    0
  • Generally speaking this salt, which may contain up to 15% of impurities, goes into commerce just as it is, but in some cases it is taken first to the refinery, where it either is simply washed and then stove-dried before being sent out, or is dissolved in fresh water and then boiled down and crystallized like white salt from rock-salt brine.

    0
    0
  • Halite or rock-salt crystallizes in the cubic system, usually in cubes, rarely in octahedra; the cubes being solid, unlike the skeleton-cubes obtained by rapid evaporation of brine.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt is mined in several states, as New York, Kansas and Louisiana; but American salt is mostly obtained from brine.

    0
    0
  • in thickness (Marston 23-26 yds.); it has above it, apparently lying in the recesses of its surface, a layer of saturated brine.

    0
    0
  • The brine used in the salt manufacture in England is very nearly saturated, containing 25 or 26% of sodium chloride, the utmost water can take up being 27%; and it ranges from 38 to 42 oz.

    0
    0
  • In some other countries the brine has to be concentrated before use.

    0
    0
  • It is situated at the confluence of the Luckow with the Dniester and its principal resources are the recovery of salt from the neighbouring brine wells, soapmaking and the trade in timber.

    0
    0
  • The so-called "Norwegian anchovies" imported into England in little wooden kegs are nothing but sprats pickled in brine with bay-leaves and whole pepper.

    0
    0
  • AA, Tower; B, ammoniacal carbonate, which brine main; E, gas-inlet; Z, vacuum filter; always contains some V, pipe to air pump.

    0
    0
  • The sodium in the latter costs next to nothing, being obtained from natural or artificial brine in which the sodium chloride possesses an extremely slight value.

    0
    0
  • A nearly saturated solution of sodium chloride is obtained by purifying natural or artificial brine, i.e.

    0
    0
  • This is, however, not of much importance, as it had been introduced in the shape of a brine where its value is very slight (6d.

    0
    0
  • the green stalks of the plant preserved in brine.

    0
    0
  • The salt lakes in Rajputana have been leased by the government of India from the rulers of the native states in which they lie, and the huge salt deposits of the Salt Range Land mines are worked under government control, as also are the brine works on the Runn of Cutch.

    0
    0
  • Sodium hypochlorite can be prepared by the electrolysis of brine solution in the presence of carbon electrodes, having no diaphragm in the electrolytic cell, and mixing the anode and cathode products by agitating the liquid.

    0
    0
  • It possesses brine and carbonated springs, the Juliushall saline baths being about a mile to the south of the town, and a hydropathic establishment.

    0
    0
  • They cultivate rice, cotton, yams and Indian corn, and prepare salt from the brine springs in their hills.

    0
    0
  • In 1880 he was married to Elizabeth Brine, daughter of Isaac Brine, timber merchant.

    0
    0
  • This salt, insoluble in water but soluble in brine, also acts upon argentite (Ag 2 S-+-Cu 2 C1 2 =2AgC1±-CuS±-Cu) and pyrargyrite (2Ag 3 SbS 3 -I-Cu 2 C12 = 2AgC1 +Ag 2 S +2Ag +2CuS +Sb2S3), and would give with silver sulphide in the presence of quicksilver, the Patioreaction; metallic silver, cupric sulphide, and mercurous chloride (2Ag 2 S+Cu 2 C1 2 +2Hg=4Ag+2CuS+Hg 2 C1 2), but the iron decomposes the quicksilver salt, setting free the quicksilver.

    0
    0
  • In the Cazo, Caldron or Hot process the pulverized silver ore is boiled in a copper-bottomed wooden vat, first with brine until the silver has been reduced by the copper, and then with quicksilver.

    0
    0
  • The steam-chest is not used to such an extent, as the bottom would be prematurely corroded; less water is used, as the pulp would become too thin on account of the soluble salts (sodium chloride, sulphate, &c.) going into solution; and the roasted ore is not ground, as the hot brine readily dissolves the silver chloride from the porous ore, and thus brings it into intimate contact with iron and quicksilver.

    0
    0
  • Sodium chloride, characteristic of the Augustin process in which the ores, after a chloridizing roast, were extracted with brine, and the silver precipitated by copper, has almost wholly fallen into disuse; and potassium cyanide, which has become a very important solvent for finely divided gold, is rarely used in leaching silver ores.

    0
    0
  • above the Caspian, the water of these streams is supposed to form saline deposits with a thin hard crust, beneath which the moisture is retained for a considerable time, thus producing those dangerous and slimy quagmires which in winter are covered with brine, in summer with a treacherous incrustation of salt.

    0
    0
  • GREAT SALT LAKE, a shallow body of highly concentrated brine in the N.W.

    0
    0
  • The large amount of salt in the water makes both fauna and flora of the lake scanty; there are a few algae, the larvae of an Ephydra and of a Tipula fly, specimens of what seems to be Corixa decolor, and in great quantities, so as to tint the surface of the water, the brine shrimp, Artemia salina (or gracilis or fertilis), notable biologically for the rarity of males, for the high degree of parthenogenesis and for apparent interchangeableness with the Branchipus.

    0
    0
  • The brine is pumped into conduits, carried to large ponds and there evaporated by the sun; during late years the salt has been refined here, being purified of the sulphates and magnesium compounds which formerly rendered it efflorescent and of a low commercial grade.

    0
    0
  • from the brine at a temperature between 30° and 20° F.

    0
    0
  • Iron is mined in the Oberland, and large quantities of salt are yielded by the brine springs of Heinrichshall.

    0
    0
  • Salt, obtained principally from brine but also as rock-salt, is an important object of industry in Cheshire, the output from that county and Staffordshire exceeding a million tons annually.

    0
    0
  • In Worcestershire, Durham and Yorkshire salt is also produced from brine.

    0
    0
  • Salt is obtained by solar evaporation chiefly of the waters of Great Salt Lake and other brine found in that vicinity; at Nephi City, Juab county; near Gunnison, Sanpete county; in Sevier and Millard counties, and at Withee Junction in Weber county.

    0
    0
  • It is well known as a health resort, for the grape cure and for the baths of the brine springs of Philippshalle, in the neighbourhood, which not only supply the bathing establishment, but produce considerable quantities of marketable salt.

    0
    0
  • The salt-springs attracted the first permanent settlers to the site of Lincoln in 1856, and settlers and freighters came long distances to reduce the brine or to scrape up the dry-weather surface deposits.

    0
    0
  • The beds, which are exploited by the brine method at Hutchinson, at Ellsworth (Ellsworth county), at Anthony (Harper county) and at Sterling (Rice county), lie from 400 to 1200 ft.

    0
    0
  • In its narrow and irregular streets many of the houses are strongly bolted to keep them secure from the subsidences which result not infrequently from the pumping of brine.

    0
    0
  • Both rock salt and white salt obtained by evaporation from brine are exported.

    0
    0
  • Its industries include the manufacture of sugar, cigars and buttons, and there are brine springs, with baths, in the vicinity.

    0
    0
  • Since the close of the Cretaceous period the Bohemian massif has remained above the sea; but the depression which lies immediately outside the Carpathian chain has at times been covered by an arm of the sea and at other times has been occupied by a chain of salt lakes, to which the salt deposits of Wieliczka and numerous brine springs owe their origin.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist of currants, sultanas, valonea, tobacco, olive oil, olives in brine, figs, citrons, wine, brandy, cocoons, and lamb, goat, and kid skins.

    0
    0
  • Rosenheim is frequented for its saline and sulphur baths, and there are important saltworks, the brine being conveyed from Reichenhall in pipes; it has also machine factories, metalworks and breweries.

    0
    0
  • Outside the refrigerator coils is the air, brine or other substance to be cooled, and outside the condenser is the cooling medium, which, as previously stated, is generally water.

    0
    0
  • brine or other substance it is desiredto cool.

    0
    0
  • Some of the results obtained by Schroeter in 1893 with an ordinary brine cooling machine on the Linde ammonia system are given in Table VI.: - TABLE VI.

    0
    0
  • With liquid machines of the compression and absorption system, the rooms are either cooled by means of cold pipes or surfaces placed in them, or by a circulation of air cooled in an apparatus separated from the rooms. The cold pipes may be direct-expansion pipes in which the liquid evaporates, or they may be pipes or walls through which circulates an uncongealable brine previously cooled to the desired temperature.

    0
    0
  • In some coolers the cooling surfaces consist of direct-expansion pipes placed in clusters of convenient form; in others brine pipes are used; in others there is a shower of cold brine, and in some cases combinations of cold pipes and brine showers.

    0
    0
  • or terned steel moulds suspended in a tank filled to the proper level with brine maintained at the desired temperature.

    0
    0
  • in width, through which cold brine is circulated by a pump. They are placed vertically in a tank, the distance between them being from 8 to 14 in., according to the thickness of the ice to be produced.

    0
    0
  • To thaw it off, warm brine is circulated through the cells.

    0
    0
  • In such cases the evaporation of the ammonia or other refrigerating liquid frequently takes place in the cells themselves, brine being dispensed with.

    0
    0
  • or more, according to the number of passengers carried, and they are generally cooled by means of brine pipes, though direct expansion and air circulation are sometimes adopted.

    0
    0
  • The holds of meat-carrying vessels are refrigerated either by cold air circulation or by brine pipes.

    0
    0
  • Brine, The Taeping Rebellion in China (1862); A.

    0
    0
  • The chief rock-salt mines and brine springs are at Stassfurt, Schonebeck and Halle.

    0
    0
  • There was a small bathhouse there for people to have a brine bath.

    0
    0
  • However, to produce white salt, a different process of evaporating brine is employed.

    0
    0
  • It was probably made by boiling brine to dryness on a small scale in many places.

    0
    0
  • Appendix on handling emulsions, e.g. breaking up an emulsion by adding saturated brine.

    0
    0
  • They are highly saline, as they grow from a thin layer of concentrated brine that forms above the sea ice.

    0
    0
  • The pan would have been used to evaporate natural brine to produce salt, which was important to the Romans as a food preservative.

    0
    0
  • hot brine from the geothermal well today provides only 18% of the total district heating mix.

    0
    0
  • Amber can float in strong brine, but not sea water.

    0
    0
  • brine shrimp embryo also requires less energy to break through a hatching membrane than a thick outer shell.

    0
    0
  • brine shrimp nauplii take a look at your fry.

    0
    0
  • brine pits associated with salt production.

    0
    0
  • brine bath.

    0
    0
  • brine channel distribution in young sea ice.

    0
    0
  • brine solution deep underground which is then pumped out.

    0
    0
  • baby brine shrimp would also be a welcome addition.

    0
    0
  • Not all the way, with the salt brine.

    0
    0
  • After about three weeks or so, the fry can be weaned onto frozen adult brine shrimp and crushed flake food.

    0
    0
  • brine in large pans.

    0
    0
  • brine Finance Group is a more specialized group brining together those involved in student finance to share ideas.

    0
    0
  • brine shrimp that sea monkeys really are.

    0
    0
  • These can be easily raised in newly hatched brine shrimp, powdered flake, and small daphnia and other pond foods.

    0
    0
  • This inspirational list of amazing sea monkey facts will help you love the brine shrimp that sea monkeys really are.

    0
    0
  • Feedings should include live brine shrimp, frozen food, algae and the traditional flakes.

    0
    0
  • frozen brine shrimp is a decent substitute for the live version.

    0
    0
  • live brine shrimp are fed spirulina prior to cryogenic freezing.

    0
    0
  • brine shrimp nauplii take a look at your fry.

    0
    0
  • baby brine shrimp would also be a welcome addition.

    0
    0
  • After about three weeks or so, the fry can be weaned onto frozen adult brine shrimp and crushed flake food.

    0
    0
  • canning in brine (salty water ), spring water, tomato sauce or oil.

    0
    0
  • evaporate, to produce white salt, a different process of evaporating brine is employed.

    0
    0
  • immersion in a brine bath.

    0
    0
  • naupliusyou've fed some brine shrimp nauplii take a look at your fry.

    0
    0
  • naupliusyou've fed some brine shrimp nauplii take a look at your fry.

    0
    0
  • peppercorns in brine are available in tins or bottles from good grocers and delicatessens.

    0
    0
  • Soak the chillies in brine first then pickle in vinegar.

    0
    0
  • The pore fluid may be brine, which is electrically conductive, or hydrocarbons which are electrically resistive.

    0
    0
  • To obtain the washed rind they must be rinsed in brine at regular intervals.

    0
    0
  • These pumps which were like giant seesaws had a bucket on the end which would be dipped into the Forth and filled with brine.

    0
    0
  • frozen brine shrimp is a decent substitute for the live version.

    0
    0
  • The brine shrimp embryo also requires less energy to break through a hatching membrane than a thick outer shell.

    0
    0
  • soaked in brine or processed.

    0
    0
  • domestic water softeners regenerated with brine produce water containing an increased concentration of sodium.

    0
    0
  • domestic water softeners regenerated with brine produce water containing an increased concentration of sodium.

    0
    0
  • In 1771 Thomas Jefferson described a " burning spring " in the Kanawha Valley, and when wells were drilled for salt brine near Charleston petroleum and natural gas were found here before there was any drilling for oil in Pennsylvania.

    0
    0
  • Jn 1841 natural gas was found with salt brine in a well on the Kanawha, and was used as a fuel to evaporate the salt water.

    0
    0
  • Brine wells have been mentioned above; the salt industry is still carried on in Mason county, and in 1908 145,157 bbls.

    0
    0
  • Though this industry has lapsed, there are brine baths, much used in cases of rheumatism, gout and general debility, and the former private mansion of Shrewbridge Hall is converted into a hotel with a spa.

    0
    0
  • After 1900 the production of salt rapidly increased up to 1906, when it was 11,249 bbls.; in 1907 it was only 6457 bbls., all graded as " common coarse " and all obtained by solar evaporation from brine.

    0
    0
  • The chief interest of the place centres in its brine springs which are largely impregnated with carbonic acid gas and oxide of iron, and are efficacious in chronic catarrh of the respiratory organs, in liver and stomach disorders and women's diseases.

    0
    0
  • 69-79) the distinctive 2 " The soil of this marsh [east of Palmyra] is so impregnated with salt that a trench or pit sunk in it becomes filled in a short time with concentrated brine, the water of which evaporates in the intense sunshine and leaves an incrustation of excellent salt."

    0
    0
  • the artesian well system previously adopted for obtaining brine and water.

    0
    0
  • Either common salt or strong brine in measured quantity is added to the charge, and, the soap being insoluble in such salt solution, a separation of constituents takes place: the soap collects on the surface in an open granular condition, and the spent lye sinks to the bottom after it has been left for a short time to settle.

    0
    0
  • The principal occupation is the manufacture of the salt obtained from the brine springs or wyches, to which the town probably owes both its name and its origin.

    0
    0
  • There are Royal Brine baths, supplied with water of extreme saltness, St Andrew's baths, and a private bath hospital.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the pumping of the brine for the salt-works there is a continual subsidence of the ground, detrimental to the buildings, and new houses are mostly built in the suburbs.

    0
    0
  • A Roman villa, with various relics, has been discovered here, but it is doubtful how far the Romans made use of the brine springs.

    0
    0
  • A brine spring (Soolquelle) at the foot of the neighbouring Domberg is said to have given name to the town.

    0
    0
  • The term 1 is not limited to underground operations, but includes also surface excavations, as in placer mining and open-air workings of coal and ore deposits by methods similar to quarrying, and boring operations for oil, natural gas or brine.

    0
    0
  • Methylamine, CH 3 NH 2, occurs in Mercurialis perennis, in bone-oil, and herring brine.

    0
    0
  • The surplus brine of Berchtesgaden is conducted to Reichenhall, and thence, in increased volume, to Traunstein and Rosenheim, which possess larger supplies of timber for use as fuel in the process of boiling.

    0
    0
  • The brine springs of Reichenhall are mentioned in a document of the 8th century and were perhaps known to the Romans; but almost all trace of antiquity of the town was destroyed by a conflagration in 1834.

    0
    0
  • The brine conduit to Traunstein dates from 1618.

    0
    0
  • It distils salt from the brine of Reichenhall, whence (22 m.

    0
    0
  • The best known mineral springs are the alkaline springs of Rohitsch and Gleichenberg, the brine springs of Aussee, and the thermal springs of Tiiffer, Neuhaus and Tobelbad.

    0
    0
  • During the rapid formation of ice the still unfrozen brine is often imprisoned between the little plates of frozen water; hence without some special treatment sea-ice is not suitable as a source of drinking water.

    0
    0
  • After long continued frost the last of the included brine may be frozen and the salts driven out in crystals on the surface; these crystals are known to polar explorers by the Siberian name of rassol.

    0
    0
  • Salt, in the form of brine, is sometimes present in coal.

    0
    0
  • The freezing is effected by circulating brine (calcium chloride solution) cooled to 5° F.

    0
    0
  • The chilled brine enters through a central tube of small diameter, passes to the bottom of the outer one and rises through the latter to the surface, each system of tubes being connected above by a ring main with the circulating pumps.

    0
    0
  • The brine is cooled in a tank filled with spiral pipes, in which anhydrous ammonia, previously liquefied by compression, is vaporized in vacuo at the atmospheric temperature by the sensible heat of the returncurrent of brine, whose temperature has been slightly raised in its passage through the circulating tubes.

    0
    0
  • The solubility of the gas in various liquids, as given by different observers, is zoo Volumes of Brine Water Alcohol Paraffin Carbon disulphide Fusel oil Benzene Chloroform Acetic acid Acetone It will be seen from this table that where it is desired to collect and keep acetylene over a liquid, brine, i.e.

    0
    0
  • The place is resorted to for its salt, mud and brine baths, and its koumiss cures.

    0
    0
  • C'est par elle que notre philosophie, nos lettres et nos arts ont brine d'un si vif eclat; c'est par elle que notre influence morale s'est exercee en souveraine dans le monde.

    0
    0
  • Antimony, quicksilver, stone, marble, slate and potter's clay are also worked, and there are brine springs in the Hellweg and mineral springs at Lippspringe, Oynhausen, &c.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the pumping of the brine, large tracts of land have been submerged, and there is thus a constant danger to houses.

    0
    0
  • The state sank wells and built and maintained tanks from which brine was delivered to lessees.

    0
    0
  • The salinometer is a hydrometer originally intended to indicate the strength of the brine in marine boilers in which sea-water is employed.

    0
    0
  • Its brine springs, with a hydropathic establishment attached, are specific in cases of gout, obesity and liver disorders.

    0
    0
  • The province contains scarcely any salt or brine springs, but there are well-known mineral springs at Warmbrunn, Salzbrunn and several other places.

    0
    0
  • It has saline and sulphureous drinking springs and numerous brine and brine-vapour baths.

    0
    0
  • The brine used at Ischl contains about 25% of salt and there are also mud, sulphur and pine-cone baths.

    0
    0
  • There are brine baths supplied from wells near Middlesbrough, a pier, gardens and promenades.

    0
    0
  • It is much frequented as a health and summer resort, and has a variety of lake, brine, vegetable and pine-cone baths, a hydropathic establishment, inhalation chambers, whey cure, &c. There are a great number of excursions and points of interest round Gmunden, specially worth mentioning being the Traun Fall, 10 m.

    0
    0
  • Salt is obtained on a large scale partly from brine springs and partly from mines, the principal centres being Halle, Berchtesgaden, Traunstein and Rosenheirn.

    0
    0
  • Oil and gas are of importance in the Lower Carboniferous Pocono sandstone of West Virginia and in the Berea grit of Ohio, where brine also occurs.

    0
    0
  • With the exception of sealskins, which are pickled in brine, all raw skins come to the various trade markets simply dried like this.

    0
    0
  • Its brine springs, known as early as the 15th century, are still frequented.

    0
    0
  • Generally speaking this salt, which may contain up to 15% of impurities, goes into commerce just as it is, but in some cases it is taken first to the refinery, where it either is simply washed and then stove-dried before being sent out, or is dissolved in fresh water and then boiled down and crystallized like white salt from rock-salt brine.

    0
    0
  • In northern Russia and in Siberia sea water is concentrated by freezing, the ice which separates containing little salt; the brine is then boiled down when an impure sea salt is deposited.

    0
    0
  • Halite or rock-salt crystallizes in the cubic system, usually in cubes, rarely in octahedra; the cubes being solid, unlike the skeleton-cubes obtained by rapid evaporation of brine.

    0
    0
  • The mineral occurs generally in lenticular deposits, which may reach a thickness of more than loo ft.; but it is mined only to a limited extent, most of the salt being obtained from brine springs and wells which derive their saline character from deposits of salts.

    0
    0
  • Rock-salt is mined in several states, as New York, Kansas and Louisiana; but American salt is mostly obtained from brine.

    0
    0
  • Although brine springs have been known to exist in both these counties ever since the Roman occupation, and salt had been made there from time immemorial, it was not till 1670 that rock-salt about 30 yds.

    0
    0
  • in thickness (Marston 23-26 yds.); it has above it, apparently lying in the recesses of its surface, a layer of saturated brine.

    0
    0
  • This is the brine which is raised at the various pumping stations in Northwich and elsewhere around, and which serves to produce white salt.

    0
    0
  • In Cheshire the surface-water trickling through the overlying strata dissolves the salt, which is subsequently pumped as brine, but at Middlesbrough the great depth and impermeability of the strata precludes this, so another method has been resorted to.

    0
    0
  • Through this space the fresh surface water finds its way, and dissolving the salt below rises in the inner tube as brine, but only to such a level that the two columns bear to one another the relation of ten to twelve, this being the inverse ratio of the respective weights of saturated brine and fresh water.

    0
    0
  • For the remaining distance the brine is raised by a pump. The fresh water, however, as it descends rises to the surface of the salt, tending rather to dissolve its upper layers and extend superficially, so that after a time the superincumbent soil, being without support, falls in.

    0
    0
  • In the United States extensive deposits and brine springs are worked, and also incrustations (see above).

    0
    0
  • In the former case it is often difficult to obtain the brine at a density even approaching saturation, and chambers and galleries are sometimes excavated within the saliferous beds to increase the dissolving surface, and water let down fresh is pumped up as brine.

    0
    0
  • Many brine springs also occur in a more or less saturated condition.

    0
    0
  • The purer rock-salt is often simply ground for use, as at Wieliczka and elsewhere, but it is more frequently pumped as brine, produced either by artificial solution as at Middlesbrough and other places, or by natural means, as in Cheshire and Worcestershire.

    0
    0
  • In Britain the brine is so pure that, keeping a small stream of it running into the pan to replace the losses by evaporation and the removal of the salt, it is only necessary occasionally (not often) to reject the mother-liquor when at last it becomes too impure with magnesium chloride; but in some works the mother-liquor not only contains more of this impurity but becomes quite brown from organic matter on concentration, and totally unfit for further service after yielding but two or three crops of salt crystals.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes, to get rid of these impurities, the brine is treated in a large tub-`(bessoir) with lime; on settling it becomes clear and colourless, but the dissolved lime forms a skin on its surface in the pan, retards the evaporation and impedes the crystallization.

    0
    0
  • At times sodium sulphate is added to the brine, producing sodium chloride and magnesium sulphate by double decomposition with the magnesium chloride.

    0
    0
  • The brine used in the salt manufacture in England is very nearly saturated, containing 25 or 26% of sodium chloride, the utmost water can take up being 27%; and it ranges from 38 to 42 oz.

    0
    0
  • In some other countries the brine has to be concentrated before use.

    0
    0
  • It is situated at the confluence of the Luckow with the Dniester and its principal resources are the recovery of salt from the neighbouring brine wells, soapmaking and the trade in timber.

    0
    0
  • The so-called "Norwegian anchovies" imported into England in little wooden kegs are nothing but sprats pickled in brine with bay-leaves and whole pepper.

    0
    0
  • AA, Tower; B, ammoniacal carbonate, which brine main; E, gas-inlet; Z, vacuum filter; always contains some V, pipe to air pump.

    0
    0
  • The sodium in the latter costs next to nothing, being obtained from natural or artificial brine in which the sodium chloride possesses an extremely slight value.

    0
    0
  • A nearly saturated solution of sodium chloride is obtained by purifying natural or artificial brine, i.e.

    0
    0
  • This is, however, not of much importance, as it had been introduced in the shape of a brine where its value is very slight (6d.

    0
    0
  • the green stalks of the plant preserved in brine.

    0
    0
  • The salt lakes in Rajputana have been leased by the government of India from the rulers of the native states in which they lie, and the huge salt deposits of the Salt Range Land mines are worked under government control, as also are the brine works on the Runn of Cutch.

    0
    0
  • Sodium hypochlorite can be prepared by the electrolysis of brine solution in the presence of carbon electrodes, having no diaphragm in the electrolytic cell, and mixing the anode and cathode products by agitating the liquid.

    0
    0
  • It possesses brine and carbonated springs, the Juliushall saline baths being about a mile to the south of the town, and a hydropathic establishment.

    0
    0
  • They cultivate rice, cotton, yams and Indian corn, and prepare salt from the brine springs in their hills.

    0
    0
  • In 1880 he was married to Elizabeth Brine, daughter of Isaac Brine, timber merchant.

    0
    0
  • This salt, insoluble in water but soluble in brine, also acts upon argentite (Ag 2 S-+-Cu 2 C1 2 =2AgC1±-CuS±-Cu) and pyrargyrite (2Ag 3 SbS 3 -I-Cu 2 C12 = 2AgC1 +Ag 2 S +2Ag +2CuS +Sb2S3), and would give with silver sulphide in the presence of quicksilver, the Patioreaction; metallic silver, cupric sulphide, and mercurous chloride (2Ag 2 S+Cu 2 C1 2 +2Hg=4Ag+2CuS+Hg 2 C1 2), but the iron decomposes the quicksilver salt, setting free the quicksilver.

    0
    0
  • In the Cazo, Caldron or Hot process the pulverized silver ore is boiled in a copper-bottomed wooden vat, first with brine until the silver has been reduced by the copper, and then with quicksilver.

    0
    0
  • Krohnke into Copiapo, Chile, in 1860, the silver mineral of the pulverized ore is decomposed in a revolving barrel by a hot solution of cuprous chloride in brine in the presence of zinc or lead and quicksilver (see B.

    0
    0
  • The steam-chest is not used to such an extent, as the bottom would be prematurely corroded; less water is used, as the pulp would become too thin on account of the soluble salts (sodium chloride, sulphate, &c.) going into solution; and the roasted ore is not ground, as the hot brine readily dissolves the silver chloride from the porous ore, and thus brings it into intimate contact with iron and quicksilver.

    0
    0
  • Sodium chloride, characteristic of the Augustin process in which the ores, after a chloridizing roast, were extracted with brine, and the silver precipitated by copper, has almost wholly fallen into disuse; and potassium cyanide, which has become a very important solvent for finely divided gold, is rarely used in leaching silver ores.

    0
    0
  • above the Caspian, the water of these streams is supposed to form saline deposits with a thin hard crust, beneath which the moisture is retained for a considerable time, thus producing those dangerous and slimy quagmires which in winter are covered with brine, in summer with a treacherous incrustation of salt.

    0
    0
  • GREAT SALT LAKE, a shallow body of highly concentrated brine in the N.W.

    0
    0
  • The large amount of salt in the water makes both fauna and flora of the lake scanty; there are a few algae, the larvae of an Ephydra and of a Tipula fly, specimens of what seems to be Corixa decolor, and in great quantities, so as to tint the surface of the water, the brine shrimp, Artemia salina (or gracilis or fertilis), notable biologically for the rarity of males, for the high degree of parthenogenesis and for apparent interchangeableness with the Branchipus.

    0
    0
  • The brine is pumped into conduits, carried to large ponds and there evaporated by the sun; during late years the salt has been refined here, being purified of the sulphates and magnesium compounds which formerly rendered it efflorescent and of a low commercial grade.

    0
    0
  • from the brine at a temperature between 30° and 20° F.

    0
    0
  • Iron is mined in the Oberland, and large quantities of salt are yielded by the brine springs of Heinrichshall.

    0
    0
  • Salt, obtained principally from brine but also as rock-salt, is an important object of industry in Cheshire, the output from that county and Staffordshire exceeding a million tons annually.

    0
    0
  • In Worcestershire, Durham and Yorkshire salt is also produced from brine.

    0
    0
  • Salt is obtained by solar evaporation chiefly of the waters of Great Salt Lake and other brine found in that vicinity; at Nephi City, Juab county; near Gunnison, Sanpete county; in Sevier and Millard counties, and at Withee Junction in Weber county.

    0
    0
  • It is well known as a health resort, for the grape cure and for the baths of the brine springs of Philippshalle, in the neighbourhood, which not only supply the bathing establishment, but produce considerable quantities of marketable salt.

    0
    0
  • The salt-springs attracted the first permanent settlers to the site of Lincoln in 1856, and settlers and freighters came long distances to reduce the brine or to scrape up the dry-weather surface deposits.

    0
    0
  • The beds, which are exploited by the brine method at Hutchinson, at Ellsworth (Ellsworth county), at Anthony (Harper county) and at Sterling (Rice county), lie from 400 to 1200 ft.

    0
    0
  • In its narrow and irregular streets many of the houses are strongly bolted to keep them secure from the subsidences which result not infrequently from the pumping of brine.

    0
    0
  • Both rock salt and white salt obtained by evaporation from brine are exported.

    0
    0
  • Its industries include the manufacture of sugar, cigars and buttons, and there are brine springs, with baths, in the vicinity.

    0
    0
  • Since the close of the Cretaceous period the Bohemian massif has remained above the sea; but the depression which lies immediately outside the Carpathian chain has at times been covered by an arm of the sea and at other times has been occupied by a chain of salt lakes, to which the salt deposits of Wieliczka and numerous brine springs owe their origin.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist of currants, sultanas, valonea, tobacco, olive oil, olives in brine, figs, citrons, wine, brandy, cocoons, and lamb, goat, and kid skins.

    0
    0
  • Rosenheim is frequented for its saline and sulphur baths, and there are important saltworks, the brine being conveyed from Reichenhall in pipes; it has also machine factories, metalworks and breweries.

    0
    0
  • Outside the refrigerator coils is the air, brine or other substance to be cooled, and outside the condenser is the cooling medium, which, as previously stated, is generally water.

    0
    0
  • brine or other substance it is desiredto cool.

    0
    0
  • Some of the results obtained by Schroeter in 1893 with an ordinary brine cooling machine on the Linde ammonia system are given in Table VI.: - TABLE VI.

    0
    0
  • With liquid machines of the compression and absorption system, the rooms are either cooled by means of cold pipes or surfaces placed in them, or by a circulation of air cooled in an apparatus separated from the rooms. The cold pipes may be direct-expansion pipes in which the liquid evaporates, or they may be pipes or walls through which circulates an uncongealable brine previously cooled to the desired temperature.

    0
    0
  • In some coolers the cooling surfaces consist of direct-expansion pipes placed in clusters of convenient form; in others brine pipes are used; in others there is a shower of cold brine, and in some cases combinations of cold pipes and brine showers.

    0
    0
  • or terned steel moulds suspended in a tank filled to the proper level with brine maintained at the desired temperature.

    0
    0
  • in width, through which cold brine is circulated by a pump. They are placed vertically in a tank, the distance between them being from 8 to 14 in., according to the thickness of the ice to be produced.

    0
    0
  • To thaw it off, warm brine is circulated through the cells.

    0
    0
  • In such cases the evaporation of the ammonia or other refrigerating liquid frequently takes place in the cells themselves, brine being dispensed with.

    0
    0
  • or more, according to the number of passengers carried, and they are generally cooled by means of brine pipes, though direct expansion and air circulation are sometimes adopted.

    0
    0
  • The holds of meat-carrying vessels are refrigerated either by cold air circulation or by brine pipes.

    0
    0
  • Brine, The Taeping Rebellion in China (1862); A.

    0
    0
  • The chief rock-salt mines and brine springs are at Stassfurt, Schonebeck and Halle.

    0
    0
  • The pore fluid may be brine, which is electrically conductive, or hydrocarbons which are electrically resistive.

    0
    0
  • To obtain the washed rind they must be rinsed in brine at regular intervals.

    0
    0
  • These pumps which were like giant seesaws had a bucket on the end which would be dipped into the Forth and filled with brine.

    0
    0
  • They are peas, pure and simple, with no additives, and not soaked in brine or processed.

    0
    0
  • Domestic water softeners regenerated with brine produce water containing an increased concentration of sodium.

    0
    0
  • Brine Shrimp A X X X A X X X A X X Collected from FDA certified solar salt ponds.

    0
    0
  • The brine solidifies to become hydrogel, a highly porous solid substance.

    0
    0
  • Fresh cabbage is generally cut and then allowed to ferment in a brine for a period of time.

    0
    0
  • Pour the brine in a cooler and immerse the turkey overnight.

    0
    0
  • To remedy the situation, let the water/salt brine warm up a bit and proceed, taking care not to overdo the salt.

    0
    0
  • Making pickles at home can range from simple to difficult, with Alton Brown's pickling brine recipe falling in the middle.

    0
    0
  • Some recipes, such as the pickling brine, give viewers a chance to make seemingly ordinary foods right in their kitchen that have an extraordinary flavor..

    0
    0
  • Brown has explained that brine is really just a mixture of salt and water.

    0
    0
  • This base is the start of the spicy pickling brine recipe that gets such great reviews.

    0
    0
  • Alton Brown's pickling brine recipe is printed in many areas around the Internet, with Brown's permission.

    0
    0
  • The difference means a bubbling brine vs a flat one, so avoid the distilled water.

    0
    0
  • Using real pickling salt will make a big difference and keep your brine from going cloudy.

    0
    0
  • Add some hot banana peppers to the mix to spice up the original pickle brine a bit more.

    0
    0
  • Give Alton Brown's pickling brine a try and produce some homemade pickles that put the store bought variety to shame.

    0
    0
  • Cooking the perfect Thanksgiving turkey may seem daunting, but if you prepare the Alton Brown turkey brine, your bird will be the talk of the family gathering.

    0
    0
  • Brine is a mixture in which you soak turkey and other poultry or seafood-meats with low fat content-before cooking.

    0
    0
  • "Alton Brown Turkey Brine" is regarded as one of the tastiest brining recipes out there.

    0
    0
  • Prepare this in advance; when you are ready to cook the turkey, pour the brine into a large container or cooler along with the ice water.

    0
    0
  • Let it sit for eight to 16 hours, turning the bird at the halfway point.Remove the turkey from the brine and rinse it on the inside and outside with cold water and pat it dry with paper towels.

    0
    0
  • Brine turkey in a non-reactive container; avoid aluminum, garbage bags and other plastic containers that are not food grade.

    0
    0
  • Completely submerge the turkey in the brine; use a heavy plate to hold it down if it floats.

    0
    0
  • Discard brine after use and do not reuse.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →