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brilliant

brilliant

brilliant Sentence Examples

  • The stars were brilliant this evening.

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  • Dawn came slowly, followed by the brilliant blue sky of morning.

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  • You're perfect, brilliant, and beautiful.

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  • A brilliant flash of lightning made the furniture in their bedroom stand out in relief.

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  • Down the hall, the living room was lit up constantly with brilliant flashes of lightning.

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  • Nishani was not only brilliant, but she was fast in her work.

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  • The mother is a physician and a brilliant woman, he says.

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  • She'd seen how brilliant A'Ran's battles were.

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  • Another brilliant bolt of lightning ended in a deafening clap of thunder.

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  • When the children saw the trees all aglow with brilliant colors they clapped their hands and shouted for joy, and immediately began to pick great bunches to take home.

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  • The sun was brilliant, the pinks and oranges – combined with the multiple shades of blue sky as it lightened – creating a vision beyond that of any dream.

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  • Cocoa skin, soulful dark eyes, exotic features, and brilliant tattoos over his exposed, muscular arms.

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  • My father started out with nothing but a brilliant mind, like yours.

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  • Now I have another dazzling thought, bred from my brilliant research.

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  • His gaze went to the sunrise, a brilliant display of reds and oranges over the desert.

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  • Alex gazed in awed silence at the brilliant sunset.

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  • This was the brilliant charge of the Horse Guards that amazed the French themselves.

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  • His clothing fitted his form snugly and was gorgeously colored in brilliant shades of green, which varied as the sunbeams touched them but was not wholly influenced by the solar rays.

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  • Bruised, she blinked as brilliant sunlight pierced the cracked door.

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  • Pierre was just the husband needed for a brilliant society woman.

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  • She beamed another brilliant smile, and it took all his willpower to leave her to see one of his least favorite people.

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  • The barberry's brilliant fruit was likewise food for my eyes merely; but I collected a small store of wild apples for coddling, which the proprietor and travellers had overlooked.

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  • Of course, it is a very brilliant match, but happiness, my dear...

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  • Evelyn gave a brilliant smile, and Romas eyed her.

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  • Elisabeth stood, transfixed on the brilliant vista.

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  • The sun pushed aside the shadows as it emerged from the depths of the distant sea until it sat on the horizon, casting long shadows and brilliant bars of light into the walled city.

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  • The sun pushed aside the shadows as it emerged from the depths of the distant sea until it sat on the horizon, casting long shadows and brilliant bars of light into the walled city.

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  • A flood of brilliant, joyful light poured from her transfigured face.

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  • Only the skeleton of life remained: his house, a brilliant wife who now enjoyed the favors of a very important personage, acquaintance with all Petersburg, and his court service with its dull formalities.

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  • The rocket slammed into an ambulance parked in front of Andre's, the brilliant explosion throwing heat and light that reached her on what she estimated was the twentieth floor.

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  • Her brilliant hair topped a freckled face and mile-wide smile.

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  • A general with a brilliant suite galloped off at once to fetch the boyars.

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  • Dean said, brilliant conversationalist that he was.

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  • She, seeing herself surrounded by such brilliant and polite young men, beamed with satisfaction, try as she might to hide it, and perturbed as she evidently was each time her husband moved in his sleep behind her.

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  • So these doctors were perhaps just as brilliant as those who have come since.

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  • Roving searchlights splashed the Undersecretary with brilliant white light.

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  • Sofi appeared relaxed in the cell, her head resting against the wall and her brilliant eyes focused on Jenn.

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  • To his surprise, she pulled away from him and smiled, a brilliant sight that made her eyes sparkle and face glow.

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  • He had not ridden many hundred yards after that before he saw to his left, across the whole width of the field, an enormous mass of cavalry in brilliant white uniforms, mounted on black horses, trotting straight toward him and across his path.

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  • And now the Tin Woodman arrived, his body most beautifully nickle-plated, so that it shone splendidly in the brilliant light of the room.

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  • Fluorescent lighting overhead morphed to an expansive blue sky and brilliant sunlight that made him squint.

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  • The night was clear and cool, the sky a beautiful pageant of dark blue silk and brilliant stars, of streaking meteors and two glowing orbs.

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  • caerulea, and the latter by the brilliant rose-breasted H.

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  • Anna Mikhaylovna also had of late visited them less frequently, seemed to hold herself with particular dignity, and always spoke rapturously and gratefully of the merits of her son and the brilliant career on which he had entered.

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  • She was brilliant, loyal, and sweet.

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  • Then he gave careful directions about the fortification of the Kremlin, and drew up a brilliant plan for a future campaign over the whole map of Russia.

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  • If 127 parts of iodine, which is an almost black solid, and loo parts of mercury, which is a white liquid metal, be intimately mixed by rubbing them together in a mortar, the two substances wholly disappear, and we obtain instead a brilliant red powder quite unlike the iodine or the mercury; almost the only property that is unchanged is the weight.

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  • And Nicholas' management produced very brilliant results.

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  • The gazettes from which the old prince first heard of the defeat at Austerlitz stated, as usual very briefly and vaguely, that after brilliant engagements the Russians had had to retreat and had made their withdrawal in perfect order.

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  • Wynn was brilliant at small talk, distracting her and making her laugh with his dry, morbid humor.

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  • Wynn was brilliant at small talk, distracting her and making her laugh with his dry, morbid humor.

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  • Around it were arranged, like the five points of a star, the other five brilliant balls; one being rose colored, one violet, one yellow, one blue and one orange.

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  • Vera's remark was correct, as her remarks always were, but, like most of her observations, it made everyone feel uncomfortable, not only Sonya, Nicholas, and Natasha, but even the old countess, who--dreading this love affair which might hinder Nicholas from making a brilliant match-- blushed like a girl.

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  • Her plan, while brilliant when plotted the past month, didn't seem quite so wonderful right now.

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  • Vienna considers the bases of the proposed treaty so unattainable that not even a continuity of most brilliant successes would secure them, and she doubts the means we have of gaining them.

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  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.

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  • It was a gay and brilliant fete.

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  • It was just as spectacular as those on earth, a brilliant mix of pinks, oranges, burnt yellows, reds, and purples.

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  • He had a brilliant position in society thanks to his intimacy with Countess Bezukhova, a brilliant position in the service thanks to the patronage of an important personage whose complete confidence he enjoyed, and he was beginning to make plans for marrying one of the richest heiresses in Petersburg, plans which might very easily be realized.

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  • The immense house was brilliant with lights shining through its lofty windows.

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  • All was blended into one brilliant procession.

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  • Natasha, smoothing her gown, went in with Sonya and sat down, scanning the brilliant tiers of boxes opposite.

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  • "I am the brilliant surgeon you believe me to be," he said.

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  • With her the least worldly of men would occupy a most brilliant position in society.

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  • Brilliant sunlight blinded her after days of grey, and she blinked at the bright, familiar blue sky.

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  • Brilliant sunlight blinded her after days of grey, and she blinked at the bright, familiar blue sky.

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  • Each instrument--now resembling a violin and now a horn, but better and clearer than violin or horn--played its own part, and before it had finished the melody merged with another instrument that began almost the same air, and then with a third and a fourth; and they all blended into one and again became separate and again blended, now into solemn church music, now into something dazzlingly brilliant and triumphant.

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  • You are a brilliant artist.

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  • Jenn faced the newcomer, surprised to see a small, grandfatherly man with brilliant green eyes standing near them.

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  • This brilliant company separated into several groups who all discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the position, the state of the army, the plans suggested, the situation of Moscow, and military questions generally.

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  • His brilliant gaze turned to Gabriel, who shook his head.

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  • Everywhere you work, you're recognized for being the brilliant person I know you are.

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  • Leo had intended his younger brother Giuliano and his nephew Lorenzo for brilliant secular careers.

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  • Everywhere you work, you're recognized for being the brilliant person I know you are.

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  • Every muscle of his thin face was now quivering with nervous excitement; his eyes, in which the fire of life had seemed extinguished, now flashed with brilliant light.

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  • Pierre was struck by the modesty of the small though clean house after the brilliant surroundings in which he had last met his friend in Petersburg.

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  • Four days before, sentinels of the Preobrazhensk regiment had stood in front of the house to which Balashev was conducted, and now two French grenadiers stood there in blue uniforms unfastened in front and with shaggy caps on their heads, and an escort of hussars and uhlans and a brilliant suite of aides-de-camp, pages, and generals, who were waiting for Napoleon to come out, were standing at the porch, round his saddle horse and his Mameluke, Rustan.

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  • While they drove past the garden the shadows of the bare trees often fell across the road and hid the brilliant moonlight, but as soon as they were past the fence, the snowy plain bathed in moonlight and motionless spread out before them glittering like diamonds and dappled with bluish shadows.

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  • Among the opinions and voices in this immense, restless, brilliant, and proud sphere, Prince Andrew noticed the following sharply defined subdivisions of tendencies and parties:

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  • She was so pleased by praise from this brilliant beauty that she blushed with pleasure.

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  • She's a brilliant analyst and one of the few non-PMF members I trust.

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  • The men and officers returning spoke of a brilliant victory, of the occupation of the town of Wischau and the capture of a whole French squadron.

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  • Even at ten o'clock, when the Rostovs got out of their carriage at the chapel, the sultry air, the shouts of hawkers, the light and gay summer clothes of the crowd, the dusty leaves of the trees on the boulevard, the sounds of the band and the white trousers of a battalion marching to parade, the rattling of wheels on the cobblestones, and the brilliant, hot sunshine were all full of that summer languor, that content and discontent with the present, which is most strongly felt on a bright, hot day in town.

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  • In the first place the marriage was not a brilliant one as regards birth, wealth, or rank.

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  • The music sounded louder and through the door rows of brightly lit boxes in which ladies sat with bare arms and shoulders, and noisy stalls brilliant with uniforms, glittered before their eyes.

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  • An immense and brilliant suite surrounded him.

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  • The colors of the mortal world were brilliant, the light in her bedchamber blinding her.

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  • The colors of the mortal world were brilliant, the light in her bedchamber blinding her.

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  • Two daggers perched at her rounded hips, and her brilliant eyes glowed in the sunlight.

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  • The brilliant suns were overhead, their heat heavy in the still day.

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  • Hoadly was shrewd enough not to answer the most brilliant, though comparatively unknown, of his antagonists, William Law.

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  • The brilliant suns were overhead, their heat heavy in the still day.

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  • Hoadly was shrewd enough not to answer the most brilliant, though comparatively unknown, of his antagonists, William Law.

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  • And she saw Mademoiselle Bourienne, with her ribbon and pretty face, and her unusually animated look which was fixed on him, but him she could not see, she only saw something large, brilliant, and handsome moving toward her as she entered the room.

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  • Rostov was horrified to hear later that of all that mass of huge and handsome men, of all those brilliant, rich youths, officers and cadets, who had galloped past him on their thousand-ruble horses, only eighteen were left after the charge.

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  • Kiera followed as Evelyn turned toward the main house, a sprawling, single-story compound made of brilliant white stone and dotted with hundreds of glass-less windows.

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  • "Since the day of our brilliant success at Austerlitz," wrote Bilibin, "as you know, my dear prince, I never leave headquarters.

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  • Around him thronged Moscow's most brilliant young men, whom he evidently dominated.

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  • She could not follow the opera nor even listen to the music; she saw only the painted cardboard and the queerly dressed men and women who moved, spoke, and sang so strangely in that brilliant light.

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  • The house was as brilliant white on the inside as it was outside.

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  • Dolokhov was a suitable and in some respects a brilliant match for the dowerless, orphan girl.

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  • Napoleon enters Moscow after the brilliant victory de la Moskowa; there can be no doubt about the victory for the battlefield remains in the hands of the French.

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  • The town's promenaders were clothed in sweaters at most, with only tee shirts adequate in the brilliant sun.

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  • After the junction with the army of the brilliant admiral and Petersburg hero Wittgenstein, this mood and the gossip of the staff reached their maximum.

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  • In the plains below, the swards are gay with the scarlet and white verbena and other brilliant wild flowers.

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  • As a diplomatist he displayed many brilliant qualities - adroitness in negotiation, incisiveness in argument and elegance in style.

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  • In 1830 he was rector of the university; and in his speech at the tricentenary of the Augsburg Confession in that year he charged the Catholic Church with regarding the virtues of the pagan world as brilliant vices, and giving the crown of perfection to poverty, continence and obedience.

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  • Natasha's unwontedly brilliant eyes, continually glancing at him with a more than cordial look, had reduced him to this condition.

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  • Some plans he couldn't use for lack of manpower, timing constraints, or other battle-related reasons, but some were brilliant.

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  • The temperature hovered around twenty-five and the sun was brilliant.

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  • The general construction of wooden screens is close panelling beneath, on which stands screen-work composed of slender turned balusters or regular wooden mullions, supporting tracery more or less rich with cornices, crestings, &c., and often painted in brilliant colours and gilded.

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  • William Gifford Palgrave (1826-1888) went to India as a soldier after a brilliant career at Charterhouse School and Trinity College, Oxford; but, having become a Roman Catholic, he was ordained priest and served as a Jesuit missionary in India, Syria, and Arabia.

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  • Less resolute and reliable than his brother Guillaume, the cardinal had brilliant qualities, and an open and free mind.

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  • The oil when brought to the surface has the appearance of a whitish-blue water, which gives out brilliant straw-coloured rays, and emits a strong pungent odour.

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  • Artists have been known to use the left hand in the hope of checking the fatal facility which practice had conferred on the right; and if Hood had been able to place under some restraint the curious and complex machinery of words and syllables which his fancy was incessantly producing, his style would have been a great gainer, and much real earnestness of object, which now lies confused by the brilliant kaleidoscope of language, would have remained definite and clear.

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  • His residence in the Netherlands fell in the most prosperous and brilliant days of the Dutch state, under the stadtholdership of Frederick Henry (1625-1647).

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  • The following are the approximate wave-lengths of the most brilliant lines: When the discharge passes through helium at a pressure of several millimetres, the yellow line 5876 is prominent.

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  • That work was on the point of opening its most brilliant chapter by an invasion of the great king's dominions; the army was concentrated and certain forces had already been sent on to occupy the opposite shore of the Hellespont.

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  • With the improvements in wind instruments this continued, as a more brilliant effect was gained.

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  • They played a brilliant part in the War of Independence (1821-1829), and to-day supply the Greek army with its best soldiers.

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  • Having been taught that there is no absolutely true religion, Mendelssohn's own descendants - a brilliant circle, of which the musician Felix was the most noted - left the Synagogue for the Church.

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  • He rallied the Bulgarian army, now deprived of its Russian officers, to resist the Servian invasion, and after a brilliant victory at Slivnitza (November 19) pursued King Milan into Servian territory as far as Pirot, which he captured (November 27).

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  • In 1803 he produced El BarOn in its present form; originally written (1791) as a zarzuela, it was shamelessly plagiarized by Andres de Mendoza, but the recast, a far more brilliant work, still keeps the stage.

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  • Frogs of many kinds are plentiful, the brilliant green frogs being especially conspicuous and noisy.

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  • He retired into what Bright called the "Cave of Adullam," and opposed the bill in a series of brilliant speeches, which raised his reputation as an orator to its highest point and effectually caused the downfall of the government.

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  • Modern mathematicians may find on reading this brilliant summary a good many dicta which they will call in question, but, whatever its defects may be, Peacock's report remains a work of permanent value.

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  • In 1520 he went to Rome, where he entered the brilliant literary circle of Leo X.

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  • coccinea, often confounded with the red oak, but with larger leaves, with long lobes ending in several acute points; they change to a brilliant scarlet with the first October frosts, giving one of the most striking of the various glowing tints that render the American forests so beautiful in autumn.

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  • temperatures radiates out a most brilliant white light.

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  • He was educated at Glasgow university, where he had a brilliant academic career; and having entered the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, he returned to Canada and obtained a pastoral charge in Halifax, Nova Scotia, which he held from 1863 to 1877.

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  • But in all moral qualities the brilliant adventurer of the r 5th was infinitely superior to the brilliant adventurer of the r9th century.

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  • Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Treviso, Venice entered into a compact to defend their liberties; and when he came again in 1163 with a brilliant staff of German knights, the imperial cities refused to join his standards.

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  • At the end of this century and a half, five principal powers divided the peninsula; and their confederated action during the next forty-five years (1447-1492) secured for Italy a season of peace and brilliant pro,sperity.

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  • During the following fourteen years of his brilliant career he made himself absolute master of Florence, and so modified her institutions that the Medici were henceforth necessary to the state.

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  • The Transpadane Republic, or, as it was soon called, the Cisalpine 7l~~ Republic, began its organized life on the 9th of July Republic. 1797, with a brilliant festival at Milan.

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  • Physalia, known commonly as the Portuguese man-of-war, is remarkable for its great size, its brilliant colours, and its terrible stinging powers.

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  • This pressed amber yields brilliant interference colours in polarized light.

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  • He was instrumental in saving New York and Vermont from invasion by his brilliant victory of lake Champlain gained, on the nth of September 1814, with a flotilla of 14 vessels carrying 86 guns, over Captain George Downie's 16 vessels and 92 guns.

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  • The cells in which the fungoid organism is vigorously flourishing are exceedingly active, showing large size, brilliant nuclei, protoplasm and vacuole, all of which give signs of iptense metabolic activity.

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  • In recognition of this and other brilliant services, he was elected consul in 88, and brought the revolt to an end by the capture of Nola in Campania.

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  • Here he had a brilliant career, and seems to have been almost immediately recognized as the leading man of his year.

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  • Of an olive-green above, deeply tinted in some parts with black and in others lightened by yellow, and beneath of a yellowish-white again marked with black, the male of this species has at least a becoming if not a brilliant garb, and possesses a song that is not unmelodious, though the resemblance of some of its notes to the running-down of a piece of clockwork is more remarkable than pleasing.

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  • It is probable that the Liberian chimpanzee may offer one or more distinct varieties; there is an interesting local development of the Diana monkey, sometimes called the bay-thighed monkey (Cercopithecus diana ignita) on account of its brilliant orange-red thighs.

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  • 30), are adorned with metallic or other brilliant colours.

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  • Cyprian carried all his natural enthusiasm and brilliant powers: into his new profession.

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  • In 1757 Voltaire came to reside at Lausanne; and although he took but little notice of the young Englishman of twenty, who eagerly sought and easily obtained an introduction, the establishment of the theatre at Monrepos, where the brilliant versifier himself declaimed before select audiences his own productions on the stage, had no small influence in fortifying Gibbon's taste for the French theatre, and in at the same time abating that "idolatry for the gigantic genius of Shakespeare which is inculcated from our infancy as the first duty of an Englishman."

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  • But after three hours, Pescara's light horse having meantime been driven in by the superior light horse of the enemy, the artillery-loving duke of Ferrara conceived the brilliant plan of taking his mobile field-guns to the extreme right of the enemy.

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  • From 1860 to 1870 he was professor of history at the faculty of letters at Strassburg, where he had a brilliant career as a teacher, but never yielded to the influence exercised by the German universities in the field of classical and Germanic antiquities.

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  • There are other nebulae in which a nucleus can be just discerned, others again in which the nucleus is easily seen, and still others where the nucleus is a brilliant star-like point.

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  • It was occupied by the Russians in 1770, and twenty years later its capture was one of the brilliant achievements of the Russian general, Count A.

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  • trans., 1885, also the brilliant article " Israel " in the 9th ed.

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  • Samson) until a brilliant victory was gained by the prophet Samuel, some account of whose early history is recorded.

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  • While the Spanish period of Jewish history was thus brilliant from the point of view of public service, it was equally notable on the literary side.

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  • Brilliant results accrued from all this participation in the general life of Germany.

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  • A brilliant account has come down of the ceremonies at the installation of a new exilarch.

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  • With this division Baker sustained the brilliant rearguard action of Tashkessan against the troops of Gourko.

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  • Masderallia is common in cultivation and has often brilliant scarlet, crimson or orange flowers.

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  • Thus Greece excelled the Eastern countries from whom she may have derived her civilization, and Buddhism had a far more brilliant career outside India than in it.

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  • The Mala y a dynasty maintained Hindu civilization in the 6th century, and from 606 to 646 Harsha established a brief but brilliant empire in the north with its capital at Kanauj.

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  • They never subjugated the south, but the empire which they founded in the north was for about two centuries, under such rulers as Akbar and Shah Jehan, one of the most brilliant which Asia has seen.

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  • are left untold, but the Chronicler omits the revolt of Absalom and 1 If Ewald's brilliant interpretation of an obscure word in 2 Sam.

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  • His mother belonged to the brilliant Gregory family (q.v.), which, in the 18th century, gave so many representatives to literature and science in Scotland.

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  • To the brilliant court of Marienburg, not only a school of chivalry, but under Winrich's predecessor Luther of Brunswick, a literary centre,(fn3) men came from all over Europe to win their spurs.

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  • Though he lacked the brilliant qualities of his rival Wallqvist, Nordin had the same alertness and penetration, and was infinitely more stable and disinterested.

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  • In his Westminster review of Whately's Logic in 1828 (invaluable to all students of the genesis of Mill's logic) he appears, curiously enough, as an ardent and brilliant champion of the syllogistic logic against highfliers such as the Scottish philosophers who talk of "superseding" it by "a supposed system of inductive logic."

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  • At the end of October 1785 he closed a scholastic career which had been creditable but not brilliant.

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  • With him in his poorly furnished lodgings was Louis Bonaparte, the fourth surviving son, whom he carefully educated and for whom he predicted a brilliant future.

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  • His brilliant parts were somewhat obscured by his rather erratic conduct, and a certain contempt, partly aristocratic and partly intellectual, for commonplace men and ways.

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  • Into these regions descended Hibil the brilliant, in the power of Mana rabba, just as in the Manichaean mythology the "primal man," armed with the elements of the king of light, descends to a contest with the primal devil.

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  • 27) led C. Gegenbaur to the brilliant suggestion that wings might be regarded as specialized and transformed gills.

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  • Forbes, two brilliant and short lived young men who occupied successively the post of prosector to the Zoological Society of London, and who made a rich use of the material provided by the collection of that society.

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  • The most brilliant star of this constellation, a-Aquilae or Altair, has a parallax of 0.23", and consequently is about eight times as bright as the sun; q-Aquilae is a short-period variable, while Nova Aquilae is a " temporary " or " new " star, discovered by Mrs Fleming of Harvard in 1899.

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  • Although he was the father of two children by Charlemagne's daughter, Bertha, one of them named Nithard, we have no authentic account of his marriage, and from 790 he was abbot of St Riquier, where his brilliant rule gained for him later the renown of a saint.

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  • Ancient philosophers, who had not the Scriptures, received direct illumination from God, and only thus can the brilliant results attained by them be accounted for.

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  • With his Palmyrene troops, 4 strengthened by what was left of the Roman army corps, he took the offensive against Shapur, defeated him at Ctesiphon, and in a series of brilliant engagements won back the East for Rome.

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  • Citric acid is also distinguished from tartaric acid by the fact that an ammonia solution of silver tartrate produces a brilliant silver mirror when boiled, whereas silver citrate is reduced only after prolonged ebullition.

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  • Pico's works cannot now be read with much interest, but the man himself is still interesting, partly from his influence on Reuchlin and partly from the spectacle of a truly devout mind in the brilliant circle of half-pagan scholars of the FlOrentine renaissance.

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  • Henceforth his name was known in all European countries; the English translation by Mrs Austin was the occasion of one of Macaulay's most brilliant essays.

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  • They have lost their value, except for the few matters of fact embedded in a mass of commonplace meditation, and for some occasionally brilliant illustrations.

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  • In demeanour he was quiet, reserved and tactful, but when occasion called for it he proved himself a brilliant orator.

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  • Taking Varro for his model, Fenestella was one of the chief representatives of the new style of historical writing which, in the place of the brilliant descriptive pictures of Livy, discussed curious and out-of-the-way incidents and customs of political and social life, including literary history.

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  • Yet the material prosperity of Athens under Pericles was less notable than her brilliant attainments in every field of culture.

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  • The brilliant summary of the historian Thucydides in the famous Funeral Speech of Pericles (delivered in 430), in which the social life, the institutions and the culture of his country are set forth as a model, gives a substantially true picture of Athens in its greatest days.

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  • This brilliant epoch, however, was not without its darker side.

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  • The rhetorical schools experienced a brilliant revival under Constantine and his successors, when Athens became the alma mater of many notable men, including Julian, Libanius, Basil and Gregory of Nazianzus, and in her professors owned the last representatives of a humane and moralized paganism.

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  • The olive complexion, a face emaciated by austerities, the large forehead, the brilliant and small eyes, the high bald head tell their own tale.

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  • The rivers and neighbouring seas seem to be well stocked with fish, and especial mention must be made of the turtles, flying-fish, and brilliant I coral-fish which swarm in the waters warmed by the Kurosiwo current, the gulf-stream of the Pacific. Shell-fish form an important article of diet to both the Chinese and the aborigines along the coast - a species of Cyrena, a species of Tapes, Cytheraea petechiana and Modiola teres being most abundant.

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  • On the morning of the 19th of August 1779 the British garrison was surprised by Major Henry Lee ("Light Horse Harry"), who with about 50o men took 159 prisoners and lost only 2 killed and 3 wounded, one of the most brilliant exploits during the War of Independence.

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  • After a brilliant college career, which made him doctor of laws and a qualified barrister at nineteen, he was appointed counsel to the Breton estates and in 1775 professor of ecclesiastical law at Rennes.

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  • Rouelle, while in England Humphry Davy expounded the same idea in the experimental demonstrations which gave his lectures their brilliant charm.

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  • BdXXo, a green bud, on account of a brilliant green line in its spectrum) in the selenious mud of the sulphuric acid manufacture; the chemical affinities of this element, on the one hand approximating to the metals of the alkalis, and on the other hand to lead, were mainly established by C. A.

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  • The brilliant researches of Frankland on the organo-metallic compounds, and his consequent doctrine of saturation capacity or valency of elements and radicals, relieved Kolbe's views of all obscurity.

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  • The brilliant success of Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel, in which Wagnerian technique is applied to the diatonic style of nursery songs with a humorous accuracy undreamed of by Wagner's imitators, points a moral which would have charmed Wagner himself; but until the revival of some rudiments of musical common sense becomes widespread, there is little prospect of the influence of Wagner's harmonic style being productive of anything better than nonsense.

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  • Owing to his eloquence he was speedily ranked in popular estimation with Corneille, Racine, and the other leading figures of the most brilliant period of Louis XIV.'s reign.

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  • They made a greater display of brilliant metal and gorgeous colour than the Roman armies, for instance.

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  • The coast scenery, especially on the west, is always picturesque and often grand, the cliffs, sheer precipices of brilliant colouring, reaching a height of over l000 ft.

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  • The summer is almost nightless, print being legible at midnight, but in winter the days are only six hours long, though the nights are frequently illuminated with brilliant displays of the aurora borealis.

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  • Ever afterwards he was honoured as a god, and the most brilliant star in the heavens was called by his name.

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  • The Bahir (" brilliant," Job.

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  • Liber sapientiae), an apocryphal book of the "Wisdom Literature" (q.v.), the most brilliant production of pre-Christian Hebrew philosophical thought, remarkable both for the elevation of its ideas and for the splendour of its diction.

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  • The avifauna is varied and abundant, comprising eagles, vultures (protected by law), hawks, owls, pelicans, cranes, turkeys, geese, partridges " (called quail or " Bob White " elsewhere), ducks, &c., besides numerous smaller species, many of which are brilliant of plumage but harsh of voice.

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  • Bernardo de Galvez (1756-1794), a brilliant young officer of twentyone, when he became the governor of the colony, was one of the most liberal of the Spanish rulers and of all the most popular.

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  • During the American War of Independence he gave valuable aid to the United States; and when Spain finally joined in the war against Great Britain, Galvez, in a series of energetic and brilliant campaigns (1779-1781), captured all the important posts in the British colony of West Florida.

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  • Lepidoptera are very brilliant in colouring.

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  • During the same period a brilliant group of mathematical physicists, notably Lord Kelvin (W.

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  • A holy war was preached by their leader, Hussein Aga Berberli, a brilliant soldier and orator, who called himself Zmaj Bosanski, the "Dragon of Bosnia," and was regarded by his followers as a saint.

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  • In reward for the brilliant services rendered him by Ertoghrul (the father of Osman) and by Osman himself, Ala-ud-din, the last of the Seljuk sultans, conferred certain provinces in fief upon these two great warriors.

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  • At this time (1657-1681) the brilliant administration of the two Kuprilis restored temporary order to Ottoman finance.

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  • By a brilliant march to the Danube Bayezid subjugated them; then returning to Asia he crushed the prince of Karamania, who had made head again and had defeated Timur Tash Pasha.

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  • All hope seemed lost, when by a brilliant feat of arms John Sobieski, king of Poland, drove away the besiegers in hopeless confusion and saved the cause of Christianity, 1683.

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  • Yielding to the inevitable, but not forgetting to announce a brilliant victory in a bulletin, he sent his troops into winter quarters along the Passarge and down the Baltic, enjoining on his corps commanders most strictly to do nothing to disturb their adversary.

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  • In spite of this misfortune, Napoleon could claim a brilliant success for himself, but almost at the same moment news reached him that Oudinot at Grossbeeren near Berlin, and Macdonald on the Katzbach opposed to Blucher, had both been severely defeated.

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  • To this fresh emergency Napoleon and his army responded in most brilliant fashion.

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  • As at Krasnoi in 1812, they went straight for their enemy and after one of the most brilliant series of artillery movements in history, directed by General Drouot, they marched right over their enemy, practically destroying his whole force.

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  • For a great heiress and a very ambitious girl the marriage scarcely seemed brilliant, for Stael had no fortune and no very great personal distinction.

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  • She spent the summer at the chateau with a brilliant company; in the autumn she journeyed to Italy accompanied by Schlegel and Sismondi, and there gathered the materials of her most famous work, Corinne.

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  • Here she received a brilliant reception and was much lionized during the season of 1813.

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  • His imposing height, his noble features, his brilliant eloquence, as well as his renown for zeal and charity, made him a prominent feature in French life for many years.

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  • Here he learnt that Madrid had fallen to Napoleon (Dec. 3) after he had by a brilliant charge of the Polish lancers and chasseurs of the Guard forced the Somosierra Pass (Nov.

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  • On the 10th of December ' Baird joined Moore near Mayorga, and a brilliant cavalry combat now took place at Sahagun, in which the British hussar brigade distinguished itself.

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  • In spite of the failure before Burgos, the successes of the campaign had been brilliant.

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  • This brilliant exploit earned him his captain's commission and a sword of honour from Congress.

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  • His son Isaak (1618-1689), after a brilliant career of scholarship in Sweden, became residentiary canon at Windsor in 1673.

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  • But if he lacked the brilliant qualities of his impulsive, jovial father, he possessed in a high degree the compensating virtues of moderation, sobriety and self-control.

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  • Ritschl's recommendation, appointed to an extraordinary professorship of classical philology in the university of Basel, and rapidly promoted to an ordinary professorship. Here he almost immediately began a brilliant literary activity, which gradually assumed a more and more philosophical character.

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  • For the next ten years he lived in various health resorts, in considerable suffering (he declares that the year contained for him 200 days of pure pain), but dashing off, at high pressure, the brilliant essays on which his fame rests.

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  • Even as a child her parts were good, if not brilliant, but unfortunately her education was both imperfect and desultory.

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  • Although the Arctic Ocean had been reached as early as the first half of the 17th century, the exploration of its coasts by a series of expeditions under Ovtsyn, Minin, Pronchishev, Lasinius and Laptev - whose labours constitute a brilliant page in the annals of geographical discovery - was begun only in the 18th century (1735-1739).

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  • with being the most brilliant orator of the British Empire, and the enthusiasm which he evoked in London was great.

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  • The best crystallized specimens of any mica are afforded by the small brilliant crystals of biotite, which encrust cavities in the limestone blocks ejected from Monte Somma, Vesuvius.

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  • In this she was represented without arms, as a brilliant type of virgin beauty.

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  • The outer surface of many of the species presents likewise the most exquisite sculpture, heightened by brilliant shades, or spots of green, red, yellow and bluish black.

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  • In character he was as estimable as he was brilliant in intellect.

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  • ' The poem of Aymeri de Narbonne contains the account of the young Aymeri's brilliant capture of Narbonne, which he then receives as a fief from Charlemagne, of his marriage with Ermenjart, sister of Boniface, king of the Lombards, and of their children.

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  • He proceeded in the beginning of 1847 to Berlin, attracted thither by that brilliant constellation of mathematical genius whose principal stars were P. G.

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  • Here his strength rapidly ebbed away, but his mental faculties remained brilliant to the last.

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  • He distinguished himself as a statesman at the Assembly of Notables at Fontainebleau in 1560, when he delivered an exceedingly brilliant discourse, in which he opposed the policy of violence and demanded a national council and the assembly of the states general.

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  • Nowhere, however, were the keenness and clearness of his intellect more conspicuous than in this brilliant effort, which, if it failed in its immediate object, was highly effective in secondary results.

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  • Amongst the brilliant group of mathematicians whose magnanimous rivalry contributed to accomplish the task of generalization and deduction reserved for the 18th century, Lagrange occupies an eminent place.

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  • The method of "generalized coordinates," as it is now called, by which he attained this result, is the most brilliant achievement of the analytical method.

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  • Some of his brilliant rival's most conspicuous discoveries were implicitly contained in his writings, and wanted but one step for completion.

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  • Different substances were distinguished by the name of "alumen"; but they were all characterized by a certain degree of astringency, and were all employed in dyeing and medicine, the light-coloured alumen being useful in brilliant dyes, the dark-coloured only in dyeing black or very dark colours.

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  • There were arrangements for the brilliant illumination of the choir and its relief, which was sometimes sculptured on both sides and reversible, while the podia were intentionally more obscure.

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  • Imagining himself sure of a brilliant destiny in Europe if he lost his Brazilian crown, the emperor attempted to risk a decisive attack against the Liberals, and to form a new ministry composed of men favourable to absolutism.

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  • His life was the triumph of steady determination unaided by a single brilliant or attractive quality.

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  • In the 17th century we find Ludovico Sergardi (Quinto Settano), a Latinist and satirical writer of much talent and culture; but the most original and brilliant figure in Sienese literature is that of Girolamo Gigli (1660-1722), author of the Gazzettino, La Sorellina di Don Pilone, Il Vocabolario cateriniano and the Diario ecclesiastico.

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  • Unfortunately, however, the brilliant epoch of the alliance of Liberalism and Catholicism, represented on its literary side by Chateaubriand and by Lamartine, to whose poetic school Herculano had belonged, was past, and fanatical attacks and the progress of events drove this former champion of the Church into conflict with the ecclesiastical authorities.

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  • His brilliant career, both as a civilian and as a soldier, drew all eyes to him as best fitted to guide the fortunes of the new Confederacy, and with a deep sense of the responsibility he obeyed the call.

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  • This poem was a brilliant satire on contemporary manners, and enjoyed an extraordinary success.

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  • in height and include the knob-thorn, water-boom, kafir-boom (with brilliant scarlet flowers), the Cape chestnut and milkwoods (Mimusops).

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  • But his brilliant ability and restless activity made him the central figure in the dialectical as in the other discussions of his time.

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  • Bela endeavoured to strengthen his own monarchy by introducing the hereditary principle, crowning his infant son Emerich, as his successor during his own lifetime, a practice followed by most of the later Arpads; he also held a brilliant court on the Byzantine model, and replenished the treasury by his wise economies.

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  • Valiant and enterprising as both these princes were (Stephen successfully resisted the aggressions of the brilliant " golden King," Ottakar II.

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  • Albert, a sturdy soldier, who had given brilliant proofs of valour and generalship in the Hussite wars, was crowned king of Hungary at Szekesfehervar (Stuhlweissenburg) on the 1st of January 1438, elected king of the Romans at Frankfort on the 18th of March 1438, and crowned king of Bohemia at Prague on the 29th of June 1438.

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  • Transylvania, and Transylvania and the emperor, desultory and languishing as regards the Turks (the one notable battle being Sigismund Bathory's brilliant victory over the 2 At first the Habsburgs held their court at Prague instead of at Vienna.

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  • The diet of 1839 refused to proceed to business till the political prisoners had been released, and, while in the Lower Chamber the reforming majority was larger than ever, a Liberal party was now also formed in the Upper House under the brilliant leadership of Count Louis Batthyany and Baron Joseph EdtvOs.

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  • Fortunately, in Kalman Tisza, the leader of the Liberal From the first, Tisza was exposed to the violent attacks of the opposition, which embraced, not only the party of Independence, champions of the principles of 1848, but the so-called National party, led by the brilliant orator Count Albert Apponyi, which aimed at much the same ends but looked upon the Compromise of 1867 as a convenient substructure on which to build up the Magyar state.

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  • With these brilliant performances the first period of Laplace's scientific career may be said to have closed.

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  • In this year he married, performed his most brilliant service to his country, and completed his greatest literary work.

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  • When the Moorish empire began to wane the brilliant intellectual gifts which they had so abundantly nourished during three or four centuries became enfeebled, and after that period they failed to produce an author comparable with those of the 7th to the 11th centuries.

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  • Ivan Gundulic and the brilliant group of poets that gathered round him at Ragusa in the early 17th century, reflected in their writings the little Slav Republic's intimate connexion with its kinsmen of Serbia and Bosnia.

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  • materially contributed to Italy's brilliant stand against the last Piave offensive in June.

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  • Rowland to his brilliant invention of concave gratings, by which spectra can be photographed without any further optical appliance.

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  • The birds, as Mr Necker very truly describes, appear like flying brilliant sparks."

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  • 4-21, which is as brilliant with the glow of lyric enthusiasm as the stern prophecy which precedes it is, from the same point of view, dull and uninspiring.

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  • In spite of his brilliant talents and of the admirable training he received, his life, on the whole, cannot be pronounced a success.

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  • As a politician and statesman, Chesterfield's fame rests on his short but brilliant administration of Ireland.

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  • In these his language is vigorous and dignified; he states the results of his labour and thought with freshness and lucidity; tells numberless stories in a most delightful manner, and exhibits a wonderful talent for the representation of personal character; the many portraits of historic persons of all orders which he draws in these prefaces are as brilliant in execution as they are exact and convincing.

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  • Subsequently he served in the French army under Turenne, and in the Spanish under Conde, and was applauded by both commanders for his brilliant personal courage.

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  • in 1215, was the most brilliant and the most numerously attended of all, and marks the culminating point of a pontificate which itself represents the zenith attained by the medieval papacy.

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  • The attempt Hood made in January 1782 to save them from capture, with 22 ships to 29, was not successful, but the series of bold movements by which he first turned the French out of their anchorage at the Basse Terre of St Kitts, and then beat off the attacks of the enemy, were the most brilliant things done by any British admiral during the war.

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  • The discoveries made in pathological bacteriology, indeed, must be held to be among the most brilliant of the age.

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  • Watery solution of iodine imparts to it a deep mahogany-brown colour; iodine and sulphuric acid occasionally, but not always, an azure-blue, methylviolet, a brilliant rose-pink and methyl-green gives a reaction very much like that of methyl-violet, but not so vivid.

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  • Iodine gives usually a dark brown reaction, sometimes a deep blue; iodine and sulphuric acid almost always call forth an intense deep blue reaction; and methyl-violet usually a brilliant pink, quite resembling that of true amyloid.

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  • He was entirely eclipsed by the brilliant and vigorous school who succeeded him with Victor Hugo at their head.

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  • Pergamum was early distinguished for its medical school; but in this as in other respects its reputation was ultimately effaced by the more brilliant fame of Alexandria.

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  • It was at first very naturally imagined that the simple revival of classical and especially of Greek literature would at once produce the same brilliant results in medicine as in literature and philosophy.

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  • In looking back on the repeated attempts in the 18th century to construct a universal system of medicine, it is impossible not to regret the waste of brilliant gifts and profound acquirements which they involved.

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  • Laennec, it is hardly too much to say that this simple and purely mechanical invention has had more influence on the development of modern medicine than all the "systems" evolved by the most brilliant intellects of the 18th century.

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  • During this brilliant period of French medicine the superiority of the school of Paris could hardly be contested.

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  • William Hunter (1718-1783) was known in London as a brilliant teacher of anatomy and successful obstetric physician; his younger brother and pupil, John Hunter (1728-1793), was also a teacher of anatomy, and practised as a surgeon.

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  • It is interesting to find that, with all this activity in the present reformed methods of research and verification are not confined to the work of the passing day; in the brilliant achievements of modern research and reconstruction the maxim that "Truth is the daughter of Time" has not been forgotten.

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  • It is not the fortune of many more brilliant statesmen to earn this testimonial to character.

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  • His brilliant personal courage, his amiability and his loyalty to the cause make him a very attractive figure, but a commander-in-chief of the Vendeans, who came and went as they pleased, had little real power or opportunity to display the qualities of a general.

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  • Since the 17th century this park has been one of the most favoured resorts of fashionable society, and at the height of the " season," from May to the end of July, its drives present a brilliant scene.

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  • The Covent Garden theatre is the principal home of grand opera; the building, though spacious, suffers by comparison with the magnificence of opera houses in some other capitals, but during the opera season the scene within the theatre is brilliant.

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  • He had a brilliant course, and was in due time licensed as a minister of the French Protestant Church.

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  • On his father's transference to Berlin, as director of the mint, the boy was sent to the Joachimsthal gymnasium there; his brilliant talents, however, did not develop until later, when at the university of Konigsberg he fell under the influence of Kant.

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  • For a Prussian official to venture to give uncalled-for advice to his sovereign was a breach of propriety not calculated to increase his chances of favour; but it gave Gentz a conspicuous position in the public eye, which his brilliant talents and literary style enabled him to maintain.

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  • Gentz used his enforced leisure to write a brilliant essay on "The relations between England and Spain before the outbreak of war between the two powers" (Leipzig, 1806); and shortly afterwards appeared Fragmente aus der neuesten Geschichte des politischen Gleichgewichts in Europa (translated s.t.

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  • To have done so would have been impossible, in spite of his brilliant gifts, had he been no more than the "wretched scribe" sneered at by Napoleon.

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  • Kolbe was a very successful teacher, a ready and vigorous writer, and a brilliant experimentalist whose work revealed the nature of many compounds the composition of which had not previously been understood.

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  • The glass at this stage has a comparatively dull surface and this must now be replaced by that brilliant and perfectly polished surface which is the chief beauty of this variety of glass.

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  • This glass shows a pattern in high relief and gives a very brilliant effect.

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  • This term is applied to blown sheet-glass, whose surface has been rendered plane and brilliant by a process of grinding and polishing.

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  • It is the most brilliant and the most colourless of all glasses, and was undoubtedly first perfected in England.

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  • It was the necessary apprenticeship to his brilliant diplomatic career.

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  • The young nobleman was, from the first, a prime favourite at the French court, owing, partly to the recollection of his father's devotion to France, but principally because of his own amiable and brilliant qualities.

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  • Fischer may be regarded as one of the most brilliant achievements in modern chemistry.

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  • But in spite of his brilliant ability and his record of having lost but two cases, the bitter attacks which he directed against his fellow advocates, especially against Gerbier (1725-1788), caused his dismissal from the bar in 1775.

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  • If zinc be heated to near its boiling-point, it catches fire and burns with a brilliant light into its powdery white oxide, which forms a reek in the air (lana philosophica, " philosopher's wool").

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  • On the rocky hill-sides in Yemen the Adenium Obesum is worthy of notice, with its enormous bulb-like stems and brilliant red flowers.

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  • On the other hand Ibn ul-Mo`tazz (son of the caliph) was the writer of brilliant occasional verse, free of all imitation.

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  • At the Ecole des Chartes, where his career was remarkably brilliant, his valedictory thesis was an Essai sur les revenus publics en Normandie au XII' siècle (1849), and it was to the history of his native province that he devoted his early works.

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  • Although it had long been suspected that these insects were in some way connected with malaria and other diseases, while that the species now called Stegomyia calopus was the carrier of yellow fever had been asserted by Finlay as early as 1881, it was not until the closing years of the 19th century that the brilliant researches of Ross in India, and of Grassi and others in Italy, directed the attention of the whole civilized world to mosquitoes as the exclusive agents in the dissemination of malarial fever.

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  • The product has a brilliant white fracture, a specific gravity of 4.87, very friable, but harder than quartz or steel.

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  • No similar contest disturbed Aurangzeb's long reign of forty-six years, which has been celebrated, though with doubtful justice, as the most brilliant period of the history of Hindustan.

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  • It was the brilliant exhibition in November 1833 that, in modern times particularly, attracted earnest students to investigate the subject of meteors generally, and to make systematic observations of their apparitions on ordinary nights of the year.

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  • There was a brilliant exhibition of meteors on the 10th of April 1803, and in other years meteors have been very abundant on about the 19th to the 21st of April, shooting from a radiant a few degrees south-west of a Lyrae.

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  • The photographic method appears to have practically failed during recent years, since there has been no brilliant display upon which to test its capacity.

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  • Indeed more than six centuries passed before the idea was again resuscitated; and even then it required a group of brilliant Frenchmen to do what the old Dominican had carried out unaided.

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  • He was tried, but acquitted of all blame, and on the renewal of the war with the Turkish Empire in 1684 he was again appointed commanderin-chief, and after several brilliant victories he reconquered the Peloponnesus and Athens; on his return to Venice he was loaded with honours and given the title of "Peloponnesiaco."

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  • It soon became the capital of the Seljuk state, and one of the most brilliant cities of the world.

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  • Halleck with the command of a large force to clear the lower reaches of the Cumberland and the Tennessee, and, whatever criticism may be passed on the general strategy of the campaign, Grant himself, by his able and energetic work, thoroughly deserved the credit of his brilliant success of Fort Donelson, where 15,000 Confederates were forced to capitulate.

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  • There were soldiers more accomplished, as was McClellan, more brilliant, as was Rosecrans, and more exact, as was Buell,.

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  • He won a brilliant victory over the forces of Saladin at Arsuf (1191), and twice led the Christian host within a few miles of Jerusalem.

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  • In 1815 he entered the cathedral school at Christiania, and three years later he gave proof of his mathematical genius by his brilliant solutions of the original problems proposed by B.

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  • From Berlin he passed to Freiberg, and here he made his brilliant researches in the theory of functions, elliptic, hyperelliptic and a new class known as Abelians being particularly studied.

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  • His works are very voluminous, and to a large extent fragmentary and devoid of artistic finish; nevertheless they are nearly always worth investigating for the brilliant suggestions in which they abound.

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  • Otto marched against them, and in a battle fought on the Lechfeld on the 10th of August 955 the king's troops gained a brilliant victory which completely freed Germany from these invaders; while in the same year Otto also defeated the Sla y s who had been ravaging the Saxon frontier.

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  • It had a population reputed to number 125,000, an extensive trade, a brilliant court and a powerful army.

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  • During the latter part of his undergraduate career he took a brief but brilliant share in the proceedings of the Union, of which he was successively secretary and president.

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  • It established the chancellor of the exchequer as the paramount financier of his day, and it was only the first of a long series of similar performances, different, of course, in detail, but alike in their bold outlines and brilliant handling.

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  • During Lord Palmerston's last administration, which lasted from 1859 to 1865, Gladstone was by far the most brilliant and most conspicuous figure in the cabinet.

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  • Under the Hohenstaufen many brilliant diets were held within its walls.

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  • He was a robust man, and inherited his father's love of violent exercise; but his character was weak and his intelligence mediocre, and he had none of the superficial and brilliant gifts of Francis I.

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  • Their literary and speculative qualities are indeed exceptionally brilliant; they are splendid in diction, elaborate in argument, cogent yet reverent, keen while fearless in criticism.

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  • The heron (sagi) constitutes a charming feature in a Japanese landscape, especially the silver heron (shira-sagi), which displays its brilliant white plumage in the rice-fields from spring to early autumn.

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  • They have undoubtedly a fine sense of color, and a similarly delicate and subtle feeling for harmonious blending of brilliant and sober hues.

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  • The Buddhist style was probably even more ancient than the Chinese, for the scheme of coloring distinctive of the Buddhist picture was almost certainly of Indian origin; brilliant fi ddhi and decorative, and heightened by a lavish use of S~ t.

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  • Kenzan, adopted his style, and left a reputation as a decorator of pottery hardly less brilliant than Krins in that of lacquer; and a later follower, HOitsu (1762-1828), greatly excelled the master in delicacy and refinement, although inferior to him in vigour and invention.

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  • Many brilliant specimens of these mens work survive, their general features being that the motives are naturalistic, that the quality of the metal is exceptionally fine, that in addition to beautifully clear casting obtained by highly skilled use of the cera-perduta process, the chisel was employed to impart delicacy and finish to the design, and that modelling in high relief is most successfully introduced.

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  • Thus Arakawa Reiun, one of Kouns most brilliant pupils, has exhibited a figure of a swordsman in the act of driving home a furious thrust.

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  • The most characteristic examples of it are distinguishable, however, by the preponderating presence of a peculiar russet red, differing essentially from the full-bodied and comparatively brilliant color of the Arita pottery.

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  • Ninsei, in the middle of the 17th century, inaugurated a long era of beautiful productions with his cream-like fish-roe eraquel glazes, carrying jrich decoration of clear and brilliant vitrifiable enamels.

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  • It can scarcely be doubted that the true instincts of the ceramist will ultimately counsel him to confine his decoration over the glaze to vitrifiable enamels, with which the Chinese and Japanese potters of former times obtained such brilliant results.

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  • His military achievements were equally brilliant.

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  • extremely handsome, he was a sturdy and valiant knight, affable, courteous, a brilliant talker and a facile poet.

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  • These brilliant qualities, however, were all on the surface.

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  • By the unusual development he gave to the court he converted the nobility into a brilliant household of dependants.

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  • The 18th century was a brilliant period for the city; it became the seat of a bishopric, its streets were improved, its commerce developed, and an academy of science and letters founded; while its literary salons were hardly less celebrated than those of Paris.

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  • Scott, being dissatisfied with the new review, persuaded John Murray, his London publisher, to start its brilliant Tory competitor, the Quarterly Review (Feb.

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  • The Universal Magazine (1747) had a short, if brilliant, career; but the European Magazine, founded by James Perry in 1782, lasted down to 1826.

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  • One of the most successful was the Farmer's Weekly Museum (1790-1799), supported by perhaps the most brilliant staff of writers American periodical literature had yet been able to show, and edited by Joseph Dennie, who in 1801 began the publication of the Portfolio, carried on to 1827 at Philadelphia.

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  • Of the causes which rendered his brilliant capacity useless for the purpose of obtaining practical success the most important, perhaps the only one of real importance, was his personal character.

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  • Though deserted by the Khazars, with whom he had made an alliance upon entering into Pontus, he gained a decisive advantage by a brilliant march across the Armenian highlands into the Tigris plain, and a hard-fought victory over Chosroes' general, Shahrbaraz, in which Heraclius distinguished himself by his personal bravery.

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  • In1778-1779Muller delivered a brilliant set of lectures on general history, which were not published till 1839 under the title of Vierundzwanzig Bucher allgemeiner Geschichte.

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  • In May 1643 he won the brilliant victory of Stratton, in June he overran Devonshire, and on the 5th of July he inflicted a severe defeat on Sir William Waller at Lansdown.

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  • In 1695 he was able to resume the offensive and to retake Namur in a brilliant and, what was more unusual, a successful campaign.

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  • His most brilliant gift was his eloquence, which according to Swift was acknowledged by men of all factions to be unrivalled.

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  • The most facile and brilliant of the elegiac poets and the least serious in tone and spirit is P. Ovidius Naso or Ovid (43 B.C. - A.D.

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  • But the chief ornament of Lebanon is the Rhododendron ponticum, with its brilliant purple flower clusters; a peculiar evergreen, Vinca libanotica, also adds beauty to this zone.

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  • The small flowers are densely crowded on thick fleshy spikes, which are associated with, and often more or less enveloped by, a large leaf (bract), the so-called spathe, which, as in cuckoo-pint, where it is green in colour, Richardia, where it is white, creamy or yellow, Anthurium, where it is a brilliant scarlet, is often the most striking feature of the plant.

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  • As the fruit ripens the spathe withers, and the brilliant red berries are exposed.

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  • With closed eyes, between sleeping and waking, many people see faces, landscapes and other things flash upon their view, pictures often brilliant, but of very brief duration and rapid mutation.

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  • those on Patience and Penitence, read as though they had been spoken, and it is hard to believe that this brilliant rhetorician did not consecrate his powers of address to his new faith.

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  • After the defeat of the French by the Austro-Russian armies during Bonaparte's absence in Egypt, Charles Emmanuel landed at Leghorn, hoping to regain his kingdom; but Napoleon returned, and by his brilliant victory at Marengo he reaffirmed his position in Italy.

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  • In 1898 he was appointed financial secretary to the War Office, a post in which he distinguished himself during the Boer War, in particular by a brilliant defence, in the debate on.

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  • While the colours on the metopes and triglyphs had faded somewhat, the border above them, topped with a cornice projecting 6 in., retained a most brilliant maeander pattern of red, blue and yellow, while below these were two bands of godroons of blue and red.

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  • After the Treaty of Paris stability of government developed, and many important reforms were introduced under the strong government of the masterful Sir Thomas Maitland; he acted promptly, without seeking popularity or fearing the reverse, and he ultimately gained more real respect than any other governor, not excepting the marquess of Hastings, who was a brilliant and sympathetic administrator.

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  • was the most brilliant in Europe, and he was himself well fitted to be the head of the magnificent chivalry that obtained fame in the French wars.

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  • Then the 1st Guard Dragoons (since known as Queen Victoria's regiment), after a brilliant manoeuvre under heavy fire, to get into the best position for delivering a charge, rode down the whole French line of pursuers from left to right, and by their heroic self-sacrifice relieved the remnants of the infantry from further pursuit.

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  • Hardly had they melted away when the French made a most brilliant counter-attack from their main position between the farms of Leipzig and Moscow.

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  • He had early become connected with the brilliant band of authors and politicians who then led the Whig party, a connexion to which he owed his appointment to the well-paid and easy post of commissioner of stamps; but in practical politics, for which he was by nature unsuited, he took no active share.

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  • of Tennyson's In Memoriam, and by the testimony of his contemporaries a man of the most brilliant promise, - died in 1833 at the age of twenty-two.

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  • The operation had been brilliant in the extreme, but the exploitation proved more difficult, as neither tank nor artillery support was available in sufficient strength.

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  • The whole operation, investing as it did a most complicated and yet perfect combined action, had been a most brilliant success.

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  • Despite the comparative failure of the Composite Corps the attack had on the whole been a brilliant success, seven Allied divisions having defeated nine enemy divisions ensconced in immensely powerful works, capturing from them 5,300 prisoners and ioo guns and effecting such a wide breach in the last German line of defence that its complete capture in a few days was assured.

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  • Educated at the Byzantine court, where he had been compelled to seek refuge, he was fortunate enough to win the friendship of the brilliant emperor Manuel who, before the birth of his own son Alexius, intended to make Bela his successor and betrothed him to his daughter.

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  • Bela was in every sense of the word a great statesman, and his court was accounted one of the most brilliant in Europe.

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  • Though diffusely written, and neither brilliant nor profound, Crusius' philosophical books had a great but shortlived popularity.

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  • (For the habits of these insects see Wasp.) The Chrysididae or ruby wasps are small insects with a very hard cuticle exhibiting brilliant metallic colours - blue, green and crimson.

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  • His retreat from Jaroslau to Warsaw, with the fragments of his host, amidst three converging armies, in a marshy forest region, intersected in every direction by well-guarded rivers, was one of his most brilliant achievements.

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  • On July 18-20 the combined Swedes and Brandenburgers, 18,000 strong, after a three days' battle, defeated John Casimir's army of ioo,000 at Warsaw and reoccupied the Polish capital; but this brilliant feat of arms was altogether useless, and when the suspicious attitude of Frederick William compelled the Swedish king at last to open negotiations with the Poles, they refused the terms offered, the war was resumed, and Charles concluded an offensive and defensive alliance with the elector of Brandenburg (treaty of Labiau, Nov.

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  • But Turenne was preparing for another winter campaign, the most brilliant in the great commander's career.

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  • Manius Valerius Maximus Corvinus Messalla, consul 263 B.C. In this year, with his colleague Manius Otacilius (or Octacilius) Crassus, he gained a brilliant victory over the Carthaginians and Syracusans; the honour of a triumph was decreed to him alone.

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  • In 1877 he was the Canadian nominee on the Anglo-American fisheries commission at Halifax, and rendered brilliant service.

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  • On the whole, Trajan's civil administration was sound, careful and sensible, rather than brilliant.

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  • Trajan's campaigns in the East ended in complete though brilliant failure.

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  • In the more congenial grande guerre of Russia and Germany he was in his element, and at Smolensk, Borodino and Leipzig he did brilliant service.

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  • He was a brilliant social figure in Paris.

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  • As he watched Cesare Borgia at this, the most brilliant period of his adventurous career, the man became idealized in his reflective but imaginative mind.

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  • But literary criticism is merged in admiration of the wit, the humour, the vivacity, the satire of a piece which brings before us the old life of Florence in a succession of brilliant scenes.

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  • When heated in a current of hydrogen it sublimes in the form of brilliant prismatic crystals.

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  • At his own request he was ordered east, and on the 23rd of September 1861 was made brigadier-general of volunteers and assigned to command a brigade in the Army of the Potomac. He took part in the Peninsula campaign, and the handling of his troops in the engagement at Williamsburg on the 5th of May 1862, was so brilliant that McClellan reported "Hancock was superb," an epithet always afterwards applied to him.

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  • For the elucidation of these foreign elements a new method - the traditional-historical - is necessary, and to the brilliant scholar Gunkel we owe its origination.

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  • Bright, glance or pitch coal is another brilliant variety, brittle, and breaking into regular fragments of a black colour and pitchy lustre.

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  • Some lignites are, however, quite as brilliant as anthracite; cannel and jet may be turned in the lathe, and are susceptible of taking a brilliant polish.

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  • As a historical writer he excelled chiefly in brilliant and thoughtful essays on the leading political personalities of his time, such as Paul Nagy, Bertalan, Szemere and others.

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  • Gensonne was accounted one of the most brilliant of the little band of brilliant orators from the Gironde, though his eloquence was somewhat cold and he always read his speeches.

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  • For the greater part of the year the animal is of a uniform grey colour, but about December its back becomes a brilliant orange-yellow, which lasts until about March, when it is again replaced by grey.

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  • As president of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, Franklin signed a petition to Congress (12th February 1790) for immediate abolition of slavery, and six weeks later in his most brilliant manner parodied the attack on the petition made by James Jackson (1757-1806) of Georgia, taking off Jackson's quotations of Scripture with pretended texts from the Koran cited by a member of the Divan of Algiers in opposition to a petition asking for the prohibition of holding Christians in slavery.

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  • His brilliant intellectual qualities attracted the attention of the government, and he became secretary to Prince Kurakin.

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  • This officer fought a number of brilliant actions, and aided by Major (later Colonel) G.

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  • In 1848 he removed to London to fill a post in the board of health, under Edwin Chadwick, and became a prominent member of the brilliant circle which included George Grote and John Stuart Mill.

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  • Bain resigned his professorship in 1880 and was succeeded by William Minto, one of his most brilliant pupils.

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  • Unlike his predecessors, who had rarely stayed long in Anjou, Rene from 1443 onwards paid long visits to it, and his court at Angers became one of the most brilliant in the kingdom of France.

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  • He made a brilliant success of the expedition against Louisburg in 1745, William Pepperell, a Maine officer, being in immediate command.

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  • The chief authority for his life is Tacitus, according to whom Secundus was a man of refinement and brilliant intellect.

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  • The addition of brilliant ornamentation in shell, teeth, feathers, wings of insects and dyed fibres completed the round of the textile art.

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  • Its head and neck are covered with short thick-set feathers, resembling velvet pile, of a bright straw colour above, and a brilliant emerald green beneath.

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  • The lesser bird of paradise (Paradisea minor), though smaller in size and somewhat less brilliant in plumage, in other respects closely resembles the preceding species.

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  • The king bird of paradise (Cicinnurus regius) is one of the smallest and most brilliant of the group, and is specially distinguished by its two middle tail feathers, the ends of which alone are webbed, and coiled into a beautiful spiral disk of a lovely emerald green.

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  • Accepted into this brilliant society, on familiar terms with all probably, as he certainly was with Olorus, 2 Most recent critics (e.g.

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  • The colours are often brilliant; white spots and stripes being prevalent.

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  • The large and brightly coloured bongo (Boocercus euryceros) of the equatorial forest-districts serves in some respects to connect the bushbucks with the elands, having horns in both sexes, and a tufted tail, but a brilliant orange coat with vertical white stripes.

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  • This was the most brilliant period in the history of the Ada Sanctorum.

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  • He had an unbounded admiration for Erasmus, with whom he entered into correspondence, and from whom he received a somewhat chilling patronage; whilst the brilliant humanist, Pico della Mirandola (1463-1494), taught him to criticize, in a rationalizing way, the medieval doctrines of Rome.

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  • Herein Napoleon wronged France, for he deprived her of the most brilliant cavalry soldier of the period.

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  • After the revolution of 1830 he came to Paris, formed connexions with numerous political personages, even with King Louis Philippe, and became a brilliant defender of Liberal ideas in the law courts and in the press, - witness his :loge funebre of the bishop Gregoire (1830), his Memoire for the political rehabilitation of Marshal Ney (1833), and his plea for the accused of April (1835).

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  • His defence of that place was one of the most brilliant episodes of the campaign of 1814.

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  • The lustre is metallic and brilliant.

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  • He distinguished himself by a brilliant action at the siege of Vannes in 1342; and after that he disappears from history for some years.

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  • During this period his stimulating teaching and brilliant researches attracted students from all parts, and he formed at Manchester a school of organic chemistry famous throughout Europe.

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  • The main results of his work are embodied in a very numerous and brilliant series of papers in the Transactions of the Chemical Society.

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  • In 1848 he retired to Macon; but there, as in Paris, he was the centre of a brilliant circle, for he was a wonderful causeur, and an equally good listener, and had many interesting experiences to recall.

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  • And in the brilliant campaign during the autumn of 1918 they destroyed or captured nearly the whole Turko-German army in Syria, and only stayed their advance N.

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  • Diplomatic interviews, exhausting journeys, impressive mass meetings, brilliant literary propaganda - all these methods were employed by him to the utmost limit of self-denial.

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  • It was considered a brilliant political success, but it was not profitable, and in September 1841 was merged in the Weekly Tribune.

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  • In August, on representations of the alarming state of the contest, he took the field in person, and made a series of campaign speeches, beginning in New England and extending throughout Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana, which aroused great enthusiasm, and were regarded at the time by both friends and opponents as the most brilliant continuous exhibition of varied intellectual power ever made by a candidate in a presidential canvass.

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  • His career as a minister of state, brilliant though it was, would probably have been by this time forgotten but for the record he himself has left of it in his celebrated history.

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  • The brilliant way in which he sustained his preliminary examination won him the friendship of the examiner, Bishop Jasper Brokman, at whose palace he first met Frederick III.

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  • In London the day itself was kept by a solemn service in Westminster Abbey, to which the queen went in state, surrounded by the most brilliant, royal, and princely escort that had ever accompanied a British sovereign, and cheered on her way by the applause of hundreds of thousands of her subjects.

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  • Here, most brilliant sight of all, were the Imperial Service troops sent by the native princes of India; while the detachments of Sikhs who marched earlier in the procession received their full meed of admiration and applause.

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  • England, in particular, owes much to it, for there Florence Nightingale acquired the practical knowledge which enabled her afterwards to turn her remarkable gift of organization to such brilliant account.

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  • From 1883 to 1901 he was headmaster of Westminster school; and his death, on the 19th of July 1907, deprived classical scholarship in England of one of its most brilliant modern representatives.

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  • The picturesque effect of this sculpturing by water, wind and fire is greatly enhanced by the brilliant colours along the faces of the hills and ravines - grey, yellow, black and every shade of red and brown.

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  • Few more brilliant pieces of historical writing exist than his description of the coronation procession of Anne Boleyn through the streets of London, few more full of picturesque power than that in which he relates how the spire of St Paul's was struck by lightning; and to have once read is to remember for ever the touching and stately words in which he compares the monks of the London Charterhouse preparing for death with the Spartans at Thermopylae.

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  • In 1793 he distinguished himself by the brilliant defence of a redoubt at the Col di Tenda, with only thirty men against a battalion of the enemy.

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  • But the last half of the 18th century marks the most brilliant period in the literary history of Geneva, whether as regards natives or resident foreigners, while in the succeeding half century the number of Genevese scientific celebrities is remarkable.

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  • The British infantry, aided by some of the Hanoverians, had won a brilliant success, and every man in the army looked to the British cavalry to charge and to make it a decisive victory.

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  • The Girondists were, indeed, rather a group of individuals holding certain opinions and principles in common than an organized political party, and the name was at first somewhat loosely applied to them owing to the fact that the most brilliant exponents of their point of view were deputies from the Gironde.

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  • by Torrey), who wrote in a sympathetic spirit and with special stress upon the religious side of the subject, and has been followed by many disciples, for instance, Hagenbach, Schaff and Herzog; and Baur (Das Christenthum and die christliche Kirche, 1853 ff.), the most brilliant of all, whose many historical works were dominated by the principles of the Hegelian philosophy and evinced both the merits and defects of that school.

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  • In October 732 - just 100 years after the death of Mahomet - Charles gained a brilliant victory over Abdur Rahman, who was called back to Africa by the revolts of the Berbers and had to give up the struggle.

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  • Aix possesses many beautiful fountains, one of which in the Cours Mirabeau is surmounted by a statue of Rene, count of Provence, who held a brilliant court at Aix in the 15th century.

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  • At Cambridge he was one of the most brilliant classical scholars of his time.

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  • He had a brilliant career at the school of artillery at Metz, obtained his commission in 1781, and became captain in 1788.

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  • The death of the brilliant adventurer at Vienna in 1490 came therefore as a distinct relief to Poland, and all danger from the side of Hungary was removed in 1490 when Casimir's son Wladislaus, already king of Bohemia, was elected king of Hungary also.

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  • The Jagiellos were rarely brilliant, but they were always perspicacious.

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  • On these principles he acted with brilliant results.

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  • In 1664 a peace congress was opened at Durovicha and the prospects of Poland seemed most brilliant; but at the very moment when she needed all her armed strength to sustain her diplomacy, the rebellion of one of her leading magnates, Prince Lubomirsky, involved her in a dangerous civil war, compelled her to reopen negotiations with the Muscovites, at Andrussowo, under far more unfavourable conditions, and after protracted negotiations practically to accept the Muscovite terms. By the truce of Andrussowo (Feb.

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  • Despite his brilliant military achievements (see John King Of Poland), his reign of twenty-two years was a failure.

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  • Alexander of Russia directed his own diplomacy, and round him he had gathered a brilliant body of men who could express but not control their master's desires.

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  • At last Burnside moved forward, and, after a brilliant defence by the handful of men left to oppose him, forced the Antietam and began to roll up Lee's right, only to be attacked in rear himself by A.

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  • For some years Henrietta Maria's chief interests lay in her young family, and in the amusements of a gay and brilliant court.

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  • Much of Holbach's fame is due to his intimate connexion with the brilliant coterie of bold thinkers and polished wits whose creed, the new philosophy, is concentrated in the famous Encyclopedie.

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  • Lord Rosse had therefore no help towards his brilliant results.

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  • His speculum metal is composed of four atoms of copper (126.4 parts) and one of tin (58.9 parts), a brilliant alloy, which resists tarnish better than any other compound tried.

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  • The wide popularity of his brilliant lectures in the " schools " of Paris made this city the resort of the many students who were ultimately organized as a " university " (c. 1170).

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  • He was not so much a scientific scholar as a keen and brilliant man of letters and a widely influential apostle of humanism.

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  • Even at the close of the previous century the brilliant achievements of French literature had prompted La Bruyere vs.

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  • As crown prince he distinguished himself by his brilliant victory over the Tatars at Kopersztyn in 1487.

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  • A slight campaign in New Mexico took place in February 1862, in which several brilliant tactical successes were won by the Texan forces, but no permanent foothold was secured by them.

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  • On the whole, the first part of the western campaign was uniformly a brilliant success for the Federal arms. General H.

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  • Like Buell, McClellan had tempered the tools with which others were to strike; he was not again employed, and in his fall was involved his most brilliant subordinate, Fitz John Porter.

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  • Burnside and the new Army of the Ohio had now cleared east Tennessee and occupied Knoxville (September 2), and meanwhile Rosecrans by a brilliant movement, in which he displayed no less daring in execution than skill in planning, once more manoeuvred Bragg out of his position and occupied Chattanooga.

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  • In the closing months of the year Grant's brilliant cavalry commander Sheridan had been put in command of an army to operate against Early in the Valley.

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  • After a brilliant university career at the university of Brunswick, at Edinburgh and Heidelberg, he returned to Canada and taught in various local schools, eventually becoming professor of classics and history in the local university.

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  • A careful and even brilliant financier, and a keen debater, he became known as a strong believer in protection for Canadian industries and in preferential trade within the British empire.

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  • The conduct of Lord Cochrane, as he was called till the death of his father, was brilliant and was rewarded by the order of the Bath, but his aggressive temper led him into making attacks on the admiral which necessitated a court-martial on Gambier.

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  • The best sides of his character were his brilliant social gifts and his intense devotion to literature and art.

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  • From 1875 onwards Smith contributed to the 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica a long series of important articles, which, together with the articles of Cheyne, Wellhausen and others, made that work an important factor in the change which was to pass over English thought in regard to the Bible; in 1878, by his pleadings in the trial for heresy brought against him on the ground of these articles, he turned a personal defeat in the immediate issue into a notable victory for the cause which led to his condemnation; and subsequently (in 1880), in two series of lectures, afterwards published 2 and widely read, he gave a brilliant, and, as it proved, to a rapidly increasing number a convincing exposition of the criticism of the literature, history and religion of Israel, which was already represented in Germany 2 The Old Testament in the Jewish Church (1881); The Prophets of Israel (1882).

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  • Space forbids any attempt to sketch here the special growth of criticism in other countries, such as France, where the brilliant genius of Renan was in part devoted to the Old Testament, or within the Roman Catholic Church, which possesses in Pere Lagrange, for example, a deservedly influential critical scholar, and in the Revue Biblique an organ which devotes much attention to the critical study of the Old Testament.

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  • This is significant enough; Prof. Sayce, the most brilliant and distinguished of the " anti-critics," does not really reoccupy the position of the " able and pious men " of the mid-19th century, to whom " even to speak of any portion of the Bible as a history " was " an outrage upon religion " (Stanley, Jewish Church, Preface); these may still have pious, but they have no longer scholarly successors.

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  • He owed his political influence chiefly to his rank, his mild disposition, and his personal integrity, for his talents were in no sense brilliant, and he was deficient in practical energy as well as in intellectual grasp.

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  • The Edinburgh Review, on the other hand, enlisted a brilliant and independent staff of contributors, guided by the editor, not the publisher.

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  • The particular work which provided the starting-point 'of an article was in many cases merely the occasion for the exposition, always brilliant and incisive, of the author's views on politics, social subjects, ethics or literature.

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  • William from his early youth accompanied his father in his campaigns, and already in 1643 highly distinguished himself in a brilliant cavalry fight at Burgerhout (September 5).

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  • It was no time for brilliant initiative or adventurous politics; the need was to avoid Scylla and Charybdis, and a via media had to be found in church and state, at home and abroad.

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  • Lives by Collins (1732), Charlton and Melvil (1738), were followed by Nares's biography in three of the most ponderous volumes (1828-1831) in the language; this provoked Macaulay's brilliant but misleading essay.

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  • But Hubert owed his success to the skill with which he manoeuvred for the weather-gage, and his victory was not less brilliant than momentous.

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  • The brilliant French naturalist Georges Louis Leclerc, comte de Buffon (1707-1788), in Les Epoques de la nature, included in his vast speculations the theory of alternate submergence and emergence of the continents.

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  • The brilliant theories of the palaeobotanist, Oswald Heer, as to the extension of a sub-tropical climate to Europe and even to extreme northern latitudes in Tertiary time, which have appealed to the imagination and found their way so widely into literature, are now challenged by J.

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  • Louis Dollo especially has Fossorial Amphibious Digitigrade Grass Herb Herbivorous Shrub Fruit Root Dentition reduced Omnivorous Fish Carnivorous-{Flesh Carrion contributed most brilliant discussions of the theory of alternations of habitat as applied to the interpretation of the anatomy of the marsupials, of many kinds of fishes, of such reptiles as the herbivorous dinosaurs of the Upper Cretaceous.

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  • by Groebe, 1906, pp. 125-829), and the brilliant but partial panegyric of Th.

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  • 24.1) that a brilliant vision appeared from above to the worldcreating angels; they were unable to hold it fast, but formed man after its image.

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  • The common soldiers went into battle brilliant in savage war-paint, but those of higher rank had helmets like birds and beasts of prey, armour of gold and silver, wooden greaves, and especially the ichcapilli, the quilted cotton tunic two fingers thick, so serviceable as a protection from arrows that the Spanish invaders were glad to adopt it.

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  • An important character, and one by which the mineral may always be recognized, is the perfect cubical cleavage, on which the lustre is brilliant and metallic. The colour of the mineral and of its streak is lead-grey; it is opaque; the hardness is 2 2 and the specific gravity 7.5.

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  • But both failed - Lamartine almost ludicrously - while Thiers in hard conditions made a striking if not a brilliant success.

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  • Christiansen found, in an investigation of this kind, that the refractivity of the liquid could only be got to match that of the powder for mono-chromatic light, and that, if white light were used, brilliant colour effects were obtained, which varied in a remarkable manner when small changes occurred in the refractive index of the liquid.

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  • It happened to him, as he himself claimed, to turn a page in the history of thought, and one cannot ignore the actual advance upon his predecessor achieved by him or the brilliant fertility of the genius by which that achievement was accomplished.

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  • Yet it would be unjust to ignore the many brilliant and sometimes valuable thoughts that are scattered throughout the writings on Naturphilosophie - thoughts to which Schelling himself is but too frequently untrue.

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  • His brilliant.

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  • brucei) in cattle and horses laid low with nagana or the tsetse-fly disease; and this worker subsequently demonstrated, in a brilliant manner, the essential part played by the tsetse-fly in transmitting the parasites.

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  • In 1857 he published his best known work, the System of Analytical Mechanics, which was, however, surpassed in brilliant originality by his Linear Associative Algebra (lithographed privately in a few copies, 1870; reprinted in the Amer.

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  • A brilliant examination for the degree of bachelor procured him, in 1588, admittance on the foundation to the university of Tubingen, where he laid up a copious store of classical erudition, and imbibed Copernican principles from the private instructions of his teacher and life-long friend, Michael Maestlin.

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  • 24, 1601) a brilliant career seemed to be thrown open to Kepler.

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  • He dedicated to the emperor in 1603 a treatise on the "great conjunction" of that year (Judicium de trigono igneo); and he published his observations on a brilliant star which appeared suddenly (Sept.

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  • In 1187 a four years' truce was broken by the brilliant brigand Renaud de Chatillon and thus began Saladin's third period of conquest.

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  • Though in July Richard secured two brilliant victories at Jaffa, the treaty made on the 2nd of September was a triumph for Saladin.

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  • Their pharmacological action is as obscure as their effects in certain diseased conditions are consistently brilliant and unexampled.

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  • With the exception of a high dado, itself very beautiful, made of marble slabs with bands of mosaic between them, the whole interior surface of the walls, including soffits and jambs of all the arches, is covered with minute mosaic-pictures in brilliant colours on a gold ground.

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  • Francois had brilliant successes when studying at Avignon in the lycee where he was afterwards professor (1815); he returned to Aix to study law, and in 1818 was called to the bar, where his eloquence would have ensured his success had he not preferred the career of an historian.

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  • Flora.The Alpine flora, which is found in the United States only on the tops of those mountains which rise above the limit of trees, consists principally of a variety of plants which bloom as soon as the snow melts and for a short season make a brilliant display of colors.

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  • The brilliant period of history for which Kensington is famous may be dated from the settlement of the Court here by William III.

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  • Subsequently, however, (1780) he met the king again at Spa and completely won the monarch's favour by his natural amiability, intelligence and brilliant social gifts.

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  • The Mufaddaliyat differs from the Hamasa in being a collection of complete odes (gasidas), while the latter is an anthology of brilliant passages specially selected for their interest or effectiveness, all that is prosaic or less striking being pruned away.

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  • We are thus presented with a view of the literature of the age which is much more characteristic and comprehensive than that given by the brilliant poet to whom we owe the Ilamasa, and enables us to form a better judgment on the general level of poetic achievement.

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  • The winters are brilliant but cold, and the summers average from 60° to 65° F., with generally clear skies and a bracing atmosphere which makes these regions favourite summer resorts for the people of the cities to the south.

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  • In Europe it saw the brilliant victories of Marlborough; in America it was less decisive, but France lost heavily.

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