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brighton

brighton

brighton Sentence Examples

  • from London by the London, Brighton and South Coast railway.

  • from London by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway.

  • The tendency of the currents in the Channel opposite Brighton is to drive the shingle eastward, and encroachments of the sea were frequent and serious until the erection of a massive sea-wall, begun about 1830, 60 ft.

  • Educational establishments are numerous, and include Brighton College, which ranks high among English public schools.

  • Although there is evidence of Roman and Saxon occupation of the site, the earliest mention of Brighton (Bristelmeston, Brichelmestone, Brighthelmston) is the Domesday Book record that its three manors belonged to Earl Godwin and were held by William de Warenne.

  • That Brighton was a large fishing village in 1086 is evident from the rent of 4000 herrings; in 1285 it had a separate constable, and in 1333 it was assessed for a tenth and fifteenth at £5:4:64, half the assessment of Shoreham.

  • Brighton refused a charter offered by George, prince of Wales, but was incorporated in 1854.

  • Melville, Brighton, its History, its Follies and its Fashions (London, 1909).

  • HOVE, a municipal borough of Sussex, England, adjoining the watering-place of Brighton on the west, on the London, Brighton, & South Coast railway.

  • The great seawall of Brighton continues along the front at Hove, forming a pleasant promenade.

  • The municipal borough, incorporated in 1898, includes the parishes of Hove and Aldrington, of which the first is within the parliamentary borough of Brighton, but the second is in the Lewes division of the county.

  • Glasgow opened its exchange in March 1901, Tunbridge Wells in May 1901, Portsmouth in March 1903, Brighton in October 1903, Swansea in November 1903 and Hull in October 1904.

  • The Tunbridge Wells and Swansea municipal undertakings were subsequently sold to the National Telephone Company, and the Glasgow and Brighton undertakings to the Post Office.

  • In those cases in which the company's licence has been extended beyond 1911 (Glasgow to 1913, Swansea to 1926, Brighton to 1926 and Portsmouth to 1926) the Postmaster-General will buy the unexpired licence with allowance for goodwill.

  • The total number of subscribers to the Post Office provincial exchanges on the 31st of March 1907 (excluding those in Glasgow and Brighton) was 10,010, and the number of telephones rented was 12,006.

  • The Glasgow system included 11,103 subscribers' lines with 12,964 telephones, and the Brighton system contained 1542 subscribers lines with 1884 telephones.

  • A remarkably fine cup turned in amber from a bronze-age barrow at Hove is now in the Brighton Museum.

  • from London by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway, on the English Channel at the mouth of the Ouse.

  • At the new Victoria station (London) of the London, Brighton & South Coast railway - which is so long that two trains can stand end to end at the platforms - this system is extended so as to permit a train to start out from the inner end of a platform even though another train is occupying the outer end.

  • of London by the South Eastern & Chatham railway, served also by a branch of the London Brighton & South Coast line.

  • The London, Brighton & South Coast railway has its western terminus at Victoria, and its central terminus at London Bridge, on the south side of the Thames.

  • Thus the West London Extension line carries local traffic between the North Western and Great Western and the Brighton and South-Western systems, while the Metropolitan Extension through the City connects the Midland and Great Northern with the South-Eastern & Chatham lines.

  • The watering-places of the Sussex, Kent and Essex coasts, and pre-eminently Brighton, are specially favoured for these brief holidays.

  • of London, on the London, Brighton & South Coast and the South-Eastern & Chatham railways.

  • from its confluence with the Ohio, opposite New Brighton, and about 32 m.

  • Beaver Falls was first settled in 1801; was laid out as a town and named Brighton in 1806; received its present name a few years later; and in 1868 was incorporated as a borough.

  • dozens in a morning near Brighton.

  • of London by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway.

  • of London Bridge by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway.

  • of Chichester by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway; served also by the London & South Western railway.

  • Robertson of Brighton and F.

  • from London by the London & South Western and the London, Brighton & South Coast railways.

  • Windsor she considered too stately, and the Pavilion at Brighton too uncomfortable.

  • The principal villages are New Brighton, West New Brighton, Port Richmond, Stapleton, and Tompkinsville on the north coast, and Tottenville (or Bentley Manor) on the south-west coast.

  • At West New Brighton is a large dyeing establishment, there are also ship-building yards, oyster fisheries, and truck farms, and among the maufactures are linoleum, paper, white lead, linseed oil, brick, and fire-clay products.

  • At school he made little progress, and left at the age of fifteen for his father's counting-house at Brighton.

  • radius is another circle - to the east Kew (9469) and Hawthorne (21,430), to the south-east St Kilda (20,542) and Brighton (10,047), to the south-west Williamstown (14,052) and Footscray (18,318), to the north-west Essenden (17,426), and Flemington and Kensington (10,946), and to the north Brunswick (24,141).

  • 1797), the hydrographer; Malcolm Laing (1762-1818), author of the History of Scotland from the Union of the Crowns to the Union of the Kingdoms; Mary Brunton (1778-1818), author of Self-Control, Discipline and other novels; Samuel Laing (1780-1868), author of A Residence in Norway, and translator of the Heimskringla, the Icelandic chronicle of the kings of Norway; Thomas Stewart Traill (1781-1862), professor of medical jurisprudence in Edinburgh University and editor of the 8th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica; Samuel Laing (1812-1897), chairman of the London, Brighton & South Coast railway, and introducer of the system of "parliamentary" trains with fares of one penny a mile; Dr John Rae (1813-1893), the Arctic explorer; and William Balfour Baikie (1825-1864), the African traveller.

  • He died at Brighton on the 25th of October 1825.

  • He accompanied the family sometimes to Bath, and sometimes to Brighton, once to Wales and once to Paris.

  • In September 1782 the place at Streatham was from motives of economy let to Lord Shelburne, and Mrs Thrale took a house at Brighton, whither Johnson accompanied her; they remained for six weeks on the old familiar footing.

  • A statue was erected in St Paul's in 1825, and there are commemorative tablets in Lichfield Cathedral, St Nicholas (Brighton), Uttoxeter, St Clement Danes (London), Gwaynynog and elsewhere.

  • The young Lord Dalmeny was educated at Brighton and at Eton, where he had as slightly junior contemporaries Mr A.

  • The massively moulded ormolu stair balustrade of Northumberland House, now at 49 Prince's Gate; the candelabra at Windsor and Buckingham Palace, produced in Birmingham by the firm of Messenger; the cast-iron railings with javelin heads and lictors' fasces, the tripods, Corinthian column standard lamps and candelabra, boat-shaped oil lamps and tent-shaped lustres with classic mountings, are examples of the metal-work of a style which, outside the eccentric Brighton Pavilion and excursions into Gothic and Elizabethan, was universally accepted in the United Kingdom from the days of the Regency until after the accession of Victoria.

  • south to Seaside Park (15 acres), on Brighton Beach, Coney Island.

  • from London, on the London & South-Western and the London, Brighton & South Coast railways.

  • From this Ruge soon withdrew, and in 1850 went to Brighton, where he supported himself by teaching and writing.

  • There is more than one meaning of Brighton discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • He died at Brighton on the 4th of October 1806.

  • from Worcester, where he separated himself from all his followers except Wilmot, concealing himself in the famous oak during the 6th of September, moving subsequently to Boscobel, to Moseley and Bentley Hall, and thence, disguised as Miss Lane's attendant, to Abbots Leigh near Bristol, to Trent in Somersetshire, and finally to the George Inn at Brighton, having been recognized during the forty-one days of his wanderings by about fifty persons, none of whom, in spite of the reward of £1000 offered for his capture, or of the death penalty threatened for aiding his concealment, had betrayed him.

  • of Brighton by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway.

  • It was now decided that Prince, Starkey (whose sister Prince had married as his second wife) and the Rev. Lewis Prince should leave the Church of England and preach their own gospel; Prince opened Adullam Chapel, Brighton, and Starkey established himself at Weymouth.

  • Brighton, Eastbourne, Dover, Chatham, or in the gaps where rivers from the centre pierce the Chalk ring, as at Guildford, Rochester, Canterbury, Lewes and Arundel.

  • London, Brighton & South Coast (1846).

  • Some through trains are provided between the North-Western and the London, Brighton & South Coast lines via Willesden Junction, Addison Road and Clapham Junction; and a through connexion by way of Ludgate Hill has been arranged between main line trains of the South-Western and the Great Northern railways, but otherwise passengers travelling through London have generally to make their own way from one terminus to another.

  • Newhaven to Dieppe (London, Brighton & South Coast railway).

  • NEW BRIGHTON, a borough of Beaver county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on Beaver river, 2 m.

  • New Brighton was laid out as a town in 1815 and was incorporated as a borough in 1838.

  • SOUTHSEA, a seaside resort of Hampshire, England, part of the municipal and parliamentary borough of Portsmouth, with a terminal station (East Southsea) on a branch of the London & South-Western and London, Brighton & South Coast railways.

  • Still he remained as sunny and genial as ever, looking from his Cambridge study windows across the Brighton meadows to the Brookline hills, or enjoying the "free wild winds of the Atlantic," and listening to "The Bells of Lynn" in his Nahant home.

  • FREDERICK WILLIAM ROBERTSON (1816-1853), English divine, known as Robertson of Brighton, was born in London on the 3rd of February 1816.

  • After this mental revolution he felt unable to return to Cheltenham, but after doing duty for two months at St Ebbe's, Oxford, he entered in August 1847 on his famous ministry at Trinity Chapel, Brighton.

  • New Brighton, New York >>

  • In 1838 he went into the office of John Urpeth Rastrick, one of the leading railway engineers of the day, where he was employed in designing bridges for the line from London to Brighton, and also in surveying for railways in Lancashire.

  • The exertions which he made to retrieve his waning influence proved too much for his strength, and in the autumn of 1891 he died suddenly at Brighton.

  • The original township of Cambridge was very large, and there have been successively detached from it, Newton (1691), Lexington (1713), Brighton (1837) and Arlington (1867).

  • It is served by the London & South-Western and the London, Brighton & South Coast railways, and on the racecourse on the neighbouring Downs there is a station (Tattenham Corner) of the South-Eastern & Chatham railway.

  • On the 6th of October 1891 he died at Brighton, from the effects of a chill following on overwork and excitement.

  • Several railway stations give it communication with all parts of the metropolis, the principal railways serving it being the London, Brighton & South Coast and the South-Eastern & Chatham.

  • There are tramways in the city, and to New Brighton, a seaside suburb, and other residential quarters.

  • Anglo-Catholic parish in Brighton.

  • bandsmanening ceremony in the afternoon eventually started, despite the professional bandsmen losing themselves all over Brighton.

  • The Arlanda Hotel, Brighton Our newly refurbished bedrooms all have en-suite facilities.

  • Larger zones are planned in cities that, unlike Brighton & Hove, did not miss the funding boat.

  • vital clue to Identity of another deep wreck off Brighton.

  • Later Brighton had the main convalescent and holiday home for all war-blinded in the south at West House.

  • rising crescendo Milligan: (vicar) It started in Brighton - 1898 - the year of the great Edison Bell.

  • droll observations, however, consistently managed to remind us what a strange little world Brighton can sometimes be.

  • electrifynsell designed four car 4 Lav was built at Eastleigh for use on the newly electrified Brighton Line.

  • eligible to join the Brighton Circle Email group.

  • enuresis services in Hastings and Rother Top of Page There are enuresis services across East Sussex, Brighton and Hove.

  • erected as a permanent memorial to the use of the various Brighton buildings for the Indian wounded.

  • The Brighton Adonis show (a hen party extravaganza!

  • extreme weather, we start the cruise with boats scattered from Poole to Brighton.

  • fellow strugglers Brighton.

  • A drawing recording the attack by the French fleet on Brighton is preserved in the Hove Museum.

  • football league clubs - one was a striker at Brighton.

  • In October 1891, aged forty-five, Parnell died in Brighton, Sussex.

  • Kieran who has been playing golf for three years said: " I play at New Brighton.

  • greyhound stadia: Brighton and Hove and Romford.

  • I saw police armed with machine guns last week in Brighton.

  • What happens when open source, freely available linde combination handler products like GNU Radio become... Brighton moves ahead with pre-WiMax network.

  • housebound people in Brighton & Hove 365 days a year.

  • St Dunstan's Ovingdean, its National Center in Brighton is a thriving hub of activity.

  • Both have been with football league clubs - one was a striker at Brighton.

  • liberal MP for Brighton.

  • Brighton & Hove celebrated the Golden Jubilee in 2002 with two specially liveried Plaxton President bodied Dennis Tridents.

  • machine guns last week in Brighton.

  • manhandled by stewards out of his seat and ejected from the Brighton Center.

  • Crewe's left-sided midfielder David Vaughan looks set to miss the vital six-pointer against Brighton & Hove Albion this coming Saturday.

  • And by now there was a whole new wave of Brighton bands and punk venues, which were bursting at the seams.

  • night watchmanolice came into being in Brighton, 1810 Town Act authorized Town Commissioners to appoint night watchmen.

  • Loads of daytime activities including paintball, karting, Brighton Racecourse, hangliding, ballooning and sea fishing trips.

  • Brian Rix plays a Brighton antique dealer with a talking parrot whom he believes is the reincarnation of his dead partner Ronald Shiner.

  • pedestrian underpass and trains from Falmer run to Brighton, Hove and Lewes.

  • punctual service for all users of the Brighton Main Line, with improved reliability.

  • Well like the sound recordist Stewart Bruce, he's got his own sound recording business down in Brighton.

  • reproduced with permission from Brighton Local Studies library Comments: " St.

  • Having lived in Brighton 30 years sago he wanted to see if he could locate any of his old haunts.

  • Private gardens become public tea shops as Brighton residents mingle and admire the sculptures.

  • Brighton and Hove combine to offer Regency and Georgian grandeur, miles of Victorian seafront and social life opportunities rarely found outside central London.

  • Answers to: EMail Glaucus@hotmail.com seashells washed Up at Brighton Children can collect seashells washed in by the tide and deposited on the strandline.

  • There was an aquarium here in Victorian times - they used to bring the seawater for the tanks up from Brighton on the train!

  • self catering accomodation in central Brighton.

  • Crown Gardens offers stylish luxury self catering accomodation in central Brighton.

  • It also hosts the only skateboard run in Brighton town center.

  • snapshot survey to see how HIV patients in Brighton felt about using their GP.

  • A minor news snippet of progress on the Bluebell's Brighton Atlantic project.

  • speciality food and drink The main gastronomic specialty of Brighton is of course fish and seafood.

  • Coral Betting and Coral Eurobet owns and operates two of the countries leading greyhound stadia: Brighton and Hove and Romford.

  • I remembered the very strong-minded captain of the two Chinese ladies teams for her appearance in Brighton a few years back.

  • By Simon Hope Moshi Moshi is Brighton's original conveyor belt sushi bar - not a noodle in sight here!

  • Sussex posted: Mon Jul 19, 2004 8:53 am Move down to Brighton, we will put loads of work your way.

  • east Sussex Posted: Mon Jul 19, 2004 8:53 am Move down to Brighton, we will put loads of work your way.

  • town planner from Brighton who received his new kidney in 1987, is the player with the longest-surviving transplant.

  • Local pub the Three Jolly Butchers emerged triumphant with their blazing yellow Albion kit, very kindly donated by the Brighton football club.

  • two-piece set in Brighton, and from the intro in the first song, I knew they would be great.

  • The dark underbelly of the Brighton music scene from 1976 to 1980.

  • unique opportunity to run through the streets of Brighton.

  • Brighton has more pubs than days in the year and an incredibly vibrant world-renowned club scene.

  • Don't miss a chance to hear this wonderfully soulful, exuberant vocalist & his quartet on a rare outing to Brighton.

  • We are proposing to construct an 11km long sewer to transfer wastewater from Black Rock in Brighton to our planned new site at Peacehaven.

  • Situated on the coast Wallasey offers a lovely beach and promenade leading to New Brighton's famous waterfront.

  • In 1860 William Brighton, who built the famous wherry Albion, worked in the Bungay Staithe area.

  • Perhaps they should have used local sparkling wine instead from a vineyard nearer to Brighton!

  • from London by the London, Brighton and South Coast railway.

  • BRIGHTON, a municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Sussex, England, one of the best-known seaside resorts in the United Kingdom, 51 m.

  • from London by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway.

  • The tendency of the currents in the Channel opposite Brighton is to drive the shingle eastward, and encroachments of the sea were frequent and serious until the erection of a massive sea-wall, begun about 1830, 60 ft.

  • Educational establishments are numerous, and include Brighton College, which ranks high among English public schools.

  • Although there is evidence of Roman and Saxon occupation of the site, the earliest mention of Brighton (Bristelmeston, Brichelmestone, Brighthelmston) is the Domesday Book record that its three manors belonged to Earl Godwin and were held by William de Warenne.

  • That Brighton was a large fishing village in 1086 is evident from the rent of 4000 herrings; in 1285 it had a separate constable, and in 1333 it was assessed for a tenth and fifteenth at £5:4:64, half the assessment of Shoreham.

  • In 1580 commissioners sent to decide disputes between the fishermen and landsmen found that from time immemorial Brighton had been governed by two head boroughs sitting in the borough court, and assisted by a council called the Twelve.

  • Brighton refused a charter offered by George, prince of Wales, but was incorporated in 1854.

  • From a fishing town in 1656 it became a fashionable resort in 1756; its popularity increased after the visit of the prince of Wales (see George Iv.) to the duke of Cumberland in 1783, and was ensured by his building the Pavilion in 1784-1787, and his adoption of it as his principal residence; and his association with Mrs Fitzherbert at Brighton was the starting-point of its fashionable repute.

  • Melville, Brighton, its History, its Follies and its Fashions (London, 1909).

  • HOVE, a municipal borough of Sussex, England, adjoining the watering-place of Brighton on the west, on the London, Brighton, & South Coast railway.

  • The great seawall of Brighton continues along the front at Hove, forming a pleasant promenade.

  • The municipal borough, incorporated in 1898, includes the parishes of Hove and Aldrington, of which the first is within the parliamentary borough of Brighton, but the second is in the Lewes division of the county.

  • By 1907 altogether 59 local authorities had examined the proposition of establishing telephone systems after 1899, and licences were granted to local authorities at Brighton, Belfast, Chard, Glasgow, Grantham, Huddersfield, Hull, Portsmouth, Swansea, Tunbridge Wells, Oldham, Scarborough and Hartle - pool, but only six municipalities proceeded with the business.

  • Glasgow opened its exchange in March 1901, Tunbridge Wells in May 1901, Portsmouth in March 1903, Brighton in October 1903, Swansea in November 1903 and Hull in October 1904.

  • The Tunbridge Wells and Swansea municipal undertakings were subsequently sold to the National Telephone Company, and the Glasgow and Brighton undertakings to the Post Office.

  • In those cases in which the company's licence has been extended beyond 1911 (Glasgow to 1913, Swansea to 1926, Brighton to 1926 and Portsmouth to 1926) the Postmaster-General will buy the unexpired licence with allowance for goodwill.

  • The total number of subscribers to the Post Office provincial exchanges on the 31st of March 1907 (excluding those in Glasgow and Brighton) was 10,010, and the number of telephones rented was 12,006.

  • The Glasgow system included 11,103 subscribers' lines with 12,964 telephones, and the Brighton system contained 1542 subscribers lines with 1884 telephones.

  • A remarkably fine cup turned in amber from a bronze-age barrow at Hove is now in the Brighton Museum.

  • from London by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway, on the English Channel at the mouth of the Ouse.

  • At the new Victoria station (London) of the London, Brighton & South Coast railway - which is so long that two trains can stand end to end at the platforms - this system is extended so as to permit a train to start out from the inner end of a platform even though another train is occupying the outer end.

  • The area of the original Boston was only 783 acres, but by the filling in of tidal flats (since 1804) this was increased to 1829 acres; while the larger corporate Boston of the present day - including the annexed territories of South Boston (1804), Roxbury (1868), Charlestown, Dorchester, Brighton and West Roxbury (1874) - comprehends almost 43 sq.

  • of London by the South Eastern & Chatham railway, served also by a branch of the London Brighton & South Coast line.

  • The London, Brighton & South Coast railway has its western terminus at Victoria, and its central terminus at London Bridge, on the south side of the Thames.

  • Thus the West London Extension line carries local traffic between the North Western and Great Western and the Brighton and South-Western systems, while the Metropolitan Extension through the City connects the Midland and Great Northern with the South-Eastern & Chatham lines.

  • The watering-places of the Sussex, Kent and Essex coasts, and pre-eminently Brighton, are specially favoured for these brief holidays.

  • of London, on the London, Brighton & South Coast and the South-Eastern & Chatham railways.

  • from its confluence with the Ohio, opposite New Brighton, and about 32 m.

  • Beaver Falls was first settled in 1801; was laid out as a town and named Brighton in 1806; received its present name a few years later; and in 1868 was incorporated as a borough.

  • dozens in a morning near Brighton.

  • of London by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway.

  • of London Bridge by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway.

  • of Chichester by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway; served also by the London & South Western railway.

  • Robertson of Brighton and F.

  • from London by the London & South Western and the London, Brighton & South Coast railways.

  • Windsor she considered too stately, and the Pavilion at Brighton too uncomfortable.

  • The principal villages are New Brighton, West New Brighton, Port Richmond, Stapleton, and Tompkinsville on the north coast, and Tottenville (or Bentley Manor) on the south-west coast.

  • At West New Brighton is a large dyeing establishment, there are also ship-building yards, oyster fisheries, and truck farms, and among the maufactures are linoleum, paper, white lead, linseed oil, brick, and fire-clay products.

  • At school he made little progress, and left at the age of fifteen for his father's counting-house at Brighton.

  • radius is another circle - to the east Kew (9469) and Hawthorne (21,430), to the south-east St Kilda (20,542) and Brighton (10,047), to the south-west Williamstown (14,052) and Footscray (18,318), to the north-west Essenden (17,426), and Flemington and Kensington (10,946), and to the north Brunswick (24,141).

  • 1797), the hydrographer; Malcolm Laing (1762-1818), author of the History of Scotland from the Union of the Crowns to the Union of the Kingdoms; Mary Brunton (1778-1818), author of Self-Control, Discipline and other novels; Samuel Laing (1780-1868), author of A Residence in Norway, and translator of the Heimskringla, the Icelandic chronicle of the kings of Norway; Thomas Stewart Traill (1781-1862), professor of medical jurisprudence in Edinburgh University and editor of the 8th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica; Samuel Laing (1812-1897), chairman of the London, Brighton & South Coast railway, and introducer of the system of "parliamentary" trains with fares of one penny a mile; Dr John Rae (1813-1893), the Arctic explorer; and William Balfour Baikie (1825-1864), the African traveller.

  • He died at Brighton on the 25th of October 1825.

  • He accompanied the family sometimes to Bath, and sometimes to Brighton, once to Wales and once to Paris.

  • In September 1782 the place at Streatham was from motives of economy let to Lord Shelburne, and Mrs Thrale took a house at Brighton, whither Johnson accompanied her; they remained for six weeks on the old familiar footing.

  • A statue was erected in St Paul's in 1825, and there are commemorative tablets in Lichfield Cathedral, St Nicholas (Brighton), Uttoxeter, St Clement Danes (London), Gwaynynog and elsewhere.

  • The young Lord Dalmeny was educated at Brighton and at Eton, where he had as slightly junior contemporaries Mr A.

  • The massively moulded ormolu stair balustrade of Northumberland House, now at 49 Prince's Gate; the candelabra at Windsor and Buckingham Palace, produced in Birmingham by the firm of Messenger; the cast-iron railings with javelin heads and lictors' fasces, the tripods, Corinthian column standard lamps and candelabra, boat-shaped oil lamps and tent-shaped lustres with classic mountings, are examples of the metal-work of a style which, outside the eccentric Brighton Pavilion and excursions into Gothic and Elizabethan, was universally accepted in the United Kingdom from the days of the Regency until after the accession of Victoria.

  • south to Seaside Park (15 acres), on Brighton Beach, Coney Island.

  • from London, on the London & South-Western and the London, Brighton & South Coast railways.

  • From this Ruge soon withdrew, and in 1850 went to Brighton, where he supported himself by teaching and writing.

  • There is more than one meaning of Brighton discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • He died at Brighton on the 4th of October 1806.

  • from Worcester, where he separated himself from all his followers except Wilmot, concealing himself in the famous oak during the 6th of September, moving subsequently to Boscobel, to Moseley and Bentley Hall, and thence, disguised as Miss Lane's attendant, to Abbots Leigh near Bristol, to Trent in Somersetshire, and finally to the George Inn at Brighton, having been recognized during the forty-one days of his wanderings by about fifty persons, none of whom, in spite of the reward of £1000 offered for his capture, or of the death penalty threatened for aiding his concealment, had betrayed him.

  • of Brighton by the London, Brighton & South Coast railway.

  • It was now decided that Prince, Starkey (whose sister Prince had married as his second wife) and the Rev. Lewis Prince should leave the Church of England and preach their own gospel; Prince opened Adullam Chapel, Brighton, and Starkey established himself at Weymouth.

  • Brighton, Eastbourne, Dover, Chatham, or in the gaps where rivers from the centre pierce the Chalk ring, as at Guildford, Rochester, Canterbury, Lewes and Arundel.

  • London, Brighton & South Coast (1846).

  • Some through trains are provided between the North-Western and the London, Brighton & South Coast lines via Willesden Junction, Addison Road and Clapham Junction; and a through connexion by way of Ludgate Hill has been arranged between main line trains of the South-Western and the Great Northern railways, but otherwise passengers travelling through London have generally to make their own way from one terminus to another.

  • Newhaven to Dieppe (London, Brighton & South Coast railway).

  • NEW BRIGHTON, a borough of Beaver county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on Beaver river, 2 m.

  • New Brighton was laid out as a town in 1815 and was incorporated as a borough in 1838.

  • SOUTHSEA, a seaside resort of Hampshire, England, part of the municipal and parliamentary borough of Portsmouth, with a terminal station (East Southsea) on a branch of the London & South-Western and London, Brighton & South Coast railways.

  • Still he remained as sunny and genial as ever, looking from his Cambridge study windows across the Brighton meadows to the Brookline hills, or enjoying the "free wild winds of the Atlantic," and listening to "The Bells of Lynn" in his Nahant home.

  • FREDERICK WILLIAM ROBERTSON (1816-1853), English divine, known as Robertson of Brighton, was born in London on the 3rd of February 1816.

  • After this mental revolution he felt unable to return to Cheltenham, but after doing duty for two months at St Ebbe's, Oxford, he entered in August 1847 on his famous ministry at Trinity Chapel, Brighton.

  • New Brighton, New York >>

  • In 1838 he went into the office of John Urpeth Rastrick, one of the leading railway engineers of the day, where he was employed in designing bridges for the line from London to Brighton, and also in surveying for railways in Lancashire.

  • The exertions which he made to retrieve his waning influence proved too much for his strength, and in the autumn of 1891 he died suddenly at Brighton.

  • The original township of Cambridge was very large, and there have been successively detached from it, Newton (1691), Lexington (1713), Brighton (1837) and Arlington (1867).

  • It is served by the London & South-Western and the London, Brighton & South Coast railways, and on the racecourse on the neighbouring Downs there is a station (Tattenham Corner) of the South-Eastern & Chatham railway.

  • On the 6th of October 1891 he died at Brighton, from the effects of a chill following on overwork and excitement.

  • Several railway stations give it communication with all parts of the metropolis, the principal railways serving it being the London, Brighton & South Coast and the South-Eastern & Chatham.

  • There are tramways in the city, and to New Brighton, a seaside suburb, and other residential quarters.

  • And so I went home to my bed, and left him to pick his way through the darkness and the mud to Brighton--or Bright-town--which place he would reach some time in the morning.

  • A more punctual service for all users of the Brighton Main Line, with improved reliability.

  • Well like the sound recordist Stewart Bruce, he 's got his own sound recording business down in Brighton.

  • St Andrew 's Church, Waterloo Street Picture reproduced with permission from Brighton Local Studies library Comments: St.

  • What happens when open source, freely available products like GNU Radio become... Brighton moves gum rosin distributor ahead with pre-WiMax network.

  • Having lived in Brighton 30 years sago he wanted to see if he could locate any of his old haunts.

  • Private gardens become public tea shops as Brighton residents mingle and admire the sculptures.

  • We wish him success but hope it does n't scupper our plans to open a Lesbian & Gay History Center here in Brighton.

  • Brighton and Hove combine to offer Regency and Georgian grandeur, miles of Victorian seafront and social life opportunities rarely found outside central London.

  • Answers to: EMail Glaucus@hotmail.com Seashells Washed Up at Brighton Children can collect seashells washed in by the tide and deposited on the strandline.

  • There was an aquarium here in Victorian times - they used to bring the seawater for the tanks up from Brighton on the train !

  • Crown Gardens offers stylish luxury self catering accomodation in central Brighton.

  • It also hosts the only skateboard run in Brighton town center.

  • Brighton buzz It would n't be our fair city without a smattering of sex shops.

  • Last autumn I conducted an anonymous snapshot survey to see how HIV patients in Brighton felt about using their GP.

  • A minor news snippet of progress on the Bluebell 's Brighton Atlantic project.

  • Brighton food and drink The main gastronomic specialty of Brighton is of course fish and seafood.

  • I remembered the very strong-minded captain of the two Chinese ladies teams for her appearance in Brighton a few years back.

  • By Simon Hope Moshi Moshi is Brighton 's original conveyor belt sushi bar - not a noodle in sight here !

  • East sussex Posted: Mon Jul 19, 2004 8:53 am Move down to Brighton, we will put loads of work your way.

  • In January 2002, David returned south joining Brighton in a swap deal for Matthew Wicks.

  • Mick Anson, a 40-year-old town planner from Brighton who received his new kidney in 1987, is the player with the longest-surviving transplant.

  • Local pub the Three Jolly Butchers emerged triumphant with their blazing yellow Albion kit, very kindly donated by the Brighton football club.

  • Just seen a two-piece set in Brighton, and from the intro in the first song, I knew they would be great.

  • The dark underbelly of the Brighton music scene from 1976 to 1980.

  • A unique opportunity to run through the streets of Brighton.

  • Brighton has more pubs than days in the year and an incredibly vibrant world-renowned club scene.

  • Do n't miss a chance to hear this wonderfully soulful, exuberant vocalist & his quartet on a rare outing to Brighton.

  • We are proposing to construct an 11km long sewer to transfer wastewater from Black Rock in Brighton to our planned new site at Peacehaven.

  • Situated on the coast Wallasey offers a lovely beach and promenade leading to New Brighton 's famous waterfront.

  • In 1860 William Brighton, who built the famous wherry Albion, worked in the Bungay Staithe area.

  • Perhaps they should have used local sparkling wine instead from a vineyard nearer to Brighton !

  • Over at New Brighton AH on Saturday the Third Eleven chasing 204 for 6 won by one wicket.

  • Born Katie Infield in Brighton, England on May 22, 1978, Katie changed her last name to Price when her mother remarried.

  • Simon Phillip Cowell was born in Brighton, East Sussex, England on October 7, 1959 to Eric Phillip and Julie Brett.

  • Don't be: between four extension centers west of Ann Arbor, in Brighton, in Hartland and Ypsilanti and a distance learning program, the school can easily find a place for you.

  • Lou Taylor Professor of dress and textile history, University of Brighton Art Nouveau and Art Deco C.

  • Brighton silver jewelry has a fun, distinctive look that is backed by quality.

  • Brighton opened its doors in 1991 with a collection of belts.

  • You may be more familiar with Brighton purses than you are with the company's jewelry line, but the jewelry has just as much to offer as the stylish handbags.

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