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brigadier-general

brigadier-general

brigadier-general Sentence Examples

  • He was adjutant-general of New York state in 1839-1843, and became a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Union army in 1861, commanded a division in Virginia in 1862-1863, and, being compelled by ill health to resign from the army, was U.S. minister to the Papal States in 1863-1867.

  • For his services at Franklin he was awarded the rank of brigadier-general (November 1864) and the brevet rank of major-general (March 1865) in the regular army.

  • In 1861 he was captain of a company (which he had raised) in the 69th regiment of New York volunteers and fought at the first battle of Bull Run; he then organized an Irish brigade, of whose first regiment he was colonel until the 3rd of February 1862, when he was appointed to the command of this organization with the rank of brigadier-general.

  • Lyons, in Brigadier-General Thomas Francis Meagher (New York, 1870), gives a eulogistic account of his career.

  • His son, Hugh Boyle Ewing (1826-1905), served throughout the Civil War in the Federal armies, rising from the rank of colonel { 1861) to that of brigadier-general (1862) and brevet majorgeneral (1865), and commanding brigades at Antietam and Vicksburg and a division at Chickamauga; and was minister of the United States to the Netherlands in 1866-1870.

  • In the Civil War he attained the rank of brigadier-general (March 1863) and received the brevet of major-general (1865).

  • In the Atlanta campaign under Sherman he gained considerable distinction, rising successively to the rank of brigadier-general in 1864 and major-general in 1865.

  • The command was given to Brigadier-General W.

  • He was captured at Shiloh and was imprisoned for a time at Madison, Ga., and in Libby prison, Richmond, Va., and in 1865 was brevetted brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He served in the Northern Campaign under his father-in-law, General Taylor, and was greatly distinguished for gallantry and soldierly conduct at Monterey and particularly at Buena Vista, where he was severely wounded early in the engagement, but continued in command of his regiment until victory crowned the American arms. While still in the field he was appointed (May 1847) by President Polk to be brigadier-general of volunteers; but this appointment Davis declined, on the ground, as he afterwards said, "that volunteers are militia and the Constitution reserves to the state the appointment of all militia officers."

  • Brigadier-General Yule then took command, and an overwhelming force of Boers rendering the further occupation of Dundee dangerous, he decided to retire his force to Ladysmith.

  • He was promoted to be brigadiergeneral of volunteers in September 1861, and to be major-general of volunteers in July 1862, earned the brevet of lieutenant-colonel in the regular army at the capture of Nashville, Tennessee, that of colonel at Shiloh, and that of brigadier-general at Perryville, and in March 1865 was breveted major-general for his services during the war.

  • He became a brigadier-general in 1890, and a major-general in 1894; retired in 1895; and in 1898-1899 served on a commission to investigate the United States department of war as administered during the war with Spain.

  • Gainesville was settled about 1851, was incorporated in 1873, and was chartered as a city in 1879; it was named in honour of General Edmund Pendleton Gaines (1777-1849), who served with distinction in the War of 1812, becoming a brigadier-general in March 1814 and receiving the brevet of major-general and the thanks of Congress for his defence of Fort Erie in August 1814.

  • Baird served also at the Cape of Good Hope as a brigadier-general, and he returned to India as a major-general in 1798.

  • Another brother, Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835-), born in Boston on the 27th of May 1835, graduated at Harvard in 1856, and served on the Union side in the Civil War, receiving in 1865 the brevet of brigadier-general in the regular army.

  • In 1861 he was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers, and had command of the 2nd brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves in the Army of the Potomac under General M'Call.

  • His reward was the commission of brigadier-general; in the regular army.

  • After some delay he was commissioned colonel of the 21st Illinois regiment and soon afterwards brigadier-general.

  • He served as a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Spanish-American War of 1898,1898, and then in the Philippines, becoming brigadiergeneral in the regular army in February 1901 and major-general in February 1906.

  • Later in the year, however, he was placed in command (by New Hampshire), with the rank of brigadier-general of militia, of a force of militiamen, with whom, on the 16th of August, near Bennington, Vermont, he defeated two detachments of Burgoyne's army under Colonel Friedrich Baum and Colonel Breyman.

  • In February 1776 he was placed in command of all the military forces of South Carolina, and in October of the same year was commissioned a brigadier-general and was taken into the Continental service; but on account of a dispute arising out of a conflict between state and Federal authority resigned his command in 1777.

  • He became colonel of a new regiment of regulars on the 14th of May, and soon afterwards brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • Promoted, brigadier-general of volunteers, Sherman was in August sent to Kentucky to serve under General Robert Anderson.

  • In July he was made a brigadier-general in the regular army.

  • Blair was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in August 1862 and a major-general in November 1862.

  • America as a brigadier-general in the Louisburg expedition under Amherst and Boscawen.

  • Gates recommended him for a brigadier-general's commission for services which another actually performed, and succeeded in gaining it, but their friendship was broken by the collapse of the Conway Cabal against Washington in which both were implicated and about which Wilkinson had indiscreetly blabbed.

  • As brigadier-general his leading of the right wing at Preston contributed greatly to the victory.

  • made brigadier-general of provincial troops in 1782.

  • On the 14th of May 1861 he was transferred to the regular army as a lieutenant-colonel, and in September he was made a brigadier-general U.S.V.

  • Enlisting in a Michigan cavalry regiment in September 1861, he rose from captain to colonel, distinguished himself in the Gettysburg campaign and under Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, and in 1864 and 1865 respectively received the brevets of brigadier-general and major-general of volunteers.

  • At his own request he was ordered east, and on the 23rd of September 1861 was made brigadier-general of volunteers and assigned to command a brigade in the Army of the Potomac. He took part in the Peninsula campaign, and the handling of his troops in the engagement at Williamsburg on the 5th of May 1862, was so brilliant that McClellan reported "Hancock was superb," an epithet always afterwards applied to him.

  • In August he was promoted to brigadier-general in the regular army.

  • With the artillery reserve he rendered the greatest assistance at the battle of Malvern Hill, and soon afterwards he became chief of artillery in the Army of the Potomac. On the day after the battle of South Mountain he was made brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He served in Virginia to the end of the war, attaining the brevet ranks of major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general of regulars.

  • His brother, Lewis Cass Hunt (1824-1886), served throughout the Civil War in the infantry arm, becoming brigadier-general of volunteers in 1862, and brevet brigadier-general U.S.A. in 1865.

  • Confederate cavalry under Brigadier-General William Lewis Cabell attacked the city on the 18th of April 1863, but were driven off.

  • In 1847, while again a representative in the state legislature, he introduced a bill appropriating money for the equipment of a regiment to serve in the Mexican War; although the bill was defeated, he raised the necessary funds privately, and served in Mexico first as colonel and afterwards as brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • Here he was persuaded to make peace in consideration of a brigadier-general's commission and payment for the property confiscated by Georgia; and with the warriors who accompanied him he signed a formal treaty of peace and friendship on the 7th of August.

  • His father, James Clinton (1736-1812), served as a captain of provincial troops in the French and Indian War, and as a brigadier-general in the American army in the War of Independence, taking part in Montgomery's attack upon Quebec in 1775, unsuccessfully resisting at Fort Montgomery, along the Hudson, in 1777 the advance of Sir Henry Clinton, accompanying General John Sullivan in 177 9 in his expedition against the Iroquois in western New York, and in 1781 taking part in the siege of Yorktown, Virginia.

  • He joined the army as brigadier-general of militia in June 1778,, and served in the New York Senate in 1777-1781 and 1784-1790.

  • It consists of four brigades each commanded by a brigadier-general.

  • Fremont is on the site of a favourite abode of the Indians, and a trading post was at times maintained here; but the place is best known in history as the site of Fort Stephenson, erected during the War of 1812, and on the 2nd of August 1813 gallantly and successfully defended by Major George Croghan (1791-1849), with 160 men, against about T000 British and Indians under Brigadier-General Henry A.

  • He was, however, employed to the end of the war, and in 1867 received the brevets of brigadier-general U.S.A. and major-general U.S.A. for his services at Fredericksburg and Gettysburg respectively.

  • Sullivan was appointed a brigadier-general in the Continental army in June 1775 and a major-general in August 1776.

  • He strongly opposed secession, but finally voted for the Virginia ordinance, was commissioned brigadier-general in the Confederate army and served throughout the war.

  • Hamilton had opposed Burr's aspirations for the vice-presidency in 1792, and had exerted influence through Washington to prevent his appointment as brigadier-general in 1798, at the time of the threatened war between the United States and France.

  • He served in the Civil War, on the Union side, from 1862 to 1865, rising in the volunteer service to the regular rank of colonel and the brevet rank of brigadier-general, and, after December 1863, acted as one of the officers of the coloured troops commanded by General William Birney.

  • In the central theatre (Kentucky), the only event of importance was a daring reconnaissance of the Confederate fort at Columbus on the Mississippi by a small force under Brigadier-General U.

  • In June he received the command of a brigade, and in July promotion to the rank of brigadier-general.

  • He was made a brigadier-general in 1880, on the recommendation of the duc d'Aumale, then commanding the VII.

  • Soon after the outbreak of the war with Mexico, in 1846, Pierce enlisted as a private at Concord, but soon (in February 1847) became colonel of the Ninth Regiment (which joined General Winfield Scott at Pueblo on the 6th of August 1847), and later (March, 1847) became a brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He became a brigadier-general in May 1776 and a major-general in February 1777.

  • He had been deeply interested from 1840 until 1850 in the militia of his state, and had risen through its grades of service to that of brigadier-general.

  • He was military governor of Havana and Pinar del Rio in 1899, subsequently commanded the department of the Missouri, and retired as a brigadier-general U.S. Army in 1901.

  • He served throughout the war, distinguished himself particularly at South Mountain, Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, and by successive promotions became a brigadier-general of volunteers and, by brevet, a major-general of volunteers.

  • returned to Spain in 1873 as brigadier-general, and took an active part against the Carlists in the eastern provinces of the Peninsula in 1875 and 1876, for which he was raised to the rank of general of division.

  • In 1861 he took part in the war as brigadier-general of volunteers, and for his skill in seizing certain important strategic points was on the 11th of April 1862 made major-general.

  • The new road cut through the Juniata region in the march of the army of Brigadier-General John Forbes, against Fort Duquesne in 1758, was a result of the influence of Pennsylvania, for it was considered even then a matter of great importance to the future prosperity of the province that its seaport, Philadelphia, be connected with navigation on the Ohio by the easiest line of communication that could be had wholly within its limits.

  • In September 1864 he became colonel of the 127th United States Colored Infantry; in 1864-1865 was in command of the prison camp at Elmira, New York, and in March 1865 was breveted brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • corps, fought at Port Gibson, Raymond and Jackson, and after the fall of Vicksburg was strongly recommended by Grant for the rank of brigadier-general in the regular army, to which he was promoted on the 1st of August 1863.

  • In August 1863 he was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers, and was placed in command of the Federal forces at Natchez.

  • The American brigadier-general William Hull invaded Canada on the 12th of July from Detroit, just below the small Lake of St Clair between Huron and Erie.

  • 2 Norwich was the birthplace of Benjamin Huntington (1736-1800), a member of the Continental Congress in1780-1784and 1787-1788, a representative in Congress in 1789-1791, judge of the state superior court in 1793-1798, and first mayor of Norwich in 1784-1796; of Jabez Huntington (1719-1786), a patriot leader and majorgeneral of Connecticut militia during the War of Independence; of his son, Jedediah Huntington (1743-1818), also a patriot leader, a brigadier-general in the Continental Army (1777-1783), and a founder of the Society of the Cincinnati; of Jedediah's brother, Ebenezer Huntington (1754-1834), a soldier and in1810-1811and 1817-1819 a representative in Congress; and of Jedediah's nephew, Jabez Williams Huntington (1788-1847), a jurist, a representative in Congress in 1829-1834, and a member of the U.S. Senate in 1840-1847.

  • In March 1865 he was breveted brigadier-general of volunteers for gallantry in the battle of Valverde (on the 21st of February 1862) and for distinguished services in New Mexico, and after the war resumed his position as Indian agent, which he held until his death at Fort Lyon, Colorado, on the 23rd of May 1868.

  • Within the next few days large numbers of Confederate volunteers assembled here; and Harper was succeeded in command (27th April) by "Stonewall" Jackson, who was in turn succeeded by Brigadier-General Joseph E.

  • One of his brigades, the Heavy (4th and 5th Dragoon Guards, 1st, 2nd and 6th Dragoons) under Brigadier-General J.

  • The British resident, Major Missett, having represented the importance of taking Rosetta and Rahmanieh,to secure supplies for Alexandria, General Fraser, with the concurrence of the admiral, Sir John Duckworth, detached the 31st regiment and the Chasseurs Britanniques, accompanied by some field artillery under Major-General Wauchope and Brigadier-General Meade, on this service; and these troops entered Rosetta without encountering any opposition; but as soon as they had dispersed among the narrow streets, the garrison opened a deadly fire on them from the latticed windows and the roofs of the houses.

  • Seven batteries of artillery, under Brigadier-General Goodenough, were placed in the centre.

  • The cavalry, 10th and 19th Hussars, under Brigadier-General Sir H.

  • Two heavy blows had now been inflicted on the followers of Osman Digna, and the road to Berber could have been opened, as General Graham and Brigadier-General Sir H.

  • Among many British officers killed was Brigadier-General Simon Fraser, who had been the life of the expedition.

  • In 1783 he was commissioned a brevet brigadier-general in the continental army.

  • He returned to America in January 1862, resigned his post, was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers in April, and in June took command of a division under Fremont, and then in Sigel's corps, with which he took part in the second battle of Bull Run.

  • He served in the Federal army throughout the Civil War, rising from the rank of captain (April 22, 1860 to that of brigadier-general of volunteers (Sept.

  • The Union gunboats, which had passed up the river toward Shreveport at high water, were caught in its decline above the falls at Alexandria, but they were saved by a splendid piece of engineering (a dam at the falls), constructed by Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bailey (1827-1867), who for this service received the thanks of Congress and the brevet of brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • In the Mexican War he served as a brigadier-general of volunteers under General Zachary Taylor on the Rio Grande, under General John E.

  • In August 1861, soon after the outbreak of the Civil War, he was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers; in March 1862 he succeeded to the command of General Frederick W.

  • In 1796 it was named Bloomfield in honour of General Joseph Bloomfield (1753-1823), who served (1775-1778) in the War of American Independence, reaching the rank of major, was governor of New Jersey in 1801-1802 and 1803-1812, brigadier general in the United States army during the War of 1812, and a Democratic representative in Congress from 1817 to 1821.

  • He had been commissioned in September 1862 colonel of the 61st New York volunteers, commanded a brigade at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and in May 1864 was rewarded for his gallant leadership by the grade of brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He was promoted to be brigadier-general U.S.A. (Dec. 1880), and to be major-general (April 1890), and in 1895 succeeded General John McA.

  • On his return to India in 1817 he was appointed by Lord Moira his political agent in the Deccan, with eligibility for military command; as brigadier-general under Sir T.

  • He became in May a brigadier-general U.S.V., and served with Nathaniel Lyon at Wilson's Creek and with J.

  • He studied law at Cincinnati, Ohio, and served on the Federal side in the Civil War, becoming colonel in November 1862; he was mustered out in May 1864, and in March 1865 was breveted brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • Like his father, he was a strong Union man, and in September 1861 he was commissioned by President Lincoln a brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He resigned his commission in December 1864, but in July 1866 entered the regular army with the rank of colonel of infantry, receiving the brevet of brigadier-general in 1867, served on the frontier and in several Indian wars, and retired in 1881.

  • For conduct at Las Guasimas and San Juan Hill, Wood was promoted brigadier-general July 1898 and in Dec. major-general of volunteers.

  • Meanwhile he had been honourably discharged from voluntary service and appointed brigadier-general in the regular army Feb.

  • In June he was placed in command of a cavalry brigade, and a month later he won promotion to the rank of brigadier-general U.S.V.

  • The victories of the Opequan, or Winchester (September 19), Fisher's Hill (September 22) and Cedar Creek (October 19), produced great elation in the North and corresponding depression in the Confederacy, and Sheridan was made successively brigadier-general U.S.A. for Fisher's Hill and major-general U.S.A. for Cedar Creek.

  • In 1846 the Congress of the United States declared that war existed with Mexico, and on the 3rd of June Brigadier-General Stephen W.

  • He entered the army as a colonel of infantry, and in 1 757 he accompanied count de Lally to the East Indies, with the rank of brigadier-general.

  • Harrison, and rose from the rank of colonel of volunteers to be major-general of Ohio militia and finally to be a brigadier-general in the regular United States army.

  • He rendered great assistance in raising troops for the Union service in 1861, enlisted himself in spite of poor health and a family of six small children, and in April was commissioned a brigadier-general, U.S.V.

  • Hence arose the counter-mission of Sir Harford Jones from the British government, which, on arrival at Bombay in April 1808, found that it had been anticipated by a previously sent mission from the governor-general of India, under Malcolm again, then holding the rank of brigadier-general.

  • Two years later, when the Family Compact involved Portugal in a war with Spain, Pombal called in Count William of Lippe-Biickeburg to reorganize the army, which was reinforced by a British contingent under Brigadier-General John Burgoyne, and was increased from 5000 to 50,000 men.

  • A few weeks later (22nd August 1812) he was made brigadier-general in the regular U.S. army, and soon afterwards was put in command of all the troops in the north-west, and on the 2nd of March 1813 he was promoted to the rank of major-general.

  • On the 25th of December 1837, after a difficult campaign, he inflicted a severe defeat upon the Indians at the battle of Okeechobee, and for this was breveted brigadier-general.

  • At the time of the Baltimore riot which opened the Civil War, Butler, as a brigadier-general in the state militia, was sent by Governor John A.

  • The fort was finally recaptured by the English in 1758, as the result of an elaborate expedition (involving about 7000 troops) planned by Brigadier-General John Forbes (1710-1759), and prosecuted, with the assistance of Colonel George Washington and Colonel Henry Bouquet, in the face of great difficulties.

  • On the 13th of the same month Congress tardily raised him to the rank of brigadier-general.

  • He fortified the post of Columbus, Kentucky, the foremost line of defence on the Mississippi, against which Brigadier-General U.

  • He entered the Lutheran ministry, had charge of churches at New Germantown and Bedminster, New Jersey, and after 1772 of a church in Woodstock, Virginia, and there in 1775 raised the 8th Virginia (German) regiment, of which he was made colonel; in February 1 77 7 he became a brigadier-general in the Continental Army; and in September 1783 was breveted major-general.

  • He returned to the law, but at the beginning of the Civil War became colonel of the Eleventh Indiana Infantry, served in the West Virginia campaign, and on the 3rd of September 1861 was appointed brigadier-general.

  • But in 1898, at the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, he was made brigadier-general and soon afterwards major-generalof volunteers.

  • After reverting for a time to the rank of brigadier-general, he was made a major-general U.S.V.

  • So strongly did Lord Roberts feel on the subject, that he at once made Colonel Brabant, a well-known and respected colonial veteran and member of the House of Assembly, a brigadier-general, and started recruiting loyal colonists in earnest.

  • In September he was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • There he served as county judge, and attained the rank (1810) of brigadier-general in the state militia.

  • In July 1813 he was commissioned brigadier-general in the regular army, and in January 1814 he was promoted major-general and succeeded General James Wilkinson in command of the forces at Niagara.

  • In the last days of his term he apparently had such an intention, but during the year 1860 the Southern States actually received less than their full quota of arms. After the secession of Virginia he was commissioned a brigadier-general in the Confederate service.

  • During Shays's rebellion there was a riot here in September 1786, and on the 25th of January 1787 the insurgent forces under Daniel Shays attacked the arsenal, but were dispersed by the militia under Brigadier-General William Shepard (1737-1817).

  • brigada; the English use of the word dates from the early 17th century), a unit in military organization commanded by a major-general, brigadier-general or colonel, and composed of two or more regiments of infantry, cavalry or artillery.

  • As a reward for his success in the Philippines President Roosevelt in 1906 finally secured his promotion from captain to brigadier-general, passing him over 862 senior officers.

  • In May 1799 he distinguished himself by saving a division of the French army which was about to be crushed by the Russians at the battle of Bassignana, and was named at once brigadier-general by Moreau.

  • No successor to Sevier was elected, and he was arrested on a charge of treason, but was allowed to escape, and soon afterwards was again appointed brigadier-general of militia.

  • He served in Kentucky, was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers early in 1862; took part in the second day's fighting at the battle of Shiloh, served as chief of staff under Rosecrans in the Army of the Cumberland in 1863, fought at Chickamauga, and was made a major-general of volunteers for gallantry in that battle.

  • He was adjutant-general of New York state in 1839-1843, and became a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Union army in 1861, commanded a division in Virginia in 1862-1863, and, being compelled by ill health to resign from the army, was U.S. minister to the Papal States in 1863-1867.

  • For his services at Franklin he was awarded the rank of brigadier-general (November 1864) and the brevet rank of major-general (March 1865) in the regular army.

  • He became its colonel, and as such continued in the Union Army until the close of the war, and on the 23rd of January 1865 was breveted a brigadier-general of volunteers for "ability and manifest energy and gallantry in command of brigade."

  • In 1861 he was captain of a company (which he had raised) in the 69th regiment of New York volunteers and fought at the first battle of Bull Run; he then organized an Irish brigade, of whose first regiment he was colonel until the 3rd of February 1862, when he was appointed to the command of this organization with the rank of brigadier-general.

  • Lyons, in Brigadier-General Thomas Francis Meagher (New York, 1870), gives a eulogistic account of his career.

  • His son, Hugh Boyle Ewing (1826-1905), served throughout the Civil War in the Federal armies, rising from the rank of colonel { 1861) to that of brigadier-general (1862) and brevet majorgeneral (1865), and commanding brigades at Antietam and Vicksburg and a division at Chickamauga; and was minister of the United States to the Netherlands in 1866-1870.

  • In the Civil War he attained the rank of brigadier-general (March 1863) and received the brevet of major-general (1865).

  • In the Atlanta campaign under Sherman he gained considerable distinction, rising successively to the rank of brigadier-general in 1864 and major-general in 1865.

  • The command was given to Brigadier-General W.

  • He was captured at Shiloh and was imprisoned for a time at Madison, Ga., and in Libby prison, Richmond, Va., and in 1865 was brevetted brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He served in the Northern Campaign under his father-in-law, General Taylor, and was greatly distinguished for gallantry and soldierly conduct at Monterey and particularly at Buena Vista, where he was severely wounded early in the engagement, but continued in command of his regiment until victory crowned the American arms. While still in the field he was appointed (May 1847) by President Polk to be brigadier-general of volunteers; but this appointment Davis declined, on the ground, as he afterwards said, "that volunteers are militia and the Constitution reserves to the state the appointment of all militia officers."

  • Brigadier-General Yule then took command, and an overwhelming force of Boers rendering the further occupation of Dundee dangerous, he decided to retire his force to Ladysmith.

  • He was promoted to be brigadiergeneral of volunteers in September 1861, and to be major-general of volunteers in July 1862, earned the brevet of lieutenant-colonel in the regular army at the capture of Nashville, Tennessee, that of colonel at Shiloh, and that of brigadier-general at Perryville, and in March 1865 was breveted major-general for his services during the war.

  • He became a brigadier-general in 1890, and a major-general in 1894; retired in 1895; and in 1898-1899 served on a commission to investigate the United States department of war as administered during the war with Spain.

  • Gainesville was settled about 1851, was incorporated in 1873, and was chartered as a city in 1879; it was named in honour of General Edmund Pendleton Gaines (1777-1849), who served with distinction in the War of 1812, becoming a brigadier-general in March 1814 and receiving the brevet of major-general and the thanks of Congress for his defence of Fort Erie in August 1814.

  • Baird served also at the Cape of Good Hope as a brigadier-general, and he returned to India as a major-general in 1798.

  • Another brother, Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835-), born in Boston on the 27th of May 1835, graduated at Harvard in 1856, and served on the Union side in the Civil War, receiving in 1865 the brevet of brigadier-general in the regular army.

  • In 1861 he was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers, and had command of the 2nd brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves in the Army of the Potomac under General M'Call.

  • His reward was the commission of brigadier-general; in the regular army.

  • After some delay he was commissioned colonel of the 21st Illinois regiment and soon afterwards brigadier-general.

  • He served as a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Spanish-American War of 1898,1898, and then in the Philippines, becoming brigadiergeneral in the regular army in February 1901 and major-general in February 1906.

  • Later in the year, however, he was placed in command (by New Hampshire), with the rank of brigadier-general of militia, of a force of militiamen, with whom, on the 16th of August, near Bennington, Vermont, he defeated two detachments of Burgoyne's army under Colonel Friedrich Baum and Colonel Breyman.

  • For this victory, which did much to bring about the capitulation of General Burgoyne, Stark received the thanks of Congress and a commission as brigadier-general in the Continental Army (Oct.

  • In February 1776 he was placed in command of all the military forces of South Carolina, and in October of the same year was commissioned a brigadier-general and was taken into the Continental service; but on account of a dispute arising out of a conflict between state and Federal authority resigned his command in 1777.

  • He became colonel of a new regiment of regulars on the 14th of May, and soon afterwards brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • Promoted, brigadier-general of volunteers, Sherman was in August sent to Kentucky to serve under General Robert Anderson.

  • In July he was made a brigadier-general in the regular army.

  • Blair was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in August 1862 and a major-general in November 1862.

  • America as a brigadier-general in the Louisburg expedition under Amherst and Boscawen.

  • Gates recommended him for a brigadier-general's commission for services which another actually performed, and succeeded in gaining it, but their friendship was broken by the collapse of the Conway Cabal against Washington in which both were implicated and about which Wilkinson had indiscreetly blabbed.

  • As brigadier-general his leading of the right wing at Preston contributed greatly to the victory.

  • made brigadier-general of provincial troops in 1782.

  • On the 14th of May 1861 he was transferred to the regular army as a lieutenant-colonel, and in September he was made a brigadier-general U.S.V.

  • Enlisting in a Michigan cavalry regiment in September 1861, he rose from captain to colonel, distinguished himself in the Gettysburg campaign and under Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, and in 1864 and 1865 respectively received the brevets of brigadier-general and major-general of volunteers.

  • At his own request he was ordered east, and on the 23rd of September 1861 was made brigadier-general of volunteers and assigned to command a brigade in the Army of the Potomac. He took part in the Peninsula campaign, and the handling of his troops in the engagement at Williamsburg on the 5th of May 1862, was so brilliant that McClellan reported "Hancock was superb," an epithet always afterwards applied to him.

  • In August he was promoted to brigadier-general in the regular army.

  • With the artillery reserve he rendered the greatest assistance at the battle of Malvern Hill, and soon afterwards he became chief of artillery in the Army of the Potomac. On the day after the battle of South Mountain he was made brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He served in Virginia to the end of the war, attaining the brevet ranks of major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general of regulars.

  • His brother, Lewis Cass Hunt (1824-1886), served throughout the Civil War in the infantry arm, becoming brigadier-general of volunteers in 1862, and brevet brigadier-general U.S.A. in 1865.

  • Confederate cavalry under Brigadier-General William Lewis Cabell attacked the city on the 18th of April 1863, but were driven off.

  • In 1847, while again a representative in the state legislature, he introduced a bill appropriating money for the equipment of a regiment to serve in the Mexican War; although the bill was defeated, he raised the necessary funds privately, and served in Mexico first as colonel and afterwards as brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • Here he was persuaded to make peace in consideration of a brigadier-general's commission and payment for the property confiscated by Georgia; and with the warriors who accompanied him he signed a formal treaty of peace and friendship on the 7th of August.

  • His father, James Clinton (1736-1812), served as a captain of provincial troops in the French and Indian War, and as a brigadier-general in the American army in the War of Independence, taking part in Montgomery's attack upon Quebec in 1775, unsuccessfully resisting at Fort Montgomery, along the Hudson, in 1777 the advance of Sir Henry Clinton, accompanying General John Sullivan in 177 9 in his expedition against the Iroquois in western New York, and in 1781 taking part in the siege of Yorktown, Virginia.

  • He joined the army as brigadier-general of militia in June 1778,, and served in the New York Senate in 1777-1781 and 1784-1790.

  • It consists of four brigades each commanded by a brigadier-general.

  • Fremont is on the site of a favourite abode of the Indians, and a trading post was at times maintained here; but the place is best known in history as the site of Fort Stephenson, erected during the War of 1812, and on the 2nd of August 1813 gallantly and successfully defended by Major George Croghan (1791-1849), with 160 men, against about T000 British and Indians under Brigadier-General Henry A.

  • He was, however, employed to the end of the war, and in 1867 received the brevets of brigadier-general U.S.A. and major-general U.S.A. for his services at Fredericksburg and Gettysburg respectively.

  • Sullivan was appointed a brigadier-general in the Continental army in June 1775 and a major-general in August 1776.

  • He strongly opposed secession, but finally voted for the Virginia ordinance, was commissioned brigadier-general in the Confederate army and served throughout the war.

  • Hamilton had opposed Burr's aspirations for the vice-presidency in 1792, and had exerted influence through Washington to prevent his appointment as brigadier-general in 1798, at the time of the threatened war between the United States and France.

  • He served in the Civil War, on the Union side, from 1862 to 1865, rising in the volunteer service to the regular rank of colonel and the brevet rank of brigadier-general, and, after December 1863, acted as one of the officers of the coloured troops commanded by General William Birney.

  • In the central theatre (Kentucky), the only event of importance was a daring reconnaissance of the Confederate fort at Columbus on the Mississippi by a small force under Brigadier-General U.

  • In June he received the command of a brigade, and in July promotion to the rank of brigadier-general.

  • He was made a brigadier-general in 1880, on the recommendation of the duc d'Aumale, then commanding the VII.

  • Soon after the outbreak of the war with Mexico, in 1846, Pierce enlisted as a private at Concord, but soon (in February 1847) became colonel of the Ninth Regiment (which joined General Winfield Scott at Pueblo on the 6th of August 1847), and later (March, 1847) became a brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He became a brigadier-general in May 1776 and a major-general in February 1777.

  • He had been deeply interested from 1840 until 1850 in the militia of his state, and had risen through its grades of service to that of brigadier-general.

  • He was military governor of Havana and Pinar del Rio in 1899, subsequently commanded the department of the Missouri, and retired as a brigadier-general U.S. Army in 1901.

  • He served throughout the war, distinguished himself particularly at South Mountain, Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, and by successive promotions became a brigadier-general of volunteers and, by brevet, a major-general of volunteers.

  • returned to Spain in 1873 as brigadier-general, and took an active part against the Carlists in the eastern provinces of the Peninsula in 1875 and 1876, for which he was raised to the rank of general of division.

  • In 1861 he took part in the war as brigadier-general of volunteers, and for his skill in seizing certain important strategic points was on the 11th of April 1862 made major-general.

  • The new road cut through the Juniata region in the march of the army of Brigadier-General John Forbes, against Fort Duquesne in 1758, was a result of the influence of Pennsylvania, for it was considered even then a matter of great importance to the future prosperity of the province that its seaport, Philadelphia, be connected with navigation on the Ohio by the easiest line of communication that could be had wholly within its limits.

  • In September 1864 he became colonel of the 127th United States Colored Infantry; in 1864-1865 was in command of the prison camp at Elmira, New York, and in March 1865 was breveted brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • corps, fought at Port Gibson, Raymond and Jackson, and after the fall of Vicksburg was strongly recommended by Grant for the rank of brigadier-general in the regular army, to which he was promoted on the 1st of August 1863.

  • In August 1863 he was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers, and was placed in command of the Federal forces at Natchez.

  • The American brigadier-general William Hull invaded Canada on the 12th of July from Detroit, just below the small Lake of St Clair between Huron and Erie.

  • 2 Norwich was the birthplace of Benjamin Huntington (1736-1800), a member of the Continental Congress in1780-1784and 1787-1788, a representative in Congress in 1789-1791, judge of the state superior court in 1793-1798, and first mayor of Norwich in 1784-1796; of Jabez Huntington (1719-1786), a patriot leader and majorgeneral of Connecticut militia during the War of Independence; of his son, Jedediah Huntington (1743-1818), also a patriot leader, a brigadier-general in the Continental Army (1777-1783), and a founder of the Society of the Cincinnati; of Jedediah's brother, Ebenezer Huntington (1754-1834), a soldier and in1810-1811and 1817-1819 a representative in Congress; and of Jedediah's nephew, Jabez Williams Huntington (1788-1847), a jurist, a representative in Congress in 1829-1834, and a member of the U.S. Senate in 1840-1847.

  • In March 1865 he was breveted brigadier-general of volunteers for gallantry in the battle of Valverde (on the 21st of February 1862) and for distinguished services in New Mexico, and after the war resumed his position as Indian agent, which he held until his death at Fort Lyon, Colorado, on the 23rd of May 1868.

  • Within the next few days large numbers of Confederate volunteers assembled here; and Harper was succeeded in command (27th April) by "Stonewall" Jackson, who was in turn succeeded by Brigadier-General Joseph E.

  • One of his brigades, the Heavy (4th and 5th Dragoon Guards, 1st, 2nd and 6th Dragoons) under Brigadier-General J.

  • The British resident, Major Missett, having represented the importance of taking Rosetta and Rahmanieh,to secure supplies for Alexandria, General Fraser, with the concurrence of the admiral, Sir John Duckworth, detached the 31st regiment and the Chasseurs Britanniques, accompanied by some field artillery under Major-General Wauchope and Brigadier-General Meade, on this service; and these troops entered Rosetta without encountering any opposition; but as soon as they had dispersed among the narrow streets, the garrison opened a deadly fire on them from the latticed windows and the roofs of the houses.

  • Seven batteries of artillery, under Brigadier-General Goodenough, were placed in the centre.

  • The cavalry, 10th and 19th Hussars, under Brigadier-General Sir H.

  • Two heavy blows had now been inflicted on the followers of Osman Digna, and the road to Berber could have been opened, as General Graham and Brigadier-General Sir H.

  • Among many British officers killed was Brigadier-General Simon Fraser, who had been the life of the expedition.

  • In 1783 he was commissioned a brevet brigadier-general in the continental army.

  • He returned to America in January 1862, resigned his post, was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers in April, and in June took command of a division under Fremont, and then in Sigel's corps, with which he took part in the second battle of Bull Run.

  • He served in the Federal army throughout the Civil War, rising from the rank of captain (April 22, 1860 to that of brigadier-general of volunteers (Sept.

  • The Union gunboats, which had passed up the river toward Shreveport at high water, were caught in its decline above the falls at Alexandria, but they were saved by a splendid piece of engineering (a dam at the falls), constructed by Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bailey (1827-1867), who for this service received the thanks of Congress and the brevet of brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • In the Mexican War he served as a brigadier-general of volunteers under General Zachary Taylor on the Rio Grande, under General John E.

  • In August 1861, soon after the outbreak of the Civil War, he was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers; in March 1862 he succeeded to the command of General Frederick W.

  • In 1796 it was named Bloomfield in honour of General Joseph Bloomfield (1753-1823), who served (1775-1778) in the War of American Independence, reaching the rank of major, was governor of New Jersey in 1801-1802 and 1803-1812, brigadier general in the United States army during the War of 1812, and a Democratic representative in Congress from 1817 to 1821.

  • He had been commissioned in September 1862 colonel of the 61st New York volunteers, commanded a brigade at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and in May 1864 was rewarded for his gallant leadership by the grade of brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He was promoted to be brigadier-general U.S.A. (Dec. 1880), and to be major-general (April 1890), and in 1895 succeeded General John McA.

  • On his return to India in 1817 he was appointed by Lord Moira his political agent in the Deccan, with eligibility for military command; as brigadier-general under Sir T.

  • He became in May a brigadier-general U.S.V., and served with Nathaniel Lyon at Wilson's Creek and with J.

  • He studied law at Cincinnati, Ohio, and served on the Federal side in the Civil War, becoming colonel in November 1862; he was mustered out in May 1864, and in March 1865 was breveted brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • Like his father, he was a strong Union man, and in September 1861 he was commissioned by President Lincoln a brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He resigned his commission in December 1864, but in July 1866 entered the regular army with the rank of colonel of infantry, receiving the brevet of brigadier-general in 1867, served on the frontier and in several Indian wars, and retired in 1881.

  • For conduct at Las Guasimas and San Juan Hill, Wood was promoted brigadier-general July 1898 and in Dec. major-general of volunteers.

  • Meanwhile he had been honourably discharged from voluntary service and appointed brigadier-general in the regular army Feb.

  • In June he was placed in command of a cavalry brigade, and a month later he won promotion to the rank of brigadier-general U.S.V.

  • The victories of the Opequan, or Winchester (September 19), Fisher's Hill (September 22) and Cedar Creek (October 19), produced great elation in the North and corresponding depression in the Confederacy, and Sheridan was made successively brigadier-general U.S.A. for Fisher's Hill and major-general U.S.A. for Cedar Creek.

  • In 1846 the Congress of the United States declared that war existed with Mexico, and on the 3rd of June Brigadier-General Stephen W.

  • He entered the army as a colonel of infantry, and in 1 757 he accompanied count de Lally to the East Indies, with the rank of brigadier-general.

  • Harrison, and rose from the rank of colonel of volunteers to be major-general of Ohio militia and finally to be a brigadier-general in the regular United States army.

  • He rendered great assistance in raising troops for the Union service in 1861, enlisted himself in spite of poor health and a family of six small children, and in April was commissioned a brigadier-general, U.S.V.

  • Hence arose the counter-mission of Sir Harford Jones from the British government, which, on arrival at Bombay in April 1808, found that it had been anticipated by a previously sent mission from the governor-general of India, under Malcolm again, then holding the rank of brigadier-general.

  • Two years later, when the Family Compact involved Portugal in a war with Spain, Pombal called in Count William of Lippe-Biickeburg to reorganize the army, which was reinforced by a British contingent under Brigadier-General John Burgoyne, and was increased from 5000 to 50,000 men.

  • A few weeks later (22nd August 1812) he was made brigadier-general in the regular U.S. army, and soon afterwards was put in command of all the troops in the north-west, and on the 2nd of March 1813 he was promoted to the rank of major-general.

  • On the 25th of December 1837, after a difficult campaign, he inflicted a severe defeat upon the Indians at the battle of Okeechobee, and for this was breveted brigadier-general.

  • At the time of the Baltimore riot which opened the Civil War, Butler, as a brigadier-general in the state militia, was sent by Governor John A.

  • The fort was finally recaptured by the English in 1758, as the result of an elaborate expedition (involving about 7000 troops) planned by Brigadier-General John Forbes (1710-1759), and prosecuted, with the assistance of Colonel George Washington and Colonel Henry Bouquet, in the face of great difficulties.

  • On the 13th of the same month Congress tardily raised him to the rank of brigadier-general.

  • He fortified the post of Columbus, Kentucky, the foremost line of defence on the Mississippi, against which Brigadier-General U.

  • He entered the Lutheran ministry, had charge of churches at New Germantown and Bedminster, New Jersey, and after 1772 of a church in Woodstock, Virginia, and there in 1775 raised the 8th Virginia (German) regiment, of which he was made colonel; in February 1 77 7 he became a brigadier-general in the Continental Army; and in September 1783 was breveted major-general.

  • He returned to the law, but at the beginning of the Civil War became colonel of the Eleventh Indiana Infantry, served in the West Virginia campaign, and on the 3rd of September 1861 was appointed brigadier-general.

  • But in 1898, at the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, he was made brigadier-general and soon afterwards major-generalof volunteers.

  • After reverting for a time to the rank of brigadier-general, he was made a major-general U.S.V.

  • So strongly did Lord Roberts feel on the subject, that he at once made Colonel Brabant, a well-known and respected colonial veteran and member of the House of Assembly, a brigadier-general, and started recruiting loyal colonists in earnest.

  • In September he was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • There he served as county judge, and attained the rank (1810) of brigadier-general in the state militia.

  • In July 1813 he was commissioned brigadier-general in the regular army, and in January 1814 he was promoted major-general and succeeded General James Wilkinson in command of the forces at Niagara.

  • In the last days of his term he apparently had such an intention, but during the year 1860 the Southern States actually received less than their full quota of arms. After the secession of Virginia he was commissioned a brigadier-general in the Confederate service.

  • During Shays's rebellion there was a riot here in September 1786, and on the 25th of January 1787 the insurgent forces under Daniel Shays attacked the arsenal, but were dispersed by the militia under Brigadier-General William Shepard (1737-1817).

  • brigada; the English use of the word dates from the early 17th century), a unit in military organization commanded by a major-general, brigadier-general or colonel, and composed of two or more regiments of infantry, cavalry or artillery.

  • As a reward for his success in the Philippines President Roosevelt in 1906 finally secured his promotion from captain to brigadier-general, passing him over 862 senior officers.

  • In May 1799 he distinguished himself by saving a division of the French army which was about to be crushed by the Russians at the battle of Bassignana, and was named at once brigadier-general by Moreau.

  • No successor to Sevier was elected, and he was arrested on a charge of treason, but was allowed to escape, and soon afterwards was again appointed brigadier-general of militia.

  • When the Civil War broke out, he fought on the side of the South and became a brigadier-general.

  • Captain Carter would eventually achieve the rank of Colonel over the course of the series and Colonel O'Neill would be promoted to Brigadier General in the series final two years.

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