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brewster

brewster

brewster Sentence Examples

  • The great reflecting telescope at Dorpat was manufactured by him, and so great was the skill he attained in the making of lenses for achromatic telescopes that, in a letter to Sir David Brewster, he expressed his willingness to furnish an achromatic glass of 18 in.

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  • Though he duly finished his theological course and was licensed to preach, Brewster's preference for other pursuits prevented him from engaging in the active duties of his profession.

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  • The fact that other philosophers, notably Etienne Louis Malus and Augustin Fresnel, were pursuing the same investigations contemporaneously in France does not invalidate Brewster's claim to independent discovery, even though in one or two cases the priority must be assigned to others.

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  • An instrument of higher interest, the stereoscope, which, though of much later date (1849-1850), may be mentioned here, since along with the kaleidoscope it did more than anything else to popularize his name, was not, as has often been asserted, the invention of Brewster.

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  • To Brewster is due the merit of suggesting the use of lenses for the purpose of uniting the dissimilar pictures; and accordingly the lenticular stereoscope may fairly be said to be his invention.

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  • A much more valuable practical result of Brewster's optical researches was the improvement of the British lighthouse system.

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  • Brewster's own discoveries, important though they were, were not his only, perhaps not even his chief, service to science.

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  • In 1819 Brewster undertook further editorial work by establishing, in conjunction with Robert Jameson (1774-1854), the Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, which took the place of the Edinburgh Magazine.

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  • The first ten volumes (1819-1824) were published under the joint editorship of Brewster and Jameson, the remaining four volumes (1825-1826) being edited by Jameson alone.

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  • After parting company with Jameson, Brewster started the Edinburgh Journal of Science in 1824, sixteen volumes of which appeared under his editorship during the years 1824-1832, with very many articles from his own pen.

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  • Brewster's relations as editor brought.

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  • Its first meeting was held at York in 1831; and Brewster, along with Charles Babbage and Sir John F.

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  • In the same year in which the British Association held its first meeting, Brewster received the honour of knighthood and the decoration of the Guelphic order of Hanover.

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  • In estimating Brewster's place among scientific discoverers the chief thing to be borne in mind is that the bent of his genius was not characteristically mathematical.

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  • In addition to the various works of Brewster already noticed, the following may be mentioned: - Notes and Introduction to Carlyle's translation of Legendre's Elements of Geometry (1824); Treatise on Optics (1831); Letters on Natural Magic, addressed to Sir Walter Scott (1831); The Martyrs of Science, or the Lives of Galileo, Tycho Brake, and Kepler (1841); More Worlds than One (1854).

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  • See The Home Life of Sir David Brewster, by his daughter Mrs Gordon.

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  • William Brewster >>

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  • surveys the spot where Knox was buried; the reformer himself is in the quadrangle of New College: Sir David Brewster adorns the quadrangle of the university; Dr William Chambers is in Chambers Street, and Frederick, duke of York (1763-1827), and the 4th earl of Hopetoun are also commemorated.

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  • At the present time excellent reproductions of Rowland's speculum gratings are on the market (Thorp, Ives, Wallace), prepared, after a suggestion of Sir David Brewster, by coating the original with a varnish, e.g.

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  • or the bands comes about in a very curious way, as is shown by a circumstance first observed by Brewster.

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  • Mag., 1904), whose point of view offers the great advantage of affording an instantaneous explanation of the peculiarity noticed by Brewster.

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  • After holding a school mastership and two curacies, he was made rector of St Martin's Orgar in London in 1628, where he took a leading part in the contest between the London clergy and the citizens about the city tithes, and compiled a treatise on the subject, which is printed in Brewster's Collectanea (1752).

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  • A year later he was appointed professor of natural philosophy in Edinburgh University, in succession to Sir John Leslie and in competition with Sir David Brewster, and during his tenure of that office, which he did not give up till 1860, he not only proved himself an active and efficient teacher, but also did much to improve the internal conditions of the university.

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  • In 1859 he was appointed successor to Brewster in the principalship of the United College of St Andrews, a position which he held until his death at Clifton on the 31st of December 1868.

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  • of Sir David Brewster, who had married the poet's second daughter) was destroyed.

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  • Acting on a principle quite different from any previously discussed is the capillary hydrometer or staktometer of Brewster, which is based upon the difference in the surface tension and density of pure water, and of mixtures of alcohol and water in varying proportions.

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  • Sir David Brewster found with one of these instruments that the number of drops of pure water was 734, while of proof spirit, sp. gr.

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  • Brewster (Ency.

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  • It may be said to begin with the arrival in 1620 of a small company including William Brewster, elder of the refugee church in Leiden, which founded Plymouth in the modern Massachusetts in the winter of that year.

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  • 1616), rector of Babworth, and Brewster, a layman of Scrooby in Nottinghamshire.

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  • Men so moved so to act could hardly be commonplace; and so among them we find characters strong and marked, with equal ability to rule and to obey, as William Bradford (1590-1657) and Brewster, Edward Winslow (1595-1655) and Miles Standish (1584-1656), John Winthrop (1588-1649) and Dr Samuel Fuller, and men so inflexible in their love of liberty and faith in man as Roger Williams and young Harry Vane.

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  • An English translation, by Sir David Brewster, from the eleventh French edition, was published in 1823, and is well known in England.

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  • In Brewster's Edinburgh Journal of Science for 1828 he described his machine for polishing the speculum, which in all essential points remained unaltered afterwards.

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  • At his own request the article on Christianity was assigned to him in Dr Brewster's Edinburgh Encyclopaedia, and in studying the credentials of Christianity he received a new impression of its contents.

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  • Among papers in scientific periodicals may be mentioned articles by Adler, Ball, Baumhauer, Beck, Bonney, Brewster, Chaper, Cohen, Crookes, Daubree, Derby, Des Cloizeaux, Doelter, Dunn, Flight, Friedel, Gorceix, Gurich, Goeppert, Harger, Hudleston, Hussak, Jannettaz, Jeremejew, de Launay, Lewis, Maskelyne, Meunier, Moissan, Molengraaff, Moulle, Rose, Sadebeck, Scheibe, Stelzner, Stow.

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  • Across the river are Gattonside, with numerous orchards, and Allerly, the home of Sir David Brewster from 1827 till his death in 1868.

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  • He took a pupil or two, and wrote articles for the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia under the editorship of Brewster.

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  • Brewster, Life of Newton; R.

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  • In 1840 she married Henry Brewster Stanton (1805-1887), a lawyer and journalist, who had been a prominent abolitionist since his student days (1832-1834) in Lane Theological Seminary, and who took her on a wedding journey to London, where he was a delegate to the World's Anti-Slavery Convention.

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  • In repeating and extending the experiments of Haiiy much later, Sir David Brewster discovered that various artificial salts were pyro-electric, and he mentions the tartrates of potash and soda and tartaric acid as exhibiting this property in a very strong degree.

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  • For Sir David Brewster's work on pyro-electricity, see Trans.

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  • Electric magnets of great power were soon constructed in this manner by Sturgeon, Joule, Henry, Faraday and Brewster.

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  • 39, 61; Brewster, Newton, .ii.

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  • His father, a shipbuilder of German descent (Koch),and his mother,a descendant of William Brewster, were natives of New York City, where the boy grew up, studying law in an office in 1842-1844, and working in a broker's office in 1844-1846, and where, under the influence of Charles G.

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  • The first settlement was made here in 1631 by Miles Standish (to whom Captain's Hill was granted), William Brewster, John Alden, and a few others.

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  • Brewster's Staktometer.

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  • Brewster, Memoirs of the Life, Writings, and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton (1855; new ed.

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  • The polarizing angle varies from one transparent substance to another, and Sir David Brewster in 1815 enunciated the law that the tangent of the polarizing angle is equal to the refractive index of the substance.

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  • In Biot's earlier experiments the beam of light employed was nearly parallel: the phenomena of rings and brushes that are seen with a conical pencil of light were discovered by Sir David Brewster in the case of uniaxal crystals in 1813 and in that of biaxal crystals in 1815.

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  • At normal incidence the intensity of the reflected light, measured by the square of the amplitude, is { (µ -1) /(µ+ I) } 2 in both cases; but whereas in the former the intensity increases uniformly with i to the value unity for i =90°, in the latter the intensity at first decreases as i increases, until it attains the value zero when i -Fr = 90°, or tan i =,u - the polarizing angle of Brewster - and then increases until it becomes unity at grazing incidence.

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  • Fresnel's formulae are sufficiently accurate for most practical purposes, but that they are not an exact representation of the facts of reflection was shown by Sir David Brewster and by Sir G.

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  • To reduce the aberrations Sir David Brewster proposed to employ in the place of glass transparent minerals of high refractive index and low dispersion.

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  • Brewster.

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  • Brewster (Stanhope).

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  • 7), which was really due to Brewster.

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  • Brewster, and, above all, Amici.

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  • The method for superposing the two spaces on one another was deduced by Sir David Brewster in 1856, but he does not appear to have dealt with the problem of range-finding.

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  • A portable, battery-operated meter for determining the Brewster angles of faceted gemstones using polarized laser light is described.

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  • Mark Brewster recovered from a disappointing second race to score another third.

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  • Punky Brewster Maybe the world is blind, Or just a little unkind.

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  • by Brewster's law; but, if the particles of foreign matter are small in all their dimensions, the circumstances are materially different from those under which Brewster's law is applicable.

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  • By Brewster's law (see Polarization of light) this angle in the case of regular reflection from a plate is less than a right angle; so that not only is the law of polarization for a very small particle different from that applicable to a plate, but the first effect of an increase of size is to augment the difference.

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  • Brewster, for an account of which reference may be made to E.

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  • Each wire was to be used for the transmission of one letter only, and the message was to be sent by charging the proper wires in succession, and received by observing the 1 From correspondence found among Sir David Brewster's papers after his death it seems highly probable that the writer of this letter, which was signed " C. M.," was Charles Morrison, a surgeon and a native of Greenock, but at that time resident in Renfrew.

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  • This is the principle of the kaleidoscope, an optical toy which received its present form at the hands of Sir David Brewster about the year 1815, and which at once became exceedingly popular owing to the beauty and variety of the images and the sudden and unexpected changes from one graceful form to another.

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  • Sir David Brewster modified his apparatus by moving the object-box and closing the end of the tube by a lens of short focus which forms images of distant objects at the distance of distinct vision.

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  • Brewster, apply the name of amethyst to all quartz which exhibits this structure, regardless of its colour.

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  • The great reflecting telescope at Dorpat was manufactured by him, and so great was the skill he attained in the making of lenses for achromatic telescopes that, in a letter to Sir David Brewster, he expressed his willingness to furnish an achromatic glass of 18 in.

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  • SIR DAVID BREWSTER (1781-1868), Scottish natural philosopher, was born on the 11th of December 1781 at Jedburgh, where his father, a teacher of high reputation, was rector of the grammar school.

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  • Though he duly finished his theological course and was licensed to preach, Brewster's preference for other pursuits prevented him from engaging in the active duties of his profession.

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  • The fact that other philosophers, notably Etienne Louis Malus and Augustin Fresnel, were pursuing the same investigations contemporaneously in France does not invalidate Brewster's claim to independent discovery, even though in one or two cases the priority must be assigned to others.

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  • was conferred upon Brewster by Marischal College, Aberdeen; in 1815 he was made a member of the Royal Society of London, and received the Copley medal; in 1818 he received the Rumford medal of the society; and in 1816 the French Institute awarded him one-half of the prize of three thousand francs for the two most important discoveries in physical science made in Europe during the two preceding years.

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  • An instrument of higher interest, the stereoscope, which, though of much later date (1849-1850), may be mentioned here, since along with the kaleidoscope it did more than anything else to popularize his name, was not, as has often been asserted, the invention of Brewster.

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  • To Brewster is due the merit of suggesting the use of lenses for the purpose of uniting the dissimilar pictures; and accordingly the lenticular stereoscope may fairly be said to be his invention.

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  • A much more valuable practical result of Brewster's optical researches was the improvement of the British lighthouse system.

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  • But it is indisputable that Brewster was earlier in the field than Fresnel; that he described the dioptric apparatus in 1812; that he pressed its adoption on those in authority at least as early as 1820, two years before Fresnel suggested it; and that it was finally introduced into British lighthouses mainly by his persistent efforts.

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  • Brewster's own discoveries, important though they were, were not his only, perhaps not even his chief, service to science.

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  • In 1819 Brewster undertook further editorial work by establishing, in conjunction with Robert Jameson (1774-1854), the Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, which took the place of the Edinburgh Magazine.

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  • The first ten volumes (1819-1824) were published under the joint editorship of Brewster and Jameson, the remaining four volumes (1825-1826) being edited by Jameson alone.

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  • After parting company with Jameson, Brewster started the Edinburgh Journal of Science in 1824, sixteen volumes of which appeared under his editorship during the years 1824-1832, with very many articles from his own pen.

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  • Brewster's relations as editor brought.

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  • Its first meeting was held at York in 1831; and Brewster, along with Charles Babbage and Sir John F.

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  • In the same year in which the British Association held its first meeting, Brewster received the honour of knighthood and the decoration of the Guelphic order of Hanover.

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  • In estimating Brewster's place among scientific discoverers the chief thing to be borne in mind is that the bent of his genius was not characteristically mathematical.

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  • In addition to the various works of Brewster already noticed, the following may be mentioned: - Notes and Introduction to Carlyle's translation of Legendre's Elements of Geometry (1824); Treatise on Optics (1831); Letters on Natural Magic, addressed to Sir Walter Scott (1831); The Martyrs of Science, or the Lives of Galileo, Tycho Brake, and Kepler (1841); More Worlds than One (1854).

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  • See The Home Life of Sir David Brewster, by his daughter Mrs Gordon.

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  • William Brewster >>

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  • surveys the spot where Knox was buried; the reformer himself is in the quadrangle of New College: Sir David Brewster adorns the quadrangle of the university; Dr William Chambers is in Chambers Street, and Frederick, duke of York (1763-1827), and the 4th earl of Hopetoun are also commemorated.

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  • At the present time excellent reproductions of Rowland's speculum gratings are on the market (Thorp, Ives, Wallace), prepared, after a suggestion of Sir David Brewster, by coating the original with a varnish, e.g.

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  • or the bands comes about in a very curious way, as is shown by a circumstance first observed by Brewster.

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  • Mag., 1904), whose point of view offers the great advantage of affording an instantaneous explanation of the peculiarity noticed by Brewster.

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  • After holding a school mastership and two curacies, he was made rector of St Martin's Orgar in London in 1628, where he took a leading part in the contest between the London clergy and the citizens about the city tithes, and compiled a treatise on the subject, which is printed in Brewster's Collectanea (1752).

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  • A year later he was appointed professor of natural philosophy in Edinburgh University, in succession to Sir John Leslie and in competition with Sir David Brewster, and during his tenure of that office, which he did not give up till 1860, he not only proved himself an active and efficient teacher, but also did much to improve the internal conditions of the university.

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  • In 1859 he was appointed successor to Brewster in the principalship of the United College of St Andrews, a position which he held until his death at Clifton on the 31st of December 1868.

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  • of Sir David Brewster, who had married the poet's second daughter) was destroyed.

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  • Acting on a principle quite different from any previously discussed is the capillary hydrometer or staktometer of Brewster, which is based upon the difference in the surface tension and density of pure water, and of mixtures of alcohol and water in varying proportions.

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  • Sir David Brewster found with one of these instruments that the number of drops of pure water was 734, while of proof spirit, sp. gr.

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  • Brewster (Ency.

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  • It may be said to begin with the arrival in 1620 of a small company including William Brewster, elder of the refugee church in Leiden, which founded Plymouth in the modern Massachusetts in the winter of that year.

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  • 1616), rector of Babworth, and Brewster, a layman of Scrooby in Nottinghamshire.

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  • Men so moved so to act could hardly be commonplace; and so among them we find characters strong and marked, with equal ability to rule and to obey, as William Bradford (1590-1657) and Brewster, Edward Winslow (1595-1655) and Miles Standish (1584-1656), John Winthrop (1588-1649) and Dr Samuel Fuller, and men so inflexible in their love of liberty and faith in man as Roger Williams and young Harry Vane.

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  • An English translation, by Sir David Brewster, from the eleventh French edition, was published in 1823, and is well known in England.

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  • In Brewster's Edinburgh Journal of Science for 1828 he described his machine for polishing the speculum, which in all essential points remained unaltered afterwards.

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  • At his own request the article on Christianity was assigned to him in Dr Brewster's Edinburgh Encyclopaedia, and in studying the credentials of Christianity he received a new impression of its contents.

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  • Among papers in scientific periodicals may be mentioned articles by Adler, Ball, Baumhauer, Beck, Bonney, Brewster, Chaper, Cohen, Crookes, Daubree, Derby, Des Cloizeaux, Doelter, Dunn, Flight, Friedel, Gorceix, Gurich, Goeppert, Harger, Hudleston, Hussak, Jannettaz, Jeremejew, de Launay, Lewis, Maskelyne, Meunier, Moissan, Molengraaff, Moulle, Rose, Sadebeck, Scheibe, Stelzner, Stow.

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  • Across the river are Gattonside, with numerous orchards, and Allerly, the home of Sir David Brewster from 1827 till his death in 1868.

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  • He took a pupil or two, and wrote articles for the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia under the editorship of Brewster.

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  • Brewster, Life of Newton; R.

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  • In 1840 she married Henry Brewster Stanton (1805-1887), a lawyer and journalist, who had been a prominent abolitionist since his student days (1832-1834) in Lane Theological Seminary, and who took her on a wedding journey to London, where he was a delegate to the World's Anti-Slavery Convention.

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  • In repeating and extending the experiments of Haiiy much later, Sir David Brewster discovered that various artificial salts were pyro-electric, and he mentions the tartrates of potash and soda and tartaric acid as exhibiting this property in a very strong degree.

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  • For Sir David Brewster's work on pyro-electricity, see Trans.

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  • Electric magnets of great power were soon constructed in this manner by Sturgeon, Joule, Henry, Faraday and Brewster.

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  • 8 Brewster, Life of Newton (1855) (see particularly vol.

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  • 39, 61; Brewster, Newton, .ii.

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  • His father, a shipbuilder of German descent (Koch),and his mother,a descendant of William Brewster, were natives of New York City, where the boy grew up, studying law in an office in 1842-1844, and working in a broker's office in 1844-1846, and where, under the influence of Charles G.

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  • The first settlement was made here in 1631 by Miles Standish (to whom Captain's Hill was granted), William Brewster, John Alden, and a few others.

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  • Brewster's Staktometer.

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  • Brewster, Memoirs of the Life, Writings, and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton (1855; new ed.

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  • The polarizing angle varies from one transparent substance to another, and Sir David Brewster in 1815 enunciated the law that the tangent of the polarizing angle is equal to the refractive index of the substance.

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    0
  • In Biot's earlier experiments the beam of light employed was nearly parallel: the phenomena of rings and brushes that are seen with a conical pencil of light were discovered by Sir David Brewster in the case of uniaxal crystals in 1813 and in that of biaxal crystals in 1815.

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    0
  • At normal incidence the intensity of the reflected light, measured by the square of the amplitude, is { (µ -1) /(µ+ I) } 2 in both cases; but whereas in the former the intensity increases uniformly with i to the value unity for i =90°, in the latter the intensity at first decreases as i increases, until it attains the value zero when i -Fr = 90°, or tan i =,u - the polarizing angle of Brewster - and then increases until it becomes unity at grazing incidence.

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  • Fresnel's formulae are sufficiently accurate for most practical purposes, but that they are not an exact representation of the facts of reflection was shown by Sir David Brewster and by Sir G.

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  • To reduce the aberrations Sir David Brewster proposed to employ in the place of glass transparent minerals of high refractive index and low dispersion.

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  • Brewster (Stanhope).

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  • Sir David Brewster found that Wollaston's form worked best when the two lenses were hemispheres and the central space was filled up with a transparent cement having the same refractive index as the glass; he therefore used a sphere and provided it with a groove at the equator (see fig.

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  • 7), which was really due to Brewster.

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  • Brewster, and, above all, Amici.

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  • The method for superposing the two spaces on one another was deduced by Sir David Brewster in 1856, but he does not appear to have dealt with the problem of range-finding.

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  • It was hard, smooth sand, very different from the loose, sharp sand, mingled with kelp and shells, at Brewster.

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  • Just before the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, it was arranged that my teacher and I should spend our vacation at Brewster, on Cape Cod, with our dear friend, Mrs. Hopkins.

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  • Early in July she went to Brewster, Massachusetts, and spent the rest of the summer.

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  • I had a very pleasant time at Brewster.

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  • He has, in truth, behaved very strangely ever since we came to Brewster.

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  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ Brewster, Mass.

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  • We left the city last Thursday night, and arrived in Brewster Friday afternoon.

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  • While making a visit at Brewster, Massachusetts, she one day accompanied my friend and me through the graveyard.

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  • Helen and I spent the summer of 1888 with Mrs. Hopkins at her home in Brewster, Mass., where she kindly relieved me a part of the time, of the care of Helen.

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  • The only person that we supposed might possibly have read the story to Helen was her friend, Mrs. Hopkins, whom she was visiting at the time in Brewster.

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  • On Miss Sullivan's return to Brewster, she read to Helen the story of "Little Lord Fauntleroy," which she had purchased in Boston for the purpose.

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  • Mark Brewster recovered from a disappointing second race to score another third.

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  • Ben BREWSTER played in a String quartet and used to serenade girls.

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  • Punky Brewster Maybe the world is blind, Or just a little unkind.

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  • It's hard to imagine Punky Brewster grown up, as she was such a vibrant and childlike character on the NBC show.

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  • The actor that played Brewster, Soleil Moon Frye, has indeed grown up, and she is active in many different venues.

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  • In 1984, Frye was cast as the title character in the series Punky Brewster.

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  • Punky Brewster lasted for four seasons, two of them on NBC and the final two in syndication.

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  • The show was popular with young kids, who felt they could identify with Punky Brewster's struggles to find herself.

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  • That was about as far as producers wanted to go with Punky Brewster grown up.

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  • She is still often referred to as Punky Brewster many years later.

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  • To keep up with the former Punky Brewster, you can follow Soleil Moon Frye on Twitter.

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  • Jordana Brewster: She started out on daytime soaps, but soon took on roles in The Fast and the Furious and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning.

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  • Unlike some celebrities who act exclusively on the big screen, Brewster bounces back and forth between film and television work.

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  • Keep in mind that a camp doesn't need to be listed as being specifically for ADHD for your child to benefit - many camps such as Brewster Academy have a great record working with ADHD kids.

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  • Sir David Brewster modified his apparatus by moving the object-box and closing the end of the tube by a lens of short focus which forms images of distant objects at the distance of distinct vision.

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  • SIR DAVID BREWSTER (1781-1868), Scottish natural philosopher, was born on the 11th of December 1781 at Jedburgh, where his father, a teacher of high reputation, was rector of the grammar school.

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  • was conferred upon Brewster by Marischal College, Aberdeen; in 1815 he was made a member of the Royal Society of London, and received the Copley medal; in 1818 he received the Rumford medal of the society; and in 1816 the French Institute awarded him one-half of the prize of three thousand francs for the two most important discoveries in physical science made in Europe during the two preceding years.

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