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brevet

brevet

brevet Sentence Examples

  • For his services at Franklin he was awarded the rank of brigadier-general (November 1864) and the brevet rank of major-general (March 1865) in the regular army.

  • His son, Hugh Boyle Ewing (1826-1905), served throughout the Civil War in the Federal armies, rising from the rank of colonel { 1861) to that of brigadier-general (1862) and brevet majorgeneral (1865), and commanding brigades at Antietam and Vicksburg and a division at Chickamauga; and was minister of the United States to the Netherlands in 1866-1870.

  • In the Civil War he attained the rank of brigadier-general (March 1863) and received the brevet of major-general (1865).

  • In 1861 he became captain, and in the Abyssinian expedition of 1867-68 was a brigade major, being again mentioned in despatches and given a brevet majority.

  • It was also a distributory tax (impot de repartition); every year the king in his council fixed the total sum which the taille was to produce in the following year; he drew up and signed the brevet de la taille (warrant), and the contribution of the individual taxpayer was arrived at in the last analysis by a series of subdivisions.

  • From the latter he graduated in July 1828, and became by brevet a second lieutenant of infantry.

  • He was promoted to be brigadiergeneral of volunteers in September 1861, and to be major-general of volunteers in July 1862, earned the brevet of lieutenant-colonel in the regular army at the capture of Nashville, Tennessee, that of colonel at Shiloh, and that of brigadier-general at Perryville, and in March 1865 was breveted major-general for his services during the war.

  • Gainesville was settled about 1851, was incorporated in 1873, and was chartered as a city in 1879; it was named in honour of General Edmund Pendleton Gaines (1777-1849), who served with distinction in the War of 1812, becoming a brigadier-general in March 1814 and receiving the brevet of major-general and the thanks of Congress for his defence of Fort Erie in August 1814.

  • Another brother, Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835-), born in Boston on the 27th of May 1835, graduated at Harvard in 1856, and served on the Union side in the Civil War, receiving in 1865 the brevet of brigadier-general in the regular army.

  • Lee, and was made brevet second lieutenant, 4th Artillery, in 1829.

  • When the Seven Days' battle began Porter's corps had to sustain alone the full weight of the Confederate attack, and though defeated in the desperately fought battle of Gaines's Mill (June 27, 1862) the steadiness of his defence was so conspicuous that he was immediately promoted major-general of volunteers and brevet origadiergeneral U.S.A. His corps, moreover, had the greatest share in the successful battles of Glendale and Malvern Hill.

  • After the war, now brevet major-general, he returned to regular engineer duty as chief engineer of the U.S. army, and retired in 1879.

  • At the Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, he rendered further good service, and at Gettysburg his handling of the artillery was conspicuous in the repulse of Pickett's charge, and he was rewarded with the brevet of colonel.

  • He served in Virginia to the end of the war, attaining the brevet ranks of major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general of regulars.

  • His brother, Lewis Cass Hunt (1824-1886), served throughout the Civil War in the infantry arm, becoming brigadier-general of volunteers in 1862, and brevet brigadier-general U.S.A. in 1865.

  • of France, made him by brevet physician to his guards with 2000 livres a year and allowances.

  • He served in the Civil War, on the Union side, from 1862 to 1865, rising in the volunteer service to the regular rank of colonel and the brevet rank of brigadier-general, and, after December 1863, acted as one of the officers of the coloured troops commanded by General William Birney.

  • He served throughout the war, distinguished himself particularly at South Mountain, Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, and by successive promotions became a brigadier-general of volunteers and, by brevet, a major-general of volunteers.

  • In 1796 he was sent with his regiment to India, being promoted colonel by brevet about the same time.

  • Yarns are sold according to their "actual" counts, though when they are woven into cloth they frequently attain nominal or brevet rank.

  • The fort and the settlement were named in honour of General William Jenkins Worth (1794-1849), a native of Hudson, New York, who served in the War of 1812, commanded the United States forces against the Seminole Indians in 1841-1842, served under both General Taylor and General Scott in the Mexican War, distinguishing himself at Monterey (where he earned the brevet of major-general) and in other engagements, and later commanded the department of Texas.

  • Incapacitated for further active service, he continued to be employed in administrative posts to the end of the war, and for several years thereafter he served at army headquarters, becoming captain in 1866 and brevet lieutenant-colonel in 1867.

  • Slocum, and in 1865 received a captain's brevet for "efficient services during the campaigns in North Carolina and Georgia."

  • In 1783 he was commissioned a brevet brigadier-general in the continental army.

  • Sherman's campaign in the Carolinas; and in September 1865 received the brevet of major-general of volunteers.

  • The Union gunboats, which had passed up the river toward Shreveport at high water, were caught in its decline above the falls at Alexandria, but they were saved by a splendid piece of engineering (a dam at the falls), constructed by Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bailey (1827-1867), who for this service received the thanks of Congress and the brevet of brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • He resigned his commission in December 1864, but in July 1866 entered the regular army with the rank of colonel of infantry, receiving the brevet of brigadier-general in 1867, served on the frontier and in several Indian wars, and retired in 1881.

  • At the outbreak of the Civil War he entered the United States cavalry as a private, and he rose to commissioned rank in 1863, becoming brevet captain in 1865.

  • He was engaged in the Seminole War and the war with Mexico, won the brevet of captain for his gallantry at Contreras and Churubusco, and was wounded in the assault on the city of Mexico.

  • brevet rank of Captain with the position of Adjutant Nigel Hurst (2nd U.S. Art.

  • brevet crown, but with the wrong bezel insert, or wrong dial.

  • brevet card with your address and the phone number of your next of kin.

  • brevet colonel and received a military burial.

  • For his services at Franklin he was awarded the rank of brigadier-general (November 1864) and the brevet rank of major-general (March 1865) in the regular army.

  • His son, Hugh Boyle Ewing (1826-1905), served throughout the Civil War in the Federal armies, rising from the rank of colonel { 1861) to that of brigadier-general (1862) and brevet majorgeneral (1865), and commanding brigades at Antietam and Vicksburg and a division at Chickamauga; and was minister of the United States to the Netherlands in 1866-1870.

  • In the Civil War he attained the rank of brigadier-general (March 1863) and received the brevet of major-general (1865).

  • In 1861 he became captain, and in the Abyssinian expedition of 1867-68 was a brigade major, being again mentioned in despatches and given a brevet majority.

  • It was also a distributory tax (impot de repartition); every year the king in his council fixed the total sum which the taille was to produce in the following year; he drew up and signed the brevet de la taille (warrant), and the contribution of the individual taxpayer was arrived at in the last analysis by a series of subdivisions.

  • From the latter he graduated in July 1828, and became by brevet a second lieutenant of infantry.

  • He was promoted to be brigadiergeneral of volunteers in September 1861, and to be major-general of volunteers in July 1862, earned the brevet of lieutenant-colonel in the regular army at the capture of Nashville, Tennessee, that of colonel at Shiloh, and that of brigadier-general at Perryville, and in March 1865 was breveted major-general for his services during the war.

  • Gainesville was settled about 1851, was incorporated in 1873, and was chartered as a city in 1879; it was named in honour of General Edmund Pendleton Gaines (1777-1849), who served with distinction in the War of 1812, becoming a brigadier-general in March 1814 and receiving the brevet of major-general and the thanks of Congress for his defence of Fort Erie in August 1814.

  • Another brother, Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835-), born in Boston on the 27th of May 1835, graduated at Harvard in 1856, and served on the Union side in the Civil War, receiving in 1865 the brevet of brigadier-general in the regular army.

  • Lee, and was made brevet second lieutenant, 4th Artillery, in 1829.

  • When the Seven Days' battle began Porter's corps had to sustain alone the full weight of the Confederate attack, and though defeated in the desperately fought battle of Gaines's Mill (June 27, 1862) the steadiness of his defence was so conspicuous that he was immediately promoted major-general of volunteers and brevet origadiergeneral U.S.A. His corps, moreover, had the greatest share in the successful battles of Glendale and Malvern Hill.

  • After the war, now brevet major-general, he returned to regular engineer duty as chief engineer of the U.S. army, and retired in 1879.

  • At the Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, he rendered further good service, and at Gettysburg his handling of the artillery was conspicuous in the repulse of Pickett's charge, and he was rewarded with the brevet of colonel.

  • He served in Virginia to the end of the war, attaining the brevet ranks of major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general of regulars.

  • His brother, Lewis Cass Hunt (1824-1886), served throughout the Civil War in the infantry arm, becoming brigadier-general of volunteers in 1862, and brevet brigadier-general U.S.A. in 1865.

  • of France, made him by brevet physician to his guards with 2000 livres a year and allowances.

  • Educated at Westminster School and Trinity College, Dublin, he was gazetted captain in the 7th Cathcart's Horse (now 6th Dragoon Guards) in 1737, and three years later was transferred to Bragg's regiment of foot (Gloucestershire Regiment) as lieutenant-colonel; immediately afterwards the regiment sailed for active service on the Rhine, and although it was not present at the battle of Dettingen, its lieutenant-colonel was made brevet colonel and aide-de-camp to the king.

  • He served in the Civil War, on the Union side, from 1862 to 1865, rising in the volunteer service to the regular rank of colonel and the brevet rank of brigadier-general, and, after December 1863, acted as one of the officers of the coloured troops commanded by General William Birney.

  • He served throughout the war, distinguished himself particularly at South Mountain, Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, and by successive promotions became a brigadier-general of volunteers and, by brevet, a major-general of volunteers.

  • In 1796 he was sent with his regiment to India, being promoted colonel by brevet about the same time.

  • Yarns are sold according to their "actual" counts, though when they are woven into cloth they frequently attain nominal or brevet rank.

  • The fort and the settlement were named in honour of General William Jenkins Worth (1794-1849), a native of Hudson, New York, who served in the War of 1812, commanded the United States forces against the Seminole Indians in 1841-1842, served under both General Taylor and General Scott in the Mexican War, distinguishing himself at Monterey (where he earned the brevet of major-general) and in other engagements, and later commanded the department of Texas.

  • Incapacitated for further active service, he continued to be employed in administrative posts to the end of the war, and for several years thereafter he served at army headquarters, becoming captain in 1866 and brevet lieutenant-colonel in 1867.

  • Slocum, and in 1865 received a captain's brevet for "efficient services during the campaigns in North Carolina and Georgia."

  • In 1783 he was commissioned a brevet brigadier-general in the continental army.

  • Sherman's campaign in the Carolinas; and in September 1865 received the brevet of major-general of volunteers.

  • The Union gunboats, which had passed up the river toward Shreveport at high water, were caught in its decline above the falls at Alexandria, but they were saved by a splendid piece of engineering (a dam at the falls), constructed by Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bailey (1827-1867), who for this service received the thanks of Congress and the brevet of brigadier-general of volunteers.

  • There were, under the ancien regime, three classes of dukes in France: (1) dukes who were peers (see Peerage) and had a seat in the parlement of Paris; (2) hereditary dukes who were not peers; (3) "brevet" dukes, created for life only.

  • He resigned his commission in December 1864, but in July 1866 entered the regular army with the rank of colonel of infantry, receiving the brevet of brigadier-general in 1867, served on the frontier and in several Indian wars, and retired in 1881.

  • At the outbreak of the Civil War he entered the United States cavalry as a private, and he rose to commissioned rank in 1863, becoming brevet captain in 1865.

  • He was engaged in the Seminole War and the war with Mexico, won the brevet of captain for his gallantry at Contreras and Churubusco, and was wounded in the assault on the city of Mexico.

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