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brenner

brenner Sentence Examples

  • When I mentioned it to Brenner, he agreed.

  • in length) from Domodossola to Brigue, the St Gotthard from Milan to Chiasso (the tunnel is entirely in Swiss territory), the Brenner from Verona to Trent, the line from Udine to Tarvis and the line from Venice to Triest by the Adriatic coast.

  • Farther west came the roads over the higher Alpine passes the Brenner from Verona, the Septimer and the Splugen from Clavenna (Chiavenna), the Great and the Little St Bernard from Augusta Praetoria (Aosta), and the Mont Genvre from Augusta Taurinorum (Turin).

  • The great route was that which led from Venice over the Brenner and up the Rhine to Bruges; and this route became the long red line of municipal development, along which - in Lombardy, Germany and Flanders - the great towns of the middle ages sprang to life.

  • It is on the Brenner railway, by which it is 15m.

  • Brenner Pass >>

  • It accepted the Brenner as a fair strategic line on the north, but argued that the Treaty of London was no longer applicable in respect of Italy's eastern frontier, since the line which it traced was designed to secure Italy against future Austro-Hungarian aggression, and AustriaHungary had by now ceased to exist.

  • Anthracnose is the name usually given to a disease which was formerly known as "charbon," "pech" or "brenner."

  • BRENNER PASS, the lowest (4495 ft.) and one of the most frequented passes across the Alps in all ages, though the name itself rarely occurs in the middle ages, the route over it being said to lie through "the valley of Trent."

  • Munich lies at the centre of an important network of railways connecting it directly with Strassburg (for Paris), Cologne, Leipzig, Berlin, Rosenheim (for Vienna) and Innsbruck (for Italy via the Brenner pass), which converge in a central station.

  • of Venice by rail, and is also the point of departure of the main lines to Mantua and Modena and to the Brenner, while a branch line runs N.W.

  • It was an important point in the road system of the district, lying on that between Mediolanum and Aquileia, while here diverged to the north the roads up the Athesis valley and over the Brenner into Raetia, and to the south roads ran to Betriacum, Mantua and Hostilia.

  • It stands on the left bank of the Adige where this river is joined by the Fersina, and is a station on the Brenner railway, 35 m.

  • Trent was originally the capital of the Tridentini, and is mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary as a station on the great road from Verona to Veldidena (Innsbruck) over the Brenner.

  • He afterwards accepted the situation of secretary to count de Brenner, which afforded him an opportunity of seeing Germany and Italy.

  • It is divided into two very distinct portions by the Brenner Pass (4495 ft.), connecting the Stubai and the Zillerthal groups; over this pass a splendid railway was built in1864-1867from Innsbruck to Verona, while the highway over the pass has from the earliest times been of immense importance from every point of view.

  • The Brenner, too, being on the main watershed of the Alps, separates the two main river systems of which Tirol is composed.

  • Besides the great railway line over the Brenner, there are other lines from Botzen past Meran to Mals, from Franzensfeste up the Pusterthal to Lienz in the Drave valley, and from Innsbruck, by a tunnel beneath the Arlberg Pass to the Vorarlberg and the Rhine valley.

  • It is built at a height of 869 ft., and is a station on the Brenner railway, being 58 m.

  • Botzen is the busiest commercial town in the German-speaking portion of Tirol, being admirably situated at the junction of the Brenner route from Germany to Italy with that from Switzerland down the Upper Adige valley or the Vintschgau.

  • Another route into Austria, the Brenner, leaves the Milan-Venice line at Verona, which is connected with Modena (and so with central and southern Italy) by a railway through Mantua.

  • The easiness of the Brenner pass and the abundance of communication with the sea led to the rise of such towns as Verona, Padua and Aquileia: and Milan only became more important than any of these when the German attacks on Italy were felt farther west.

  • Eastward of this pass, the main chain runs north-east to the Brenner Pass along the snowy crest of the Oetzthal and Stubai Alps, the loftiest point on it being the Weisskugel (12,291 ft., Oetzthal), for the highest summits both of the Oetzthal and of the Stubai districts, the Wildspitze (12,382 ft.) and the Zuckerhiitl (11,520 ft.) stand a little to the north.

  • The Brenner (4495 ft.) is almost the lowest of all the great carriage-road passes across the main chain, and has always been the chief means of communication between Germany and Italy.

  • Hence the passes that can be shown to have been certainly known to them are comparatively few in number: they are, in topographical order from west to east, the Col de l'Argentiere, the Mont Genevre, the two St Bernards, the Spliigen, the Septimer, the Brenner, the Radsta.dter Tauern, the SOlkscharte, the P16cken and the Pontebba (or Saifnitz).

  • Of these the Mont Genevre and the Brenner were the most frequented, while it will be noticed that in the Central Alps only two passes (the Spliigen and the Septimer) were certainly known to the Romans.

  • the Mont Cenis, Llie Great St Bernard, the St Gotthard, the Septimer and the Brenner.

  • the Semmering, the Brenner, the Tenda and the Arlberg) can boast of carriage roads constructed before 1800, while those over the Umbrail and the Great St Bernard were not completed till the early years of the 10th century.

  • Still more recently the main alpine chain has been subjected to the further indignity of having railway lines carried over it or through it-the Brenner and the Pontebba lines being cases of the former, and the Col de Tenda, the Mont Cenis (though the tunnel is really 17 m.

  • Central Tirol Alps (from the Brenner Pass to the Radstalter Tauern Pass, north of the Drave Valley and south of the Pinzgau and the Enns Valley).

  • Alpeinerscharte (Breitlahner to St Jodok am Brenner), foot path (Z) .

  • 7,763 Tuxerjoch or Schmirnjoch (Mayrhofen to St Jodok am Brenner), foot path (Z).

  • Ortler, Oetzthal and Stubai Ranges (from the Reschen Scheideck and the Stelvio to the Brenner Pass, south of the Inn Valley, and north of the Tonale Pass).

  • 6,870 Reschen Scheideck Pass (Landeck to Meran), carriage road 4,902 Brenner Pass (Innsbruck to Verona), railway over.

  • The Dolomites of South Tirol (from the Brenner Pass Monte Croce Pass, and south of the Pusterthal).

  • He travelled by way of Munich, the Brenner and Lago di Garda to Verona and Venice, and from thence to Rome, where he arrived on the 29th of October 1786.

  • About this time also took place a great invasion of Italy; Segovisus and Bellovisus, the nephews of Ambigatus, led armies through Switzerland, and over the Brenner, and by the Maritime Alps, respectively (Livy v.

  • This Alpine pass is in some sort the pendant of the Brenner Pass, but leads from the upper valley of the Inn or Engadine to the upper valley of the Adige.

  • from Landeck) where the Brenner route is joined.

  • When I mentioned it to Brenner, he agreed.

  • autobahn system and Innsbruck, then over the Brenner Pass.

  • At Innsbruck the Bavarians had already donned the red cockade, and on the Brenner rebellion had broken out.

  • Why does Brenner think that absolutist France was not feudal?

  • in length) from Domodossola to Brigue, the St Gotthard from Milan to Chiasso (the tunnel is entirely in Swiss territory), the Brenner from Verona to Trent, the line from Udine to Tarvis and the line from Venice to Triest by the Adriatic coast.

  • Farther west came the roads over the higher Alpine passes the Brenner from Verona, the Septimer and the Splugen from Clavenna (Chiavenna), the Great and the Little St Bernard from Augusta Praetoria (Aosta), and the Mont Genvre from Augusta Taurinorum (Turin).

  • The great route was that which led from Venice over the Brenner and up the Rhine to Bruges; and this route became the long red line of municipal development, along which - in Lombardy, Germany and Flanders - the great towns of the middle ages sprang to life.

  • It is on the Brenner railway, by which it is 15m.

  • Brenner Pass >>

  • It accepted the Brenner as a fair strategic line on the north, but argued that the Treaty of London was no longer applicable in respect of Italy's eastern frontier, since the line which it traced was designed to secure Italy against future Austro-Hungarian aggression, and AustriaHungary had by now ceased to exist.

  • Anthracnose is the name usually given to a disease which was formerly known as "charbon," "pech" or "brenner."

  • BRENNER PASS, the lowest (4495 ft.) and one of the most frequented passes across the Alps in all ages, though the name itself rarely occurs in the middle ages, the route over it being said to lie through "the valley of Trent."

  • Munich lies at the centre of an important network of railways connecting it directly with Strassburg (for Paris), Cologne, Leipzig, Berlin, Rosenheim (for Vienna) and Innsbruck (for Italy via the Brenner pass), which converge in a central station.

  • of Venice by rail, and is also the point of departure of the main lines to Mantua and Modena and to the Brenner, while a branch line runs N.W.

  • It was an important point in the road system of the district, lying on that between Mediolanum and Aquileia, while here diverged to the north the roads up the Athesis valley and over the Brenner into Raetia, and to the south roads ran to Betriacum, Mantua and Hostilia.

  • It stands on the left bank of the Adige where this river is joined by the Fersina, and is a station on the Brenner railway, 35 m.

  • Trent was originally the capital of the Tridentini, and is mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary as a station on the great road from Verona to Veldidena (Innsbruck) over the Brenner.

  • He afterwards accepted the situation of secretary to count de Brenner, which afforded him an opportunity of seeing Germany and Italy.

  • It is divided into two very distinct portions by the Brenner Pass (4495 ft.), connecting the Stubai and the Zillerthal groups; over this pass a splendid railway was built in1864-1867from Innsbruck to Verona, while the highway over the pass has from the earliest times been of immense importance from every point of view.

  • The Brenner, too, being on the main watershed of the Alps, separates the two main river systems of which Tirol is composed.

  • Besides the great railway line over the Brenner, there are other lines from Botzen past Meran to Mals, from Franzensfeste up the Pusterthal to Lienz in the Drave valley, and from Innsbruck, by a tunnel beneath the Arlberg Pass to the Vorarlberg and the Rhine valley.

  • It is built at a height of 869 ft., and is a station on the Brenner railway, being 58 m.

  • Botzen is the busiest commercial town in the German-speaking portion of Tirol, being admirably situated at the junction of the Brenner route from Germany to Italy with that from Switzerland down the Upper Adige valley or the Vintschgau.

  • Another route into Austria, the Brenner, leaves the Milan-Venice line at Verona, which is connected with Modena (and so with central and southern Italy) by a railway through Mantua.

  • The easiness of the Brenner pass and the abundance of communication with the sea led to the rise of such towns as Verona, Padua and Aquileia: and Milan only became more important than any of these when the German attacks on Italy were felt farther west.

  • Eastward of this pass, the main chain runs north-east to the Brenner Pass along the snowy crest of the Oetzthal and Stubai Alps, the loftiest point on it being the Weisskugel (12,291 ft., Oetzthal), for the highest summits both of the Oetzthal and of the Stubai districts, the Wildspitze (12,382 ft.) and the Zuckerhiitl (11,520 ft.) stand a little to the north.

  • The Brenner (4495 ft.) is almost the lowest of all the great carriage-road passes across the main chain, and has always been the chief means of communication between Germany and Italy.

  • Hence the passes that can be shown to have been certainly known to them are comparatively few in number: they are, in topographical order from west to east, the Col de l'Argentiere, the Mont Genevre, the two St Bernards, the Spliigen, the Septimer, the Brenner, the Radsta.dter Tauern, the SOlkscharte, the P16cken and the Pontebba (or Saifnitz).

  • Of these the Mont Genevre and the Brenner were the most frequented, while it will be noticed that in the Central Alps only two passes (the Spliigen and the Septimer) were certainly known to the Romans.

  • the Mont Cenis, Llie Great St Bernard, the St Gotthard, the Septimer and the Brenner.

  • the Semmering, the Brenner, the Tenda and the Arlberg) can boast of carriage roads constructed before 1800, while those over the Umbrail and the Great St Bernard were not completed till the early years of the 10th century.

  • Still more recently the main alpine chain has been subjected to the further indignity of having railway lines carried over it or through it-the Brenner and the Pontebba lines being cases of the former, and the Col de Tenda, the Mont Cenis (though the tunnel is really 17 m.

  • Central Tirol Alps (from the Brenner Pass to the Radstalter Tauern Pass, north of the Drave Valley and south of the Pinzgau and the Enns Valley).

  • Alpeinerscharte (Breitlahner to St Jodok am Brenner), foot path (Z) .

  • 7,763 Tuxerjoch or Schmirnjoch (Mayrhofen to St Jodok am Brenner), foot path (Z).

  • Ortler, Oetzthal and Stubai Ranges (from the Reschen Scheideck and the Stelvio to the Brenner Pass, south of the Inn Valley, and north of the Tonale Pass).

  • 6,870 Reschen Scheideck Pass (Landeck to Meran), carriage road 4,902 Brenner Pass (Innsbruck to Verona), railway over.

  • The Dolomites of South Tirol (from the Brenner Pass Monte Croce Pass, and south of the Pusterthal).

  • He travelled by way of Munich, the Brenner and Lago di Garda to Verona and Venice, and from thence to Rome, where he arrived on the 29th of October 1786.

  • The valley of the Po formed the main artery of trade between western Europe and the East, Milan being besides the point of convergence for all Alpine passes west of the Brenner (the St Gotthard, however, was not made accessible until early in the 13th century).

  • About this time also took place a great invasion of Italy; Segovisus and Bellovisus, the nephews of Ambigatus, led armies through Switzerland, and over the Brenner, and by the Maritime Alps, respectively (Livy v.

  • This Alpine pass is in some sort the pendant of the Brenner Pass, but leads from the upper valley of the Inn or Engadine to the upper valley of the Adige.

  • from Landeck) where the Brenner route is joined.

  • The day that Claudia Brenner and Rebecca Wight were shot was a sunny spring day on the Appalachian Trail.

  • Brenner. "Fluid and Electrolyte Disturbances."

  • Brenner. In 1909, his initials V.D.B. were stamped on a limited quantity of the pennies.

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