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breeds

breeds Sentence Examples

  • I never knew there were so many goat breeds.

  • Oh, there are a lot more breeds.

  • The book was about all the different goat breeds and uses of the goat, beginning with a history of the goat.

  • Nevertheless the idea of the value of improving breeds is gaining ground.

  • One or other of these types is to be found in cats of almost all breeds, whether Persian, short-haired or Manx; and there appear to be no intermediate stages between them.

  • of the origin of our domesticated breeds has not yet been determined.

  • The fact that in tabby Persians the body-markings are never so strong as in the short-haired breeds is in some degree confirmatory of this, as suggesting descent from a nearly wholecoloured type.

  • At the present day, however, Persians exhibit nearly all the colour and pattern types of the short-haired breeds, the "orange Persian" representing the erythristic phase.

  • One of these breeds is the Paraguay cat, which when adult weighs only about three pounds, and is not more than a quarter the size of an ordinary cat.

  • Gradually Durham, Short horn, Hereford and other stock were introduced to improve the native breeds, with results so satisfactory that now herds of threequarters-bred cattle are to be found in all parts of the country.

  • Holstein, Jersey and other well-known dairy breeds were imported for the new industries of butterand cheese-making.

  • In the season of 1899-1900 the wool exports weighed 420,000,000 lb, and averaged more than 5 lb per sheep. The extra weight of fleece was owing to the large importation of better breeds.

  • Of cattle besides the breeds named the Norman (beef and milk), the Limousin (beef), the Mont bfiard, the Bazadais, the Flamand, the Breton and tile larthenais breeds may be mentioned, societies and in many other ways.

  • In the desert tracts fine breeds of camels, cattle, horses and sheep are to be found wherever there is pasturage.

  • These vary in weight from soo to 1000 lb, according to the variety of camel employed, for of the Arabian camel there are almost as many breeds as there are of the horse.

  • a day for three days without drink, getting a supply of water, however, on the fourth; but the fleeter breeds will carry their rider and a bag of water so m.

  • The state helps to improve the breeds by placing choice stallions at the disposal of private breeders at a low tariff.

  • As a wild bird it breeds constantly, though locally, throughout the greater part of Scotland, and has frequently done so in England, but more rarely in Ireland.

  • It was during this period that the genius of Robert Bakewell produced an extraordinary change in the character of our more important breeds of live stock, more especially by the perfecting of a new race of sheep - the well-known Leicesters.

  • The sections provided for cattle are properly restricted to what may be termed the beef breeds; in the catalogue order they are Devon, South Devon, Hereford, Shorthorn, Sussex, Red Polled, Aberdeen-Angus, Galloway, Welsh, Highland, Cross-bred, Kerry and Dexter, and Small Cross-bred.

  • It will be noticed that such characteristically milking breeds as the Ayrshire, Jersey and Guernsey have no place here.

  • Provision is made, however, for all the well-known breeds of sheep and swine.

  • The only exception was in the case of the slowly-maturing Cheviot and mountain breeds, for which the second class was for wether sheep of any age above twelve months.

  • The three-year-old wethers and older oxen that used to be common in the fat stock markets are now rarely seen, excepting perhaps in the case of mountain breeds of sheep and Highland cattle.

  • A noteworthy feature of the closing decades of the 19th century was the formation of voluntary associations of stockbreeders, with the object of promoting the interests of the respective breeds of live stock.

  • Other horsebreeders' associations, all doing useful work in the interests of their respective breeds, are the Suffolk Horse Society, the Clydesdale Horse Society, the Yorkshire Coach Horse Society, the Cleveland Bay Horse Society, the Polo Pony Society, the Shetland Pony Stud Book Society, the Welsh Pony and Cob Society and the New Forest Pony Association.

  • Other cattle societies, all well caring for the interest of their respective breeds, are the Shorthorn Society of Great Britain and Ireland, the Lincolnshire Red Shorthorn Association, the Hereford Herd Book Society, the Devon Cattle Breeders' Society, the South Devon Herd Book Society, the Sussex Herd Book Society, the Longhorned Cattle Society, the Red Polled Society, the English Guernsey Cattle Society, the English Kerry and Dexter Cattle Society, the Welsh Bla.

  • In the case of sheep the National Sheep Breeders' Association looks after the interests of flockmasters in general, whilst most of the pure breeds are represented also by separate organizations.

  • ab, g, The limpet breeds upon the southern English coast in the early part of April, but its development has not been followed.

  • It breeds from four to eight times a year, bringing forth each time from three to eight young; its period of gestation is about thirty days, and it is able to bear when six months old.

  • For not only has the weight been more than quadrupled in some of the larger breeds, and the structure of the skull and other parts of the skeleton greatly altered, but the proportionate size of the brain has been reduced and the colour and texture of the fur altered in a remarkable manner.

  • Amongst the breeds which are valued for the distribution of colour on the fur are the Himalayan and the Dutch.

  • Though produced by crossing, it now generally breeds true to colour, at times throwing back, however, to the silver greys from which it was derived.

  • Other breeds include the Japanese, with an orange coat, broadly banded on the hind-quarters with black; the pink-eyed and short and thick-furred albino Polish; the Siberian, probably produced by crossing the Himalayan with the Angora; and the black-and-tan and blue-and-tan.

  • It is not improbable that all dogs sprang from one common source, but climate, food and cross-breeding caused variations of form which suggested particular uses, and these being either designedly or accidentally perpetuated, the various breeds of dogs arose, and became numerous in proportion to the progress of civilization.

  • Among the ruder or savage tribes they possess but one form; but the ingenuity of man has devised many inventions to increase his comforts; he has varied and multiplied the characters and kinds of domestic animals for the same purpose, and hence the various breeds of horses, cattle and dogs.

  • Pearce) was issued, as to the identity of the two great divisions of dogs, an incident at Altrincham Show in September 'goo - an exhibitor entering a Russian wolfhound in both the sporting and non-sporting competitions - made it necessary for authoritative information to be given as to how the breeds should be separated.

  • On the 4th of May 1898 a sub-committee of the Kennel Club decided that the following breeds should be classified as "toy dogs": - Black and tan terriers (under 7 lb), bull terriers (under 8 lb), griffons, Italian greyhounds, Japanese, Maltese, Pekingese, poodles (under 15 in.), pugs, toy spaniels, Yorkshire terriers and Pomeranians.

  • All these varieties were represented at the annual show of the Kennel Club in the autumn of 1905, and at the representative exhibition of America held under the management of the Westminster Kennel Club in the following spring the classification was substantially the same, additional breeds, however, being Boston terriers - practically unknown in England, - Chesapeake Bay dogs, Chihuahuas, Papillons and Roseneath terriers.

  • The progress of the club has been remarkable, and that its formation did much to improve the conditions of the various breeds of dogs, to encourage their use in the field by the promotion of working trials, and to check abuses which were common with regard to the registration of pedigrees, &c., cannot.

  • Most of the leading breeds have clubs or societies, which have been founded by admirers with a view to furthering the interests of their favourites; and such combinations as the Bulldog Club (incorporated), the London Bulldog Society, the British Bulldog Club, the Fox Terrier Club, the Association of Bloodhound Breeders - under whose management the first man-hunting trials were held, - the Bloodhound Hunt Club, the Collie Club, the Dachshund Club, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club, the English Setter Club, the Gamekeepers' Association of the United Kingdom, the International Gun Dog League, the Irish Terrier Club, the Irish Wolfhound Club, the St Bernard Club, the National Terrier Club, the Pomeranian Club, the Spaniel Club, the Scottish Terrier Club and the Toy Bulldog Club have done good work in keeping the claims of the breeds they represent before the dogowning public and encouraging the breeding of dogs to type.

  • Several weekly papers published on the continent of Europe devote a considerable portion of their space to dogs, and canine journals have been started in America, South Africa and even India: while apart from Lee's volumes and other carefully compiled works treating on the dog in general, the various breeds have been written about, and the books or monographs have large sales.

  • Breeds of Dog.

  • Nothing is known with certainty as to the origin of the vast majority of breeds of dogs, and it is an unfortunate fact that the progressive changes which have been made within comparatively recent times by fanciers have not been accurately recorded by the preservation, in museums or collections, of the actual specimens considered typical at different dates.

  • No scientific classification of the breeds of dogs is at present possible, but whilst the division already given into "sporting" and "non-sporting" is of some practical value, for descriptive purposes it is convenient to make a division into the six groups: - wolfdogs, greyhounds, spaniels, hounds, mastiffs and terriers.

  • Throughout the northern regions of both hemispheres there are several breeds of semi-domesticated dogs which are wolf-like, with erect ears and long woolly hair.

  • They may be divided into field spaniels, water spaniels and the smaller breeds kept as pets.

  • The Clumber, Sussex, Norfolk and Cocker breeds are the best established.

  • Of the water spaniels the Irish breeds are best known.

  • They are pre-eminently dogs for sporting purposes, and special strains or breeds adapted to the peculiarities of different kinds of sporting have been produced.

  • It is probable that pointer blood was introduced in the course of shaping the various breeds of setter.

  • Both breeds were large and heavy, with pendulous ears and thick throats with dewlaps.

  • The pointers, of which there are breeds slightly differing in.

  • The number of breeds is very large, the two extreme types being the smooth fox-terrier with compact shape, relatively long legs, and the longbodied, short-legged Skye terrier, with long hair and pendent ears.

  • All the well-known breeds of dogs are highly artificial and their maintenance requires the constant care of the breeder in mating, and in rejecting aberrant progeny.

  • Extra claw, found occasionally on all breeds.

  • The pendulous lips of the bloodhound and other breeds.

  • It is important to grasp clearly the distinction between breeds.

  • To better the breeds.

  • It was formerly thought to be only an autumnal or wintervisitor to Britain, but later experience has proved that, though there may very likely be an immigration in the fall of the year, it breeds in nearly all the English counties to Yorkshire, and abundantly in those nearest to London.

  • The principal breeds are either native or Swiss (especially that of Simmenthal).

  • Since the beginning of the 10th century strenuous efforts have been made to improve the sanitary condition by a new system of drainage, a better water service, the filling up of marshes wherein the malarial mosquito breeds, and in other directions.

  • 2 This is the more noteworthy as the district in which he was born and educated is almost the only part of Italy in which the rook breeds.

  • There are exceptionally fine breeds of cattle, asses and goats; cows of a large and very powerful build are used for ploughing.

  • Mimus polyglottus, the northern mocking-bird, inhabits the southern part of the United States, being in the north only a summer visitant; it breeds rarely in New England, is seldom found north of the 38th parallel, and migrates to the south in winter, passing that season in the Gulf States and Mexico.

  • and there are fine breeds of horses and large flocks of sheep. Productive fisheries are carried on at the mouth of the Don.

  • The breeds of buffaloes and horses in this state are highly esteemed.

  • As a wild animal, then, the aurochs appears to have ceased to exist in the early part of the 17th century; but as a species it survives, for the majority of the domesticated breeds of European cattle are its descendants, all diminished in point of size, and some departing more widely from the original type than others.

  • Aurochs' calves were in all probability captured by the early inhabitants of Britain and the continent and tamed; and from these, with perhaps an occasional blending of wild blood, are descended most European breeds of cattle.

  • These white breeds are, however, partial albinos; and such semi-albinos are always the result of domestication and could not have arisen in the wild state.

  • Moreover, park-cattle display evidence of their descent from dark-coloured breeds by the retention of red or black ears and brown or black muzzles.

  • Evidence as to the affinity between these breeds is afforded by the fact that a breed of cattle very similar to that at Chillingham was found in Wales in the 10th century; these cattle being white with red ears.

  • He visited all parts of the country himself, and personally encouraged agriculture; he introduced a more economical mode of mining and smelting silver; he favoured the importation of finer breeds of sheep and cattle; and he brought foreign weavers from abroad to teach the Saxons.

  • Dutch, Ayrshire and other breeds are used to improve the breed of cattle by crossing.

  • Not only does the milk of different races and breeds of cows vary within comparatively wide limits; the milk of the same animal is subject to extensive fluctuation.

  • The principal causes of variation in the individual are age, period of lactation, nature and amount of food, state of health, and treatment, such as frequency of milking, &c. The following table indicates the The average quantity of milk yielded by variable, both in individuals and breeds.

  • Stockfarming, a relatively undeveloped industry, tends to become more important, owing to the assistance which the state renders by the importation of horses, cattle, sheep and swine, from Europe and the United States, in order to improve the native breeds.

  • The varying climatic conditions of Mexico have produced breeds of cattle that have not only departed from the original Spanish type, but likewise present strikingly different characteristics among themselves.

  • 6 more or less mingled with domesticated breeds, the Cretan animal being distinguished as Capra hircus creticus; but the large typical race C. h.

  • Some of these reverted breeds have developed horns of considerable size, although not showing that regularity of curve distinctive of the wild race.

  • Among the domesticated breeds the following are some of the more important.

  • Firstly, we have the common or European goats, of which there are several more or less well-marked breeds, differing from each other in length of hair, in colour and slightly in the configuration of the horns.

  • The ears are more or less upright, sometimes horizontal, but never actually pendent, as in some Asiatic breeds.

  • Both British breeds, as well as those from abroad, are frequently ornamented with two tassel-like appendages, hanging near together under the throat.

  • It has been supposed by many that these are traceable to foreign blood; but although there are foreign breeds that possess them, they appear to pertain quite as much to the English native breeds as to those of distant countries, the peculiarity being mentioned in very old works on the goats of the British Islands.

  • The latter, often also called Ox-bird, Plover's Page, Purre and Stint, - names which it shares with some other species, - not only breeds commonly on many of the elevated moors of Britain, but in autumn resorts in countless flocks to the shores.

  • The spoon-billed sandpiper, Eurinorhynchus pygmaeus, breeds in north-eastern Asia and N.W.

  • The chaffinch breeds early in the season, and its song may often be heard in February.

  • but increasing extent in the North-West Provinces, the breeds being mainly the Clydesdale and the Shire.

  • The cattle breeds are principally those of British origin.

  • All the leading British varieties are reared, the Shropshire, Oxford Down, Leicester and Cotswold breeds being most numerous.

  • Pigs, mostly of the Yorkshire, Berkshire and Tamworth breeds, are reared and fattened in large numbers, and there is a valuable export trade in bacon.

  • During his first two years in the federal parliament his chief speeches were made in defence of Rid and the French half breeds who were concerned in the Red River rebellion, and on fiscal questions.

  • Shorthorns and polled Angus are the commonest breeds of cattle; the sheep are mostly Cheviots and a Cheviot-Leicester cross, but the native sheep are still reared in considerable numbers in Hoy and South Ronaldshay; pigs are also kept on several of the islands, and the horses - as a rule hardy, active and small, though larger than the famous Shetland ponies - are very numerous, but mainly employed in connexion with agricultural work.

  • the breeds which spin large cocoons.

  • By this laborious and painstaking method it has been found possible to re-establish a healthy stock of valuable races from previously highly-infected breeds.

  • Common cocoons enclosing chrysalides weigh each from 16 to 50 grains, or say from 300 to 600 of small breeds and from 270 to 300 of large breeds to the lb.

  • As the outer flossy threads and the inner vests are not reelable, it is difficult to estimate the total length of thread produced by the silkworm, but the portion reeled varies in length and thickness, according to the condition and robustness of the cocoon, in some breeds giving a result as low as Soo metres, and in others 900 to 1200 metres.

  • Four species of Puffinus are recorded as visiting the coasts of the United Kingdom; but the Manx shearwater is the only one that at all commonly breeds in the British Islands.

  • The possibility that it had been brought to England by Cabot or some of his successors earlier in the century is not to be overlooked, and reasons will presently be assigned for supposing that one of the breeds of English turkeys may have had a northern origin;' but the of tenquoted distich first given in Baker's Chronicle (p. 298), asserting that turkeys came into England in the same year - and that year by reputation 2524 - as carps, pickerels and other commodities, is wholly untrustworthy, for we know that both these fishes lived in the country long before, if indeed they were not indigenous to it.

  • gallinula, the smallest and most beautifully coloured of the group. Without being as numerous as the common or full Snipe, it is of frequent occurrence in Great Britain from September to April (and occasionally both earlier and later); but it breeds only, so far as is known, in N.

  • The old fable of this bird inserting its beak into a reed or plunging it into the ground, and so causing the booming sound with which its name will be always associated, is also exploded, and nowadays indeed so few people in Britain have ever heard its loud and awful voice, which seems to be uttered only in the breeding-season, and is therefore unknown in a country where it no longer breeds, that incredulity as to its booming at all has in some quarters succeeded the old belief in this as in other reputed peculiarites of the species.

  • This species lays eggs of a deep sea-green colour, having wholly the character of heron's eggs, and it often breeds in company with herons, while the eggs of all other ibises whose eggs are known resemble those of the sacred ibis.

  • Many garden plants have originated solely by selection; and much has been done to improve our breeds of vegetables, flowers and fruit by systematic selection.

  • Stock-breeding, like agriculture, has considerably improved under the care of the government (state and provincial), which grants subsidies for breeding, irrigation of pasture-lands, the importation of finer breeds of cattle and horses, the erection of factories for dairy produce, schools, &c.

  • Fine breeds of horses and cattle are kept on the larger estates of the nobility, and cattle are exported to Austria.

  • (For the zoology, see Swine.) British breeds of pigs are classified as black, white and red.

  • The white breeds are liable to sun-scald, and black pigs (like black men) are much better adapted than white to exposure in strong sunlight, conforming to the rule that animals in the tropics have black skins.

  • The above three breeds were designated Yorkshire Whites, and are still so named at times.

  • The Middle White, formed by crossing the large and the small breeds, is not so symmetrical as the parent stocks, and the type is not uniform.

  • English Breeds Of Pig, from photographs of F.

  • inbred, and is not so hardy and prolific as most breeds.

  • The Tamworth is one of the oldest breeds of pigs.

  • W.) In America nearly all the breeds may be classified as lardhogs.

  • The Chester White, named from Chester county, Pennsylvania, is one of the four leading breeds of lard-hogs in America.

  • Coleman, Pigs of Great Britain (1877);; Sanders Spencer, Pigs: Breeds and Management (1905); G.

  • Plumb, Types and Breeds of Farm Animals (1906) the Herd Books of the Breed Societies, and Reports of the Agricultural Departments of Great Britain, Canada and the United States.

  • It is not uncommon on many parts of the Himalayas, where it breeds; and on the mountains of Kumaon and the Punjab, and is the "golden eagle" of most AngloIndians.

  • The lammergeyer breeds early in the year.

  • Donkeys and mules of various breeds are good, and would be better were they not so often weakened by heavy work before attaining full maturity.

  • Formerly the island appears to have been wooded, but it now presents only a few bushes (Edwardsia, Broussonetia, &c.), ferns, grasses, sedges, &c. The natives grow bananas in the shelter of artificial pits, also sugar-canes and sweet potatoes, and keep a few goats and a large stock of domestic fowls, and a Tahitian commercial house breeds cattle and sheep on the island.

  • Under the Congested Districts (Scotland) Act of 18 97, £35, 0 0 0 a year was devoted within certain districts of Argyll, Inverness, Ross and Cromarty, Sutherland, Caithness, Orkney and Shetland, to assisting migration, improving the breeds of live stock, building piers and boatslips, making roads and bridges, developing home industries, &c.

  • The breeds include the Ayrshire, noted milkers and specially adapted for dairy farms (which prevail in the south-west), which in this respect have largely supplanted the Galloway in their native district; the polled Angus or Aberdeen, fair milkers, but valuable for their beef-making qualities, and on this account, as well as their hardihood, in great favour in the north-east, where cattlefeeding has been carried to perfection; and the West Highland or Kyloe breed, a picturesque breed with long horns, shaggy coats and decided colours-black, red, dun, cream and brindle-that thrives well on wild and healthy pasture.

  • The special breeds of sheep are >>423-424

  • breeds, as well as a variety of crosses, are kept for winter feeding on lowland farms. The principal breeds of horses are the Shetland and Highland ponies, and the Clydesdale draught.

  • Erasmus Darwin, the grandfather of Charles Darwin, set forth ',in' Zoonomia a much more definite theory of the relation of variation to evolution, and the following passage, cited by Clodd, clearly expresses it: "When we revolve in our minds the metamorphoses of animals, as from the tadpole to the frog; secondly, the changes produced by artificial cultivation, as in the breeds of horses, dogs and sheep; thirdly, the changes produced by conditions of climate and season, as in the sheep of warm climates being covered with hair instead of wool, and the hares and partridges of northern climates becoming white in winter; when, further, we observe the changes of structure produced by habit, as shewn especially by men of different occupations; or the changes produced by artificial mutilation and prenatal influences, as in the crossing of species and production of monsters; fourth, when we observe the essential unity of plan in all warmblooded animals - we are led to conclude that they have been alike produced from a single living filament."

  • Seven years before he had started a model farm at Frechine, where he demonstrated the advantages of scientific methods of cultivation and of the introduction of good breeds of cattle and sheep. Chosen a member of the provincial assembly of Orleans in 1787, he busied himself with plans for the improvement of the social and economic conditions of the community by means of savings banks, insurance societies, canals, workhouses, &c.; and he showed the sincerity of his philanthropical work by advancing money out of his own pocket, without interest, to the towns of Blois and Romorantin, for the purchase of barley during the famine of 1788.

  • Although the name llama properly applies only to one of the domesticated breeds, zoologically it is taken to include all the South American representatives of the Camelidae, which form the genus Lama.

  • Potatoes, barley and a little oats are grown, and the pasture being good the cattle are larger than most of the Hebridean breeds.

  • A keen sense of how much is at stake in any alteration breeds suspicion of every reform.

  • There are, however, some fine breeds in existence.

  • The breeds of cattle are far superior now to the old range stock, so that it pays to take care of them; many thousands are fed during the winter on alfalfa hay.

  • It breeds abundantly on many of the Scottish islands, and in most countries lying to the northward.

  • It breeds abundantly in some seasons on the fells of Lapland, its appearance depending chiefly on the presence of lemmings (Lemmus norvegicus), on which it mainly preys.

  • In general appearance it is very like some of the pariah dogs of India and Egypt; and, except on distributional grounds, there is no reason for regarding it as specifically distinct from such breeds.

  • A committee exists " for the improvement of the breeds of Cyprus stock "; stallions of Arab blood have been imported, and prizes are offered for the best donkeys.

  • The yak of Thibet cannot long survive in the plains of India, or even on the hills below a certain altitude; and that this is due to climate, and not to the increased density of the atmosphere, is shown by the fact that the same animal appears to thrive well in Europe, and even breeds there readily.

  • The farmer breeds from such of his stock as he finds to thrive best with him, and gets rid of those which suffer from cold, damp or disease.

  • A more or less close adaptation to local conditions is thus brought about, and breeds or races are produced which are sometimes liable to deterioration on removal even to a short distance in the same country, as in numerous cases quoted by C. Darwin (Animals and Plants under Domestication).

  • ALPACA, one of two domesticated breeds of South American camel-like ungulates, derived from the wild huanaco or guanaco.

  • Unsuccessful attempts were made to acclimatize the alpaca goat in England, on the European continent and in Australia, and even to cross certain English breeds of sheep 1 Grown in Peru but shipped from Valparaiso.

  • The principal breeds of cattle are the alpine in Norrland, and Ayrshire, short-horn, and red-and-white Swedish in the midlands and south.

  • The various breeds of goldfish are familiar examples, but the carp is almost the only food-fish capable of similar domestication.

  • Moreover, such a division takes for granted the idea which is involved in the word race, that each of these varieties is due to special ancestry, each race thus representing an ancient breed or stock, however these breeds.

  • It has been argued, on the other hand, that not all such mixed breeds are permanent, and especially that the cross between Europeans and Australian indigenes is almost sterile; but this assertion, when examined with the care demanded by its bearing on the general question of hybridity, has distinctly broken down.

  • Most of the cattle are of the zebu or hump-backed variety, but there � are also two breeds - one large, the other resembling the Jersey cattle - which are straight-backed.

  • The best breeds come from the Shoa uplands.

  • Wood and glossy ibises are commonly seen, and the white ibis breeds in numbers; the sand-hill crane is less common than formerly.

  • Excellent breeds of cattle, sheep and pigs are kept.

  • To account for the stripes on the subsequent foals, it is only necessary (now that the principles of cross-breeding are better understood) to assume that in the cross-bred chestnut mare there lay latent the characteristics of the Kattiawar or other Indian breeds, in which stripes commonly occur.

  • Two of the purest breeds at the present day are the Scottish deerhound and the Dalmatian (spotted carriage-dog), A deerhound after having seven pups to a Dalmatian was put to a dog of her own breed.

  • There are three breeds of Rumanian oxen, besides the peculiar black buffaloes, with horns lying almost flat along their necks.

  • Besides the Moldavian and Servian breeds, thousands of so-called " swamp hogs " run wild among the marshes and on the islands of the Danube.

  • It breeds in many parts of the British Islands, making its nest in places very like those chosen by the Wild Duck, A.

  • Although many of the domesticated breeds are hornless, sheep belong to the family of hollow-horned ruminants or Bovidae.

  • It may be added that the long tails of most tame breeds are, like wool, in all probability the results of domestication.

  • The variations of external characters seen in the different breeds are very great.

  • coast of Africa two distinct breeds of hairy sheep are indigenous, the one characterized by its large size, long limbs and smooth coat, and the other by its inferior stature, lower build and heavily maned neck and throat.

  • Both breeds, which have short tails and small horns (present only in the rams), were regarded by the German naturalist Fitzinger as specifically distinct from the domesticated Ovis cries of Europe; and for the first type he proposed the name 0.

  • Although such distinctions may be doubtful (the two African breeds are almost certainly descended from one ancestral form), the retention of such names may be convenient as a provisional measure.

  • British Breeds Of Sheep, from photographs by F.

  • of England; and the question arises whether the two breeds may not have been nearly related.

  • Most remarkable of all is the so-called Wallachian sheep, or Zackelschaf (Ovis strepsiceros), represented by several more or less distinct breeds in E.

  • For the various breeds of wild sheep see R.

  • L.*) Modern British Breeds of Sheep. - The sheep native to the British Isles may be classified as the lowland and the mountain breeds, and subdivided into longwools and shortwools - the latter including the Down breeds, sometimes termed black-faced.

  • The longwool breeds are the Leicester, Border Leicester, Cotswold, Lincoln, Kent, Devon Longwool, South Devon, Wensleydale and Roscommon.

  • The shortwool breeds are the Oxford Down, Southdown, Shropshire, Hampshire Down, Suffolk, Ryeland, Dorset and Somerset Horn, Kerry Hill, Radnor and Clun Forest.

  • These breeds are all English, except the Border Leicester, Cheviot and Scotch Black-face, which belong to Scotland; the Welsh Mountain, which belongs to Wales; and the Roscommon, which is Irish.

  • In the other horned breeds, the Dorset and Somerset, Limestone, Exmoor, Old Norfolk, and Western or Old Wiltshire, both sexes have horns.

  • The remaining breeds are hornless.

  • In past times Leicester blood was extensively employed in the improvement or establishment of other longwool breeds of sheep. The Leicester, as seen now, has a white wedge-shaped face, the forehead covered with wool; thin mobile ears; neck full towards the trunk, short and level with the back; width over the shoulders and through the heart; a full broad breast; fine clean legs standing well apart; deep round barrel and great depth of carcass; firm flesh, springy pelt, and pink skin, covered with fine, curly, lustrous wool.

  • of England for crossing with ewes of the various black-faced horned mountain breeds to produce mutton of superior quality and to use the cross-ewes to breed to a pure longwool or sometimes a Down ram.

  • In past times it did for the improvement of the shortwool breeds of sheep very much the same kind of work that the Leicester performed in the case of the longwool breeds.

  • The breed is distinguished by having the smoothest and blackest face and legs of all the Down breeds and no wool on the head.

  • The mutton of all the Down breeds is of superior quality, but that of the Suffolk is pre-eminently so.

  • Riding of Yorkshire, and it is the largest of the mountain breeds of the N.

  • The Herdwick is the hardiest of all the breeds thriving upon the poor mountain land in Cumberland and Westmorland.

  • It is related to the Clun Forest and the Kerry Hill sheep. The draft ewes of all three breeds are in high demand for breeding to Down and longwool rams in the English midlands.

  • The Exmoor is a horned breed of Devonshire moorland, one of the few remaining remnants of direct descent from the old forest breeds of England.

  • With good management twenty ewes of any of the lowland breeds should produce and rear thirty lambs, and the proportion can be increased by breeding from ewes with a prolific tendency.

  • Low, Breeds of the Domestic Animals of the British Isles (1842, illustrated, and 1845); R.

  • It breeds in no small numbers in the Hebrides, and parts of the Scottish Highlands from Argyllshire to Sutherland, as well as in the more elevated or more northern districts of Norway, Sweden and Finland, and probably also thence to Kamchatka.

  • It is not uncommon on the Falkland Isles, where it breeds.

  • Among other British breeds may be mentioned the Devons and Herefords, both characterized by their red colour; the long-horned and Sussex breeds, both with very large horns, showing a tendency to grow downwards; and the Ayrshire.

  • Polled, or hornless, breeds, such as the polled Angus and polled Suffolk, are of interest, as showing how easily the horns can be eliminated, and thus indicating a hornless ancestry.

  • The eider duck, which breeds on the islands of Breit51fjor6r, is a source of livelihood to the inhabitants, as are also the many kinds of sea-fowl which breed on the sea-cliffs.

  • He describes various kinds of game, methods of hunting, the best breeds of horses and dogs.

  • The Servian pig is pure white or black, but other breeds, notably the Berkshire and Yorkshire, are kept.

  • The object of these associations is principally to facilitate the acquisition of improved implements and better breeds of cattle.

  • The local administration endeavours to better the quality of live-stock by importing purer breeds, distributing prizes, and other measures; but the native farmers are slow to accept improvements.

  • The cattle raised are the Shorthorns and improved Lincolnshire breeds.

  • The sheep are chiefly of the Lincolnshire and large Leicestershire breeds, and go to the markets of Yorkshire and London.

  • The numbers of the mermos have been greatly reduced, and they have been replaced by coarse-woolled breeds.

  • Breeds Of Horses.

  • B.) Breeds Of Horses The British breeds of light horses include the Thoroughbred, the Yorkshire Coach-horse, the Cleveland Bay, the Hackney and the Pony; of heavy horses, the Shire, the Clydesdale and the Suffolk.

  • The Thoroughbred is probably the oldest of the breeds, and it is known as the " blood-horse " on account of the length of time through which its purity of descent can be traced.

  • Its body looks too heavy for its limbs, which are free from the " feather " so much admired in the two other heavy breeds; it possesses a characteristic chestnut colour.

  • I never knew there were so many goat breeds.

  • Oh, there are a lot more breeds.

  • The book was about all the different goat breeds and uses of the goat, beginning with a history of the goat.

  • Assurance doesn't breed apathy, doubt does, it breeds industry.

  • Whoever coined the phrase "Familiarity breeds contempt" must have gone that route.

  • Bligh was still less visible to the men, not present in a "familiarity breeds contempt" sense.

  • abnormalityenital abnormalities have been reported more often in certain breeds.

  • ambassador for the Welsh breeds.

  • The avifauna includes the federally endangered southern bald eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus and peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus which successfully breeds here.

  • He still retains a very strong hunting instinct, something which has sadly been bred out of other terrier breeds.

  • I think the problem locally is that everybody know that and familiarity breeds contempt.

  • It is common for dogs to cost more to ensure than cats, with extra charges for pedigree breeds or big animals.

  • All three had the same ambition - to improve their native cattle and challenge the English beef breeds.

  • There are a total of nearly 30 dog breeds on the A, B, C list.

  • breeds of sheep for different purposes.

  • breeds of cattle that originated in the county.

  • breeds contempt.

  • bunnycourse many rescue bunnies maybe a cross between breeds.

  • chested breeds, and ruptured cruciate ligaments which normally can be repaired very successfully.

  • That may well be true, but smugness breeds complacency, and that is dangerous.

  • congenital abnormalities have been reported more often in certain breeds.

  • The short haired dachshunds are easy to groom while the long haired and wire haired breeds require more extensive grooming.

  • With their long, low bodies dachshunds are one of the most instantly recognizable breeds.

  • domesticated including many rare breeds.

  • dysplasia in larger dog breeds.

  • familiarity breeds contempt ' sense.

  • foetidfetid air on this bus breeds viruses faster than a Ukrainian website.

  • The red jungle fowl is the ancestral species of all domestic chicken breeds.

  • The milk of the Red Poll is higher in protein and has smaller fat globules than other breeds such as the Fresian.

  • Visitors can also see the rare breeds of chickens, cows, pigs and pygmy goats stocked.

  • Despite this, staff at Darley Oaks, which breeds guinea pigs for scientific research, have vowed to continue working as normal.

  • Chinese hamsters are said to be the most placid of the breeds.

  • For example, Continental breeds now dominate the national beef herd.

  • The red jungle fowl is the ancestral species of all domestic chicken breeds.

  • When not sitting in front of his Mac he breeds llamas and dreams of owning a vineyard.

  • low frequency of microsatellite length mutations as the association was consistent across several breeds.

  • The results indicated a low frequency of microsatellite length mutations as the association was consistent across several breeds.

  • Their research will include other breeds as well, but they are only investigating hereditary nephritis.

  • outcross breeds will be reduced as La Perms progress.

  • He who desires but acts not, breeds pestilence.

  • identify polymorphisms for target genes in different cattle breeds.

  • Due to selective breeding, most pedigree dog breeds are genetically predisposed to suffer.

  • puppy farms are pumping out 750 new pups per year, all of specially designed breeds.

  • The Chinese Painted quail is probably the most widely kept of the ornamental aviary breeds.

  • retriever breeds are labs.

  • The Cattle semen Bank collects semen from bulls of breeds on the Trust's Priority List.

  • semen imported from high producing sires the genetic potential of the native breeds can be improved.

  • Ailments The exotic shorthair is, like must hybrid breeds, a robust healthy cat and has no specific health problems.

  • In many European countries, the leading sire may account for up to 25% of pedigree inseminations in some breeds.

  • skylark breeds on the meadow.

  • A typical Tamworth has the longest snout of the present day domestic breeds.

  • A highlight will be pens of cows and calves showing as many combinations as possible of potential breeds / crosses for replacement suckler heifers.

  • Use of drugs (chemotherapy ), livestock resistant breeds or insecticides helps protect livestock and control animal trypanosomiasis.

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