Breed sentence example

breed
  • What breed do you raise?
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  • The native breed of mules is remarkably fine.
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  • The most remarkable feature about the breed is that the young are white.
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  • - Skins Of The Striped Domestic Cat, Giving The "Ticked" Breed And A Partially Albino Specimen.
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  • The blue eyes -and the white coat of the kitten indicate that the Siamese breed is a semi-albino, which when adult tends towards melanism, such a combination of characters being apparently unknown in any other animal.
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  • In the royal Siamese breed the head is rather long and pointed, the body also elongated with relatively slender limbs, the coat glossy and close, the eyes blue, and the general colour some shade of cream or pink, with the face, ears, feet, under-parts, and tail chocolate or seal-brown.
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  • If the frequent presence of a kink in the tail be an inherent feature, the breed is evidently related to the other kink-tailed Malay cats which, as already stated, have a cry differing from that of European cats.
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  • Leche shows that the wild Bactrian camel differs from the domesticated breed of central Asia in the following external characters: the humps are smaller; the long hair does not occupy nearly so much of the body; the colour is much more rufous; and the ears and muzzle are shorter.
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  • In old days New Mexico was the home of a breed of hairless cats, said to have been kept by the ancient Aztecs, but now well-nigh if not completely extinct.
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  • Originally the cattle were nearly all of the long-horned Spanish breed and of little value for their meat, except to the saladero establishments.
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  • At Saluzzo in Piedmont there is a stock with hanging ears, arched face and tall stature, kept for its dairy qualities; and in the Biellese the merino breed is maintained by some of the larger proprietors.
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  • Gulls and amphibious birds abound in large variety; three kinds of penguin have their rookeries and breed here, migrating yearly for some months to the South American mainland.
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  • It does not breed in captivity, and is not found wild west of the Jumna river in northern India.
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  • Attempts to breed these sheep in other countries have always resulted in a deterioration in the quality of the skins owing to some peculiarity of climate.
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  • The Bergamo sheep is the largest breed in the country; that of Cadore and Belluno approaches it in size.
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  • Of the 55 million sheep kept in Russia only about 15 millions belong to the fine merino breed, and these are pastured chiefly on the Black Sea steppes.
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  • He was responsible for all care, must restore ox for ox, sheep for sheep, must breed them satisfactorily.
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  • This comparison leads to the important conclusion that the wild Bactrian Camelus bactrianus ferus comes much nearer to the fossil species than it does to the domesticated breed, the resemblance being specially noticeable in the absolutely and relatively small size of the last molar.
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  • In India elephants seldom breed in captivity, though they do so more frequently in Burma and Siam; the domesticated stock is therefore replenished by fresh captures.
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  • Imported vases of the second half of the 5th century B.C. prove the existence of trade with Greece at that period; and the town was famous in Aristotle's day for a special breed of fowls.
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  • Agriculture is still carried on in a somewhat primitive fashion, and as a rule the livestock is of an inferior quality, though the breed of horses, of a heavy build and mostly used in agriculture, is held in high esteem.
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  • They carry on agriculture wheat-growing on a large scale - with the aid of modern agricultural machines, and breed cattle and horses.
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  • During the middle ages cattle and sheep were the chief farm animals, but the intermixture of stock consequent on the common-field system was a barrier to improvement in the breed and conduced to the propagation of disease.
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  • Sea-birds breed abundantly on the cliffs.
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  • The Exmoor is a horned breed of Devonshire moorland, one of the few remaining remnants of direct descent from the old forest breeds of England.
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  • What's also great about the new breed of colored contact lenses is the daily disposable colors.
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  • It is added that the remains of cats from Roman villas at Silchester and Dursley are probably referable to the domesticated breed.
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  • Should this be so, then if the ordinary Malay cats are the descendants of the jungle-cat, we shall have to assign the same ancestry to the Siamese breed.
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  • Bakewell's fame as a breeder was for a time enhanced by the improvement which he effected on the Long-horned cattle, then the prevailing breed of the midland counties of England.
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  • For a time this breed attracted much attention, and sanguine expectations were entertained that it would prove of national importance.
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  • The single exception is provided by the slowly-maturing Highland breed of cattle, for which classes were allotted to (I) steers not exceeding three years old, (2) steers or oxen above three years old (with no maximum limit), and (3) heifers not exceeding four years old.
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  • At the 1905 show, sheep of each breed, and also cross-breds, competed as (1) wether lambs under twelve months old, and (2) wether sheep above twelve and under twenty-four months old.
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  • The Hampshire Down Sheep Breeders' Association may be taken as a type of the latter, its principal object being to encourage the breeding of Hampshire Down sheep at home and abroad, and to maintain the purity of the breed.
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  • The Coccidae can, and mainly do, breed asexually (parthenogenetically).
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  • These scales breed very rapidly; Howard states one may give rise to a progeny of 3,216,080,400 in one year.
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  • These breed plu m; E, pupal stage.
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  • The mountaineers breed some cattle and sheep, and cultivate small fields on the mountain-sides.
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  • Accordingly a selection of particular plants to breed from, because they possess certain desirable characteristics, is as rational as the selection of particular animals for breeding purposes in order to maintain the character of a herd of cattle or of a flock of sheep.
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  • Improvements in the breed have been effected by the introduction of Arab stallions.
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  • Forestry is greatly developed; the breed of sheep in the Carpathians is of an improved quality, and the horses bred in the plain of the Hanna are highly esteemed.
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  • The lopeared breed is the oldest English variety, and has been cultivated carefully since about 1785, the aim of the breeder being directed to the development of the size of the ears, and with such success that they sometimes measure more than 23 in.
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  • The Belgian hare is a large breed of a hardy and prolific character, which closely resembles the hare in colour, and is not unlike it in form.
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  • This very pretty breed has no connexion with the mountains from which it takes its name, but is a variety produced by careful breeding and selection.
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  • The silver grey is a uniform-coloured breed, the fur of which is a rich chinchilla grey, varying in depth in the different strains.
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  • From the greater value of the fur, silver greys have been frequently employed to stock warrens, as they breed true to colour in the open if the ordinary wild rabbits are excluded.
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  • A blue breed has been recently introduced.
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  • The latter were only recently introduced into the United States, though well known in Great Britain as the West Highland or Poltalloch terrier; an application which was made (1900) by some of their admirers for separate classification was refused by the Kennel Club, but afterwards it was granted, the breed being classified as the West Highland white terrier.
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  • The Pomeranian dog is a close ally of the Eskimo breed and was formerly used as a wolfdog, but has been much modified.
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  • The breed is almost certainly derived from water-spaniels, with a strong admixture of Newfoundland blood.
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  • The St Bernard is a large breed taking its name from the monastery of Mount St Bernard in the Alps, and remarkable for high intelligence and use in rescuing travellers from the snow.
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  • The origin of the breed is unknown, but undoubtedly it is closely related to spaniels.
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  • The St Bernard attains as great a size as that of any other breed, a fine specimen being between 60 and 70 in.
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  • In the rough-haired breed the coat is long and wavy, but there exists a smooth breed with a nearly smooth coat.
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  • Harriers are a smaller breed of foxhounds, distinguished by their pointed ears, as it is not the custom to trim these.
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  • The original breed is said to have been used as a pointer in the country from which it takes its name, but has been much modified by the fancier's art, and almost certainly the original strain has been crossed with bull-terriers.
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  • Their ferocious appearance, and not infrequently the habits of their owners, have given this breed a reputation for ferocity and low intelligence.
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  • There are four classes in Somaliland: (I) nomads who breed ponies, sheep, cattle and camels, live entirely on milk and meat, and follow the rains in search of grass; (2) settled Somali, comparatively few, living in or near the coasts; (3) outcast races, not organized in tribes but living scattered all over Somaliland; they are hunters, workers in iron and leather, and the chief collectors of gum and resin; (4) traders.
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  • They possess a hardy breed of ponies, for which the Dolbahanta country is famed.
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  • Although it has received a distinct name, Bos (Bibos) frontalis, there can be little doubt that the gayal is merely a domesticated breed of the gaur, many gayal-skulls showing characters approximating to those of the gaur.
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  • The linnet begins to breed in April, the nest being generally placed in a bush at no great distance from the ground.
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  • The well-known Shetland breed of shaggy ponies are in steady demand for underground work in collieries.
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  • It ranks with the most picturesque and most fertile members of the group and contains a breed of ponies, a cross between the native pony and the horse.
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  • They live chiefly by pasturage - rearing camels, of which their chief agricultural stock consists, and horses of a fine breed, which fetch good prices.
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  • It is said that the aborigines had a breed of dogs which did not bark, and a small coney is also mentioned.
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  • Three or four days' journey east and southeast of Besha are the encampments of the Bani Kahtan, one of the most ancient tribes of Arabia; their pastures extend into the adjoining district of Nejd, where they breed camels in large numbers, as well as a few horses.
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  • The avifauna is very rich in migratory water and marsh fowl (Grallatores and Natatores), which come to breed in the coast region; but only five land birds - the ptarmigan (Lagopus alpinus), snow-bunting, Iceland falcon, snow-owl and raven - are permanent inhabitants of the region.
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  • The Turkomans possess a famous breed of horses and keep camels, sheep, cattle, asses and mules.
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  • The principal breed of sheep is the merino, which does well in the higher altitudes.
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  • The breed has, however, been since improved by government action, the establishment of state studs supported since 1867 by annual parliamentary grants, and the importation especially of English stock.
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  • Owing to its wide stretches of pasture-land Hungary is admirably suited for cattle-raising, and in the government " economies " the same care has been bestowed on improving the breed of horned beasts as in the case of horses.
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  • The more important wild animals are a large wild sheep (Ovis poli), foxes, wolves, jackals, bears, boars, deer and leopards; amongst birds, there are partridges, pheasants, ravens, jays, sparrows, larks, a famous breed of hawks, &c.
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  • As the breeder selects a congenital variation which suits his requirements, and by breeding from the animals (or plants) exhibiting that variation obtains a new breed specially characterized by that variation, so in nature is there a selection amongst all the congenital variations of each generation of a species.
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  • Supposing a number of some species of arthropod or fish to be swept into a cavern or to be carried from less to greater depths in the sea, those individuals with perfect eyes would follow the glimmer of light and eventually escape to the outer air or the shallower depths, leaving behind those with imperfect eyes to breed in the dark place.
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  • A defective stock, if allowed to breed, will perpetuate its defects, in spite of the concealment of those defects in an individual by training or other treatment.
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  • The Africander breed of cattle is a well-marked variety, and a characteristic native domestic animal.
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  • Great attention is given to the rearing of horses and mules, and the royal stud used to be remarkable for the beauty of its cream-coloured breed.
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  • Dorking has long been famous for a finely flavoured breed of fowl distinguished by its having five toes.
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  • Pannonia was also famous for its breed of hunting-dogs.
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  • It is exceedingly prolific, beginning to breed at the age of two months; the number of young varying, according to the age of the parent, from four to twelve.
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  • The nature of the breeding-place varies greatly according to the species, and while many of the mosquitoes that infest houses will breed even in the smallest accidental accumulation of water such as may have collected in a discarded bottle or tin, the larvae of other species less closely associated with man are found in natural pools or ditches, at the margins of slow-moving streams, in collections of water in hollow trees and bamboo-stumps, or even in the water-receptacles of certain plants.
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  • It is known to breed in Lapland, but its eggs are of great rarity.
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  • The title of "grunting ox" properly belongs only to the domesticated breed.
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  • Pigs and a hardy breed of ponies find a good living in the forest; and in spite of an act in 1851 providing for their extermination or removal, a few red deer still survive.
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  • The Maltese dog was never wild and has ceased to exist as a breed.
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  • Though goldfinches may occasionally be observed in the coldest weather, incomparably the largest number leave Britain in autumn, returning in spring, and resorting to gardens and orchards to breed, when the lively song of the cock, and the bright yellow wings of both sexes, quickly attract notice.
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  • His chapter on the flea, in which he not only describes its structure, but traces out the whole history of its metamorphoses from its first emergence from the egg, is full of interest - not so much for the exactness of his observations, as for its incidental revelation of the extraordinary ignorance then prevalent in regard to the origin and propagation of "this minute and despised creature," which some asserted to be produced from sand, others from dust, others from the dung of pigeons, and others from urine, but which he showed to be "endowed with as great perfection in its kind as any large animal," and proved to breed in the regular way of winged insects.
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  • In the Chillingham cattle the ears are generally red, although sometimes black, and the muzzle is brown; while in the breed at Cadzow Chase, Lanarkshire, both ears and muzzle are black, and there are usually flecks of black on the head and forequarters.
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  • A very ancient British breed is the black Pembroke; and when this breed tends to albinism, the ears and muzzle, and more rarely the fetlocks, remain completely black, or very dark grey, although the colour elsewhere is whitish, more or less flecked and blotched with pale grey.
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  • In the shape and curvature of the horns, which at first incline outwards and forwards, and then bend somewhat upwards and inwards, this breed of cattle resembles the aurochs and the (by comparison) dwarfed park-breeds.
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  • Evidence as to the affinity between these breeds is afforded by the fact that a breed of cattle very similar to that at Chillingham was found in Wales in the 10th century; these cattle being white with red ears.
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  • It is thus evident that park-cattle are an albino offshoot from the ancient Pembroke black breed, which, from their soft and well-oiled skins, are evidently natives of a humid climate, such as that of the forests in which dwelt the wild aurochs.
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  • This disposes of a theory that they are descendants of a white sacrificial breed introduced into Britain by the ancient Romans.
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  • They breed horses, cattle and sheep, but suffer heavy losses from murrain.
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  • A government Department of Agriculture, created in 1904, affords help to the farmers in various ways, notably in combatting insect plagues, in experimental farms, and in improving the breed of horses, sheep and cattle.
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  • In 1765 the regent Prince Xaver imported 300 merino sheep from Spain, and so improved the native breed by this new strain that Saxon sheep were eagerly imported by foreign nations to improve their flocks, and " Saxon electoral wool " became one of the best brands in the market.
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  • The foundation of the famous school of mining at Freiberg, and the improvement of the Saxon breed of sheep by the importation of merino sheep from Spain, were due to his care.
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  • The canary is very prolific, producing eggs, not exceeding six in number, three or four times a year; and in a state of nature it is said to breed still oftener.
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  • A breed peculiar to the district, known as Kents, is grazed on Romney Marsh, but Southdowns are the principal breed raised on the uplands.
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  • Those which breed in winter or spring deposit their spawn near the coast at the mouths of estuaries, and ascend the estuaries to a considerable distance at certain times, as in the Firths of Forth and Clyde, while those which spawn in summer or autumn belong more to the open sea, e.g.
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  • Dutch, Ayrshire and other breeds are used to improve the breed of cattle by crossing.
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  • A "herd-book" is a book containing the pedigree and other information of any breed of cattle or pigs, like the "flock-book" for sheep or "stud-book" for horses.
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  • Formerly the word "herdwick" was applied to the pasture ground under the care of a shepherd, and it is now used of a special hardy breed of sheep in Cumberland and Westmorland.
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  • They bring forth only one large egg at a time, but probably breed several times during the season.
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  • They are commonly of the Spanish merino breed, and suffer in many localities on account of insufficient pasturage.
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  • This breed is peculiar to Ireland, the Welsh being of a similar type, but more often white.
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  • The Norway breed is frequently white with long hair; it is rather small in size, with small bones, a short rounded body, head small with a prominent forehead, and short, straight, corrugated horns.
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  • The breed is usually hornless.
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  • The principal feature of this breed, of which there are two or three varieties, is the length and quantity of the hair, which has a particularly soft and silky texture, covering the whole body and a great part of the legs with close matted ringlets.
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  • The breed was introduced at the Cape about 1864.
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  • The Angora is a bad milker and an indifferent mother, but its flesh is better than that of any other breed, and in its native country is preferred to mutton.
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  • The coat is composed, as in the Angora, of two materials; but in this breed it is the under-coat that partakes of the nature of wool and is valued as an article of commerce.
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  • This breed therefore stands considerably higher than the common goat.
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  • Among goats met with in England a good many show signs of a more or less remote cross with this breed, derived probably from specimens brought from the East on board ships for supplying milk during the voyage.
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  • The Nepal goat appears to be a variety of the Nubian breed, having the same arched facial line, pendulous ears and long legs.
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  • Lastly the Guinea goat is a dwarf breed originally from the coast whence its name is derived.
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  • Besides the commonest Capra recurva, there is a rarer breed, Capra depressa, inhabiting the Mauritius and the islands of Bourbon and Madagascar.
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  • These people came in condition to breed with unprecedented rapidity, under the stimulus of an abundance, 2According to Lavasseur and Bodio, 14.5% from 1860 to 1880;
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  • The pastures of the neighbourhood support a breed of Aquitaine cattle, which is most highly valued in south-western France.
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  • They are a distinct breed of Jersey and Brittany type, and are stated to be descended from animals imported from France by the early settlers.
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  • Considering the liability of corruption to breed corruption we can hardly blame him if he does not, and we may say that it is no derogation to his fides if he makes self-evident corrections.
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  • There is also a good breed of mules.
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  • The Luneburger Heide yields an excellent breed of sheep, the Heidschnucken, which equal the Southdowns of England in delicacy of flavour.
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  • One of the table delicacies of former days was a particular breed of dog which was fed exclusively on poi before it was killed, cooked and served.
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  • Unlike those of their kind in Sze Ch`uen, the wax insects of Shan-tung breed and become productive in the same districts.
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  • In 1865 a male of the same species was introduced, but though a strong disposition to breed was shown on the part of both, and the eggs, after the custom of the Ratitae, were incubated by him, no progeny was hatched (Proceedings, 1868, P. 329).
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  • The merino sheep was introduced by Frederick the Great, and since then the Silesian breed has been greatly improved.
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  • Birds are fairly numerous, and include many varieties of water-fowl, several of which (Anser indicus, the bar-headed goose, for instance) breed in Tibet, while others are only found as birds of passage.
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  • They bear, four or five times in the year, from four to ten blind and naked young, which are in their turn able to breed at an age of about six months; the time of gestation being about twenty days.
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  • Near it is the noble chase with its ancient oaks, the remains of the Caledonian Forest, where are still preserved some of the aboriginal breed of wild cattle.
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  • Familiar instances of this partial albinism is seen in the domestic breed of Himalayan rabbits.
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  • Other individual rabbits, but belonging to no particular breed, are similarly marked, but in addition the eyeballs are black.
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  • Smith, to occur among a breed of albino trout, which breed true and are reared in the State fish-hatcheries of America.
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  • This and a noted breed of hardy ponies form the chief articles of export.
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  • That known as the Norfolk breed is the smaller of the two, and is said to be the less hardy.
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  • The other breed, called the Cambridge, is much more variegated in colour, and some parts of the plumage have a bright metallic gloss, while the chicks are generally mottled with brownish grey.
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  • White, pied and buff turkeys are also often seen, and if care be taken they are commonly found to " breed true."
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  • Both types are so nearly allied that they will breed together freely in captivity.
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  • The woodcock, partridge, hawk, water-ousel, magpie, jay, raven, various kinds of owls, wood-pigeon, golden-crested wren, tufted lark and titmouse are among the birds which breed here.
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  • Horse-breeding is most important in Friesland, which produces the well-known black breed of horse commonly used in funeral processions.
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  • This species of goat was some years since introduced into Cape Colony, but its wool is not so good as the Asiatic breed.
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  • Numerous aquatic birds breed on the waters of the Baltic lake-region.
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  • The animals are small, but Durham and Hereford bulls have been introduced from Argentina to improve the breed.
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  • The extensive pastures support large herds of sheep and cattle, including a noteworthy breed of merino sheep. The horses of Mecklenburg are of a fine sturdy quality and highly esteemed.
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  • The mainstay of the agriculture of the department is the raising of live-stock, especially of cattle of the Aubrac breed, for which Laguiole is an important market.
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  • In some places, notably Wales and Gloucester, a remnant of a spotted breed lingers; and a large proportion of common pigs, often parti-coloured, are mongrels.
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  • Pigs of this breed are very prolific, and they may be grown to enormous weights - over 11 cwt.
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  • The sows are quite as prolific as those of the Large White breed, and, as their produce matures earlier, they are much in demand for breeding porkers.
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  • A deficiency of lean meat is a common characteristic of the breed, which is almost extinct.
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  • The Lincolnshire Curly Coated or Boston pig is a local breed of great size and capacity for producing pork.
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  • The Large Black breed, which vies with the Large White breed for size, and is probably its superior as a bacon pig, has only since 1900 received national show-yard recognition; but there is ample evidence that, with its characteristic whole black colour with a mealy hue, length, fine hair and lop ear, the Large Black existed in the south of England for generations.
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  • The Berkshire is an early-maturity breed which has been somewhat Middle White Boar.
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  • Originally a local breed in the districts around the Staffordshire town from which it takes its name, it is now extensively bred, and highly valued as a bacon pig.
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  • The Poland-China, the most popular breed in the United States, is thus degenerating.
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  • It is a breed of mixed blood, and is believed to have originated from the "Big China" pig - a large white hog with sandy spots, taken to Ohio in 1816, and blended with Irish graziers in 1839, and with a breed known as Bayfields, as well as with Berkshires.
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  • The early English ancestors, the breed of which is not on record in America, were most probably of Lincoln origin.
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  • A better breed of horses is being obtained by more careful selection, and by crossing with Arab and English stallions imported by the government.
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  • The Egyptian goose (chenalopex) is figured in the XVIIIth dynasty as sacred to Ammon; but his most frequent and celebrated incarnation was the woolly sheep with curved (" Ammon") horns (as opposed to the oldest native breed with long horizontal twisted horns and hairy coat, sacred to Khnum or Chnumis).
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  • The horses are of indifferent breed, apparently of a type much inferior to that possessed by the ancient Egyptians.
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  • The common or pariah dog is generally of sandy color; in Upper Egypt there is a breed of wiry rough-haired black dogs, noted for their fierceness.
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  • Sheep of a peculiar breed with horizontal twisted horns and hairy coat are figured on.
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  • The farming is, however, chiefly pastoral, nearly one-third of the county is common or waste land, and its number of sheep (mainly of the Radnor Forest breed) far exceeds that of any other county in Wales.
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  • The breeding of cobs and ponies comes next in importance, and thirdly that of cattle, now mostly Herefords, though Speed mentions a native breed, long since extinct, all white with red ears.
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  • The inhabitants are principally engaged in agriculture and the fisheries, and in the preservation of sardines, anchovies, &c. The breed of draught horses in the island is highly prized.
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  • The Fayum also possesses an excellent breed of sheep. Lake Kerun abounds in fish, notably the bulli (Nile carp), of which considerable quantities are sent to Cairo.
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  • The breeds include the Ayrshire, noted milkers and specially adapted for dairy farms (which prevail in the south-west), which in this respect have largely supplanted the Galloway in their native district; the polled Angus or Aberdeen, fair milkers, but valuable for their beef-making qualities, and on this account, as well as their hardihood, in great favour in the north-east, where cattlefeeding has been carried to perfection; and the West Highland or Kyloe breed, a picturesque breed with long horns, shaggy coats and decided colours-black, red, dun, cream and brindle-that thrives well on wild and healthy pasture.
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  • Even the representatives of the Resolutioners urged Charles not to use the Anglican service, though they confided to Sharp, their agent in London, their opinion that, if the Re- monstrants (or Protesters) had any hand in affairs, " it cannot but breed continual distemper and disorders."
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  • In any race of animals, the number of young produced in a season is almost always greater than the number which survives to attain maturity; it is not certain that every one of those which become mature will breed, and not all of those which breed contribute an equal number of offspring to the next generation.
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  • These are discussed by Mr Howard in the paper referred to, but in brief they all amount to measures of general hygiene, and the isolation, prompt removal, or proper sterilization of the animal or human excrement in which these flies breed.
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  • Pigs and sheep of a small, coarse-woolled breed, are numerous; and large herds of goats wander in an almost wild state over the higher hills.
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  • Galloway also gives its name to a famous indigenous breed of black hornless cattle.
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  • The most important domestic animals are the sheep and the goat; the breed of oxen is small and poor.
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  • However, these transformed salamanders, of which twenty-nine were obtained from 1865 to 1870, did not breed, although their branchiate brethren continued to do so very freely.
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  • The Afghan is by breed and nature a bird of prey.
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  • The camel is of a more robust and compact breed than the tall beast used in India, and is more carefully tended.
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  • The breed of horses was much improved under the amir Abdur Rahman, who took much interest in it.
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  • In Mysore the amrit mahal, a breed said to have been introduced by Hyder Ali for military purposes, is still kept up by the state.
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  • In the Madras districts of Nellore and Kurnool the indigenous breed has been greatly improved under the stimulus of cattle shows and prizes founded by British officials.
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  • In the Central Provinces there is a peculiar breed of trotting bullocks which is in great demand for wheeled carriages.
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  • The breed of horses has generally deteriorated since the demand for military purposes has declined with the establishment of British supremacy.
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  • The horses, which are of Mexican, Spanish and Chinese origin, are small and poorly cared for; some American horses have been introduced for the purpose of improving the breed.
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  • Many of the gulls congregate in vast numbers to breed, whether on rocky cliffs of the sea-coast or on healthy islands in inland waters.
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  • There are deer (at least five species), boars, bears, antelopes, beavers, otters, badgers, tiger-cats, marten, an inferior sable, striped squirrels, &c. Among birds there are black eagles, peregrines (largely used in hawking), and, specially protected by law, turkey bustards, three varieties of pheasants, swans, geese, common and spectacled teal, mallards, mandarin ducks white and pink ibis, cranes, storks, egrets, herons, curlews, pigeons, doves, nightjars, common and blue magpies, rooks, crows, orioles, halcyon and blue kingfishers, jays, nut-hatches, redstarts, snipe, grey shrikes, hawks, kites, &c. But, pending further observations, it is not possible to say which of the smaller birds actually breed in Korea and which only make it a halting-place in their annual migrations.
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  • Kuningan is famous for a breed of small but strong horses.
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  • Notice of a like visitation in 1593 is recorded, but of late it has become evident that not a year passes without crossbills being observed in some part or other of England, while in certain localities in Scotland they seem to breed annually.
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  • Eared grebes and ring-billed gulls breed on the sloughs of the plains, and rarely the white pelican nests about the lake shores.
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  • Here, too, breed many species of ducks, the mallard, gadwall, baldpate, three species of teal, shoveler, pintail, hooded mergansers, and Canada geese; other ducks and geese are migrants only.
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  • On the plains a few waders breed, as the avocet, western willet and longbilled curlew; but most are birds of passage.
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  • Other mineral products of the state are 1 The breed of horses in Wyoming has improved rapidly; in 1904, when the U.S. Department of Agriculture purchased eighteen mares and a stallion in hope of improving the American carriage horse, six of the mares were from Wyoming and were principally of Morgan stocks.
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  • The dog, the cat, the pig, the domestic fowl (which is not very obviously related to the bantam of the woods), the buffalo, a smaller breed than that met with in the Malayan Peninsula, and in some districts bullocks of the Brahmin breed and small horses, are the principal domestic animals.
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  • There is a stout breed of pony raised along the Tampasuk, which is also noted for the Kalupis waterfall (1500 ft.), one of the highest in the world, though the volume of water is not great.
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  • The purchaser undertook to introduce settlers from northern Europe, to import cattle for the improvement of the Nicaraguan breed, to plant rubber and vanilla, and to provide schools for agricultural instruction.
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  • Large numbers of sheep and Angora goats are reared on the plateau, and fair horses are bred on the Uzun Yaila; but no effort is made to improve the quality of the wool and mohair or the breed of horses.
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  • Yet there are localities where, as on the Fame Islands, both meet and breed, without occupying stations apart.
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  • They generally breed in association, often in the closest proximity - their nests, containing three eggs at most, being made on the shingle or among herbage.
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  • These crowd at certain seasons in innumerable multitude to certain islands within the tropics, where they breed, and the wonderful assemblage known as " wideawake fair" on the island of Ascension has been more or less fully described from very ancient times.
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  • " The true greatness of a State" says Bacon, "consisteth essentially in population and breed of men"; and an increasing population is one of the most certain signs of the well-being of a community.
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  • On land, however, whither they resort to breed, they seek food of their own taking, whether small mammals, little birds, insects or berries; but even here their uncommon courage is exhibited, and they will defend their homes and offspring with the utmost spirit against any intruder, repeatedly shooting down on man or dog that invades their haunts, while every bird almost, from an eagle downwards, is repelled by buffets or something worse.
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  • The finer wines possess great breed and distinction, coupled with a very fine and pronounced bouquet, and in addition they are endowed with the - in the case of lighter wines - rare quality of stability.
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  • At the same time, there is no reason to believe that the finer European wines will be entirely displaced, inasmuch as these are characterized by qualities of delicacy and breed which cannot be reproduced at will.
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  • That the animal now occurs in a wild state is no argument whatever as to its being indigenous, seeing that a domesticated breed introduced by man into a new country abounding in game would almost certainly revert to the wild state.
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  • The upland tracts also afford good pasturage for a number of cobs and ponies, which obtain high prices at the local fairs, and Pembrokeshire and Cardiganshire have long been famous for their breed of horses and ponies.
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  • The cattle of Wales present all varieties of race, the Hereford breed prevailing in the eastern counties, and Shorthorns and the black Castlemartins in the southwestern parts.
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  • Besides all that has been mentioned, he found time to do something for the better administration of justice (the codification of ordinances, the diminishing of the number of judges, the reduction of the expense and length of trials for the establishment of a superior system of police) and even for the improvement of the breed of horses and the increase of cattle.
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  • The town is locally renowned for its carpets, and the district for its excellent breed of Kara-bagh horses.
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  • The Newfoundland dog will not live in India, and the Spanish breed of fowls in this country suffer more from frost than most others.
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  • This advice occurs even in classical and Chinese agricultural books as well as in those of our own day, and proves that the close adaptation of each variety or breed to the country in which it originated has always been recognized.
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  • Favourable variations of constitution will soon show themselves, and these should be carefully selected to breed from, the tender and unhealthy individuals being rigidly eliminated.
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  • Its naturalization in western Europe is very ancient, but the race supposed to have been introduced by the Romans (Phasianus colchicus) has been much modified within the last century or two by the introduction of the ring-necked Chinese form (P. torquatus), which produces fertile hybrids with the old breed.
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  • Both cattle and horses are of a small and hardy breed.
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  • Horse-breeding has also been practised for centuries, and the breed of black Frisian horse is well known.
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  • There is a wide extent of pasturage, on which are reared a considerable number of cattle and sheep, and especially those horses of pure Norman breed for which the department has long been celebrated.
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  • The Gotland, an old native light yellow breed, survives in the island of Gotland.
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  • Cattle are numerous but of a poor breed; horses do not thrive.
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  • He is an expert rider; horse-racing is his national amusement, and the Baluch breed of horses is celebrated throughout northern India.
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  • The fauna of the Tibetan Himalaya is essentially European or rather that of the northern half of the old continent, which region has by zoologists been termed Palaearctic. Among the characteristic animals may be named the yak, from which is reared a cross breed with the ordinary horned cattle of India, many wild sheep, and two antelopes, as well as the musk-deer; several hares and some burrowing animals, including pikas (Lagomys) and two or three species of marmot; certain arctic forms of carnivora - fox, wolf, lynx, ounce, marten and ermine; also wild asses.
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  • Among birds are found bustard and species of sand-grouse and partridge; water-fowl in great variety, which breed on the lakes in summer and migrate to the plains of India in winter; the raven, hawks, eagles and owls, a magpie, and two kinds of chough; and many smaller birds of the passerine order, amongst which are several finches.
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  • Oxen are employed for all field-work; those of the commonest breed are tawny, of great muscular power, very docile, and with horns measuring 5 or 6 ft.
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  • Various other food-fishes, both marine and fresh-water, can be kept in ponds for longer or shorter periods, but refuse to breed, while in other cases the fry obtained from captive breeders will not develop. Consequently there are two main types of pisciculture to be distinguished: (1) the rearing in confinement of young fishes to an edible stage, and (2) the stocking of natural waters with eggs or fry from captured breeders.
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  • The idea that systematic efforts should be made to improve the breed of mankind by checking the birth-rate of the unfit and furthering the productivity of the fit was first put forward by him in 1865; he mooted it again in 1884, using the term "eugenics" for the first time in Human Faculty, and in 1904 he endowed a research fellowship in the university of London for the promotion of knowledge of that subject, which was defined as "the study of agencies under social control that may improve or impair the racial qualities of future generations, either physically or mentally."
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  • The vast majority of the sheep are of the merino breed, but there are about a million long-woolled sheep and between two and three million cross-bred.
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  • Moreover, such a division takes for granted the idea which is involved in the word race, that each of these varieties is due to special ancestry, each race thus representing an ancient breed or stock, however these breeds.
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  • Many ducks breed here, and many others pass through in migration :: of the former, the most numerous are mallard and teal; of the latter, pintail, shoveler, scaup, ring-neck ducks, and mergansers.
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  • If a mare or other female animal is liable to be "infected" by her first or by subsequent mates, telegony will rank as a cause of variation, and breeders will be justified in believing (1) that pure-bred females are liable to be "corrupted" when mated with sires of a different breed; and (2) that inferior or cross-bred females, if first mated with a high-class sire, will thereafter produce superior offspring, however inferior or cross-bred her subsequent mates.
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  • Two of the purest breeds at the present day are the Scottish deerhound and the Dalmatian (spotted carriage-dog), A deerhound after having seven pups to a Dalmatian was put to a dog of her own breed.
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  • A black-brindled Scottish terrier belonging to a famous breed had first a litter of pups to a curly-haired liver-and-white cocker-spaniel.
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  • The result was three pups, all in make and markings pure terriers, and one of the three was regarded as an unusually good specimen of the breed.
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  • The population, which was 686,863 in 1897 (324,587 women), consists chiefly of Russians in the northern and middle portions, and of Kirghiz (about 350,000), who breed cattle, horses and sheep. The urban population was only 74,069.
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  • Indian breed, which has probably been introduced from Africa, both sexes are devoid of horns.
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  • In Angola occurs a breed of this sheep which has probably been crossed with the fat-tailed Malagasy breed; while in Guinea there is a breed with lappets, or wattles, on the throat, which is probably the result of a cross with the lop-eared sheep of the same district.
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  • Hairy long-legged sheep are also met with in Persia, but are not pure-bred, being apparently the result of a cross between the long-legged Guinea breed and the fat-tailed Persian sheep.
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  • In point of size this pigmy Cameroon breed comes very close to an exceedingly small sheep of which the limb-bones have been, DUFi: RAlu.
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  • Although there are no means of ascertaining whether the extinct pigmy British sheep was clothed with hair or with wool, it is practically certain that some of the early European sheep retained hair like that of their wild ancestor; and there is accordingly no prima facie reason why the breed in question should not have been hairy.
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  • On the other hand, since the socalled peat-sheep of the prehistoric Swiss lake-dwellers appears to be represented by the existing Graubunden (Grisons) breed, which is woolly and coloured something like a Southdown, it may be argued that the former was probably also woolly, and hence that the survival of a hairy breed in a neighbouring part of Europe would be unlikely.
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  • Four-horned sheep are common in Iceland and the Hebrides; the small half-wild breed of Soa often showing this reduplication.
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  • It was the breed which Robert Bakewell took in hand in the 18th century, and greatly improved by the exercise of his skill and judgment.
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  • The Border Leicester originated after the death in 1795 of Bakewell, when the Leicester breed, as it then existed, diverged into two branches.
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  • The one is represented by the breed still known in England as the Leicester.
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  • They are longwool sheep, derived from the old Teeswater breed by crossing with Leicester rams. They have a tuft of wool on the forehead.
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  • The Cotswold is an old-established breed of the Gloucestershire hills, extending thence into Oxfordshire.
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  • The Lincolns are descended from the old native breed of Lincolnshire, improved by the use of Leicester blood.
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  • The wool has a broad staple, and is denser and longer, and the fleece heavier, than in any other British breed.
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  • For this reason it has been the breed most in favour with breeders in all parts of the world for mating with Merino ewes and their crosses.
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  • The South Devon or South Dum are, like the cattle of that name, a strictly local breed, which likewise exemplify the good results of crossing with the Leicesters.
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  • The Roscommon - the one breed of modern sheep native to Ireland - is indebted for its good qualities largely to the use of Leicester blood.
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  • They were gradually, like the Cotswolds, improved from the original type of slow-maturity sheep by selection in preference to the use of rams of the Improved Leicester breed.
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  • With the exception of the Lincoln, no breed has received greater distinction in New Zealand, where it is in high repute for its hardiness and general usefulness.
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  • The Oxford Down is a modern breed which owes its origin to crossing between Cotswolds and Hampshire Downs and Southdowns.
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  • The breed is popular in Oxford and other midland counties.
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  • Its most notable success in recent years is on the Scottish and English borders, where, at the annual ram sales at Kelso, a greater number of rams is auctioned of this than of any other breed, to cross with flocks of LeicesterCheviot ewes especially, but also with Border Leicesters and three-parts-bred ewes.
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  • "Underhill" flocks that have been kept for generations in East Anglia, on the Weald, and on flat meadow land in other parts of the country, have assumed a heavier type than the original "Upperdown" sheep. It was at one time thought not to be a rent-paying breed, but modern market requirements have brought it well within that category.
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  • This breed has made rapid strides in recent years, and it has acquired favour in Ireland as well as abroad.
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  • It is an early-maturity breed, and no other Down produces a better back to handle for condition - the frame is so thickly covered with flesh and fat.
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  • The Hampshire Down is another breed which owes much of its improved character to an infusion of Southdown blood.
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  • Early maturity and great size have been the objects aimed at and attained, this breed, more perhaps than any other, being identified with early maturity.
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  • The Dorset Down or West Country Down, " a middle type of Down sheep pre-eminently suited to Dorsetshire," is a local variety of the Hampshire Down breed, separated by the formation of a Dorset Down sheep society in 1904, about eighty years after the type of the breed had been established.
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  • The Suffolk is another Down, which took its origin about 1790 in the crossing of improved Southdown rams with ewes of the old black-face Horned Norfolk, a breed still represented by a limited number of animals.
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  • The breed is distinguished by having the smoothest and blackest face and legs of all the Down breeds and no wool on the head.
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  • Although it handles hard on the back when fat, no breed except the old Horned Norfolk equals it in producing a saddle cut of mutton with such an abundance of lean red meat in proportion to fat.
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  • The Cheviot takes its name from the range of hills stretching along the boundary between England and Scotland, on both sides of which the breed now extends, though larger types are produced in East Lothian and in Sutherlandshire.
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  • The Limestone is a breed of which little is heard.
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  • The breed does not thrive off its own geological formation, and the ewes seek the ram early in the season.
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  • The Welsh Mountain is a small, active, soft-woolled, whitefaced breed of hardy character.
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  • It is descended from the old Tan-faced sheep. It is now three parts Shropshire, having been much crossed with that breed, but its wool is rather coarser.
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  • The Ryeland breed is so named from the Ryelands, a poor upland district in Herefordshire.
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  • It is a very old breed, against which the Shropshires have made substantial headway.
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  • The Dartmoor, a hardy local Devonshire breed, is a large hornless, longwool, white-fleeced sheep, with a long mottled face.
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  • The Dorset and Somerset Horn is an old west-country breed of sheep. The fleece is fine in quality, of close texture, and the wool is intermediate between long and short, whilst the head carries a forelock.
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  • This is a hardy breed, in size somewhat exceeding the Southdown.
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  • The special characteristic of the breed is that the ewes take the ram at an unusually early period of the year, and cast ewes are in demand for breeding house lamb for Christmas.
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  • The Merino resemble the Dorset Horn breed.
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  • Lowland rams put to breed half-bred and cross lambs receive about I lb of grain daily to prevent their falling off too rapidly in condition, as they would do if exclusively supported on mountain fare.
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  • Its lapses resembled those of Mrs Browning, who was of his own breed in her fervour and exaltation.
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  • They are a shy, harmless, simple folk, living chiefly by hunting; they lime birds, catch fish by poisoning the water, and are skilled in getting wild honey; they have bows with iron-pointed arrows and breed hunting dogs.
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  • Goss compiled a list of 335 species, of which 175 were known to breed in the state.
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  • The black Kerry breed and the black or brown Scotch cattle are also more or less nearly related; and a similar kinship is claimed for the Siemental cattle of Switzerland, although their colour is white and fawn.
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  • The white cattle formerly kept at Chartley Park, Staffordshire, exhibit signs of affinity with the long-horn breed.
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  • The Channel Island cattle, which are either black or fawn, would seem to be nearly allied to the Spanish fighting breed, and thus to the aurochs.
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  • In Europe the name zebu is generally applied to the Indian breed, although no such designation is known in India itself.
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  • The river Lapps, many of whom, however, are descendants of Finns proper, breed cattle, attempt a little tillage and entrust their reindeer to the care of mountain Lapps.
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  • The eider duck, which breeds on the islands of Breit51fjor6r, is a source of livelihood to the inhabitants, as are also the many kinds of sea-fowl which breed on the sea-cliffs.
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  • Its main products are sheep - the celebrated Heidschnucken breed, - potatoes, bilberries, cranberries and honey.
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  • Cattle are numerous and of excellent breed, and game is abundant.
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  • Lincolnshire has long been famous for a fine breed of horses both for the saddle and draught.
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  • The Dongola breed of horses is noted for its strength and hardness.
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  • They are, however, all so closely allied that'each will, at least in a state of domestication or captivity, breed with any of the others.
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  • Ridgeway, in his Origin and Influence of the Thoroughbred Horse (1905), reinvestigated the historical mystery as to the Arab breed, and its connexion with the English thoroughbred stock, but his conclusions have been hotly controverted; archaeology and biology are in fact still in the dark on the subject, but see the section on " Species " above.
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  • After the occupation of the country by the Romans, it appears that the horses of their cavalry were crossed with the native mares, and thus there was infused into the breed new blood, consisting probably of strains from very quarter from which Roman remounts were procured.
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  • We are also quite uncertain as to the extent to which the Jutes and Saxons may in their turn have again introduced a new breed of horses into England; and even to the close of the Anglo-Saxon period of English history allusions to the horse are still very infrequent.
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  • The horsthegn we know, however, was from an early period a high court official; and from such a law as that of Athelstan prohibiting the exportation of horses except as presents, it may be inferred that the English breed was not only much valued at home but also in great request abroad.'
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  • William the Conqueror's own horse was of the Spanish breed, and others of the same kind were introduced by the barons on their estates.
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  • King John gave great encouragement to horse-breeding: one of his earliest efforts was to import a hundred Flemish stallions, and, having thus paved the way for improving the breed of agricultural horses, he set about acquiring a valuable stud for his own use.
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  • At this time there was evidently a tendency to breed a somewhat lighter and speedier horse; but, while the introduction of a more active animal would soon have led to the displacement of the ponderous but powerful cavalry horse then in use, the substituted variety would have been unable to carry the weight of armour with which horse and rider were alike protected; and so in the end the old breed was kept up for a time.
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  • This is the first authentic account we have of the importation of Arab blood, and the Stud-Book says he was the first of that breed ever seen in England.
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  • The Stud-Book shows of what breed the royal mares really were: one of them, the dam of Dodsworth (who, though foaled in England, was a natural Barb), was a Barb mare; she was sold by the stud-master, after Charles II.'s death, for forty guineas, at twenty years old, when in foal by the Helmsley Turk.
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  • That experiments, founded on the study of his nature and properties, which have from time to time been made to improve the breed, and bring the different varieties to the perfection in which we now find them, have succeeded, is best confirmed by the high estimation in which the horses of Great Britain are held in all parts of the civilized world; and it is not too much to assert that, although the cold, humid and variable nature of their climate is by no means favourable to the production of these animals in their very best form, Englishmen have by great care, and by sedulous attention to breeding, high feeding and good grooming, with consequent development of muscle, brougnt them to the highest state of perfection of which their nature is capable.
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  • As in the case of the hackney, so with the pony, thoroughbred blood has been used, and with good results, except in the case of those animals which have to remain to breed in their native haunts on the hills and moorlands.
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  • There the only possible way of improvement is by selecting the best native specimens, especially the sires, to breed from.
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  • He endeavours to breed an animal possessing a small head, good shoulders, true action and perfect manners.
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  • Under the various names of the War Horse, the Great Horse, the Old English Black Horse and the Shire Horse, the breed has for centuries been cultivated in the rich fen-lands of Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire, and in many counties to the west.
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  • The Clydesdale, the Scottish breed named from the valley of the Clyde, is not quite so large as the Shire, the average height of stallions being about 16 hands 2 in.
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  • This breed is growing rapidly in favour in Canada, but in the United States the Percheron, with its round bone and short pasterns, holds the field.
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  • A blend of the Shire and Clydesdale strains of the British rough-legged draught horse (virtually sections of the same breed) is a better animal than either of the parents.
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  • The blend is being established in U.S.A. as a National breed.
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  • With an average height of about 16 hands they often have a weight of as much as 2000 lb., and this may explain the appearance which has given rise to the name of the Suffolk Punch, by which the breed is known.
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  • The Suffolk Stud-Book and History of the Breed, published in 1880, is the most exhaustive record of its kind in England.
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  • - Animals to breed from should be of good blood, sound and compactly built, with good pluck and free from nervous excitability and vicious tendency.
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  • Cook, History of the English Turf (1903); The General Stud-Book (issued quinquennially); and the Stud-Books of the various breed societies.
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  • Stock-raising and dairy-farming are flourishing in the Perche, which is famous for the production of a breed of large and powerful horses.
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  • Tasmania shows a decline in sheep-breeding, yet the state is singularly well adapted for sheep-raising, and its stud flocks are well known and annually drawn upon to improve the breed in the other states.
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  • Otter-hunting with packs of hounds of a special breed, and trained for the purpose, is a pastime in many parts of the country.
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  • The trick was to breed men who could kill immortals without ever allowing them to become immortals themselves.
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  • No, that's just a characteristic of the breed.
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  • Assurance doesn't breed apathy, doubt does, it breeds industry.
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  • The didactic purpose of "War of the Worlds" is to demonstrate that mankind is a lesser breed.
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  • Tone Deaf Amigos play an interesting breed of music having allsorts on stage including their dad's PC, well worth keeping an eye on.
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  • In 1967 the breed was finally amalgamated with the Wessex Saddleback forming the pig we now know as the British Saddleback.
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  • Neurological storage disease has been reported in this breed and renal amyloidosis, a form of kidney disease, has also been seen.
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  • It was the Japanese who really liked robots; so they would breed the electronic wizards most likely to construct the first genuine androids.
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  • Dawkins: Yes, I could easily imagine you could breed for skill in making flint arrowheads.
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  • No one breed dominated this year's May beef sales at Borderway, writes auctioneer David Dickinson.
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  • The age of the spritsail barges created a whole new industry, a special kind of ship and a tough new breed of sailors.
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  • These medium-sized mill towns breed a sordid viciousness which makes gangsters seem as benign as Robin Hood and the East Side a cultural paradise.
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  • In spring when the phytoplankton biomass increases and blooms the adult Cal fin begin to breed.
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  • The invention of firearms and in particular the development of the sporting rifle dealt a near fatal blow to the breed.
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  • Boxer dog breed clubs for the specific breed you are looking for are a good place to find a boxer dog breed clubs for the specific breed you are looking for are a good place to find a boxer dog breeder.
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  • Ah singing drummers, they're a rare breed.
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  • Ailments The Norwich Terrier is a healthy and quite hardy breed of dog.
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  • Calum Macinnes, Primary 6. Eriskay Pony The native breed of pony has been rescued from near-extinction in the past 30 years.
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  • They each breed 3000 broilers per year, so the cooperative produces 30000 broilers each year.
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  • Even then, you can only reasonably expect to breed budgerigars equal to the average quality of the stud from which you buy.
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  • Emperor penguins breed in the Antarctic, under the harshest conditions for any species of bird Infant Capuchin monkeys Issue 10.
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  • I would not at this stage care to put much money on the outcome - central bankers are a naturally cautious breed.
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  • Black Guillemots also breed in various coastal cliff crevices.
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  • The group includes the only true terrestrial crustaceans, the woodlice, which no longer need to return to water in order to breed.
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  • Grand summit pledges that turn into creative accounting breed cynicism.
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  • We haue been guided by thee hitherto, And of thy Cunning had no diffidence, One sudden Foyle shall neuer breed distrust Bastard.
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  • Some fishes exhibit a marked disinclination to breed, which may be due to hormone treatments and inbreeding.
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  • In the US, TV dramatists are a more serious breed altogether.
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  • Compared to saving the rainforests, or helping pandas to breed, linguistic ecology can seem a bit tame.
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  • Like any breed of cat they do need to be vaccinated regularly against cat flu and feline enteritis.
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  • What one person or even a vet says about a breed may be totally erroneous.
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  • Norwegian cat fanciers in Norway worked very hard to preserve this breed by introducing a very strict breeding program me.
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  • He was of a rare breed - an academically minded young man, turned firebrand.
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  • In the wild, greater flamingoes breed in very large numbers on salt or soda lakes. often there are thousands of birds.
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  • Prior to the war, Miss Breed had grown fond of the children who visited the library.
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  • The wedge shaped face with the wrinkled forehead are also peculiar to the breed.
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  • D Devonshire Traditional Breed Center Chickens - wide range of pure bred large and bantam fowl for beginner and experienced keeper.
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  • In addition, some hunts breed foxes in areas where their numbers are sparse to ensure an adequate number for the " sport " .
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  • It is not possible to keep a foxhound in the home, therefore the breed as a whole would be destroyed.
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  • Its objects to promote the breeding of the welsh foxhound in order that the distinctive national breed may be maintained on established lines.
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  • If you are a neat freak and cannot stand dust bunnies, consider a lower shedding breed.
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  • On deeper water great crested and little grebes breed, breeding duck include gadwall and tufted duck.
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  • Some families keep guinea pigs which they breed and eat.
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