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breathes

breathes Sentence Examples

  • But this formal agreement includes material differences, and the spirit which breathes in Lotze's writings is more akin to the objects and aspirations of the idealistic school than to the cold formalism of Herbart.

  • Even into his mythological learning he breathes a life to which these dry scholars are strangers.

  • And yet, though Rembrandt's " Nightwatch " is dated the very year after the publication of the Meditations, not a word in Descartes breathes of any work of art or historical learning.

  • 7, Yahweh breathes his own breath into the lifeless body.

  • A favourite contrast for which there is more to be said is that drawn between the m k agico-religious spell-ritual, that says in effect, "My will be done," and the spirit of "Thy will be done" that breathes through the highest forms of worship. Such resignation in the face of the divine will and providence is, however, not altogether beyond the horizon of primitive faith, as witness the following prayer of the Khonds of Orissa: "We are ignorant of what it is good to ask for.

  • The gnat larva, for example, breathes at the tail-end, hanging head-downwards from the surface-film.

  • Europe had sinned in the face of God; otherwise Jerusalem would never have fallen; and the idea of a spiritual reform from within, as the necessary corollary and accompaniment of the expedition of Christianity without, breathes in some of the papal letters, just as, during the conciliar movement, the causa reformationis was blended with the causa unionis.

  • New poems in abundance dealt with the history of the Crusades, either in a faithful narrative, like that of the Chanson of Ambroise, which narrates the Third Crusade, or in a free and poetical spirit, such as breathes in the Chanson d'Antioche.

  • The basis of this growth is partly the story-telling instinct innate in all men, which loves to heighten an effect, sharpen a point or increase a contrast - the instinct which breathes in Icelandic sagas like that of Burnt Njal; partly the instinct of idolization, if it may be so called, which leads to the perversion into impossible greatness of an approved character, and has created, in this instance, the legendary figures of Peter the Hermit and Godfrey of Bouillon (qq.v.); partly the religious impulse, which counted nothing wonderful in a holy war, and imported miraculous elements even into the sober pages of the Gesta.

  • The celebrated " homo sum " is a translation from Alexis, and the spirit of it breathes in many passages of the Greek drama.

  • And the whole breathes such a genuine originality, all is psychologically so accurate and just, the earliest beginnings of the new religious.

  • An intense and passionate ardour breathes in his verses, and forms one of the most remarkable as well as one of the most attractive characteristics of his style; for, while few even among Turkish poets are more artificial than he, few seem to write with greater earnestness and sincerity.

  • He breathes the old national spirit, and his mastery of classical idiom and versification is for his age extraordinary.

  • But his own system has a distinct unity and originality; it breathes throughout the fiery spirit of Bruno himself.

  • In character it is profoundly " pneumatic "; Paul's super-earthly Spirit-Christ here breathes and speaks, and invites a corresponding spiritual comprehension.

  • The teaching rather breathes the atmosphere of the fourth gospel, which sets the Last Supper before the feast of the Passover (xiii.

  • Every clause breathes the philosopher's humanity.

  • " From the charnel-house of the Vienna cabinet," he exclaimed, " a pestilential air breathes on us, which dulls our nerves and paralyses the flight of our spirit."

  • The spirit of beauty breathes in every line; a sense of music and of colour is everywhere abundant; the reader moves, as it were, under a canopy of apple-blossom, over a flower-starred turf, to the faint harmony of virginals.

  • An immense joy in battle breathes through the earliest Norse literature, which has scarce its like in any other literature; and we know that the language recognized a peculiar battle fury, a veritable madness by which certain were seized and which went by the name of " berserk's way " (berserksgangr).2 The courage of the vikings was proof against anything, even as a rule against superstitious terrors.

  • His correspondence breathes a most Christian spirit, especially in its tone of charity towards his persecutors.

  • These are the external gills, through which the animal breathes the oxygen dissolved in the water.

  • When the medical attendant declares the case hopeless a priest advances to the bed of the dying man, repeats sundry texts of the Zend-Avesta, the substance of which tends to afford him consolation, and breathes a prayer for the forgiveness of his sins.

  • than those of any other Stoic. Zeno's seeming dualism of God (or force) and formless matter he was able to transform into the lofty pantheism which breathes in every line of the famous.

  • The soul of the world fills and penetrates it: in like manner the human soul pervades and breathes through all the body, informing and guiding it, stamping the man with his essential character of rational.

  • In all that the older Stoics taught there breathes that enthusiasm for righteousness in which has been traced the earnestness of the Semitic spirit; but nothing presents more forcibly the pitch of their moral idealism than the doctrine of the Wise Man.

  • Nevertheless even such a writer as D could not escape the influence of the age and atmosphere in which he lived; and despite the spirit of love which breathes so strongly throughout the book, especially for the poor, the widow and the fatherless, the stranger and the homeless Levite (xxiv.

  • Under ordinary circumstances the horse breathes entirely by the nasal passages, the communication between the larynx and the mouth being closed by the velum palati.

  • anaesthesiaravenous anesthesia (TIVA) where the patient breathes oxygen enriched air is becoming more commonplace.

  • There is an almost devotional aspect to much of this recording: it breathes an intimacy that speaks of warm firesides and mulled wine.

  • There is an almost devotional aspect to much of this recording: it breathes an intimacy that speaks of warm firesides and mulled wine.

  • And I have read your diary that you have so goodly written for me, and which breathes out truth in every line.

  • janglejangling guitar sound breathes life into this subtle, slightly melancholy piece.

  • The diver breathes pure oxygen through a mask, which improves exhalation of nitrogen.

  • It radically reworks old tunes and breathes new life into songs with haunting and revealing results.

  • Scone palace - scone palace - Scone is a place that breathes history like nowhere else in Scotland.

  • A young bird twitters And hides its head; A little wind suddenly Breathes, and is dead.

  • But this formal agreement includes material differences, and the spirit which breathes in Lotze's writings is more akin to the objects and aspirations of the idealistic school than to the cold formalism of Herbart.

  • Even into his mythological learning he breathes a life to which these dry scholars are strangers.

  • And yet, though Rembrandt's " Nightwatch " is dated the very year after the publication of the Meditations, not a word in Descartes breathes of any work of art or historical learning.

  • 7, Yahweh breathes his own breath into the lifeless body.

  • A favourite contrast for which there is more to be said is that drawn between the m k agico-religious spell-ritual, that says in effect, "My will be done," and the spirit of "Thy will be done" that breathes through the highest forms of worship. Such resignation in the face of the divine will and providence is, however, not altogether beyond the horizon of primitive faith, as witness the following prayer of the Khonds of Orissa: "We are ignorant of what it is good to ask for.

  • piscis), the common name of that class of vertebrate animals which lives exclusively in water, breathes through gills, and whose limbs take the form of fins (see Ichthyology).

  • The gnat larva, for example, breathes at the tail-end, hanging head-downwards from the surface-film.

  • Europe had sinned in the face of God; otherwise Jerusalem would never have fallen; and the idea of a spiritual reform from within, as the necessary corollary and accompaniment of the expedition of Christianity without, breathes in some of the papal letters, just as, during the conciliar movement, the causa reformationis was blended with the causa unionis.

  • New poems in abundance dealt with the history of the Crusades, either in a faithful narrative, like that of the Chanson of Ambroise, which narrates the Third Crusade, or in a free and poetical spirit, such as breathes in the Chanson d'Antioche.

  • The basis of this growth is partly the story-telling instinct innate in all men, which loves to heighten an effect, sharpen a point or increase a contrast - the instinct which breathes in Icelandic sagas like that of Burnt Njal; partly the instinct of idolization, if it may be so called, which leads to the perversion into impossible greatness of an approved character, and has created, in this instance, the legendary figures of Peter the Hermit and Godfrey of Bouillon (qq.v.); partly the religious impulse, which counted nothing wonderful in a holy war, and imported miraculous elements even into the sober pages of the Gesta.

  • The celebrated " homo sum " is a translation from Alexis, and the spirit of it breathes in many passages of the Greek drama.

  • The Koran breathes a considerate and kindly spirit towards the class, and encourages manumission.

  • And the whole breathes such a genuine originality, all is psychologically so accurate and just, the earliest beginnings of the new religious.

  • An intense and passionate ardour breathes in his verses, and forms one of the most remarkable as well as one of the most attractive characteristics of his style; for, while few even among Turkish poets are more artificial than he, few seem to write with greater earnestness and sincerity.

  • He breathes the old national spirit, and his mastery of classical idiom and versification is for his age extraordinary.

  • But his own system has a distinct unity and originality; it breathes throughout the fiery spirit of Bruno himself.

  • In character it is profoundly " pneumatic "; Paul's super-earthly Spirit-Christ here breathes and speaks, and invites a corresponding spiritual comprehension.

  • The teaching rather breathes the atmosphere of the fourth gospel, which sets the Last Supper before the feast of the Passover (xiii.

  • Every clause breathes the philosopher's humanity.

  • " From the charnel-house of the Vienna cabinet," he exclaimed, " a pestilential air breathes on us, which dulls our nerves and paralyses the flight of our spirit."

  • The spirit of beauty breathes in every line; a sense of music and of colour is everywhere abundant; the reader moves, as it were, under a canopy of apple-blossom, over a flower-starred turf, to the faint harmony of virginals.

  • An immense joy in battle breathes through the earliest Norse literature, which has scarce its like in any other literature; and we know that the language recognized a peculiar battle fury, a veritable madness by which certain were seized and which went by the name of " berserk's way " (berserksgangr).2 The courage of the vikings was proof against anything, even as a rule against superstitious terrors.

  • His correspondence breathes a most Christian spirit, especially in its tone of charity towards his persecutors.

  • These are the external gills, through which the animal breathes the oxygen dissolved in the water.

  • When the medical attendant declares the case hopeless a priest advances to the bed of the dying man, repeats sundry texts of the Zend-Avesta, the substance of which tends to afford him consolation, and breathes a prayer for the forgiveness of his sins.

  • Above all, the sacred book of laws, the Vendidad, breathes throughout the spirit of the Sassanian period, in its intolerance, its casuistry degenerating into absurdity, and its soulless monotony.

  • than those of any other Stoic. Zeno's seeming dualism of God (or force) and formless matter he was able to transform into the lofty pantheism which breathes in every line of the famous.

  • The soul of the world fills and penetrates it: in like manner the human soul pervades and breathes through all the body, informing and guiding it, stamping the man with his essential character of rational.

  • In all that the older Stoics taught there breathes that enthusiasm for righteousness in which has been traced the earnestness of the Semitic spirit; but nothing presents more forcibly the pitch of their moral idealism than the doctrine of the Wise Man.

  • Nevertheless even such a writer as D could not escape the influence of the age and atmosphere in which he lived; and despite the spirit of love which breathes so strongly throughout the book, especially for the poor, the widow and the fatherless, the stranger and the homeless Levite (xxiv.

  • Under ordinary circumstances the horse breathes entirely by the nasal passages, the communication between the larynx and the mouth being closed by the velum palati.

  • But lo! the lovely maiden only smiles more sweetly, and breathes upon the icy battlements of her enemies, and in a moment they vanish, and the glad Earth gives her a royal welcome.

  • Men come tamely home at night only from the next field or street, where their household echoes haunt, and their life pines because it breathes its own breath over again; their shadows, morning and evening, reach farther than their daily steps.

  • Of all ebriosity, who does not prefer to be intoxicated by the air he breathes?

  • It radically reworks old tunes and breathes new life into songs with haunting and revealing results.

  • Scone Palace - Scone is a place that breathes history like nowhere else in Scotland.

  • A young bird twitters And hides its head; A little wind suddenly Breathes, and is dead.

  • It truly breathes new life into an underrated classic.

  • It is best to have a shell made of cotton fabric, as cotton breathes and allows some heat to pass through.

  • Cotton breathes easily and feels soft against the skin.

  • Cotton remains the most versatile material, one that breathes during hot weather, and that can keep toddlers warm in cooler weather.

  • You can always tell if an item is made from real leather since the material breathes and adjusts to the temperature of its environment.

  • When you're stressed, you're apt to take shorter breathes.

  • Pay attention to your breathing and count breathes.

  • The next time you find yourself embroiled in a heated argument, take one to three deep breathes (up to ten would be even better).

  • If it starts to accelerate or you feel as though you can't catch your breath, take a moment to count breathes.

  • Throat cancer can leave a person with a permanent tracheotomy, a hole in the neck through which the person breathes.

  • Try taking in deep breathes just as you would when smoking.

  • When you're cutting your fabric, make sure to make the dress big enough; a tight dress is uncomfortable even if the fabric breathes well.

  • You also want fabric that breathes and is lightweight.

  • You want to stay dry and comfortable with outerwear that breathes and won't cling or be too heavy as it gets wet.

  • It is lightweight, breathes well, and can be woven tightly enough so as not to let in sun rays, but still won't promote an excess of sweat.

  • Even for a summer cardigan, a lightweight wool is a practical choice, since it breathes.

  • Unless it's been chemically treated, it keeps you warm and also breathes, keeping moisture at bay.

  • It breathes better than any other fiber, allowing the body to get to a comfortable sleeping temperature faster and maintain that level of comfort longer.

  • Wool, on the other hand, breathes with you.

  • An empire dress is perfect for summer, because it is light and feminine and breathes well.

  • In some cases, only 25 percent of the normal breathes are taken in.

  • Nasal masks are not ideal for anyone who breathes through their mouth, as these masks cover and direct pressurized air only through the nasal passages.

  • Instead, the airflow lessens when the person exhales and increases when the person breathes in.

  • Then run up to him until he breathes fire at you.

  • In the first task, Harry needs to fly with his broomstick across some rough terrain while being chased by a dragon that breathes fire.

  • The product guarantee allows customers to get a replacement item or refund if they find that water or wind entered the pants or if they do not feel the fabric breathes enough.

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