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breaking

breaking

breaking Sentence Examples

  • The congestion must be breaking up.

  • When she decided Yancey wasn't around, she started down the path, keeping close to the trees without breaking her promise not to wander in the woods.

  • Why did she need to prove to anyone, least of all herself, that she was right in breaking off the relationship?

  • "You don't understand," she said, her voice breaking with emotion.

  • Under that facade of indifference beats a heart primed for breaking.

  • I don't want you fainting and breaking your neck or something.

  • "I guess that was Alder's Bridge's bridge," I said, breaking the silence.

  • I asked, breaking the reverential silence.

  • God, I'm sorry, breaking down like that.

  • This killer left the scene of an aborted breaking where he was seeking more information on the tipster after he was wounded.

  • "Yes; be nice Frank," boss Agnes said, breaking into the conversation.

  • "I think someone is breaking into this house," I whispered.

  • Before I could say more, I heard the telltale noise of breaking glass from the far side of the house!

  • I didn't manage to say much before I heard the sound of breaking glass.

  • Toni asked, breaking their tense silence.

  • "Ikira," Dustin said, breaking away.

  • Fury bubbled within her, breaking free.

  • Her heart was breaking.

  • Darian held his head, and she wrapped her arms around him, wishing she could protect him from the dark memories breaking free.

  • As if sensing she'd noticed, he straightened and moved away, breaking contact to stand a few feet away.

  • Her heart was breaking again or maybe, her hope crumbling.

  • "You're breaking up with me," he said, smiling faintly.

  • Deidre's heart felt like it was breaking.

  • Dean could picture him and the old man breaking into the storage building in the dead of night.

  • "But anyone harboring them is breaking the law—especially in my county," Fitzgerald said, the usual venom in his voice.

  • When I called Billy to tell him I was coming out this summer, he mentioned he'd found some old bones in a mine but he was afraid of getting in trouble for breaking in.

  • By that time, the mine was open anyway, so going in there wasn't breaking and entering.

  • His hand fell from her leg, breaking her trance enough that she looked away.

  • It was bedtime on her side of the world, but dawn was breaking the sky outside her windows.

  • Breaking all the rules.

  • Maybe Darkyn is still pissed at me for breaking into Hell to rescue our friends a few months ago.

  • He began to think more and more that raising Andre was worth breaking the thousands of Immortal Laws it cost.

  • Maybe Gabe was right; maybe this was partially her fault for breaking too many Immortal Laws at once.

  • "He stabbed Alex," she said, her voice breaking with emotion.

  • The only thing that kept her from breaking down was the fact that Jonathan and Destiny needed her.

  • "If you feel the need to expel me for almost breaking the Code, I will go where you bid," Harmony said in a quieter voice.

  • She moved to face him, distracted by the fact he shifted his body to keep from breaking their physical contact.

  • The past few months, I've come close to breaking it hundreds of times to keep the underworld from shutting down.

  • You didn't quit because you wanted to, but because you had to after breaking those laws to spare me and Hazel, Katie added, patting her stomach.

  • The result of a deity breaking one of the three is basically the destruction of the world.

  • Breaking through the surface, Gabriel gasped in a few breaths before swimming towards the shore with powerful strokes.

  • Snapping necks, breaking Codes, bringing back the dead-dead.

  • Yes, well, I won't be breaking that mold.

  • The deity you were in a past life started the chain of events that put us here by breaking laws from the time-before-time.

  • Though she tried hard not to fear death, she wondered what kind of creature was capable of breaking through bars made of materials she'd never before seen and held in place with some sort of magic.

  • Maybe I've succeeded in breaking you after all.

  • She sobbed, her emotions from the week's events breaking free.

  • Don't piss these people off by breaking their rules.

  • He admired her strength but knew everyone had a breaking point.

  • Kris heard the sickening sound of the demon.s body breaking from the distance and watched the other demons shapeshift to charge the half-demon.

  • Kris had come close to breaking the Immortal rules or his own oaths to his father.

  • He has gone to them with word of his breaking allegiance to pursue his title without their mediation or interference.

  • If the giant of a man before her decided to be angry at her for breaking the rules, she'd panic as well.

  • At least I'll get a head start tomorrow night, breaking the news to Fran.

  • She smiled, breaking the tension.

  • He knew it was not, but wanted to make her squirm a little for breaking her promise.

  • They then heard things breaking, being thrown.

  • You two are already breaking ground.

  • He set his course to intercept while contemplating breaking his rule about feeding on men.

  • After breaking Sarah's embrace, she asked, "You love music so much, why don't you sing or play an instrument?"

  • The clouds were breaking up and the wind had switched around to the south.

  • Lana glanced at her micro, which still worked on breaking through his messages.

  • He helped her without breaking the kiss, their hands fumbling in their haste to have his clothes off.

  • "We're breaking camp and scattering today," Brady confirmed.

  • Lana eased back without breaking contact.

  • "Talk about insanity breaking out if anyone knew …" "I was going to take them to the Peace Command Center," she said.

  • He didn't feel up to the task, not when failure meant breaking the man he viewed as his brother.

  • Then how do you know if you're breaking them?

  • Take your place with us on the Council.  We can deal with Death without breaking down her front door and pissing her off.

  • She's breaking Immortal Code to let you go.  We have to leave, before she changes her mind.

  • I saw him play last spring when I went out to the high school to bust the Cummings kid for breaking and entering.

  • "Do you think they'll fly in this?" she asked, breaking the silence.

  • Dean exclaimed, breaking a fingernail on a knot.

  • So how about breaking tradition and going out to breakfast with me?

  • Well... I don't mind breaking tradition and seeing you this morning, but...

  • Assuming this violation occurred, what is the punishment for breaking this law?

  • "An Oracle—" "—has nothing to lose right now and doesn't mind breaking your rules."

  • Rissa waited until she was out of sight of the two guards before breaking into a trot.

  • I forgive you for breaking your promise.

  • He finally shook his head, his voice breaking as he answered.

  • So, we're not breaking up, just taking time apart.

  • "Jonny's coming back," she heard herself saying, uncertain how the teen god with a penchant for breaking arms was less of a threat than this man.

  • That's for breaking your promise!

  • At last, in 1844, the government succeeded in breaking his connexion with the paper.

  • looked coldly on the project, and from this time forth the old familiar relations between the republic and the French monarchy were strained to breaking point, though the final rupture did not come till 1682 on the arrival of the Austrian minister, Zerowski, at Warsaw.

  • On the 13th of October 1307 came the arrest of all the Knights Templar in France, the breaking of a storm conjured up by royal jealousy and greed.

  • Upon the replacing of the Rump by the army, after the breaking up of Richard's parliament, Cooper endeavoured unsuccessfully to take his seat on the ground of his former disputed election for Downton.

  • On the breaking out of the Dutch War in 1664 he was made treasurer of the prizes, being accountable to the king alone for all sums received or spent.

  • The breaking out of the Popish Terror in 1678 marks the worst part of Shaftesbury's career.

  • The Madonna della Steccata (Our Lady of the Palisade), a fine church in the form of a Greek cross, erected between 1521 and 1539 after Zaccagni's designs, contains the tombs and monuments of many of the Bourbon and Farnese dukes of Parma, and preserves its pictures, Parmigiano's "Moses Breaking the Tables of the Law" and Anselmi's "Coronation of the Virgin."

  • They are easily hydrolysed, breaking up into their components when boiled with acids or alkalies.

  • The breaking up of the old Archean foundation block began in Cambrian and Ordovician times.

  • The sea does not appear to have extended completely across Australia, breaking it into halves, for a projection from the Archean plateau of Western Australia extended as far east as the South Australian highlands, and thence probably continued eastward, till it joined the Victorian highlands.

  • He rejoiced that the breaking up of the French schools by the revolution had rendered necessary the foundation of Maynooth College, which he foresaw would draw the sympathies of the clergy into more democratic channels.

  • In the latter case the overturning tendency begins as soon as the load leaves the ground, but ceases as soon as the load again touches the ground and thus relieves the crane of the extra weight, whereas overturning backwards is caused either by the reaction of a chain breaking or by excessive counterweight.

  • These two cables did not have a very long life, that of 1865 breaking down in 1877 and that of 1866 in 1872, but by the later of these dates four other cables had been laid across the Atlantic, including one from Brest to Duxbury, Mass.

  • By the use of a key in the battery circuit as well as an interrupter or current reverser, signals can be given by breaking up the continuous hum in the telephone into long and short periods.

  • Cadmium is a white metal, possessing a bluish tinge, and is capable of taking a high polish; on breaking, it shows a distinct fibrous fracture.

  • Such multiple-electrode transmitters give a loud although somewhat harsh sound, and will bear being spoken to very strongly without breaking the circuit.

  • Nor do the highest summits form a continuous ridge of great altitude for any considerable distance; they are rather a series of groups separated by tracts of very inferior elevation forming natural passes across the range, and broken in some places (as is the case in almost all limestone countries) by the waters from the upland valleys turning suddenly at right angles, and breaking through the mountain ranges which bound them.

  • Internally Charles left the affairs of the Italian kingdom much as he found them, except that he appears to have pursued the policy of breaking up the larger fiefs of the Lombards, substituting counts for their dukes, and adding to the privileges of the bishops.

  • Finally, a mouth is formed by breaking through at the apex of the manubrium, and the now fully-formed medusa becomes separated by rupture of the stalk of the bud and swims away.

  • The breaking of such a promissory oath was called " perjury " (as in classical Latin and in Shakespeare), contrary to modern usage which confines the word to false evidence before a court of justice.

  • They may, for instance, be glandular or stinging, as in the common stinging nettle, where the top of the hair is very brittle, easily breaking off when touched.

  • ifA portion of a lactici- stematic cells, the walls separating the lerous coenocyte dissected out s cells breaking down, so that a network ihe leaf of a Euphorbia (Xi20).

  • The protoplasm is in a condition of instability and is continually breaking down to a certain extent, giving rise to various substances of different degrees of complexity, some of which are again built up by it into its own substances, and others, more simple in composition, are given off.

  • Vegetation of all sorts acts in a similar way, either in forming soil and assisting in breaking up rocks, in filling up shallow lakes, and even, like the mangrove, in reclaiming wide stretches of land from the sea.

  • While the schools of Babylonia were flourishing as the religious head of Judaism, the West, and especially Spain under Moorish rule, was becoming the home of Jewish scholarship. On the breaking of the schools many of the fugitives fled o- g up Y g?

  • The common monoclinic variety is obtained by allowing a crust to form over molten sulphur by partially cooling it, and then breaking the crust and pouring off the still liquid portion, whereupon the interior of the vessel will be found coated with long needles of this variety.

  • The tendency of modern times has been towards the breaking down of formal hereditary privileges.

  • Breaking up of the cellcontents into minute biflagellate swarm-spores, which escape, and whose history is not further known.

  • breaking out occasionally into armed conflicts, and among the princes of the other principalities the old struggle for precedence and territory went on unceasingly until it was suddenly interrupted, in the first half of the thirteenth century, by the unexpected irruption of an irresistible foreign foe coming from the mysterious.

  • The sovereigns of Sardinia, Naples, Portugal and Spain were dethroned, the pope was driven from Rome, the Rhine Confederation was extended till France obtained a footing on the Baltic, the grand-duchy of Warsaw was reorganized and strengthened, the promised evacuation of Prussia was indefinitely postponed, an armistice between Russia and Turkey was negotiated by French diplomacy in such a way that the Russian troops should evacuate the Danubian principalities, which Alexander intended to annex to his empire, and the scheme for breaking up the Ottoman empire and ruining England by the conquest of India, which had been one of the most attractive baits in the Tilsit negotiations, but which had not been formulated in the treaty, was no longer spoken of.

  • Stamboloff, pursued systematically an anti-Russian policy, but the cabinet of St Petersburg confined itself officially to breaking off diplomatic relations and making diplomatic protests, and unofficially to giving tacit encouragement to revolutionary agitation.

  • He died in Mexico, from the kick of a horse he was breaking in, on the 7th of February 1692.

  • Disciplined troops as they were, they resisted the temptation to escape Ferrara's fire by breaking out to the front; but the whole Spanish line was enfiladed, and on the left of it the papal troops, who were by no means of the same quality, filled up the ditch in front of their breastworks and charged forward, followed by all the gendarmerie.

  • In Clepsine (Glossiphonia) there is a further breaking up of the coelom.

  • Labour difficulties, low prices of produce, bad seasons and similar causes provided inducements for leaving the land in grass for two years, or over three years or more, before breaking it up for wheat.

  • The division of the foot into lobes is a simple case of that much greater elaboration or breaking up into processes and regions which it undergoes in the class Cephalopoda.

  • The discovery of the Cape route saved the breaking of bulk between India and Europe, and saved the dues exacted by the masters of Syria and Egypt.

  • Marius, finding himself overshadowed by his colleagues and compromised by their excesses, thought seriously of breaking with them, and Saturninus and Glaucia saw that their only hope 1 According to some, the son of the Caepio mentioned above.

  • These bands are due to molecular oscillations; Hartley suggests the carbon atoms to be rotating and forming alternately single and double linkages, the formation of three double links giving three bands, and of three single links another three; Baly and Collie, on the other hand, suggest the making and breaking of links between adjacent atoms, pointing out that there are seven combinations of one, two and three pairs of carbon atoms in the benzene molecule.

  • To Spohr the frequency of these incidents must have produced the impression that Wagner was perpetually beginning arias and breaking them off at once.

  • Fanatics sought death by insulting the magistrates or by breaking idols, and in their enthusiasm for martyrdom became self-centred and forgetful of their normal duty.

  • Commagene was independent under a king,MithradatesCallinicus, in the earlier part of the last century B.C. Syria itself in the last days of the Seleucid dynasty is seen to be breaking up into petty principalities, Greek or native.

  • One account says that it was caused by a broken bridge which delayed the Conqueror's advance to the north, but this is known to have been at Ferrybridge, three miles away; a second says that the new name was derived from a Norman town called Pontfrete, which, however, never existed; and a third that it was caused by the breaking of a bridge in 1153 on the arrival of the archbishop of York, St William,.

  • The History of the Revolution in England, breaking off at the point where William of Orange is preparing to intervene in the affairs of England, is chiefly interesting because of Macaulay's admiring essay on it and its author.

  • But Sunday Schools were first adopted by Charles to meet the case of young people in service who could not attend during the week, and even in that form much opposition was shown to them because teaching was thought to be a form of Sabbath breaking.

  • Wohl (Ber., 1893, 26, p. 730) in the " breaking down " of the sugars.

  • The pope urged the king of Hungary to take advantage of this favourable opportunity by breaking the truce solemnly agreed upon, and nineteen days after it had been concluded a coalition was formed against the Turks; a large army headed by Ladislaus I., king of Hungary, Hunyadi, voivode of Walachia, and Cardinal Cesarini crossed the Danube and reached Varna, where they hoped to be joined by the Greek emperor.

  • Black George), and under his able leadership succeeded in capturing Belgrade and in breaking the power of the Janissaries.

  • Sultan Mahmud now devoted himself to breaking the overgrown power of the local governors, which had for many years practically annihilated that of the central authority.

  • Unsettled claims by French citizens led to a breaking off of relations and the occupation of Mitylene by France in November 1901; the rupture was of short duration and Turkey soon gave way, according complete satisfaction both in this matter and on certain other French demands.

  • By a night march of unexampled daring and difficulty Ney succeeded in breaking through the Russian cordon, but when he regained touch with the main body at Orcha only Boo of his 6000 men were still with him (2 ist).

  • The Passover was kept in the first month on the 14th day of the month at even in the wilderness of Sinai; but certain men, unclean by touching a dead body, asked what they should do; they were to keep it on the second month on the 14th day, eating it with unleavened bread and bitter herbs, leaving none of it until the morning, nor breaking a bone.

  • About the time of the maxima there must be a longer tidal range (that is, a greater rise and fall than the average); the difference between neap tides and spring tides will also be increased, and as results of these conditions there must be great tidal floods breaking over lowlying coasts and producing extensive denudation.

  • There is evidence that, towards the close of the mediaeval period, great storms and tidal inundations occurred on the shores of the North Sea and Baltic, and in the course of these floods, culminating in 1297, the Zuider Zee was formed from a lake that existed in its neighbourhood, by the breaking down of dykes.

  • The general trend of these researches lies in the study of the decomposition or " breaking down " products of the albumin molecules; once these are accurately determined, the synthesis of an albumin is but a matter of time.

  • Unfortunately siege of San a conflagration breaking out near the breaches Sebastian, caused it to be postponed until nightfall, when, the July 10.24, breaches in the interval having been strengthened, 1813' it was delivered unsuccessfully and with heavy loss.

  • It is obtained by breaking up the roots or rhizomes in hot water and separating the rubber, and machines have now been devised for this purpose.

  • The technical value of caoutchouc chiefly depends on the extent to which it is capable of being stretched without breaking, and the extent to which it at once returns to its original dimensions.

  • The ventral valve in many of the genera is provided with two curved hinge-teeth, which fit into corresponding sockets in the opposite valve, so that the valves cannot be separated without breaking one of the teeth.

  • Its breaking strain is very small: a wire 1 o th in.

  • On the breaking out of the Rye House Plot, of which neither he, Essex, nor Sidney had the slightest knowledge, he was accused by informers of promising his assistance to raise an insurrection and compass the death of the king.

  • But this small beginning of good fortune was embittered by the deaths of his father and his eldest sister, and by the breaking up of the home at Quickborn.

  • To prevent the breaking down of their properties, the necessary consequence of this law of inheritance, there is no doubt that infanticide was common among them, and that it extended to the male as well as the female progeny, but it has been put down by the Infanticide Rules, which provide for the registration of Jareja children.

  • Add to these the eroded river basins of the Xingu, Tapajos and Guapore on the north and west, the Paraguay on the south-west, and the scores of smaller rivers along the Atlantic coast, and we may have some conception of the agencies that have been at work in breaking down and shaping this great table-land, perhaps the oldest part of the continent.

  • The more northern rivers are subject to periodical variations in volume caused by wet and dry seasons, but the greater distance of the coast range and the more gradual breaking down of the plateau toward the sea, give them longer courses and a greater extent of navigable water.

  • The bank, in addition to its private functions, farmed many of the regalia, and was in the practice of advancing large sums to the state, transactions which gave rise to extensive corruption, and terminated some years later in the breaking of the bank.

  • A heavy sea from the Indian Ocean is always breaking on the shore, even in the finest weather, and at the mouth of every natural harbour a bar occurs.

  • Society itself must take the initiative by breaking down the barriers of class exclusiveness and reviving a healthy public spirit.

  • The central authority in Austria was steadily breaking down, and the food crisis was rendered still more acute by the widespread formation of " Green Cadres " - well organized armed bands which held positions in the mountains and defied capture.

  • Whatever value is to be attached to Mendel's observation of the breaking up of self-fertilized hybrids of cultivated varieties into the two original parent forms according to the formula " 'PP, 2PN, INN," it cannot be considered as more than a contribution to the extensive investigation of heredity which still remains to be carried out.

  • In consequence of the breaking away of the lower part of "Cleopatra's Needles" when removed to Alexandria and re-erected, the Roman engineers supported the angles on bronze crabs, one of which with three reproductions now supports the angles of the obelisk on the Thames Embankment.

  • The greater part of its body is covered by a pattern of acanthus leaves, but on the shoulder is a frieze showing nomads breaking in wild mares, our chief authority for Scythian costume.

  • The only set-back was the descent which Beyers made upon Pietersburg, breaking into the concentration camp and carrying off a number of able-bodied refugees.

  • In 310 Agathocles, defeated and besieged in Syracuse, took the desperate resolve of breaking through the blockade and attacking the enemy in Africa.

  • Basing his foreign policy upon the alliance, as supplemented by the naval entente with Great Britain negotiated by his predecessor, Count Robilant, Crispi assumed a resolute attitude towards France, breaking off the prolonged and unfruitful negotiations for a new Franco-Italian commercial treaty, and refusing the French invitation to organize an Italian section at the Paris Exhibition of 1889.

  • The army was now thoroughly out of heart, and Demosthenes was for at once breaking up the camp, embarking the troops, and sailing back to Athens.

  • The principal item in mining cost is that of labour, which is expended chiefly in breaking down the mineral, either by the use of hand tools or with the aid of powder.

  • Narrow and contracted working-places are to be avoided, as in such places the cost of breaking ground is always large.

  • This tendency is overcome by the use of timber supports so disposed as to ensure the breaking of the overhanging roof at a safe distance from the workingface and prevent the interruption of the work that might otherwise result.

  • ordinary steel rope has a breaking strength of about 32 tons, which, with a' factor of safety of six gives a safe working load of 54 tons.

  • plow-steel rope has breaking and working strengths respectively of at least 48 and 8 tons.

  • The head-gear is often combined with ore-bins and machinery for breaking and sizing the lump ore previous to shipment to the reduction works.

  • That night the troops still left at Helles were reduced by one-third, and, on the next day breaking fine, it was decided to complete the operation on the following night as intended at the start.

  • per metre, which, for practical purposes, Wertheim takes as giving the limit of elasticity; column 4 gives the breaking strain.

  • With this object, after terrorizing Armenia and the Medes and breaking the power of the Hittites, Tiglathpileser III.

  • When Assur-bani-pal died, his empire was fast breaking up. Under his successor, Assur-etil-ilani, the Scythians penetrated into Assyria and made their way as far as the borders of Egypt.

  • The republic now turned to the task of breaking the power of the Ghibelline cities of Pisa and Arezzo.

  • All this decreased Savonarola's popularity to some extent, but the enemy having been beaten at Leghorn and the league being apparently on the point of breaking up, the Florentines took courage and the friar's party was once more in the ascendant.

  • The hour of Bestuzhev's triumph coincided with the peace congress of Aixla-Chapelle, which altered the whole situation of European politics and introduced fresh combinations, the breaking away of Prussia from France and a rapprochement between England and Prussia, with the inevitable corollary of an alliance between France and the enemies of Prussia.

  • ravaged the environs of Paris; and the treaty of Bicetre (November 2, 1410) only suspended hostilities for a few months, war breaking out afresh in the spring of 1411.

  • Meanwhile the empire seemed in danger of breaking up. Not till 1812 was the war with Russia closed by the treaty of Bucharest, which restored Moldavia and the greater part of Wallachia to the Ottoman government.

  • When he came to the throne the empire was breaking up from within; one by one he freed the provinces from the tyrannical rulers who, like Ali of Jannina, were carving out independent, or quasi-independent, empires within the empire.

  • - In English law, sacrilege is the breaking into a place of worship and stealing therefrom.

  • A statute of 1553 made the breaking or defacing of an altar, crucifix or cross in any church, chapel or churchyard punishable with three months' imprisonment on conviction before two justices, the imprisonment to be continued unless the offender entered into surety for good behaviour at quarter sessions.

  • The tendency of the later law has been to put the offence of sacrilege in the same position as if the offence had not been committed in a sacred building Thus breaking into a place of worship at night, says Coke, is burglary, for the church is the mansion house of Almighty God.

  • The Larceny Act of 1861 punishes the breaking into, or out of, a place of divine worship in the same way as burglary, and the theft of things sacred in the same way as larceny.

  • The people have to work on the chief's plantations and fisheries, and also work in parties for each other, breaking up new land, &c. This often ends in feasting and in dances (pilu pilu), which include allegorical representations of events or ideas.

  • The old gild system was breaking down under the action of new economic forces.

  • All these types of plough are virtually hoes pulled through the ground, breaking but not inverting the soil.

  • from the Gulf of Guayaquil to the borders of the Morrope Valley, and is traversed by three rivers - the Tumbes, Chira and Piura, the two former receiving their waters from the inner Cordillera and breaking through the outer range.

  • Otto soon showed his intention of breaking with the policy of his father, who had been content with a nominal superiority over the duchies; in 937 he punished Eberhard, duke of Franconia, for an alleged infringement of the royal authority; and in 938 deposed Eberhard, who had recently become duke of Bavaria.

  • " There have been," he wrote in later days to Bishop Wilberforce, " two great deaths, or transmigrations of spirit, in my political existence - one, very slow, the breaking of ties with my original party."

  • Within his own fold new light was breaking.

  • If the box be round, they will seek to lead the eye away from the naked regularity of the circle by a pattern distracting attention, as, for example, by a zigzag breaking the circular outline, and supported by other ornaments.

  • If the venom is slowly absorbed, the blood loses its coagulability, owing to the breaking down of the red blood-corpuscles, most so with vipers, less with Australian snakes, least so with the cobra.

  • The tension which had prevailed between the two kingdoms during the last years of Gustavus Vasa reached breaking point on the accession of Gustavus's eldest son Eric XIV.

  • The analogy between the breaking up of a solid solution on cooling and the formation of a eutectic is obvious.

  • The graphical representation of the properties of alloys can be extended so as to record all the changes, thermal and chemical, which the alloy undergoes after, as well as before, solidification, including the formation and breaking up of solid solutions and compounds.

  • The queen's health was visibly breaking, and the Tory ministers could only look forward to their own downfall on the accession of the elector of Hanover.

  • The management of that enterprise, however, was a difficult one, and cost Villehardouin another embassy into Italy to prevent if possible some of his fellow-pilgrims from breaking the treaty with the Venetians by embarking at other ports and employing other convoy.

  • The sober lists of names with which it opens; the account of the embassy, so business-like in its estimates of costs and terms, and suddenly breaking into a fervent description of how the six deputies, "prostrating themselves on the earth and weeping warm tears, begged the doge and people of Venice to have pity on Jerusalem"; the story immediately following, how the young count Thibault of Champagne, raising himself from a sickbed in his joy at the successful return of his ambassadors, "leva sus et chevaucha, et laz!

  • After a desperate melee of some minutes, the rally was sounded, and the survivors of the charge, breaking their way a second time through the French infantry, eventually reached the shelter of their own lines, having lost rather more than half their numbers, but having saved the situation momentarily for their own army.

  • But the remainder of the troops had to be withdrawn, and confusion breaking out in their rear, exposed to all the random bullets and shells of the French, a panic ensued, thousands of men breaking away and flying in wildest confusion through Gravelotte towards the west.

  • Enclosed seas extend deeply into the land and originate either by the breaking through of the ocean or by the overflowing of a subsiding area.

  • His fame as a reformer brought him to the governor's chair in 1874, and he at once gave his attention to a second set of plunderers - the "canal ring," made up of members of both parties who had been systematically robbing the state through the maladministration of its canals - and succeeded in breaking them up. In 1876 the Democrats nominated him for the presidency, the Republicans nominating Rutherford B.

  • Bright, glance or pitch coal is another brilliant variety, brittle, and breaking into regular fragments of a black colour and pitchy lustre.

  • Since the accident at Hartley colliery in 1862, caused by the breaking of the pumping-engine beam, which fell into the shaft and blocked it up, whereby the whole of the men then at work in the mine were starved to death, it has been made compulsory upon mine-owners in the United Kingdom to have two pits for each working, in place of the single one divided by walls or brattices which was formerly thought sufficient.

  • To prevent accidents from the breaking of the rope while the cage is travelling in the shaft, or from over-winding when in consequence of the engine not being stopped in time the cage may be drawn up to the head-gear pulleys (both of which are unhappily not uncommon), various forms of safety catches and disconnecting hooks have been adopted.

  • Anthracite coal in Pennsylvania is subjected to breaking between toothed rollers and an elaborate system of screening, before it is fit for sale.

  • A similar explosion will frequently follow the breaking in the same way of a cylinder charged with hydrogen at a high pressure.

  • In breaking up and sending out the carbide for commercial work, packed in air-tight drums, the crust is removed by a sand blast.

  • But unfortunately all he says is that with regard' to the certain things the two bishops speedily came to an understanding, while as to the time of Easter, each adhered to his own custom, without breaking off communion with the other.

  • The Gulf Plains have a coast line of about 400 m., and are: bordered along the Gulf of Mexico by a series of long narrow islands and peninsulas, or sandbars, which have been formed by the waves breaking on the shelving shore.

  • The revolutionary movement throughout Italy was breaking down, but Charles Albert felt that while he possessed an army he could not abandon the Lombards and Venetians, and determined to stake all on a last chance.

  • - Although it is not possible to divide literatures with absolute rigidity by centuries, and although the intellectual life of Alexandria, particularly as applied to science, long survived the Roman conquest, yet at that period the school, which for some time had been gradually breaking up, seems finally to have succumbed.

  • The new sovereign's first proclamation was directed against all such preaching as might lead to contention and the breaking of the common quiet.

  • Much truer than the common estimate of the character of the Anabaptists is that given in Sebastian Franck's Chronicle: " They taught nothing but love, faith and the crucifixion of the flesh, manifesting patience and humility under many sufferings, breaking bread with one another in sign of unity and love, helping one another with true helpfulness, lending, borrowing, giving, learning to have all things in common, calling each other ` brother.'

  • The villages were captured and recaptured, but generally the French had the better of the fighting, for they compelled Blucher to use up more and more of his reserves, and prevented the Prussians from breaking through to the southward of S.

  • Breaking up 18-19.

  • The power required for breaking down mint bars amounts to from 25 to 35 h.p. The bars are fed to the rolls by hand.

  • In 1871 he became a member of the "Committee of Seventy" in New York City, which was instrumental in breaking up the "Tweed Ring," and later assisted in the prosecution of the indicted officials.

  • In 1787 he became superintendent of studies in the seminary, and held this appointment until the breaking up of the establishment in 1790.

  • In June 1792 he returned home, and, breaking his journey at Bonn, was presented with a Cantata by Beethoven, then aged two-and-twenty, whom he invited to come to Vienna as his pupil.

  • If we watch a man breaking stones by the roadside some distance away, we can see the hammer fall before we hear the blow.

  • Probably there is a breakdown of the wave somewhat like the breaking of a water-wave when the crest gains on the next trough.

  • in diameter; each weighs about 1116 tons, and has a nominal breaking strength of 22,320 tons, the actual breaking strength being the floor into rectangles 3 ft.

  • Baker and others, show that the breaking stress of a bar is not a fixed quantity, but depends on the range of variation of stress to which it is subjected, if that variation is repeated a very large number of times.

  • Let K be the breaking strength of a bar per unit of section, when it is loaded once gradually to breaking.

  • This may be termed the statical breaking strength.

  • be the breaking strength of the same bar when subjected to stresses varying from k max .

  • = K, the statical breaking stress.

  • The real nature of the action is not well understood, but the word fatigue may be used, if it is not considered to imply more than that the breaking stress under repetition of loading diminishes as the range of variation increases.

  • Let t be the statical breaking strength of a bar, loaded once gradually up to fracture (t = breaking load divided by original area of section); u the breaking strength of a bar loaded and unloaded an indefinitely great number of times, the stress varying from u to o alternately (this is termed the primitive strength); and, lastly, let s be the breaking strength of a bar subjected to an indefinitely great number of repetitions of stresses equal and opposite in sign (tension and thrust), so that the stress ranges alternately from s to -s.

  • Putting the values of F in (1) and solving for f max ., we get for the breaking stress of a bar subjected to repetition of varying stress, f max.

  • The principle of the meter is to make the breaking and driving action so strong that the friction of the train becomes immaterial in comparison.

  • On the breaking out of the Dutch war, Sidney, who was at the Hague, urged an invasion of England, and shortly afterwards went to Paris, where he offered to raise a rebellion in England on receipt of 10o,000 crowns.

  • He soon found an excuse for breaking his promise to relieve the English Catholics.

  • Having, however, espoused the cause of the Royalist party on the breaking out of the American War of Independence, he found it expedient to abandon his professional prospects in the New World, and return to his native country.

  • The number of farms increased from 74,777 in 1850 to 166,453 in 1880 and to 234,667 in 1900; and their average size decreased from 226'7 acres in 1850 to 129'1 acres in 1880 and to 93'7 acres in 1900, these changes being largely due to the breaking up of slave estates, the introduction of a considerable number of negro farmers, and the increased cultivation of tobacco and market-garden produce.

  • With this object, during Charles XII.'s stay at Altranstadt (1706-1707), he tried to divert the king's attention to the Holstein question, and six years later, when the Swedish commander, Magnus Stenbock, crossed the Elbe, Gertz rendered him as much assistance as was compatible with not openly breaking with Denmark, even going so far as to surrender the fortress of Tenning to the Swedes.

  • The largest rivers of Mexico are: the Rio Grande de Santiago, called the Lerma above Lake Chapala, rising in the state of Mexico and flowing westward across Guanajuato, Jalisco and Tepic to the Pacific coast, with a total length of 540 m., celebrated for its deep canyons and waterfalls; the Rio de las Balsas, or Mescala, which rises in Tlaxcala and flows south and west to the Pacific with a course of 426 m.; the Yaqui, which rises in western Chihuahua and, after breaking through the northern ranges of the Sierra Madre Occidental, flows south-westerly across Sonora to the Gulf of California, with a length of 390 m.; the Grijalva, also called the Chiapas on its upper course, which has its sources in the state of Chiapas and flows north-west and north across Tabasco to the Gulf of Mexico, with a total length of 350 m.; the Fuerte, which rises in southern Chihuahua and, after breaking through the sierras, flows south-west across Sinaloa to the Gulf of California, with a course of 340 m.; the Usumacinta, which is formed by the confluence of the Chixoy and Pasion on the east frontier of Chiapas, and flows north-west across Tabasco to the Grijalva, with a course of 330 m.; and the Panuco, which has its source in the north-west of the state of Mexico and flows north-eastward to the Gulf of Mexico.

  • For the great festival of Tezcatlipoca, the handsomest and noblest of the captives of the year had been chosen as the incarnate representative of the god, and paraded the streets for public adoration dressed in an embroidered mantle with feathers and garlands on his head and a retinue like a king; for the last month they married him to four girls representing four goddesses; on the last day wives and pages escorted him to the little temple of Tlacochcalco, where he mounted the stairs, breaking an earthenware flute against each step; this was a symbolic farewell to the joys of the world, for as he reached the top he was seized by the priests, his heart torn out and held up to the sun, his head spitted on the tzompantli, and his body eaten as sacred food, the people drawing from his fate the moral lesson that riches and pleasure may turn into poverty and sorrow.

  • In his office in London men were trained in the arts of deciphering correspondence, feigning handwriting, and of breaking and repairing seals in such a way as to avoid detection.

  • In May 1798 the breaking out of a conspiracy planned by the United Irishmen to seize the city was prevented by the capture of Lord Edward Fitzgerald, son of the duke of Leinster and husband of the celebrated "Pamela."

  • The simple offering of food or shedding of blood at the grave develops into an elaborate system of sacrifice; even where ancestor-worship is not found, the desire to provide the dead with comforts in the future life may lead to the sacrifice of wives, slaves, animals, &c., to the breaking or burning of objects at the grave or to the provision of the ferryman's toll, a coin put in the mouth of the corpse to pay the travelling expenses of the soul.

  • If, in any case, all present had eaten in their homes beforehand, the giving of the cup would immediately follow on the breaking and eating of the one loaf, but Paul's words indicate that the common meal within the church was the norm.

  • 46 we read that, " the faithful continued steadfastly with one accord in the temple "; at the same time " breaking bread at home they partook of food with gladness and singleness of heart, praising God."

  • The travel-document in Acts often refers to the solemn breaking of bread.

  • In mining it is applied to various machines used in breaking and crushing the ore (see ORE-Dressing) .

  • The enjoyment of their charms is, however, generally qualified by some restriction or compact, the breaking of which is the cause of calamity to the lover and all his race, as in the notable tale of Melusine.

  • Reclus with the appearance of "a stormy sea breaking into parallel billows" (Universal Geography, ed.

  • The signaculum oris forbids all eating of unclean food (which included all bodies of animals, wine, &c. - vegetable diet being allowed because plants contained more light, though the killing of plants, or even plucking their fruit and breaking their twigs, was not permitted), as well as all impure speech.

  • From the cephalic part of this primary diverticulum solid rods of cells called the hepatic cylinders grow out, and these branch again and again until a cellular network is formed surrounding and breaking up the umbilical and vitelline veins.

  • When the larval development is completed the test is cast off, its cells breaking apart and falling to pieces leaving the young animal with a well-developed shell exposed and the internal organs in an advanced state.

  • The hair covering the body is long, coarse, and of a peculiarly brittle and pith-like character, breaking easily; it is generally of a greyish-brown colour, sometimes inclined to yellowish-red, and often variegated with lighter patches.

  • After the breaking out of the Civil War the governor of Ohio, on the 7th of June 1861, appointed him a major of a volunteer regiment, and in July he was sent to western Virginia for active service.

  • PINDARIS, a word of uncertain origin, applied to the irregular horsemen who accompanied the Mahratta armies in India during the r8th century when the Mughal Empire was breaking up; loosely organized under self-chosen leaders, each band was usually attached to one or other of the great Mahratta chieftains.

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