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breaches

breaches Sentence Examples

  • She jogged across the compound to the area of one of the breaches.

  • In the past forty-eight hours, there had been fifty perimeter breaches, all from the west wall.

  • Further floggings are inflicted with the "cat" upon convicted prisoners for breaches of discipline in prison.

  • breaches of law punishable by a fine not exceeding 12S.

  • Statistics of offences, including contravvenzioni or breaches of by-laws and regulations, exhibit a considerable increase per 100,000 inhabitants since 1887, and only a slight diminution on the figures of 1897.

  • They acted also as police courts in the case of petty thefts, breaches of the peace and the like.

  • It also provides penalties for breaches of duty by the seller, but grants him protection in cases where he is not morally responsible.

  • He determined to treat prisoners captured from submarines, in view of their breaches of the laws of war, with more severity than ordinary prisoners; but the Germans retaliated harshly on the most noteworthy English prisoners in their hands, and Mr. Balfour, on succeeding Mr. Churchill, gave up this discrimination.

  • In spite of the fact that the French field-pieces at once made practicable breaches in the mud walls of the fort, the defenders held out with desperate valour.

  • A breach of condition may, however, be waived by the landlord, and the legislature has made provision for the relief of the tenant from the consequences of such breaches in certain cases.

  • The government of Spain, beginning in 1764, made notable breaches in the old monopolistic system of colonial trade throughout America; and Cuba received special privileges, also, that were a basis for real prosperity.

  • This chief is responsible to the people for his breaches of the law, and in serious cases they can condemn him to death.

  • Soult and Marmont having begun to move to relieve the garrison, the assault was delivered on the night of the 7th of April, and Siege of though the assailants failed at the breaches, the Badajoz, carnage at which was terrible, a very daring escalade March 17 to of one of the bastions and of the castle succeeded, Apr117, 1812.

  • Unfortunately siege of San a conflagration breaking out near the breaches Sebastian, caused it to be postponed until nightfall, when, the July 10.24, breaches in the interval having been strengthened, 1813' it was delivered unsuccessfully and with heavy loss.

  • By the beginning of September all the breaches were repaired, the walls bristled with cannon, and 7000 men were under arms. So strong was the city by this time that Charles X., abandoning his original intention of carrying the place by assault, began a regular siege; but this also he was forced to abandon when, on the 29th of October, an auxiliary Dutch fleet, after reinforcing and reprovisioning the garrison, defeated, in conjunction with the Danish fleet, the Swedish navy of 44 liners in the Sound.

  • There are, however, among these border-ranges several breaches of continuity - broad depressions or trenches leading from Lake Balkash and Lake Zaisan to the upper parts of the plateau.

  • Hitherto from Oxford its course, though greatly winding, has lain generally in a southerly direction, but it now bends eastward, and breaches the chalk hills in a narrow gap, dividing the Chilterns from the downs of Berkshire or White Horse Hills.

  • The franchise, again, was an internal affair, in which the convention gave Great Britain no right to interfere, while if Great Britain relied on certain definite breaches of the convention, satisfaction for which was sought in the first place in such a guarantee of amendment as the Uitlander franchise would involve, the Boer answer was an offer of arbitration, a course which Great Britain could not accept without admitting the South African Republic to the position of an equal.

  • This position follows logically from the theory of English law that all offences are breaches of the king's peace.

  • But Amy, scarcely by her own fault, is drawn into certain breaches of definite moral laws which Defoe did understand, and she is therefore condemned, with hardly a word of pity, to a miserable end.

  • His weak points were his wanton breaches of good faith, his extravagance, his frivolity and his self-indulgence.

  • His sudden return, far from widening the breaches between the allies, had fused them indissolubly together, and the four powers bound themselves to put 150,000 men apiece under arms and to maintain them in the field until Napoleon had been utterly crushed.

  • After the conclusion of the Civil War in America very large claims were preferred against Great Britain for alleged breaches of her duty as a neutral power; and after long negotiations, England and the United States agreed to arbitration.

  • The holiness of Israel centres in the sanctuary, and round the sanctuary stand the priests, who alone can approach the most holy things without profanation, and who are the guardians of Israel's sanctity, partly by protecting the one meeting-place of God and man from profane contact, and partly as the mediators of the continual atoning rites by which breaches of holiness are expiated.

  • Indeed, it is not too much to say that, until the days of Sobieski, the Cossacks were invariably the chief cause of the breaches between the Porte and the Republic. We have seen how carefully the Jagiellos avoided participating in any of the crusades directed by the Holy See against the arch-enemies of the Cross.

  • by square towers, is so dilapidated that foot-passengers, and in places even horsemen, can find their way through the breaches.

  • Of all generals Wellington was the last to waste a single trained man, and the sight of the breaches of Badajoz after the storm for a moment unnerved even his iron sternness.

  • But Holland's chief protection against inundation is its long line of sand dunes, in which only two real breaches have been effected during the centuries of erosion.

  • The administration of justice is entrusted (1) to the high council (hooge rand) at the Hague, the supreme court of the whole kingdom, and the tribunal for all high government officials and for the members of the states-general; (2) to the five courts of justice established at Amsterdam, the Hague, Arnhem, Leeuwarden and 's Hertogenbosch; (3) to tribunals established in each arrondissement; (4) to cantonal judges appointed over a group of communes, whose jurisdiction is restricted to claims of small amount (under 200 guilders), and to breaches of police regulations, and who at the same time look after the interest of minors.

  • The picturesque winding chasm of Shanklin Chine breaches the cliffs S.

  • He seized the occasion to ~ make his peace with Liberal sentiment, and the bill ion, of indemnity for past ministerial breaches of the constitution was carried in the new Prussian diet with enthusiasm.

  • Occasional breaches during floods cause the overloaded stream to spread in a great lake over the surrounding country, where the silt covers the ground in consequence.

  • It is situated at the mouth of a small stream, the Dour, whose valley here breaches the high chalk cliffs which fringe the coast on either hand.

  • At this time prisons were primarily places of detention, not of punishment, peopled by accused persons, still innocent in the eyes of the law, and debtors guilty only of breaches of the financial rules of a commercial country, framed chiefly in the interest of the creditor.

  • This permission to be at large may easily be forfeited by fresh breaches of;the law.

  • breaches of the peace were more severely punished if committed in a town than elsewhere.

  • Thus it assumed a jurisdiction, partly concurrent with that of the lord, which it further extended to breaches of the peace.

  • Its real object is to attack such professedly Catholic governments as have fallen in with modern ideas - as for instance, by allowing freedom of worship to their Protestant subjects, or by refusing to punish brawling in Catholic churches more severely than other breaches of the peace.

  • 2 Nor did the only difficulty lie in such secret breaches of the law; in many districts the priesthood tended to become a mere hereditary caste, to the disadvantage of church and state alike.

  • To secure obedience to the law is a first and principal duty; to deal with breaches of the rules made by authority, to detect, pursue and arrest offenders.

  • Under the Public Worship Regulation Act of 1874, which gave to churchwardens and aggrieved parishioners the right to institute proceedings against the clergy for breaches of the law in the conduct of divine service, a discretionary right was reserved to the bishop to stay proceedings.

  • The second was in respect of breaches of neutrality in allowing the "Alabama," the "Florida" (originally the "Oreto"), the "Shenandoah" and other Confederate vessels to be built and equipped on British territory.

  • In the south-east of England, the North and South Downs are both well-defined ranges, but are characterized by a number of breaches through which rivers penetrate, on the one hand to the Thames or the North Sea and on the other to the English Channel.

  • On the 14th of September, after three days of artillery preparation, the assault was delivered, under Nicholson's leadership. Two practicable breaches had been made by the siege guns, and a party of engineers under Home and Salkeld blew in the Kashmir gate.

  • Sumner had always prized highly his popularity in England, but he unhesitatingly sacrificed it in taking his stand as to the adjustment of claims against England for breaches of neutrality during the war.

  • But it should be noted that the primary reference of "binding and loosing" is, according to rabbinical usage, rather to the laying down of rules than to condoning breaches of them; and nothing is said to confine the words "Whose soever sins ye forgive" to the offences of Christians already baptized, and they should be held to include preaching the Gospel and baptizing converts as well as the administration of internal discipline.

  • This part of Henrys policy is connected with the name of his two extortionate fiscal judges Empson and Dudley, who turned law and justice into rapine by their minute inquisition into all technical breaches of legality, and the nice fashion in which they adapted the fine to the wealth of the misdemeanant, without any reference to his moral guilt or any regard for extenuating circumstances.

  • It breaches the mountains in a fine valley; for this island consists practically of one long range, whereas the main valleys and ranges separating them in Viti Levu radiate for the most part from a common centre.

  • He argues that "the world-order, being in process as a moral order, permits breaches everywhere into which Satan can obtain entrance" (pp. 99, 102).

  • The town is surrounded by a wall with five towers; entrance now is obtained through breaches in the wall, but formerly it was accessible only by means of tunnels cut in the rocky substratum.

  • The lord of the manor still holds the ancient court-leet and court-baron halfyearly in May and November, in which cognizance is taken of breaches of agreement among the tenants, especially concerning the repair of roads and cultivation of lands.

  • This depression is occupied in great part by a series of lakes, some of these filling transversal breaches in the range, whilst others are remains of glacial reservoirs, bordered by morainic dams, extending as far as the eastern tableland and corresponding in these cases with transversal depressions which reach the Atlantic Ocean.

  • She jogged across the compound to the area of one of the breaches.

  • In the past forty-eight hours, there had been fifty perimeter breaches, all from the west wall.

  • The consequences of security breaches can be disastrous in terms of the public profile and the operation of your business.

  • One way of responding to breaches of Compact Plus commitments would be through publishing the adjudication of the Compact Champion.

  • A statement released by the Lebanese Army Command announced that five breaches of Lebanese airspace were recorded Tuesday night.

  • allege widespread breaches of the embargo by states or individuals.

  • alleged breaches.

  • anticipatory breaches of contract.

  • breaches of confidentiality is related to what the data is about.

  • The Pensions Act 2004 also imposes a statutory obligation on ' whistleblowers ' to report suspected breaches of the legislation to the regulator.

  • corral fish) using whistles, breaches, tail slaps and somersaults.

  • In November 2003, the board strongly deplored Iran's failures and breaches of its safeguards obligations.

  • disabled to prevent breaches of copyright.

  • For wrongful dismissal or other breaches of contract, up to £ 25,000 can be awarded.

  • disqualify any entrant who breaches any of the above rules.

  • flagrant breaches of police practice.

  • However, not all breaches will render evidence inadmissible.

  • The charge was one of publishing seditious libel and inciting to commit breaches of the incitement to Mutiny Act of 1797.

  • Up to the beginning of 2002 I had been fairly lax in pursuing breaches of copyright - simply requesting the removal of the data.

  • sham marriage law breaches rights Apr 10: Government rules to prevent sham marriages by immigrants are unfair, high court rules.

  • High speed explosive motorboats were to blast breaches in the protective booms and nets allowing two SLCs to penetrate the harbor.

  • United Biscuits pleaded guilty to two breaches of health safety regulations at a previous hearing.

  • One in eight breaches led to a custodial remand.

  • remediable breaches.

  • Appearing in court on Tuesday morning, Howley admitted the breaches and was refused bail by honorary sheriff Bill Wright.

  • tryptophan breaches the blood-brain barrier and is necessary for the production of the 'feel-good ' brain chemical serotonin.

  • In addition, SOX requires employees and professional advisors to disclose potential wrongdoing or breaches of fiduciary duty to a corporation's senior management.

  • Further floggings are inflicted with the "cat" upon convicted prisoners for breaches of discipline in prison.

  • breaches of law punishable by a fine not exceeding 12S.

  • In England occasional breaches of the law in this respect have been for some time tolerated, as in the case of the Corpus Christi procession annually held by the Italian community in London.

  • Statistics of offences, including contravvenzioni or breaches of by-laws and regulations, exhibit a considerable increase per 100,000 inhabitants since 1887, and only a slight diminution on the figures of 1897.

  • They acted also as police courts in the case of petty thefts, breaches of the peace and the like.

  • It also provides penalties for breaches of duty by the seller, but grants him protection in cases where he is not morally responsible.

  • He determined to treat prisoners captured from submarines, in view of their breaches of the laws of war, with more severity than ordinary prisoners; but the Germans retaliated harshly on the most noteworthy English prisoners in their hands, and Mr. Balfour, on succeeding Mr. Churchill, gave up this discrimination.

  • In spite of the fact that the French field-pieces at once made practicable breaches in the mud walls of the fort, the defenders held out with desperate valour.

  • A breach of condition may, however, be waived by the landlord, and the legislature has made provision for the relief of the tenant from the consequences of such breaches in certain cases.

  • The government of Spain, beginning in 1764, made notable breaches in the old monopolistic system of colonial trade throughout America; and Cuba received special privileges, also, that were a basis for real prosperity.

  • This chief is responsible to the people for his breaches of the law, and in serious cases they can condemn him to death.

  • Soult and Marmont having begun to move to relieve the garrison, the assault was delivered on the night of the 7th of April, and Siege of though the assailants failed at the breaches, the Badajoz, carnage at which was terrible, a very daring escalade March 17 to of one of the bastions and of the castle succeeded, Apr117, 1812.

  • Unfortunately siege of San a conflagration breaking out near the breaches Sebastian, caused it to be postponed until nightfall, when, the July 10.24, breaches in the interval having been strengthened, 1813' it was delivered unsuccessfully and with heavy loss.

  • By the beginning of September all the breaches were repaired, the walls bristled with cannon, and 7000 men were under arms. So strong was the city by this time that Charles X., abandoning his original intention of carrying the place by assault, began a regular siege; but this also he was forced to abandon when, on the 29th of October, an auxiliary Dutch fleet, after reinforcing and reprovisioning the garrison, defeated, in conjunction with the Danish fleet, the Swedish navy of 44 liners in the Sound.

  • There are, however, among these border-ranges several breaches of continuity - broad depressions or trenches leading from Lake Balkash and Lake Zaisan to the upper parts of the plateau.

  • Hitherto from Oxford its course, though greatly winding, has lain generally in a southerly direction, but it now bends eastward, and breaches the chalk hills in a narrow gap, dividing the Chilterns from the downs of Berkshire or White Horse Hills.

  • The franchise, again, was an internal affair, in which the convention gave Great Britain no right to interfere, while if Great Britain relied on certain definite breaches of the convention, satisfaction for which was sought in the first place in such a guarantee of amendment as the Uitlander franchise would involve, the Boer answer was an offer of arbitration, a course which Great Britain could not accept without admitting the South African Republic to the position of an equal.

  • This position follows logically from the theory of English law that all offences are breaches of the king's peace.

  • But Amy, scarcely by her own fault, is drawn into certain breaches of definite moral laws which Defoe did understand, and she is therefore condemned, with hardly a word of pity, to a miserable end.

  • His weak points were his wanton breaches of good faith, his extravagance, his frivolity and his self-indulgence.

  • His sudden return, far from widening the breaches between the allies, had fused them indissolubly together, and the four powers bound themselves to put 150,000 men apiece under arms and to maintain them in the field until Napoleon had been utterly crushed.

  • After the conclusion of the Civil War in America very large claims were preferred against Great Britain for alleged breaches of her duty as a neutral power; and after long negotiations, England and the United States agreed to arbitration.

  • The holiness of Israel centres in the sanctuary, and round the sanctuary stand the priests, who alone can approach the most holy things without profanation, and who are the guardians of Israel's sanctity, partly by protecting the one meeting-place of God and man from profane contact, and partly as the mediators of the continual atoning rites by which breaches of holiness are expiated.

  • Indeed, it is not too much to say that, until the days of Sobieski, the Cossacks were invariably the chief cause of the breaches between the Porte and the Republic. We have seen how carefully the Jagiellos avoided participating in any of the crusades directed by the Holy See against the arch-enemies of the Cross.

  • by square towers, is so dilapidated that foot-passengers, and in places even horsemen, can find their way through the breaches.

  • Of all generals Wellington was the last to waste a single trained man, and the sight of the breaches of Badajoz after the storm for a moment unnerved even his iron sternness.

  • But Holland's chief protection against inundation is its long line of sand dunes, in which only two real breaches have been effected during the centuries of erosion.

  • The administration of justice is entrusted (1) to the high council (hooge rand) at the Hague, the supreme court of the whole kingdom, and the tribunal for all high government officials and for the members of the states-general; (2) to the five courts of justice established at Amsterdam, the Hague, Arnhem, Leeuwarden and 's Hertogenbosch; (3) to tribunals established in each arrondissement; (4) to cantonal judges appointed over a group of communes, whose jurisdiction is restricted to claims of small amount (under 200 guilders), and to breaches of police regulations, and who at the same time look after the interest of minors.

  • The picturesque winding chasm of Shanklin Chine breaches the cliffs S.

  • He seized the occasion to ~ make his peace with Liberal sentiment, and the bill ion, of indemnity for past ministerial breaches of the constitution was carried in the new Prussian diet with enthusiasm.

  • Occasional breaches during floods cause the overloaded stream to spread in a great lake over the surrounding country, where the silt covers the ground in consequence.

  • It is situated at the mouth of a small stream, the Dour, whose valley here breaches the high chalk cliffs which fringe the coast on either hand.

  • At this time prisons were primarily places of detention, not of punishment, peopled by accused persons, still innocent in the eyes of the law, and debtors guilty only of breaches of the financial rules of a commercial country, framed chiefly in the interest of the creditor.

  • This permission to be at large may easily be forfeited by fresh breaches of;the law.

  • Eighty-three per cent of the annual convictions, summarily and on indictment, followed by committal to gaol, are for misconduct that is distinctly non-criminal, such as breaches of municipal by-laws and police regulations, drunkenness, gaming and offences under the vagrancy acts.

  • breaches of the peace were more severely punished if committed in a town than elsewhere.

  • Thus it assumed a jurisdiction, partly concurrent with that of the lord, which it further extended to breaches of the peace.

  • Its real object is to attack such professedly Catholic governments as have fallen in with modern ideas - as for instance, by allowing freedom of worship to their Protestant subjects, or by refusing to punish brawling in Catholic churches more severely than other breaches of the peace.

  • 2 Nor did the only difficulty lie in such secret breaches of the law; in many districts the priesthood tended to become a mere hereditary caste, to the disadvantage of church and state alike.

  • To secure obedience to the law is a first and principal duty; to deal with breaches of the rules made by authority, to detect, pursue and arrest offenders.

  • Under the Public Worship Regulation Act of 1874, which gave to churchwardens and aggrieved parishioners the right to institute proceedings against the clergy for breaches of the law in the conduct of divine service, a discretionary right was reserved to the bishop to stay proceedings.

  • The second was in respect of breaches of neutrality in allowing the "Alabama," the "Florida" (originally the "Oreto"), the "Shenandoah" and other Confederate vessels to be built and equipped on British territory.

  • In the south-east of England, the North and South Downs are both well-defined ranges, but are characterized by a number of breaches through which rivers penetrate, on the one hand to the Thames or the North Sea and on the other to the English Channel.

  • On the 14th of September, after three days of artillery preparation, the assault was delivered, under Nicholson's leadership. Two practicable breaches had been made by the siege guns, and a party of engineers under Home and Salkeld blew in the Kashmir gate.

  • Sumner had always prized highly his popularity in England, but he unhesitatingly sacrificed it in taking his stand as to the adjustment of claims against England for breaches of neutrality during the war.

  • But it should be noted that the primary reference of "binding and loosing" is, according to rabbinical usage, rather to the laying down of rules than to condoning breaches of them; and nothing is said to confine the words "Whose soever sins ye forgive" to the offences of Christians already baptized, and they should be held to include preaching the Gospel and baptizing converts as well as the administration of internal discipline.

  • This part of Henrys policy is connected with the name of his two extortionate fiscal judges Empson and Dudley, who turned law and justice into rapine by their minute inquisition into all technical breaches of legality, and the nice fashion in which they adapted the fine to the wealth of the misdemeanant, without any reference to his moral guilt or any regard for extenuating circumstances.

  • It breaches the mountains in a fine valley; for this island consists practically of one long range, whereas the main valleys and ranges separating them in Viti Levu radiate for the most part from a common centre.

  • He argues that "the world-order, being in process as a moral order, permits breaches everywhere into which Satan can obtain entrance" (pp. 99, 102).

  • The town is surrounded by a wall with five towers; entrance now is obtained through breaches in the wall, but formerly it was accessible only by means of tunnels cut in the rocky substratum.

  • The lord of the manor still holds the ancient court-leet and court-baron halfyearly in May and November, in which cognizance is taken of breaches of agreement among the tenants, especially concerning the repair of roads and cultivation of lands.

  • This depression is occupied in great part by a series of lakes, some of these filling transversal breaches in the range, whilst others are remains of glacial reservoirs, bordered by morainic dams, extending as far as the eastern tableland and corresponding in these cases with transversal depressions which reach the Atlantic Ocean.

  • United Biscuits pleaded guilty to two breaches of health safety regulations at a previous hearing.

  • You should have the opportunity to put right minor remediable breaches.

  • Taken altogether the breaches were enough to conclude that he had repudiated the Contract.

  • Appearing in court on Tuesday morning, Howley admitted the breaches and was refused bail by honorary sheriff Bill Wright.

  • See risk category for common breaches set out in the tabular summary above.

  • Tryptophan breaches the blood-brain barrier and is necessary for the production of the 'feel-good ' brain chemical serotonin.

  • In addition, SOX requires employees and professional advisors to disclose potential wrongdoing or breaches of fiduciary duty to a corporation 's senior management.

  • While database breaches do happen occasionally, major corporations invest considerable time and money to protect your personal data, especially during online transactions.

  • If there is any good news from this incident it is the fact that corporations are learning how to protect themselves and their customers from data leaks and online security breaches.

  • If the dog breaches the perimeter programmed by the owner, an alert alarm goes off.

  • Apple products are typically known for being less prone to security breaches than their Microsoft counterparts.

  • In all likelihood, other exploits and security breaches on the iPhone will be found and it is through system updates that iPhone owners can stay the safest possible.

  • AT&T has had security breaches that have allowed some customers to access the account information of other customers.

  • The lender has the legal right to begin foreclosure proceedings immediately after a homeowner breaches the contract of the loan.

  • If you're in the Navy and posting pictures, make sure there's nothing that could harm your fellow soldiers in the picture due to security breaches.

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