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brazilian

brazilian Sentence Examples

  • The greater part of the state belongs to the western extension of the Brazilian plateau, across which, between the 14th and 16th parallels, runs the water-shed which separates the drainage basins of the Amazon and La Plata.

  • It cannot be grown in the open air in Britain, as it requires protection from frost, and is more tender than the Brazilian pine.

  • Other palms abound, such as the pinch!) (Cocos australis), mbocaya (Cocos sclerocarpa) and the yatai (Cocos yatai), but the predominating species north of the Bermejo is the caranday or Brazilian wax-palm (Copernicia cerifera), which has varied uses.

  • In the " mesopotamia " region the flora is similar to that of the southern Chaco, but in the Misiones it approximates more to that of the neighbouring Brazilian highlands.

  • Telegraphic communication with Europe is effected by cables laid along the Uruguayan and Brazilian coasts, and by the Brazilian land lines to connect with transatlantic cables from Pernambuco.

  • A provisional government was formed under Urquiza, and the Brazilian and Uruguayan troops withdrew.

  • The best of the New South Wales diamonds are harder and much whiter than the South African diamonds, and are classified as on a par with the best Brazilian gems, but no large specimens have yet been found.

  • of Rio de Janeiro, on the Cuyaba river near its discharge into the Sao Lourengo, the principal Brazilian tributary of the Paraguay.

  • Vespucci afterwards made three voyages to the Brazilian coast; and in 1504 he wrote an account of his four voyages, which was widely circulated, and became the means of procuring for its author at the hands of the cartographer Waldseemi ller in 1507 the disproportionate distinction of giving his name to the whole continent.

  • the siphonium described in connexion with the mandible), but filling also such curious organs as the frontal excrescence of Chasmorhynchus, the Brazilian bell-bird, the throat-bag of the adjutant stork, and the gular pouch of the bustard.

  • The latter is, no doubt, identical with the similar sandstone series which is found in the neighbouring Brazilian province of Rio Grande do Sul, and which has there yielded plants which prove it to belong to the Permian or the upper part of the Carboniferous.

  • The great majority of the foreign population are Italians or Spaniards, with lesser numbers, in descending scale, of Brazilian, Argentine and French birth.

  • In the north there is a strong Brazilian element and the people are intensely conservative.

  • The cattle are destined chiefly for the saladero establishments for the preparation of tasajo, or jerked beef, for the Brazilian and Cuban markets, and for the Liebig factory, where large quantities of extract of meat are prepared for the European trade.

  • The state lies wholly within the great Brazilian plateau region, but its surface is much broken towards the N.

  • There is a considerable export of quartz crystal, commercially known as "Brazilian pebbles," used in optical work.

  • Among his books may be mentioned Mogreb-elAcksa: a Journey in Morocco (1898); The Ipane (1899); A Vanished Arcadia (1901); Faith (1909); Hope (1910); Charity (1912); A Life of Bernal Diaz del Castillo (1915); A Brazilian Mystic (1920); Cartagena and the Books of the Sinu (1920).

  • upon the great Brazilian plateau.

  • Among the Brazilian states it is fifth in size and first in population-3,184,099 in 1890, and 3,594,47 1 in 1900.

  • All these rivers of the Brazilian plateau are interrupted by falls and rapids.

  • Tiradentes has since been glorified as the pro-martyr of Brazilian independence.

  • Brazilian .

  • Marie galante is a harsh cotton of the Peruvian or Brazilian type.

  • Fawcett's survey of the Brazilian boundary (1906-1907) are welcome additions to our knowledge of Bolivia.

  • The region, which abounds in valuable rubber forests, was settled by Bolivians between 1870 and 1878, but was invaded by Brazilian rubber collectors during the next decade and became tributary to the rubber markets of Manaos and Para.

  • In 1899 the Bolivian government established a custom-house at Puerto Alonso, on the Acre river, for the collection of export duties on rubber, which precipitated a conflict with the Brazilian settlers and finally brought about a boundary dispute between the two republics.

  • England asserted by the Aberdeen Act (1845) the right of seizing suspected craft in Brazilian waters.

  • On 28th September 1871 the Brazilian chambers decreed that slavery should be abolished throughout the empire.

  • On Brazilian: Fletcher and Kidder, Brazil and the Brazilians (9th ed., 1879).

  • Hevea brasiliensis was introduced to Ceylon and Singapore from seedlings raised at Kew from Brazilian seed, specially collected by Mr H.

  • The provisional line, representing the Brazilian claim, begins at the termination of the Bolivian section (the intersection of the 11th parallel with the meridian of 72° 26' W.

  • approx.) and follows a semicircular direction north-west and north to the source of the Javary (or Yavary), to include the basins of the Purus and Jurua within Brazilian jurisdiction.

  • On the 9th of December 1905 protocols were signed at Caracas accepting the line between Cucuhy and the Serra Cupuy located in 1880, and referring the remainder, which had been located by a Brazilian commission in 1882 and 1884, to a mixed commission for verification.

  • Mangrove swamps, lagoons and marshes, with inland canals following the coast line for long distances, are characteristic features of a large extent of the Brazilian coast.

  • The Amazon plain is heavily forested and has a slope of less than one inch to the mile within Brazilian territory - one competent authority placing it at about one-fifth of an inch per mile.

  • The La Plata basin is less heavily wooded, its surface more varied, and its Brazilian part stands at a much higher elevation.

  • The Brazilian plateau slopes southward and eastward, traversed by broken ranges of low mountains and deeply eroded by river courses.

  • Its semi-arid character is due to the mountain ranges on its northern frontier, which extract the moisture from the north-east trades and leave the Brazilian plateau behind them with a very limited rainfall, except near the Atlantic coast.

  • In general, Brazilian Guiana, as this plateau region is sometimes called, is one of the least attractive parts of the republic.

  • The great Brazilian plateau, which is the most important physical division of Brazil, consists of an elevated tableland moo to 3000 ft.

  • The Amazonian chapadao, which includes the remainder of the great Brazilian plateau west of the Sao Francisco and Parnahyba regions and which appears to be the continuation of these tablelands westward, is much the largest of these plateau divisions.

  • In the extreme north-east corner of the republic where the Brazilian Guiana plateau slopes toward the Atlantic there is a small area lying outside the drainage basin of the Amazon.

  • The rivers of the great Brazilian plateau which flow directly to the Atlantic coast may be divided into two classes: those of its northward slope which flow in - a northerly and north-easterly direction to the north-east coast of the republic, and those which drain its eastern slope and flow to the sea in an easterly direction.

  • The more important rivers of the first division, which are described in more detail under the titles of the Brazilian states through which they flow, are the following: the Gurupy, Tury-assu, Mearim, Itapicuru and Balsas, in the state of Maranhao; the Parnahyba and its tributaries in Piauhy; Jaguaribe in Ceara; and the Apody and Piranhas in Rio Grande do Norte.

  • The Brazilian rivers of the Rio de la Plata system are numerous and important.

  • The climatic conditions of the Brazilian plateau are widely different from those of the coast in many respects.

  • The Brazilian Guiana plateau, lying immediately north of the equator, is in great part a hot, stony desert.

  • It lies in the north-east trade winds belt, but the mountain chain on its northern frontier robs these winds of their moisture and leaves the greater part of the Brazilian plateau rainless.

  • There is no absolutely dry season in this part of the great Brazilian plateau, though the year is customarily divided into a dry and wet season, the latter running from September to April in Goyaz, and from November to April in Matto Grosso.

  • One of the characteristic orders of the Brazilian fauna is that of the Edentata, which comprises the sloth, armadillo and ant-eater.

  • It is the largest of the Brazilian mammals, and inhabits densely forested tracts near river courses.

  • One of the Brazilian birds whose habits have attracted much interest is the Joao de Barro (Clay John) or oven bird (Furnarius rufus), which builds a house of reddish clay for its nest and attaches it to the branch of a tree, usually in a fork.

  • Three of the Brazilian species are voracious and dangerous.

  • Besides these, the flora of the Paraguay basin varies widely from that of the inland plateau, and that of the Brazilian Guiana region is essentially distinct from the Amazon.

  • The Brazilian flora is also rich in medicinal and aromatic plants, dye-woods, and a wide range of gum and resin-producing shrubs and trees.

  • The unrestricted intermixture of these three races forms the principal basis of the Brazilian population at the beginning of the 10th century.

  • 4 The Brazilian official titles are given for the state capitals: Belem for Para; Sao Luiz for Maranhao; Sao Salvador for Bahia; and Recife for Pernambuco.

  • A majority of the ports, from which these roads are built, are small and difficult of access, and the coasting trade is restricted to vessels carrying the Brazilian flag.

  • The series of trunk lines terminating at the port of Santos are owned by private companies and are formed by the Sao Paulo, Paulista and Mogyana lines, the first owned by an English company, and the other two by Brazilian companies.

  • The use of tramways for the transportation of passengers in cities dates from 1868, when the first section of the Botanical Garden line of Rio de Janeiro was opened to traffic. The line was completed with its surplus earnings and continued under the control of the American company which built it until 1882, when it was sold to a Brazilian company.

  • The Brazilian postal service is under the general supervision of the minister of communications and public works, and is administered by a director-general.

  • And even then, because of the insufficient number of Brazilian vessels it was provided in the regulations that foreign vessels could be enrolled in that trade by using the Brazilian flag and employing a certain proportion of Brazilians on the crew.

  • To illustrate the comparative productiveness and relationship of these sources of national wealth and industry, the following official returns of export for the years 1905 and 1906 are arranged in the four general classes previously discussed, the values being in Brazilian gold milreis, worth 2s.

  • 2 The " old metals " consist of old iron, brass, &c., derived from railway material, machinery, &c., all imported, and should not be considered a Brazilian product.

  • He must be a native Brazilian over thirty-five years of age, in the full enjoyment of his political rights, and is ineligible for the next succeeding term.

  • The Brazilian people have the natural taste for art, music and literature so common among the Latin nations of the Old World.

  • The Brazilian composer Carlos Gomes (1839-1896) is the best known of those who have adopted music as a profession, his opera Il Guarani having been produced at most of the European capitals.

  • The most prominent among Brazilian painters is Pedro Americo, and in sculpture Rodolpho Bernardelli has done good work.

  • Brazilian literature has been seriously prejudiced by partisan politics and dilettantism.

  • The personal element is conspicuous in the Brazilian journalism, and for a considerable period of its history libellous attacks on persons, signed by professional sponsors, popularly called testas de ferro (iron heads), were admitted at so much a line in the best newspapers.

  • The most popular of the Brazilian poets are Thomaz Antonio Gonzaga, Antonio Gonsalves Dias and Bernardo Guimaraes.

  • de Alencar is usually described as the greatest of Brazilian novelists.

  • Another Brazilian historian of recognized merit is Joao Manoel Pereira da Silva, whose historical writings cover the first years of the empire, from its foundation to 1840.

  • Next year the Portuguese commander, Pedro Alvares Cabral, appointed by his monarch to follow the course of Vasco da Gama in the East, was driven by adverse winds so far from his track, that he reached the Brazilian coast, April 24, and anchored in Porto Seguro (16° S.

  • The Tupinoquins, the most tractable of the Brazilian tribes, made peace with the settlers, and the colony was founded without a struggle.

  • By these adventures the whole line of Brazilian coast, from the mouth of La Plata to the mouth of the Amazon, had become studded at intervals with Portuguese settlements, in all of which law and justice were administered, however inadequately.

  • Bahia, as capital of the Brazilian states, felt that its ascendancy depended upon the union with Portugal.

  • But the Brazilian colonists, now that the mother country had thrown off the Spanish yoke, determined even without assist ance from the homeland to rise in revolt against foreign Revolt g g against domination.

  • The Brazilian Company founded by Vieyra, which so materially contributed to preserve its South American possessions to Portugal, had been abolished in 1721 by John V.; but such an instrument being well suited to the bold spirit of Pombal, he established a chartered company again in 1755, to trade exclusively with Maranhao and Para; and in 1759, in spite of the remonstrance of the British Factory at Lisbon, formed another company for Parahyba and Pernambuco.

  • Before leaving Bahia, Dom John took the first step to emancipate Brazil, opening its ports to foreign commerce, and permitting the export of all Brazilian produce under any flag, the royal monopolies of diamonds and Brazil-wood excepted.

  • The inroads made on the frontiers of Rio Grande and Sao Paulo decided the court of Rio to take possession of Montevideo; Brazil de- a force of 5000 troops was sent thither from Portugal, together with a Brazilian corps; and the irregulars integral of Artigas, unable to withstand disciplined troops, were forced, after a total defeat, to take refuge beyond the river Uruguay.

  • The discontent arising among Brazilians from this cause was heightened by a decree assigning a heavy tax on the chief Brazilian custom houses, to be in operation for forty years, for the benefit of the Portuguese noblemen who had suffered during the war with France.

  • The Brazilian deputies on arriving in Lisbon expressed dissatisfaction with the Cortes for having begun the framing of the constitution before their arrival, for Brazil could not be treated as a secondary part of the monarchy.

  • Sharp discussions and angry words passed between the Brazilian and Portuguese deputies, the news of which excited great discontent in Brazil.

  • A Brazilian squadron, under command of Lord Cochrane, attacked the Portuguese vessels, embarrassed with troops, and took several of them.

  • Taylor, another Englishman in Brazilian service, followed the vessels across the Atlantic, and even captured some of the ships in sight of the land of Portugal.

  • Negotiations were opened in London between the Brazilian and Portuguese plenipotentiaries, treating for the recognition of the independence of Brazil; and on the 25th of August 1825 a treaty was signed by which the Portuguese king, Dom John VI., assumed the title of emperor of Brazil, and immediately abdicated in favour of his son, acknowledging Brazil as an independent empire, but the treaty obliged Brazil to take upon herself the Portuguese debt, amounting to nearly two millions sterling.

  • It began with the defeat of the Brazilian army by the Argentine forces, and this entirely through the incapacity of the commander-in-chief; and misunderstandings, afterwards compensated by humbling money-payments on the part of Brazil, arose with the United States, France and England on account of merchant vessels captured by the Brazilian squadron blockading Buenos Aires.

  • Imagining himself sure of a brilliant destiny in Europe if he lost his Brazilian crown, the emperor attempted to risk a decisive attack against the Liberals, and to form a new ministry composed of men favourable to absolutism.

  • An army of Correntine, Uruguayan and Brazilian troops, under General Urquiza, assisted by a Brazilian naval squadron, advanced on Buenos Aires, completely routed the forces of Rosas, and crushed for ever the power of that dictator.

  • In 1855 the emperor of Brazil sent a squadron of eleven men-of-war and as many transports up the Parana to adjust several questions pending between the empire and was that of the right of way by the Paraguay river to the interior Brazilian province of Matto Grosso.

  • In 1864 the ambitious dictator of Paraguay, Francisco Solano Lopez, without previous declaration of war, captured a Brazilian vessel in the Paraguay, and rapidly followed up this outrage by an armed invasion of the provinces of Matto Grosso and Rio Grande in Brazil, and that of Corrientes in the Argentine Republic. A triple alliance of the invaded states with Uruguay ensued, and the tide of war was soon turned from being an offensive one on the part of Paraguay to a defensive struggle within that republic against the superior number of the allies.

  • Brazilian credit gave way under the strain, and evidences were not wanting at the beginning of 1893 that an outburst of public opinion was not far distant.

  • Admiral Mello made an unsuccessful attack on the town of Rio Grande, and then sailed to Buenos Aires, there surrendering the rebel squadron to the Argentine authorities, by whom it was immediately delivered to the Brazilian government.

  • The baron Cerro Azul was shot down without trial; Marshal de Gama Eza, an old imperial soldier of eighty years of age, was murdered in cold blood, and numerous executions of men of lesser note took place, among these being two Frenchmen for whose death the Brazilian government was subsequently called upon to pay heavy compensation.

  • The decision was given in December 1900 and was entirely in favour of the Brazilian contention.

  • This was indeed a time when questions concerning boundaries were springing up on every side, for it was only through the moderation with which the high-handed action of Bolivia in regard to the Acre rubberproducing territory was met by the Brazilian government that war was avoided.

  • Among these may be noticed thin strips of willow and cane and the fronds of numerous palms. "Brazilian" hats made from the fronds of the palmetto palms, Sabal palmetto and S.

  • In 1889 it became a federal state in the Brazilian republic.

  • Silva is the subject also of several laudatory poems and dramas, one or two of which were composed by Brazilian compatriots.

  • Along the Brazilian frontier and about the sources of the Orinoco tributaries on the eastern slops of the Andes there are extensive forests, sometimes broken with grassy campos.

  • the surface again rises into mountain ranges, which include the Parima and Pacaraima sierras on and adjacent to the Brazilian frontier, with a number of short spurs reaching northward toward the Orinoco, such as the Mapichi, Maraguaca, Maigualida, Matos, Rincote and Usupamo.

  • There are six species of monkey corresponding to those of Guiana and the Amazon valley, the sloth and ant-eater, 12 known genera of rodents, including many species of Mures, the cavy, the capybara, the paca, the nutria, the agouti, the tree porcupine, Loncheres cristata, Echimys cayen and the Brazilian hare.

  • PACA, the Brazilian name for a large, heavily-built, shorttailed rodent mammal, easily recognized by its spotted fur.

  • Balsam of Tolu, produced by Myroxylon toluiferum, a native of Venezuela and New Granada; balsam of Peru, derived from Myroxylon Pereirae, a native of San Salvador in Central America; Mexican and Brazilian elemi, produced by various species of Icica or "incense trees," and the liquid exudation of an American species of Liquidambar, are all used as incense in America.

  • Among them may be mentioned the aperea or restless cavy (C. porcellus or C. aperea) of Brazil; the Bolivian C. boliviensis, found at great elevations in the Andes; the Brazilian rock-cavy (C. rupestris), characterized by its short blunt claws; and the Peruvian C. cutleri.

  • At the junction of 2 D the Cauches with that river, that Ecuadorean line descends the Chinchipe to the Maranon, and the Peruvian ascends to a point where it is intersected by a line following the eastern Cordillera northward to the head-waters of the Caqueta, or Japura, which forms the northern boundary down to the Brazilian frontier.

  • The line adopted starts from Lake Suches, the source of a small river of that name flowing into the north of Lake Titicaca, crosses the Cordillera by the Palomani to the Tambopata river, follows that stream to the mouth of the Lanza, thence crosses to the source of the Heath river, which forms the dividing line down to its junction with the Madre de Dios, descends that river to the mouth of the Torosmonas, thence in a straight line north-westerly to the intersection of the Tahu.amanu river by the 69th meridian, and thence north on that meridian to the Brazilian frontier.

  • above sea level), and the Huallaga through that of Chasuta, enter the forests and unite after separate courses of about 600 and 400 m., the united flood then flowing eastward to the Brazilian frontier.

  • The abundant and varied fauna is the same as that of the Brazilian forests.

  • The rivers forming this system are the Maranon from Puerto Limon to Tabatinga on the Brazilian frontier (484 m.), the Japura, Putumayo, Javary, Napo, Tigre, Huallaga, Ucayali, Pachitea, Jurua, Purus, Acre, Curaray and Aguarico all navigable over parts of their courses for steamers of 4 to 8 f t.

  • The inclusion of the upper waters of the Brazilian rivers Jurua, Purus and Acre is pro forma only, as they are wholly under Brazilian jurisdiction.

  • above the Brazilian frontier and 2653 m.

  • - This genus, which comprises nearly 300 species, mostly Mexican, with a few Brazilian and West Indian, is called nipple cactus, and consists of globular or cylindrical succulent plants, whose surface instead of being cut up into ridges with alternate furrows, as in Melocactus, is broken up into teat-like cylindrical or angular tubercles, spirally arranged, and terminating in a radiating tuft of spines which spring from a little woolly cushion.

  • - This name is now restricted to two or three dwarf branching Brazilian epiphytal plants of extreme beauty, which agree with Phyllocactus in having the branches dilated into the form of fleshy leaves, but differ in having them divided into short truncate leaf-like portions, which are articulated, that is to say, provided with a joint by which they separate spontaneously; the margins are crenate or dentate, and the flowers, which are large and showy, magenta or crimson, appear at the apex of the terminal joints.

  • AMAZONAS, a territory belonging to Venezuela, and occupying the extreme southern part of that republic, adjoining the Brazilian state of Amazonas.

  • The Brazilian Basin has also a large area lying at a depth greater than 2500 fathoms and culminates in the Romanche Deep close to the Equatorial Ridge in o° rr' S., 18° 15' W.

  • pieces of bone, stone, shell, &c., were worn as ornaments in the lip (Latin, labrum) or cheek by Eskimo, Tlinkit, Nahuatlas and tribes on the Brazilian coast.

  • The sangada, with its platform and sail, belonging to the Brazilian coast, is spoken of as a good seaworthy craft.

  • With the exception of Sergipe it is the smallest of the Brazilian states.

  • The longest and most prominent of these ranges, which are for the most part the eastern escarpments of the great Brazilian plateau, is the Serra dos Aymores, which extends along fully two-thirds of the western frontier.

  • The inland valleys and slopes are very fertile and heavily forested, and much of the Brazilian export of rosewood and other cabinet woods is drawn from this state.

  • BONIFACIO Joze D ANDRADA E SYLVA' (1765-1838), Brazilian statesman and naturalist, was born at Villa de Santos, near Rio Janeiro.

  • boreale) which should not be confounded with the Brazilian Caesalpinia, palo blanco (Lysiloma candida), the cascalote and divi-divi trees (Caesalpinia Cacalaco and C. coriaria), the "zapote chico " (Achras sapota) from which chicle is extracted, " zapote prieto " (Diospyros ebenaster), wild fig, myrtles, bamboos and many of the types already mentioned in connexion with the sub-tropical zone.

  • Close to the shore are the islands of Villegaignon (occupied by a fort), Cobras (occupied by fortifications, naval storehouses, hospital and dry docks), Santa Barbara and Enxadas, the site of the Brazilian naval school.

  • America, the small tapiti or Brazilian hare (Sylvilagus brasiliensis) is nearly allied to the wood-hare, but has a yellowish brown under surface to the tail.

  • Porto Alegre, like many Brazilian cities, is in a transition stage, and handsome new structures of French and Italian styles rise from among the low, heavy and plain old buildings of Portuguese origin.

  • - The Brazilian Tree-Porcupine (Synetheres (or Coendu) prehensilis).

  • The cottontails, or wood-rabbits, of North and South America are regarded as forming a genus, Sylvilagus, by themselves, which includes the Brazilian and Paraguay hares, and appears to be chiefly distinguished by a certain feature in the parietal region of the skull.

  • The eastern and southern parts, however, belong to the lower terraces of the great Brazilian plateau, broken by eroded river-courses between which are high open plains.

  • Not very long ago Pan-Germans were paying much attention to the German settlers in the Brazilian province of Rio Grande do Sul, where large villages spoke nothing but German, and German, as the only language known on the spot, had become the tongue in which municipal business was transacted.

  • The Brazilian government, in view of the danger to which such a state of things might give rise, followed the example of the United States in dealing with the language question.

  • Mexico has abolished its former orders, the Mexican Eagle, 1865, and Our Lady of Guadalupe, 1853; as has Brazil those of the Southern Cross, 1822, Dom Pedro I., 1826, the Rose, 1829, and the Brazilian branches of the Portuguese orders of Christ, St Benedict of Aviz and St James.

  • TOUCAN, the Brazilian name of a bird,' long since adopted into nearly all European languages, and apparently first given currency in England (though not then used as an English word) in 1668 2 by W.

  • The Mexican or Brazilian orchid house accommodates the plants from the warm parts of South America, and its temperature should range from about 65° to 75° during summer and from 60° to 65° in winter.

  • By the treaty of 1872 the Brazilian frontier was drawn up the Parana from the mouth of the Iguassu or Y-Guazu (25° 30' S.) to the Salto Grande or Great Cataract of La Guayra (24° 7'), thence west along the watershed of the Sierra de Maracayu, north along the Sierra de Ambaya to the sources of the Apa, and down that stream to its junction with the Paraguay.

  • The hills and plateaus appear to be composed chiefly of the same sandstone series which in the Brazilian province of Rio Grande do Sul contains seams of coal, with plant remains similar to those of the Karharbari series of India (Permian or Upper Carboniferous).

  • An important feature about yerba mate is the small expense necessary for its production, and the cheap rate, notwithstanding the high tariff on its importation, at which it can be placed on the Argentine market as compared with ordinary tea or Brazilian coffee.

  • Numerous ocean-going liners, most of which fly the Brazilian or the Argentine flag, ply on the Paraguay and the Parana; smaller vessels ascend the tributary streams, which are also utilized for floating lumber down to the ports.

  • The Brazilian Lloyd S.

  • In 1864 a dispute arose between the younger Lopez and the Brazilian government, and Lopez marched an army through Argentine territory to invade southern Brazil.

  • The policy of Brazil was for a time directed towards the annexation of Paraguay; the debt due to Brazil on account of the war was assessed at £40,000,000, a sum which Paraguay could never hope to pay; and it was not until 1876 that the Brazilian army of occupation was wholly withdrawn.

  • The first blow to this industry was the discovery of the Brazilian mines in Minas Geraes and Bahia.

  • The enormous development of the South Africanmines,whichsuppliedin 1906, about90%of the world's produce, has thrown into the shade the Brazilian production; but the Bulletin for Feb.

  • The most famous Brazilian stones are: - The Star of the South, found in 1853, when it weighed 2542 carats and was sold for £40,000; when cut it weighed 125 carats and was bought by the gaikwar of Baroda for £80,000.

  • Many large stones have been found in South Africa; some are yellow but some are as colourless as the best Indian or Brazilian stones.

  • The maps of Ecuador, which are very defective, usually describe its territory as extending eastward to the Brazilian frontier, but as Peru is in actual occupation of the region east of Huiririma-chico, on the Napo river, 31 degrees west of that frontier, those maps cannot be considered correct.

  • The Jamaica or calabash nutmeg is derived from Monodora Myristica, the Brazilian from Cryptocarya moschata, the Peruvian from Laurelia sempervirens, the Madagascar or clove nutmeg from Agathophyllum aromaticum, and the Californian or stinking nutmeg from Torreya Myristica.

  • The habits of the Brazilian species of these bees have been described in detail by H.

  • The over-supply of cheap Brazilian coffee in the consuming markets caused a heavy fall in prices at the beginning of the decade, the average price in London in 1901 being 47s.

  • The tea outlook was good, and the coffee industry was recovering from the effects of plant disease and Brazilian competition.

  • The abolition of the external slave trade proved very injurious to the trade of the seaports, but from 1860 onward the agricultural resources of the country were developed with increasing energy, a work in which Brazilian merchants took the lead.

  • Four railways terminate at Montevideo, one of them (the Central Uruguay) extending to the Brazilian frontier.

  • The war with Paraguay that followed, which lasted until 1870, made Montevideo the base of supplies for the Brazilian army and navy and added largely to its trade and wealth.

  • flatly discovered the same property in the Siberian and Brazilian topaz, borate of magnesia, mesotype, prehnite, sphene and calamine.

  • It lies partly upon the north-east slope of the great Brazilian plateau, and partly upon the sandy coastal plain.

  • Education has made no impression upon such people, and is confined almost exclusively to the upper classes, from which some of the most prominent men in Brazilian politics and literature have come.

  • The strain of the war was acutely felt in Portugal, especially in 1711, when the French admiral DuguayTrouin sacked Rio de Janeiro and cut off the Brazilian treasureships.

  • The king refused to leave Brazil, partly owing to the intrigues of Carlota Joaquina, who hoped to become queen of an independent Brazilian kingdom.

  • A crisis was evidently imminent, for Portugal would not tolerate an absentee sovereign who was far more Brazilian than Portuguese.

  • lat., and north-west to the new Brazilian frontier.

  • Roughly calculated, two-fifths of the total area of Bolivia is comprised within the Andean cordilleras which cross its south-west corner and project east toward the Brazilian highlands in the form of a great obtuse angle.

  • West of the Cordillera Oriental, where special conditions prevail, a great desert plateau stretches entirely across one corner of the republic. Apart from the Andean system there is a group of low, broken, gneiss ranges stretching along the east side of Bolivia among the upper affluents of the Mamore and Guapore, which appear to belong to the older Brazilian orographic system, from which they have been separated by the erosive action of water.

  • Its Brazilian tributaries are comparatively unimportant, but from Bolivia it receives the Baures and the San Miguel, both rising in the Sierras de Chiquitos and flowing north-west across the llanos to the Guapore.

  • by a detached group of low sierras known collectively under the name Chiquitos, which belong to the Brazilian highlands rather than to the Andes.

  • Expeditions to the Brazilian frontier or to the Chiquitos missions are fitted out here, and it is the objective point for expeditions entering Bolivia from Matto Grosso, Brazil, and Paraguay.

  • Specular haematite forms a constituent of certain schistose rocks, such as the Brazilian itabirite.

  • Of the eastern part of the territory lying between the Meta and the Brazilian frontier, Venezuela claims as far west as the meridian of 69° so'.

  • The Colombian tapir is known as the Tapirus Roulini, and is slightly smaller than the Brazilian species (T.

  • We are disposed to agree with the Brazilian historian Constancio that Maranon is derived from the Spanish word marana, a tangle, a snarl, which well represents the bewildering difficulties which the earlier explorers met in navigating not only the entrance to the Amazon, but the whole island-bordered, river-cut and indented coast of the now Brazilian province of Maranhao.

  • It rises on the lofty Brazilian plateau near Diamantino in 14° 25' S.

  • Between Guajara-Merim and this fall, inclusive, the Madeira receives the drainage of the northeastern slopes of the Andes, from Santa Cruz de la Sierra to Cuzco, the whole of the south-western slope of Brazilian Matto Grosso, and the northern one of the Chiquitos sierras, an area about Scale, z:2z,50o.000 English Miles 0 5 o zoo 200 390 equal to that of France and Spain.

  • It runs through a continuous forest at the bottom of the great depression lying between the Madeira river, which skirts the edge of the Brazilian sandstone plateau, and the Ucayali which hugs the base of the Andes.

  • The Brazilian Boundary Commission ascended it in 1866 to the junction of the Shino with its Jaquirana branch.

  • That part of Brazil lying between the Amazon and French, Dutch and British Guiana, and bounded on the west by the Rio Negro, is known as Brazilian Guiana.

  • Their northern slope, which is occupied by the three Guianas first named, is saturated and river-torn; but their southern one, Brazilian Guiana, is in general thirsty and semi-barren, and the driest region of the Amazon valley.

  • The first was formerly known as the Hyapora, but its Brazilian part is now called the Yapura, and its Colombian portion the Caqueta.

  • It was long supposed to have eight mouths; but Ribeiro de Sampaio, in his voyage of 1774, determined that there was but one real mouth, and that the supposed others are all furor or canos.1 In 1864-1868 the Brazilian government made a somewhat careful examination of the Brazilian part of the river, as far up as the rapid of Cupaty.

  • The total population of the Brazilian portion of the Amazon basin in 1850 was perhaps 300,000, of whom about two-thirds were white and slaves, the latter numbering about 25,000.

  • On the 6th of September 1850 the emperor, Dom Pedro II., sanctioned a law authorizing steam navigation on the Amazon, and confided to an illustrious Brazilian, Barao Maua (Irineu Evangilista de Sousa), the task of carrying it into effect.

  • The number of inhabitants in the Brazilian Amazon basin (the states of Amazonas and Path) is purely a matter of rough estimate.

  • JOHN' MAURICE OF NASSAU (1604-1679), surnamed the Brazilian, was the son of John the Younger, count of NassauSiegen-Dillenburg, and the grandson of John, the elder brother of William the Silent and the chief author of the Union of Utrecht.

  • GUARANIS, a tribe and stock of South American Indians, having their home in Paraguay, Uruguay and on the Brazilian coast.

  • The curvature of the range around the Brazilian massif, and the position of the zone of older rocks upon the eastern flank, led Suess to the conclusion that the Andes owe their origin to an overthrust from east to west, and that the Vorland lies beneath the Pacific. In the south Wehrli and Burckhardt maintain that the thrust came from the west, and they look upon the ancient rocks of Argentina as the Vorland.

  • Two weeks later, with apparent impunity, security forces shot dead a young Brazilian electrician on his way to work.

  • It was the prevalent Brazilian strain, plus two ATCC reference strains.

  • The Brazilian ace took two pole positions, two race wins and two fastest laps.

  • BRAZILIAN educationalist Paulo Freire's statement of the obvious on literacy puts the recent argy-bargy over the best method of teaching reading into perspective.

  • bossa nova jazz, Joyce, with her superb Brazilian band.

  • carob bars from a Brazilian co-operative, washed down with organic carrot juice.

  • There was a Brazilian woman who mainly used her allotment to grow plants to dye cloth: woad, madder and dyer's chamomile.

  • To build a biodiversity database comprising all records of Brazilian marine planktonic copepods based on literature, collections and new material.

  • Economic and political conditions abroad had eased as a constraint since October, but this survey was completed before the recent Brazilian devaluation.

  • Since its international humiliation over Amazon deforestation in the 1980s, the Brazilian government has learned to adopt western diktat on environmental matters.

  • The Brazilian educator and revolutionary Paolo Freire was widely cited, in reference to his ideas of ' praxis ' and critical consciousness.

  • Two weeks later, with apparent impunity, security forces shot dead a young Brazilian electrician on his way to work.

  • extractive reserves in the Brazilian Amazon.

  • fatal shooting of a Brazilian.

  • For the eve of the Cowley Road Carnival, Brazil Solidarity presents a full-on Brazilian festa.

  • He's Ron his way Publication Date: 28 June 2003 Brazilian's move to United will spark transfer frenzy Top Guns!

  • In Brazil suma was reported to be more powerful than ginseng, and it is referred to as Brazilian ginseng.

  • Ronaldo goes into the Brazilian changing room to find all his team mates looking a bit glum.

  • Even then the Brazilian still produced two flashes of brilliance, but on both occasions England Under-21 goalkeeper Robinson emphasized his potential.

  • The new Brazilian menu items include grilled halibut with grilled tomato and olive tapenade and parmesan cheese crusted chicken.

  • The number of fans of the genuine Brazilian hammocks is growing steadily all over the world.

  • hippocampus reidi brazilian black seahorses.

  • ikon gallery presents the first non-commercial exhibition in the UK of the work of internationally renowned Brazilian artist Beatriz Milhazes.

  • Soccer superstar Rio Ferdinand has been man- marking a beautiful Brazilian model behind his live-in lover 's back, ' reports The People.

  • They bought the mahogany from the Brazilian logging company Juary, which has been heavily involved in illegal logging in the Amazon.

  • The UK is the second largest importer of Brazilian mahogany in the world.

  • Identify applied research needs related to species recovery Discuss the need for and feasibility of ex situ conservation measures for Brazilian mergansers.

  • They were led by a spectacularly handsome black Brazilian, sporting a pierced nipple.

  • Iron: There's a Brazilian tattoo parlor across the street from my house that just opened up.

  • The special rhythmic swing is provided by top Brazilian percussionist Edson Ribeiro (from Bahia ).

  • And today Brazilian and Jamaican dairy producers are being put out of business by imports of powdered milk from the European Union.

  • OMM 10 best cds Reviews Hot tunes From pretty pop to Brazilian psychedelia: five tracks you must hear this month.

  • The appearance, using Paul's fabulous mature Brazilian rosewood, is absolutely stunning!

  • Carnival music workshops will include Afro-Cuban drumming, Brazilian street samba, and South African township music for brass and wind.

  • The dance is similar to the Brazilian samba using dramatic or allegorical themes.

  • The Biodiversity of the Brazilian Cerrado Introduction Central Brazil is covered by a type of tree savanna known as " cerrado " .

  • A similar justification was used for the fatal shooting of a Brazilian.

  • Supermarkets corral Brazilian beef to lead stampede for bigger profits.

  • The on-off couple decided to call time on their relationship after a series of arguments about the actor's commitment to the Brazilian supermodel.

  • The Brazilian metal superstars get the main stage rocking with their always excellent take on the rap metal genre.

  • swerveors in sports In the 1950s a group of talented Brazilian footballers invented the swerving free kick.

  • syntactic parser in Prolog for Brazilian Portuguese.

  • We were immediately captivated by the tanagers, the most exotic of which were the Green-headed and the Brazilian Tanager.

  • Featuring a diverse range of musical styles including jazz, Argentinean tango, Brazilian samba, classical, ragtime and Klezmer.

  • Brazilian tapirs are hoofed mammals, with three toes on each hind foot and four on each front foot.

  • thrash out a deal with the Portugal manager who is Brazilian.

  • Ten million Brazilian Free-tailed Bats pour out, in an unstoppable torrent of wings.

  • But the real way forward for the Brazilian left is to try to engage with militant trade unionists and the active social movements?

  • Brazilian traffic warden saws woman in half Trusted computing a shield against worst attacks?

  • The greater part of the state belongs to the western extension of the Brazilian plateau, across which, between the 14th and 16th parallels, runs the water-shed which separates the drainage basins of the Amazon and La Plata.

  • It cannot be grown in the open air in Britain, as it requires protection from frost, and is more tender than the Brazilian pine.

  • to the most southerly point of the island of Tierra del Fuego in 55° 2' 30" S., while its extremes of longitude are 53° 40' on the Brazilian frontier and 73° 17' 30" W.

  • Other palms abound, such as the pinch!) (Cocos australis), mbocaya (Cocos sclerocarpa) and the yatai (Cocos yatai), but the predominating species north of the Bermejo is the caranday or Brazilian wax-palm (Copernicia cerifera), which has varied uses.

  • In the " mesopotamia " region the flora is similar to that of the southern Chaco, but in the Misiones it approximates more to that of the neighbouring Brazilian highlands.

  • Telegraphic communication with Europe is effected by cables laid along the Uruguayan and Brazilian coasts, and by the Brazilian land lines to connect with transatlantic cables from Pernambuco.

  • ==Agriculture== In 1878 the production of wheat was insufficient for home consumption, the amount of Indian corn grown barely Live stoc covered local necessities, and the only market for live stock k, &c. was in the slaughtering establishments, where the meat &c was cut into strips and cured, making the so-called " jerked beef " for the Brazilian and Cuban markets.

  • A provisional government was formed under Urquiza, and the Brazilian and Uruguayan troops withdrew.

  • The best of the New South Wales diamonds are harder and much whiter than the South African diamonds, and are classified as on a par with the best Brazilian gems, but no large specimens have yet been found.

  • Among the coast people there is a distinct infusion of Portuguese blood, and in all the parts are descendants of Brazilian negroes who returned to Africa during the 19th century.

  • of Rio de Janeiro, on the Cuyaba river near its discharge into the Sao Lourengo, the principal Brazilian tributary of the Paraguay.

  • Vespucci afterwards made three voyages to the Brazilian coast; and in 1504 he wrote an account of his four voyages, which was widely circulated, and became the means of procuring for its author at the hands of the cartographer Waldseemi ller in 1507 the disproportionate distinction of giving his name to the whole continent.

  • the siphonium described in connexion with the mandible), but filling also such curious organs as the frontal excrescence of Chasmorhynchus, the Brazilian bell-bird, the throat-bag of the adjutant stork, and the gular pouch of the bustard.

  • The latter is, no doubt, identical with the similar sandstone series which is found in the neighbouring Brazilian province of Rio Grande do Sul, and which has there yielded plants which prove it to belong to the Permian or the upper part of the Carboniferous.

  • The great majority of the foreign population are Italians or Spaniards, with lesser numbers, in descending scale, of Brazilian, Argentine and French birth.

  • In the north there is a strong Brazilian element and the people are intensely conservative.

  • The cattle are destined chiefly for the saladero establishments for the preparation of tasajo, or jerked beef, for the Brazilian and Cuban markets, and for the Liebig factory, where large quantities of extract of meat are prepared for the European trade.

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