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brazen

brazen

brazen Sentence Examples

  • Never in her life had she done anything so brazen.

  • Her father, having been warned by an oracle that she would bear a son by whom he would be slain, confined Danae in a brazen tower.

  • Phalaris, who is said to have roasted his enemies to death in a brazen bull (Pindar, Pyth.

  • When Aaron himself is connected with the worship of the golden calf, and when to Moses is attributed a brazen serpent which the reforming king Hezekiah was the first to destroy, it is evident that religious conceptions developed in the course of ages.

  • Here also was produced the Book of Dimma, consisting of the gospels and accompanied by a brazen shrine, ornamented with silver and tracery, and preserved in the library of Trinity College, Dublin.

  • Charles the Great carried off the brazen statue of Theodoric and the marble columns of his palace to his own palace at Aix-la-Chapelle.

  • A brazen serpent, whose institution was attributed to Moses, had not hitherto been considered out of place in the cult; its destruction was perhaps the king's most notable reform.

  • From the standpoint of the popular religion, the removal of the local altars, like Hezekiah's destruction of the brazen serpent, would be an act of desecration, an iconoclasm which can be partly appreciated from the sentiments of 2 Kings xviii.

  • 1844, A Piece of Friar Bacon's Brazen Heade's Prophesie (1604).

  • He is also the author of the Brazen Serpent (1831), the Doctrine of Election (1839), several "Introductory Essays" to editions of Christian Authors, and a posthumous work entitled Spiritual Order and Other Papers (1871).

  • He was honoured as a hero, and his memory was held in such respect that when all the brazen statues of tyrants were condemned to be sold in the time of Timoleon (150 years later) an exemption was made in favour of the statue of Gelo.

  • Then it breaks gently forth in a noble, swinging rhythm and massively soft brazen tones, as Wotan awakes on a mountain height and gazes upon Walhalla, his newly finished palace which he has bid the giants build, so that from it he may rule the world (Melody, Ex.

  • By Solomon, Bashan, or rather " the region of Argob in Bashan," containing " threescore great cities with walls and brazen bars," was assigned to the administrative district of Ben-Geber, one of his lieutenants (1 Kings iv.

  • At Crete the brazen Talos, who would not permit them to land, was killed by the Dioscuri.

  • On the 1st, they marched in procession through the city, dressed in an embroidered tunic, a brazen breastplate and a peaked cap; each carried a sword by his side and a short staff in his right hand, with which the shield, borne on the left arm, was struck from time to time.

  • These include the bronze doors executed by Bishop Bernward, with reliefs from the history of Adam and of Jesus Christ; a brazen font of the 13th century; two large candelabra of the 11th century; the sarcophagus of St Godehard; and the tomb of St Epiphanius.

  • Thus the late Rabbinical picture of the calf-headed brazen image of Molech within which children were burned alive is pure fable, and with it falls the favourite comparison between Molech and the Carthaginian idol from whose brazen arms children were rolled into an abyss of fire, and whom Diodorus (xux.

  • 26) that the brazen sea held 2000 baths; the bath being about 2300 cub.

  • cubit (from the brazen sea) and for the 18 in.

  • The most famous is the Brazen Palace erected by King Datagamana about 164 B.C. The pokunas are bathing-tanks or tanks for the supply of drinking-water, which are scattered everywhere through the jungle.

  • The place is little mentioned in ancient literature, though Silius Italicus tells us that it was hence that the Romans took their magisterial insignia (fasces, curule chair, purple toga and brazen trumpets), and it was undoubtedly one of the twelve cities of Etruria.

  • 3 5) as the forerunner and companion of Fortuna, holding in her brazen hand huge nails, a clamp and molten lead, symbolical of fixedness and tenacity.

  • His daring is illustrated by the story that he came by night to the temple of Athene "of the Brazen House" at Sparta, and there set up his shield with the inscription, "Dedicated to the goddess by Aristomenes from the Spartans."

  • One of the chief objects of veneration among the Cimbri is said to have been a brazen bull.

  • They wore brazen helmets with purple crests, and rough-haired black cloaks, in which they slept on the bare ground.

  • The most famous if not the first 1 is Phalaris of Acragas (Agrigentum), whose exact date is uncertain, whose letters are now cast aside, arid whose brazen bull has been called in question, but who clearly rose to power very soon after the foundation of Acragas.

  • 33); (3) the instructions as to the brazen laver would naturally be expected alongside of those for the altar of burntoffering in ch.

  • Even Moses himself is said to have made a brazen serpent which, down to Hezekiah's time, continued to be worshipped at Jerusalem.

  • Again, the accuracy of his descriptions of brazen houses - such as that of Alcinous, Od.

  • 435 there was still in Egypt a brazen globe attributed to Ptolemy which had belonged to Khalid (Ibn Qifti, p. 440, 1.15).

  • The same ideas underlie the story of the Brazen Serpent which cured the Israelites of the bites of the serpents in the Wilderness (Num.

  • The object, however, was no temporary device; centuries later, 250 years after the founding of the temple of Jerusalem, the Brazen Serpent was regarded as unorthodox by the reforming king Hezekiah, and the historian who relates its overthrow ascribes its origin to the founder of Israelite national religion (2 Kings xviii.

  • We seem here to have a remnant of the very ancient and widely diffused tree-worship. Sometimes, however, auguries were taken in other manners, being drawn from the moaning of doves in the branches, the murmur of a fountain which rose close by, or the resounding of the wind in the brazen caldrons which formed a circle all round the temple.

  • The Sicilians honoured his august aspect as he moved amongst them with purple robes and golden girdle, with long hair bound by a Delphic garland, and brazen sandals on his feet, and with a retinue of slaves behind him.

  • But his hopes were cheated by the volcano, which cast forth his brazen sandals and betrayed his secret (Diog.

  • He was at last overthrown in a general rising headed by Telemachus, the ancestor of Theron (tyrant c. 4 88 -47 2), and burned in his brazen bull.

  • In his brazen bull, invented, it is said, by Perillus of Athens, the tyrant's victims were shut up and, a fire being kindled beneath, were roasted alive, while their shrieks represented the bellowing of the bull.

  • There is hardly room to doubt that we have here a tradition of human sacrifice in connexion with the worship of the Phoenician Baal (Zeus Atabyrius) such as prevailed at Rhodes; when misfortune threatened Rhodes the brazen bulls in.

  • Human sacrifices to Baal were common, and, though in Phoenicia proper there is no proof that the victims were burned alive, the Carthaginians had a brazen image of Baal, from whose downturned hands the children slid into a pit of fire; and the story that Minos had a brazen man who pressed people to his glowing breast points to similar rites in Crete, where the child-devouring Minotaur must certainly be connected with Baal and the favourite sacrifice to him of children.

  • There was certainly a brazen bull at Agrigentum, which was carried off by the Carthaginians to Carthage, whence it was again taken by Scipio and restored to Agrigentum.

  • The most remarkable was the destruction of a brazen serpent, the cult of which was traditionally traced back to the time of Moses (Num.

  • A brazen Triton on the summit, with a rod in his hand, turned round by the wind, pointed to the quarter from which it blew.

  • A brazen statue was set up in his honour by the inhabitants, for which Theocritus composed an inscription (Epigr.

  • Crime was never again so brazen and daring, and 1856 marks also the beginning of political reform.

  • Since the equipment of Glaucus was golden and that of Diomedes brazen, the expression "golden for brazen" (Iliad, vi.

  • Sometimes they have wings of gold, brazen claws and the tusks of boars.

  • He is cowardly in war, and on one occasion was shut up for years in a huge brazen pot.

  • In 1907 the sanctuary of Athena "of the Brazen House" (X aX KlocKos) was located on the Acropolis immediately above the theatre, and though the actual temple is almost completely destroyed, fragments of the capitals show that it was Doric in style, and the site has produced the longest extant archaic inscription of Laconia, numerous bronze nails and plates and a considerable number of votive offerings, some of them of great interest.

  • Never in her life had she done anything so brazen.

  • She had never met a man so brazen, or so sexy.

  • I don't think I can look that desperate if I tried, she said, amazed at Toni's brazen attempts to flash Xander.

  • What was the purpose of the brazen intruder, and to what end had he tampered with the trappings of such a formidable adversary?

  • Secondly, ACCEPTANCE at the brazen altar within the court.

  • brazen attempt to exclude the CPGB.

  • brazen effrontery in trying to minimize or ignore unanswerable facts.

  • brazen examples of the double intent referred to above.

  • brazen corruption in the system and politicians are busy amassing public funds for private political ends.

  • brazen manner imaginable.

  • brazen attitude in something so tiny?

  • brazen enough to admit it openly, through denial.

  • brazen serpent.

  • brazen altar!

  • brazen ALF attacks.

  • brazen brow, as witches do on broomsticks now.

  • brazen liars which fill much of the Tory party.

  • brazen cheek of the man and his ilk never ceases to amaze me.

  • There's just no need to ever be quite so brazen with cushions.

  • In the manner of buttons they are quite hard, quite brazen.

  • The attempt is now brazen; it used to be surreptitious.

  • The New Ugly Face of Domination Power is increasingly brazen.

  • The takeover is often brazen, and it is extremely unlikely that Jesus was born on December 25.

  • As with all the others, there is the same quietly brazen effrontery in trying to minimize or ignore unanswerable facts.

  • This is to believe on the Son of God lifted up; which is compared with looking to the brazen serpent.

  • Her father, having been warned by an oracle that she would bear a son by whom he would be slain, confined Danae in a brazen tower.

  • Pottier, who does not dispute the historical personality of Minos, in view of the story of Phalaris considers it probable that in Crete (where a bull-cult may have existed by the side of that of the double axe) victims were tortured by being shut up in the belly of a red-hot brazen bull.

  • Phalaris, who is said to have roasted his enemies to death in a brazen bull (Pindar, Pyth.

  • 2 In the composite work Chronicles-Ezra-Nehemiah (dating after the post-exilic Levitical legislation) a peculiar interest is taken in the Levites, more particularly in the singers, and certain passages even reveal With this development in Israelite religion, observe that Judaean cult included the worship of a brazen serpent, the institution of which was ascribed to Moses, and that, according to the compiler of Kings, Hezekiah was the first to destroy it when he suppressed idolatrous worship in Judah (2 Kings xviii.

  • When Aaron himself is connected with the worship of the golden calf, and when to Moses is attributed a brazen serpent which the reforming king Hezekiah was the first to destroy, it is evident that religious conceptions developed in the course of ages.

  • The chief episode in his uneventful pontificate was the visit of Constans to Rome; the pope received him "almost with religious honours," a deference which he requited by stripping all the brazen ornaments of the city - even to the tiles of the Pantheon - and sending them to Constantinople.

  • Here also was produced the Book of Dimma, consisting of the gospels and accompanied by a brazen shrine, ornamented with silver and tracery, and preserved in the library of Trinity College, Dublin.

  • Charles the Great carried off the brazen statue of Theodoric and the marble columns of his palace to his own palace at Aix-la-Chapelle.

  • A brazen serpent, whose institution was attributed to Moses, had not hitherto been considered out of place in the cult; its destruction was perhaps the king's most notable reform.

  • From the standpoint of the popular religion, the removal of the local altars, like Hezekiah's destruction of the brazen serpent, would be an act of desecration, an iconoclasm which can be partly appreciated from the sentiments of 2 Kings xviii.

  • 1844, A Piece of Friar Bacon's Brazen Heade's Prophesie (1604).

  • He is also the author of the Brazen Serpent (1831), the Doctrine of Election (1839), several "Introductory Essays" to editions of Christian Authors, and a posthumous work entitled Spiritual Order and Other Papers (1871).

  • He was honoured as a hero, and his memory was held in such respect that when all the brazen statues of tyrants were condemned to be sold in the time of Timoleon (150 years later) an exemption was made in favour of the statue of Gelo.

  • Then it breaks gently forth in a noble, swinging rhythm and massively soft brazen tones, as Wotan awakes on a mountain height and gazes upon Walhalla, his newly finished palace which he has bid the giants build, so that from it he may rule the world (Melody, Ex.

  • By Solomon, Bashan, or rather " the region of Argob in Bashan," containing " threescore great cities with walls and brazen bars," was assigned to the administrative district of Ben-Geber, one of his lieutenants (1 Kings iv.

  • At Crete the brazen Talos, who would not permit them to land, was killed by the Dioscuri.

  • On the 1st, they marched in procession through the city, dressed in an embroidered tunic, a brazen breastplate and a peaked cap; each carried a sword by his side and a short staff in his right hand, with which the shield, borne on the left arm, was struck from time to time.

  • These include the bronze doors executed by Bishop Bernward, with reliefs from the history of Adam and of Jesus Christ; a brazen font of the 13th century; two large candelabra of the 11th century; the sarcophagus of St Godehard; and the tomb of St Epiphanius.

  • Thus the late Rabbinical picture of the calf-headed brazen image of Molech within which children were burned alive is pure fable, and with it falls the favourite comparison between Molech and the Carthaginian idol from whose brazen arms children were rolled into an abyss of fire, and whom Diodorus (xux.

  • 26) that the brazen sea held 2000 baths; the bath being about 2300 cub.

  • cubit (from the brazen sea) and for the 18 in.

  • The most famous is the Brazen Palace erected by King Datagamana about 164 B.C. The pokunas are bathing-tanks or tanks for the supply of drinking-water, which are scattered everywhere through the jungle.

  • The place is little mentioned in ancient literature, though Silius Italicus tells us that it was hence that the Romans took their magisterial insignia (fasces, curule chair, purple toga and brazen trumpets), and it was undoubtedly one of the twelve cities of Etruria.

  • 3 5) as the forerunner and companion of Fortuna, holding in her brazen hand huge nails, a clamp and molten lead, symbolical of fixedness and tenacity.

  • His daring is illustrated by the story that he came by night to the temple of Athene "of the Brazen House" at Sparta, and there set up his shield with the inscription, "Dedicated to the goddess by Aristomenes from the Spartans."

  • One of the chief objects of veneration among the Cimbri is said to have been a brazen bull.

  • They wore brazen helmets with purple crests, and rough-haired black cloaks, in which they slept on the bare ground.

  • The most famous if not the first 1 is Phalaris of Acragas (Agrigentum), whose exact date is uncertain, whose letters are now cast aside, arid whose brazen bull has been called in question, but who clearly rose to power very soon after the foundation of Acragas.

  • t-to), the payment of the half-shekel (1t-t6), the brazen laver (17-21), the anointing oil (22-33), the incense (34-38), the appointment of Bezaleel and Oholiab (xxxi.

  • 33); (3) the instructions as to the brazen laver would naturally be expected alongside of those for the altar of burntoffering in ch.

  • Even Moses himself is said to have made a brazen serpent which, down to Hezekiah's time, continued to be worshipped at Jerusalem.

  • Again, the accuracy of his descriptions of brazen houses - such as that of Alcinous, Od.

  • 435 there was still in Egypt a brazen globe attributed to Ptolemy which had belonged to Khalid (Ibn Qifti, p. 440, 1.15).

  • The same ideas underlie the story of the Brazen Serpent which cured the Israelites of the bites of the serpents in the Wilderness (Num.

  • The object, however, was no temporary device; centuries later, 250 years after the founding of the temple of Jerusalem, the Brazen Serpent was regarded as unorthodox by the reforming king Hezekiah, and the historian who relates its overthrow ascribes its origin to the founder of Israelite national religion (2 Kings xviii.

  • We seem here to have a remnant of the very ancient and widely diffused tree-worship. Sometimes, however, auguries were taken in other manners, being drawn from the moaning of doves in the branches, the murmur of a fountain which rose close by, or the resounding of the wind in the brazen caldrons which formed a circle all round the temple.

  • The Sicilians honoured his august aspect as he moved amongst them with purple robes and golden girdle, with long hair bound by a Delphic garland, and brazen sandals on his feet, and with a retinue of slaves behind him.

  • But his hopes were cheated by the volcano, which cast forth his brazen sandals and betrayed his secret (Diog.

  • He was at last overthrown in a general rising headed by Telemachus, the ancestor of Theron (tyrant c. 4 88 -47 2), and burned in his brazen bull.

  • In his brazen bull, invented, it is said, by Perillus of Athens, the tyrant's victims were shut up and, a fire being kindled beneath, were roasted alive, while their shrieks represented the bellowing of the bull.

  • There is hardly room to doubt that we have here a tradition of human sacrifice in connexion with the worship of the Phoenician Baal (Zeus Atabyrius) such as prevailed at Rhodes; when misfortune threatened Rhodes the brazen bulls in.

  • Human sacrifices to Baal were common, and, though in Phoenicia proper there is no proof that the victims were burned alive, the Carthaginians had a brazen image of Baal, from whose downturned hands the children slid into a pit of fire; and the story that Minos had a brazen man who pressed people to his glowing breast points to similar rites in Crete, where the child-devouring Minotaur must certainly be connected with Baal and the favourite sacrifice to him of children.

  • There was certainly a brazen bull at Agrigentum, which was carried off by the Carthaginians to Carthage, whence it was again taken by Scipio and restored to Agrigentum.

  • The most remarkable was the destruction of a brazen serpent, the cult of which was traditionally traced back to the time of Moses (Num.

  • A brazen Triton on the summit, with a rod in his hand, turned round by the wind, pointed to the quarter from which it blew.

  • A brazen statue was set up in his honour by the inhabitants, for which Theocritus composed an inscription (Epigr.

  • Crime was never again so brazen and daring, and 1856 marks also the beginning of political reform.

  • Since the equipment of Glaucus was golden and that of Diomedes brazen, the expression "golden for brazen" (Iliad, vi.

  • the worship of the brazen serpent, xxi.

  • Sometimes they have wings of gold, brazen claws and the tusks of boars.

  • He is cowardly in war, and on one occasion was shut up for years in a huge brazen pot.

  • In 1907 the sanctuary of Athena "of the Brazen House" (X aX KlocKos) was located on the Acropolis immediately above the theatre, and though the actual temple is almost completely destroyed, fragments of the capitals show that it was Doric in style, and the site has produced the longest extant archaic inscription of Laconia, numerous bronze nails and plates and a considerable number of votive offerings, some of them of great interest.

  • Beaufort 's brazen trumpet blast, burning the Witch of Orleans.

  • I know you like him, but you need to stand your ground and not let some boy turn you into his brazen little side dish.

  • Her styles were bold, without being brazen, and vibrantly feminine, without being overwhelming.

  • Roller, a brazen t shirt from the fall 2009 Premium T-Shirts collection.

  • Needless to say, it takes a brazen individual to wear a shirt like this, and it's usually a person who doesn't mind turning a few heads or getting into some heated discussions from time to time.

  • Whether a brilliant cherry hue or a subdued maroon, red has the ability to turn heads, instill confidence in a woman and add a shot of brazen color to her look.

  • Most students who do this prank either do it on an athletic field, in a commons area in the rear of the school, or if you are really brazen, the front lawn of the school.

  • This shade is less brazen than the aforementioned shades, but promises the same simple application and removal methods.

  • The Ed Hardy swimwear collection for men and women is rife with brazen, sexy styles that are destined to be instant favorites - assuming the wearer is gutsy enough to pull them off, of course.

  • While Micro bikinis may not be the most popular form of bathing suit, their evolution has certainly received a level of notoriety for brazen sexiness.

  • The effect is strong and enigmatic, and you'll undoubtedly turn heads - but that's usually the point when one is wearing pants as brazen as these!

  • Clearly, you don't have to be incredibly brazen to pull off this look, given that there are so many asymmetric hem styles available for petite women.

  • Fall and winter 2011 promise more of the same, in the form of looks that run the gamut from effortlessly classic to completely brazen.

  • Less brazen, yet far more brow-raising in their presence than everyday jeans and neutral trousers, were the bright pants in shades of fuchsia, blue and mustard.

  • Remember, it's always easy to get more brazen.

  • The brand's designs present everything from brazen leopard prints to muted, textured leathers, so these bags are anything but classic or conventional.

  • His liberal use of chains in the crafting of the straps is both brazen and impudent, and absolutely perfect for providing one's classic business-wear with a chic sharpness.

  • Louis Vuitton's seasonal collections are highly anticipated, and fans watch the runways with bated breath to see what brazen, fashion-forward styles the label has in store.

  • To be a landlord takes fortitude, but to be a landlord without proper insurance coverage takes a brazen disregard for financial well-being.

  • Needless to say, it takes a brazen gal to pull this magic off.

  • They're sexy without being trashy, and can make even the shyest of ladies feel a bit more brazen without stepping too far outside of her comfort zone the way an open cup bra or other nightie could.

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