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brasses

brasses Sentence Examples

  • It has interesting brasses of the 15th and 16th centuries and an early embattled tower.

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  • Some 16th-century brasses, an altar tomb and a piscina were removed hither from the old church.

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  • The church of St John the Baptist, though largely altered by modern restoration, retains Early English to Perpendicular portions, and some early monuments and brasses.

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  • A picturesque avenue leads to the church of St Mary, principally Early English and Perpendicular, with remains of Norman work, having a lofty tower surmounted by a spire, and containing several fine monuments, tombs and brasses.

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  • The church (Early English) contains some carved woodwork and ancient brasses.

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  • Its period is mainly Transitional Norman and Early English, and though considerably altered by restoration it contains some good details, with many monuments and brasses.

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  • The church of All Saints (Decorated and Perpendicular) possesses some old brasses; it was restored in 1875.

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  • There are several brasses of interest.

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  • The parish churches of Dronfield, Hathersage (with some notable stained glass), Sandiacre and Tideswell exemplify the Decorated period; the last is a particularly stately and beautiful building, with a lofty and ornate western tower and some good early brasses.

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  • The churches of Dethic, Wirksworth and Chesterfield are typical of the Perpendicular period; that of Wirksworth contains noteworthy memorial chapels, monuments and brasses, and that of Chesterfield is celebrated for its crooked spire.

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  • It contains some interesting brasses.

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  • It is rich in ancient brasses and monuments, including a brass to Sir John Daundelyon (1443), whose family occupied a manor in the neighbourhood as early as the 13th century.

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  • Among many places of worship may be mentioned the restored parish church of Holy Trinity, which dates from the 12th century and contains some interesting monuments and brasses; and the Perpendicular Hermitage or Tory chapel, with a 15th or 16th century chantry-house.

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  • The parish church (1769) has some columns of an earlier building, interesting brasses and strong embattled tower.

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  • Some of the brasses are very fine, and there is one commemorating King Stephen, as well as a tomb said to be his.

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  • Among other ancient churches within the City, that of All Hallows Barking, near the Tower of London, is principally Perpendicular and contains some fine brasses.

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  • These attachments, first invented by Jeremiah Howard, and described in the United States Patent Journal in 1858, are simply hydraulic rams fitted into the side or top caps of the mill, and pressing against the side or top brasses in such a manner as to allow the side or top roll to move away from the other rolls, while an accumulator, weighted to any desired extent, keeps a constant pressure on each of the rams. An objection to the top cap arrangement is, that if the volume or feed is large enough to lift the top roll from the cane roll, it will simultaneously lift it from the megass roll, so that the megass will not be as well pressed as it ought to be;' and an objection to the side cap arrangement on the megass roll as well as to the top cap arrangement is, that in case more canes are fed in at one end of the rolls than at the other, the roll will be pushed out farther at one end than at the other; and though it may thus avoid a breakdown of the rolls, it is apt, in so doing, to break the ends off the teeth of the crown wheels by putting them out of line with one another.

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  • The church of St George, Early English and later, contains numerous brasses; and near it is the site of a palace of the archbishops of Canterbury, maintained until the time of Archbishop Simon Islip (c. 1350).

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  • The church of Cobham contains one of the richest collections of ancient brasses in England.

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  • The church possesses two of the finest monumental brasses in existence, dated respectively 1349 and 1364.

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  • In coal it not infrequently forms bands and nodules known as "brasses," and may also be finely disseminated through the coal as "black pyrites"; but much of the so-called pyrites of coal is really marcasite.

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  • It retains Perpendicular portions, a south porch of brick of the 16th century and numerous ancient monuments and brasses.

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  • The church of St Augustine, Broxbourne, is a fine example of Perpendicular work, and contains interesting monuments, including an altar tomb with enamelled brasses of 1473.

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  • Within are a priest's chamber over the porch, a handsome oak ceiling, a 15th-century pulpit, and some curious monuments and brasses.

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  • The ornamental bronzes and brasses are generally lacquered, though in engineers' machinery they are as a rule not protected with any coating.

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  • Several ancient monuments and brasses are retained.

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  • The Elizabethan manor-house of Southall remains, and the parish church of Norwood, though greatly restored, has Early English and Decorated portions, a canopied tomb dated 1547 and brasses of the 17th century.

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  • Within are some fine carvings, brasses and monuments.

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  • For the linings of brasses, various white metals are used, these being alloys of copper, antimony and tin, and occasionally lead.

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  • The interior, however, is finely proportioned and exhibits beautiful modern polychrome decorations, numerous pictures and interesting monumental brasses.

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  • The church of St Mary is almost entirely Perpendicular, and has a beautiful south porch, brasses of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries and numerous monuments, several of which, in a chantry, commemorate members of the family of Drake, lords of the manor.

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  • It has brasses and monuments of interest and a late Decorated baptistery of stone, an ornate roofed structure, octagonal in form.

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  • (2) Words terminating in s surd or sonant and in x anciently formed their plural by adding to the singular the syllable es (bras, brasses; pres,, preses; maleix, maleixes), but subsequently, from about the 15th centui-v, the Castilian influence substituted Os, so that one now hears brrissos, presos, ma~eixos.

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  • Druitt, Costume on Brasses (London, 1906).

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  • arsenical brasses are available.

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  • Benefaction boards to either side of the door, and two restoration brasses of 1877 and 1913, and a 20thC memorial brass.

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  • Many brasses engraved between 1570 and 1585 are palimpsest, with brasses engraved between 1570 and 1585 are palimpsest, with brasses from the Low Countries on the reverse.

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  • There is still much to surprise the student of monumental brasses in the less visited parts of the English countryside.

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  • bring Reformation brought about changes in the styles of brasses.

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  • modest in comparison with earlier brasses, tho those commemorated were not of lower social status.

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  • monumental brasses need to be allowed to ' breathe ' .

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  • polished the brasses and cleaned the roof, and even hoovered inside and put clean sheets on the bed!

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  • We filled up with water, polished the brasses, did all the washing, ironed and got generally shipshape.

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  • Priests were often depicted on monumental brasses in Eucharistic vestments with their chalices.

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  • Besides other old brasses it contains in the north aisle the effigies in brass of Sir George Monoux (d.

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  • In latten also were produced the numerous monumental brasses of which a large number still exist in England (see Brasses, Monumental).

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  • Usually brasses only require dusting, but if particularly dirty, rub with a soft cloth dipped in paraffin and wipe dry.

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  • Its monuments and brasses are of much interest.

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  • There are some 15thand 16th-century brasses, a dark cradle roof, and an early 13th-century crypt under the chancel.

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  • Near the town are the three fine old churches of Weston Zoyland, Chedzoy and Middlezoy, containing some good brasses and carved woodwork.

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  • There are other brasses of the 15th and 16th centuries.

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  • It possesses a town hall, a grammar school (1576), and a Martyr's Memorial HallThe most noteworthy building, however, is the parish church, restored in 1863, which contains a curious old fresco and several interesting brasses, and has a Norman tower.

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  • The church of St Andrew is mainly Perpendicular, but has Early English portions; it contains several ancient monuments and brasses, and flanks the market-place, with its modern cross.

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