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brain

brain

brain Sentence Examples

  • An idea flashed through her brain and left a frown on her face.

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  • I have a terminal brain tumor.

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  • Why that picture settled into her brain, she couldn't say.

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  • From what I've learned his entire brain structure is distorted.

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  • I mentioned a brain scan; you'd think I'd suggested a lobotomy.

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  • "No brain tumors," she replied.

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  • No doubt he knew he was being manipulated, but his brain was foggy enough that he wasn't sure what to do about it.

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  • While Howie, between his brain damage, operations and lengthy coma created a rare combination of mental soup, could we say with any certainty that his ability was absolutely unique to him?

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  • She deserved the brain tumor.

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  • I'm kinda tired of having my brain cut open.

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  • She'd removed her personal identifiers, hacked into the government's tracking mainframe to deactivate the implant in her brain, and changed into the black tactical uniform Elise brought her over her civilian grays.

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  • If you had half a brain, you.d have helped Rhyn and killed Sasha.

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  • He tucked the information in the back of his brain as he entered the store and purchased his Fat Tire Ale.

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  • The emerging brightness of the new day, while inviting, did nothing to sort out the tangle of thoughts crowding his brain like the line of a snarled fishing reel.

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  • She clutched his wrists, the logical side of her brain preparing to remove his hands from her face, the emotional side wishing he would repeat the kiss.

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  • The Other's brain told him otherwise, that it wasn't entirely certain what happened.

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  • She refused to give in to the nagging question of brain damage.

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  • In 1872 he was promoted commander at what was an exceptionally early age, but he died on the 17th of December 1874 of brain fever.

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  • In 1872 he was promoted commander at what was an exceptionally early age, but he died on the 17th of December 1874 of brain fever.

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  • The doctor said they could find no reason for him to stay in a coma, except the possibility of brain damage from lack of oxygen or blood loss.

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  • It operates on manipulation of brain waves but only on highly intelligent individuals.

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  • When the conquest of the city seemed inevitable, a great "brain drain" of scholars, artists, teachers, theologians, and the wealthy emigrated to Western Europe, especially to Italy.

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  • One thing is certain, the language was ineffaceably stamped upon my brain, though for a long time no one knew it, least of all myself.

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  • These he peddles still, prompting God and disgracing man, bearing for fruit his brain only, like the nut its kernel.

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  • I, uh, made a deal with Darkyn a few days ago for him to remove my brain tumor.

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  • It was then that my slowly reacting brain, flowing like cold molasses began to function, more than a gerbil driven wheel.

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  • Maybe Dean's sleep-deprived brain was going in circles but something wasn't clicking, and it bothered him the rest of the night.

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  • "You mean my scrambled brain waves," Howie said with a smile.

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  • Other thoughts were skittering through her brain, those that reminded her she was no longer on her own territory and he hadn't told her something she hadn't heard before.

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  • With his brain still churning from the phone conversation, it took sometime before his eyes focused on a penciled circle on one of the articles.

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  • With his brain still churning from the phone conversation, it took sometime before his eyes focused on a penciled circle on one of the articles.

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  • A thousand thought and memories shuffled through my brain like black jack deck.

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  • All I'm trying to do is get a handle on why his brain is doing this to him.

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  • It looked like a cat scan of a brain, but it wasn't hers.

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  • "That's because the brain is the strangest tool of the body," Quinn answered.

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  • Though the power of mind manipulation was far from brain surgery, he might also know how to help Deidre.

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  • He tapped his personal net implant and murmured "Angel" to direct the implant in his brain to contact her.

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  • Or perchance, at evening, I hear him in his stable blowing off the superfluous energy of the day, that he may calm his nerves and cool his liver and brain for a few hours of iron slumber.

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  • Tests revealed normal brain function, and there was no indication of any permanent damage.

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  • He couldn't have the tumor – or half her brain missing – when he revived her.

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  • He admitted none of the mental scenarios circling his tired brain made a lick of sense.

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  • "Good. We were worried you'd have some brain damage," the woman replied cheerfully.

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  • Biking was usually Dean's thinking time, but his brain felt overused lately and had opted for a day off, restricting his thoughts to nothing more pressing than the next hill.

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  • Still, she was beginning to have a bad feeling that he might have brain damage.

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  • He wracked his brain for excuses that would be plausible.

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  • Could the fact that Howie's brain waves are somehow different after his lengthy coma and all the operations he endured be effected by what you were doing?

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  • He offered her a choice: to cure the inoperable brain tumor killing her or to outright kill her before she declined, whichever outcome she preferred.

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  • In some twentieth-century science fiction visions of the future, humans created friendly robot sidekicks with data storage capacity and computational speed the human brain lacked.

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  • In it was her bucket list, a list of things she hoped to do before she died from the terminal brain tumor she no longer possessed.

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  • Gazing at the obvious mass in her brain, she knew the results were bad, but were they worse?

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  • It was hard to imagine she had a tumor in her brain the half the size of her fist.

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  • Her brain tumor never seemed like a blessing before now.

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  • His success convinced him that language can be conveyed through type to the mind of the blind-deaf child, who, before education, is in the state of the baby who has not learned to prattle; indeed, is in a much worse state, for the brain has grown in years without natural nourishment.

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  • "Toleration," she said once, when she was visiting her friend Mrs. Laurence Hutton, "is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle."

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  • She was ransacking her brain for a good save when he reached down and grabbed the bucket.

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  • If she could see and hear, I suppose she would get rid of her superfluous energy in ways which would not, perhaps, tax her brain so much, although I suspect that the ordinary child takes his play pretty seriously.

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  • For a whole evening she will sit at the table writing whatever comes into her busy brain; and I seldom find any difficulty in reading what she has written.

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  • While he was thinking one thing in his brain, I was endeavoring to divine his thought in mine.

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  • Now a bullet through my brain-- that's all that's left me!

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  • A bullet through my brain is the only thing left me--not singing! his thoughts ran on.

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  • She had to eat, sleep, think, speak, weep, work, give vent to her anger, and so on, merely because she had a stomach, a brain, muscles, nerves, and a liver.

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  • That was when the logical part of her brain jerked her back to reality.

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  • Even so, it was as if a something had been lifted from her chest, allowing the flow of oxygen and blood to a starving brain.

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  • Maybe hearing Mary say it so often had burned it into his brain.

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  • He's suffered a bunch of operations, mostly on his brain.

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  • It's bad enough that it might fry my brain.

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  • Take her soul and brain.

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  • In spite of the protective gear worn, the challenge definitely excluded the weak of heart, and, in Dean's estimation, the strong of brain.

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  • I am here simply to assess what is in your brain.

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  • She shivered at the tingling massage traveling across her scalp and into her brain.

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  • The sea breeze seemed to pierce her skull and ruffle through her brain.

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  • You're not treating me like some enslaved woman with no brain.

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  • The micro warned him of incoming fire, sending the visuals to the implant in his brain.

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  • The early morning fog blanketing eastern Pennsylvania was thicker than the frosting on grandma's cake, but no thicker than the early morning fog shrouding David Dean's sleep-deprived brain.

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  • But once back in bed, the complexities and the happenings of the day raised their heads like so many ghosts crying for attention in his tired brain.

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  • His emotional voice was like an alarm clock in her brain.

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  • I'm going to melt his brain.

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  • Xander channeled his magic into the Other's brain.

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  • The classification into epithelial organs, connective tissues, and the more specialized muscle and nerve, was largely due to him; and he proved the presence of neuroglia in the brain and spinal cord, discovered crystalline haematoidine, and made out the structure of the umbilical cord.

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  • From the brain these spirits are conveyed through the body by means of the nerves, regarded by Descartes as tubular vessels, resembling the pipes conveying the water of a spring to act upon the mechanical appliances in an artificial fountain.

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  • The nerves conduct the animal spirits to act upon the muscles, and in their turn convey the impressions of the organs to the brain.

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  • But there is one point in the human frame - a point midway in the brain, single and free, which may in a special sense be called the seat of the mind.

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  • " It seems to me," he says, " that in receiving such and such an idea the mind is passive, and that it is active only in volition; that its Psychoi deas are put in it partly by the objects which touch the senses, partly by the impressions in the brain, and partly also by the dispositions which have preceded in the mind itself and by the movements of its will."

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  • It should be added that Professor Elliot Smith has pointed out a certain peculiarity in its commissures whereby the brain of the diprotodonts differs markedly from that of the polyprotodonts From Flower, Quart.

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  • The first is " the law that thought is a function of the brain."

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  • Accepting the law he distinguishes productive from permissive or transmissive function (p. 32), and, rejecting the view that brain produces thought, he recognizes that in our present condition brain transmits thought, thought needs brain for its organ of expression; but this does not exclude the possibility of a condition in which thought will be no longer so dependent on brain.

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  • It has received its greatest support from the study of insanity, which is now fully recognized as conditioned by disease of the brain.

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  • It but remains to call attention to the fact that the earlier view of the liver as the seat of the soul gave way among many ancient nations to the theory which, reflecting the growth of anatomical knowledge, assigned that function to the heart, while, with the further change which led to placing the seat of soul-life in the brain, an attempt was made to partition the various functions of manifestations of personality among the three organs, brain, heart and liver, the intellectual activity being assigned to the first-named; the higher emotions, as love and courage, to the second; while the liver, once the master of the entire domain of soul-life as understood in antiquity, was degraded to serve as the seat of the lower emotions, such as jealousy, anger and the like.

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  • By the time the third stage, which placed the seat of soul-life in the brain, was reached through the further advance of anatomical knowledge, the religious rites of Greece and Rome were too deeply incrusted to admit of further radical changes, and faith in the gods had already declined too far to bring new elements into the religion.

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  • But when Conrad died, the electors chose his nephew Frederick, surnamed Barbarossa, who united the rival honors of Welf and Waiblingen, to succeed him; and it was soon obvious that the empire had a master powerful Fmder!ck of brain and firm of will.

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  • In addition to these lines, all tadpoles show more or less distinctly a small whitish gland in the middle of the head between the eyes, the so-called frontal gland or pineal gland, which in early stages is connected with the brain.

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  • The idea of an identity of protoplasm does not involve a denial of special powers developed in it in different situations, and the possession of such a power by the vegetable cell is not more striking than the location of the powers of co-ordination and thought in the protoplasm of cells of the human brain.

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  • Brain.

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  • - The more characteristic features of the bird's brain show clearly a further development of the reptilian type, not always terminal features in a direct line, but rather side-departures, sometimes even a secondary sinking to a lower level, and in almost every case in a direction away from those fundamentally reptilian lines which have led to the characters typical of, and peculiar to, the mammals.

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  • The forebrain forms the bulk of the whole brain, but the large size of the hemispheres is due to the greater development of the basal and lateral portions (pedunculi cerebri and corpora striata), while the pallium (the portion external to the lateral ventricles) is thin, and restricted to the median side of each hemisphere.

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  • In zoology, the mollusca are divided into cephalous and acephalous (Acephala), according as they have or have not an organized part of their anatomy as the seat of the brain and special senses.

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  • He died of paralysis of the brain a year or two later, on the 14th of April 1883.

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  • The brain is well developed and its " mushroom-bodies " are exceptionally large.

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  • 4 According to this text Saul was simply possessed with such a personal dislike and dread of Conflicts with David as might easily occupy his disordered brain.

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  • separated by an external groove, and containing, at least temporarily, the brain, which always arises there.

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  • Nerve cord lies in coelom; brain in first segment or prostomium in many forms. Clitellum generally only two or three segments and more anterior in position than in Terricolae.

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  • The brain con sists not only of a group of six capsules corre sponding to the archi cerebrum of the Oligo chaeta, but of a further mass of cells surrounding S S and existing below the alimentary canal, which can be analysed into five or six more separate ganglia.

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  • Did it spring from the fertile brain of some court lady, Marie, or another?

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  • There the unity of conception and aim, the firm grip of all the different lines of argument and their relation to each other, which are required, can only be given by a single brain.

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  • Talk in this Ossian-like vein showed that Napoleon's brain no longer worked clearly: it was a victim to his egotism and passion.

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  • The brain innervates the eyes and feelers, and must be regarded as a " syncerebrum " representing the ganglia of the three foremost limb-bearing somites united with the primitive cephalic lobes.

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  • - Brain of Cockroach from side.

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  • In front of the three masses that will form the sub-oesophageal ganglion the mass of cells that is to form the nervous system is very large, and projects on each side; this anterior or " brain " mass consists of three lobes (the prot-, deut-, and tritencephalon of Viallanes and others), each of which might be thought to represent a segmental ganglion.

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  • These three divisions subsequently form the supra-oesophageal ganglion or brain proper.

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  • This connexion feeler; e,of eye; b, brain.

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  • " Life may be something not only ultra-terrestrial, but even immaterial, something outside our present categories of matter and energy; as real as they are, but different, and utilizing them for its own purpose " (Life and Matter, p. 198), The theory of psychophysical parallelism recognizes that while there is a correspondence between mental and material phenomena, changes in the mind and changes in the brain, the former cannot be explained by the latter, as the transition from the one to the other is unthinkable.

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  • William James distinguishes the transmissive function of the brain from the productive in relation to thought, and admits only the former, and not the latter (Human Immortality, p. 32).

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  • Thus as life is transcendent and yet immanent in body, and mind in brain, and both utilize their organs, so God, transcendent and immanent, uses the course of nature for His own ends; and the emergence both of life and mind in that course of nature evidences such a divine initiative as is assumed in the recognition of the possibility of miracles.

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  • Protonemertini, in which there are two layers of dermal muscles, external circular and internal longitudinal; the nervous system lies external to the circular muscles; the mouth lies behind the level of the brain; the proboscis has no stylet; there is no caecum to the intestine.

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  • Metanemertini, in which the nervous system lies inside the dermal muscles in the parenchyma; the mouth lies in front of the level of the brain; the proboscis as a ru'e bears stylets; the intestine nearly always has a caecum.

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  • Heteronemertini, in which the dermal musculature is in three layers, an external longitudinal, a middle circular, an internal longitudinal; the nervous system lies between the first and second of these layers; the outer layer of longitudinal muscles is a new development; there is no intestinal caecum; no stylets on the proboscis and the mouth is behind the level of the brain.

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  • This very effective and elaborate innervation, which has been directly traced to the brain, whence strong nerves (generally two) enter the proboscis, renders it exceedingly probable that the most important functions of the proboscis are of a sensiferous, tactile nature.

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  • At the circular insertion of the proboscis in front of the brain the muscular fibres belonging to the anterior extremity of the body and those connected with the proboscis are very intimately interwoven, forming a strong attachment.

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  • - Brain and that are at the base of the scale.

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  • The brain must be opening; u.l, superior brainlooked upon as the anterior thicklobe; pl., posterior brain-lobe.

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  • It stretches forward as far as the brain, and in Carinella is again continued in front of it, whereas in the Heteronemertines the innervation of the anterior extremity of the head, in front of the brain, takes the form of more definite and less numerous branching stems. The presence of this plexus in connexion with the central stems, sending out nervous filaments amongst the muscles, explains the absence, in Pro-, Mesoand Heteronemertines, of separate and distinct peripheral nerve stems springing from the central stems innervating the different organs and body-regions, the only exceptions being the L.N.

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  • - The brain of a Nemertine, with its lobes and commissures.

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  • In addition to the nerves starting from the brain-lobes just now especially mentioned, there is a double apparatus which can hardly be treated of in conjunction with the sense organs, because its sensory functions have not been sufficiently made out, and which will therefore rather be considered along with the brain and central nervous system.

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  • To it belong (a) superficial grooves or deeper slits situated on the integument near the tip of the head, (b) nerve lobes in immediate connexion with the nervous tissue of the brain, and (c) ciliated ducts penetrating into the latter and communicating with the former.

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  • What we do find is a slight transverse furrow on each side of the head, close to the tip, but the most careful examination of sections made through the tissues of the head and brain shows the absence of any further apparatus comparable to that described above.

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  • Only in one species, Carinella inexpectata, a step in advance has been made, in so far as in connexion with the furrow just mentioned, which is here also somewhat more complicated in its arrangement, a ciliated tube leads into the brain, there to end blindly amidst the nervecells.

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  • In some cases, especially when the lobes lie before the brain, their distance from it, as well as the length of these nervous connexions, has considerably increased.

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  • In all Heteronemertines there is on each side of the head a longitudinal slit of varying length but generally considerable depth, in the bottom of which the dark red brain is very plainly visible by transparency.

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  • The more highly organized species have often very numerous eyes (Amphiporus, Drepanophorus), which are provided with a spherical refracting anterior portion, with a cellular " vitreous body," with a layer of delicate radially arranged rods, with an outer sheath of dark pigment, and with a separate nerve-twig each, springing from a common or double pair of branches which leave the brain as n.

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  • The anterior opening, the mouth, is situated ventrally, close to the tip of the head and in front of the brain in the Metanemertini, somewhat more backward and behind the brain in the other Nemertines.

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  • Anteriorly it finally communicates with the lacunae just mentioned, which surround the oesophagus, bathe the posterior lobes of the brain, pass through the nerve ring together with the proboscidian sheath, and are generally continued in front of the brain as a lacunar space in the muscular tissue, one on each side.

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  • lateral nerve; 21, oesophageal nerve; 22, mouth; 23, ventral ganglion of brain; 24, dorsal ganglion of brain; 25, rhynchodaeum.

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  • The vast myth of the Ring is related in full several times in each of the three main dramas, with ruthless disregard for the otherwise magnificent dramatic effect of the whole; hosts of original dramatic and ethical ideas, with which Wagner's brain was even more fertile than his voluminous prose works would indicate, assert themselves at all points, only to be thwarted by repeated attempts to allegorize the philosophy of Schopenhauer; all efforts to read a consistent scheme, ethical or philosophical, into the result are doomed to failure; but all this matters little, so long as we have Wagner's unfailing later resources in those higher dramatic verities which present to us emotions and actions, human and divine, as things essentially complex and conflicting, inevitable as natural laws, incalculable as natural phenomena.

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  • For not only has the weight been more than quadrupled in some of the larger breeds, and the structure of the skull and other parts of the skeleton greatly altered, but the proportionate size of the brain has been reduced and the colour and texture of the fur altered in a remarkable manner.

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  • The brain is relatively large and the intelligence high.

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  • The motley body of Aryan folk-belief, when subjected to the unifying thought of a speculative brain, was transformed to a selfcontained theory of the universe and a logical dualistic principle.

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  • He sustained severe injuries in a fall from horseback which permanently affected his brain, and was persuaded by his friends to retire.

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  • In 1876 eye (and brain) trouble caused him to obtain sick leave, and finally, in 1879, to be pensioned.

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  • To get drunk for the sake of the drink was the mark of a beast; but wine was a powerful stimulant to the brain, and to fuddle oneself in order to think great thoughts was worthy of a sage.

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  • Patten, W., " Brain and Sense Organs of Limulus," Quart.

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  • Writing to a friend in July 1846, he says - "I am going to tell you of a fresh project that has been brewing in my brain.

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  • Towards the close of 1828 he felt the approach of a fatal malady - a tumour in the brain - and devoted his last days to a careful revisal of his unpublished researches and industrial processes, dictating several papers on these subjects, which were afterwards published in the Philosophical Transactions.

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  • Theorems and formulae are appropriated wholesale without acknowledgment, and a production which may be described as the organized result of a century of patient toil presents itself to the world as the offspring of a single brain.

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  • It has been argued that the elaborate structural adaptations of the nervous system which are the corporeal correlatives of Theory complicated instincts must have been slowly built up by the transmission to offspring of acquired ex perience, that is to say, of acquired brain structure.

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  • The later stages of evolution leading from his ape-like ancestors to man have consisted definitely in the acquirement of a larger and therefore more educable brain by man and in the consequent education of that brain.

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  • This factor is the Record of the Past, which grows and develops by laws other than those affecting the perishable bodies of successive generations of mankind, and exerts an incomparable influence upon the educable brain, so that man, by the interaction of the Record and his educability, is removed to a large extent from the status of the organic world and placed in a new and unique position, subject to new laws and new methods of development unlike those by which the rest of the living world is governed.

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  • Education is not in its essential nature a training administered to the young by an older generation, but is the natural and unaided assimilation of the Record of the Past by the automatically educable brain - an assimilation which is always in all races very large but becomes far larger in civilized communities.

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  • It is among them so important whilst the Record in all its details is so far beyond the receptive capacity of the brain, that selection and guidance are employed by the elders in order to enable the younger generation to benefit to the utmost by the absorption (so to speak) in the limited span of a lifetime of the most valuable influences to be acquired from this prodigious envelope of Recorded Experience.

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  • From 1816 he published various papers in the Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, which formed the basis of his Pathological and Practical Researches on Diseases of the Brain and Spinal Cord, and of his Researches on the Diseases of the Intestinal Canal, Liver and other Viscera of the Abdomen, both published in 1828.

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  • Thus the brain falls off in bulk, and the muscles become attenuated, and in no muscle is this more notable than in the case of the heart.

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  • Skin-grafting and regeneration of bone are among not the least remarkable applications of pathological principles to the combat with disease in recent times; and in this connexion may also be mentioned the daring acts of surgery for the relief of tumours of the brain, rendered practicable by improved methods of localization.

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  • It accumulates in the brain, and there generates the" nervous fluid "or pneuma - a theory closely resembling that of Mead on the" nervous liquor,"unless indeed Mead borrowed it from Hoffmann.

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  • Nor was the northern school wanting in special investigators, such as John Abercrombie (1780-1844), known for his work on diseases of the brain and spinal cord, published in 1828, and many others.

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  • The terrible nervous sequels of some forms of inflammation of the membranes of the brain, again, are due primarily to microbic invasion rather of the membranes than of their nervous contents; and many other diseases may be added to this list.

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  • These events, although far more mischievous in the brain, the functions of which are far-reaching, and the collateral circulation of which is ill-provided, are seen very commonly in other parts.

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  • It is in the structure of the brain itself that modern research has attained the most remarkable success.

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  • The results of these experimental researches by many inquirers into the constitution of the brain have transformed our conceptions of cerebral physiology, and thrown a flood of light on the diseases of the brain.

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  • The remarkable discovery of the dual nature of the nervous system, of its duplex development as a lower and upper system of "neurons," has shed much light upon the problems of practical medicine, but this construction is described under Brain; Neuropathology; Muscle And Nerve, &C.

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  • By the revelations of this instrument not only have the diseases of the eye been illuminated, but much light has been thrown also upon the part of the eye in more general maladies; as, for instance, in syphilis, in diabetes, in kidney diseases, and in diseases of the brain - F.

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  • It may be presumed with some certainty that his attentions to women were for the most part platonic; indeed, both on the good and the bad side of him, he was all brain.

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  • The second point of difference between tapeworms and Trematodes lies in the absence of a definitely demonstrable " brain."

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  • The concentration of nervous matter and ganglionic substance at the oral end of Trematodes is equivalent to the " brain " of the Planarians, but the similar thickening in the scolex of Cestodes is by no means so certainly to be called by that name.

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  • Those Cestodes which possess no very distinct organ of attachment (such, for example, as Gyrocotyle) have no distinct ganglionic thickening more pronounced at one end of the body than at the other; and as these are forms which have retained more primitive features than the rest, and show closer affinity to the Trematodes, it seems highly probable that the complicated nervous thickening found in the scolex, and often compared with the " brain " of other Platyelmia, is a structure sui generis developed within the limits of the sub-class.

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  • II.-A, a Coenurus from the brain of the sheep; the numerous scolices arise by invaginations of the bladder.

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  • Cysticercus cellulosae may be comparatively innocuous in a muscle or subcutaneous tissue, but most hurtful in the eye or brain.

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  • I I) in the brain of sheep; allied forms occur mature in the dog and larval in the rabbit.

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  • A, Dorsal view showing the nervous system and digestive system; a, mouth; b, pharynx; c, d, e, gut; E, post-genital union of two limbs of gut; f, excretory pore; g, vaginal pore; h, j, k, brain and nerves; 1, dorsal nerves; m, ventral nerves; n, adoral sucker; o, posterior sucker; p, hooks on posterior sucker; r, vitello-intestinal duct.

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  • Some of the central cells remain in clumps as "germ-balls," others form a mesenchyma in which "flame-cells" arise; others again give rise to muscles; and at the thicker end of the body, rudiments of the brain and digestive system are observable.

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  • A pair of "eye-spots" develops immediately over the brain.

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  • This is followed by the atrophy of many of the larval organs, including the brain, the sense-organ and the ciliated ring.

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  • x, Brain.

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  • It is no detriment to Comte's fame that some of the ideas which he recombined and incorporated in a great philosophic structure had their origin in ideas that were produced almost at random in the incessant fermentation of Saint-Simon's brain.

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  • They went no farther than Vienna, where Mr Hallam, returning to the hotel on the 15th of September 1833, found his son lying dead on a sofa: a blood-vessel had broken in his brain.

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  • In 1901, Professor Max Neuberger of Vienna called attention to certain anticipations of modern views made by Swedenborg in relation to the functions of the brain.

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  • It is clear that Swedenborg showed (150 years before any other scientist) that the motion of the brain was synchronous with the respiration and not with the action of the heart and the circulation of the blood, a discovery the full bearings of which are still far from being realized.

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  • He had arrived at the modern conception of the activity of the brain as the combined activity of its individual cells.

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  • The nervous system consists of a ganglion or brain, which lies dorsally about the level of the junction of the pharynx and the stomach, a nerve ring and a segmented neutral cord.

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  • An attack of scarlatina led to brain fever, and he had scarcely recovered when he fell a victim to cholera, of which he died in Paris on the 24th of August 1832.

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  • The book is most probably the work of a single author, but it was not written wholly at one date, nor have all the parts come directly from one brain.

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  • Over-exertion, however, brought on softening of the brain, which compelled him to resign office on the 24th of March 1863, and ultimately resulted in his death on the 1st of August 1866.

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  • This resulted in an inflammation of the upper membrane of the brain, delirium and death.

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  • His highly nervous organization made his feelings acute, and his brain incessantly active..

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  • Alexander, exaggerating the part he had played in the final struggle, and with some vague idea of nationality in his brain, demanded that the whole of Poland should be added to the Russian dominions.

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  • All potassium salts if taken in large doses are cardiac depressants, they also depress the nervous system, especially the brain and spinal cord.

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  • Cecil was not a political genius; no great ideas emanated from his brain.

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  • The apical end of the rotifer usually narrows suddenly beyond the curve of the gut and the cloacal aperture to form the foot of pseudopodium which ends in an organ of attachment, a pair of movable toes, each with the opening of a cement-gland (gl) at its tip. Thus for orientation we place the rotifer like the cuttle-fish, head downwards: the ciliated disk is basal or oral, proximal to the rest of the animal, the foot is apical, and the brain and cloacal aperture are anterodorsal.

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  • The eyes are refractive globules set in a cup of red pigment traversed by a nerve fibre, and lie on the proximal side of the body, directly on the postero-dorsal surface of the brain, or at a little distance from it, on the neck, often within the circle on the corona, and usually well within the transparent body.

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  • The extraing to foot of rotifers; at, median blastoporic opening of antenna, united by a nerve to br, brain the cloaca leads us to a (letter omitted in B); bl, bladder, re ver y different view, which ceiving ramified kidney in B, C, D; finds negative support f, foot, and f.g, its cement-gland;.

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  • We may note that it was long since shown that the apical organ (at first assumed to be the brain) of these larvae was innervated from an anterior thickening of the circular nerve ring, corresponding with the brain of Rotifers; the nerve cells immediately below the pit are the ordinary bipolar From H.

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  • Thus certain physical changes in the brain result in a given action; the concomitant mental desire or volition is in no sense causally connected with, or prior to, the physical change.

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  • During an attack of fever he made observations on himself with reference to the action of quickened circulation upon thought, which led him to the conclusion that psychical phenomena were to be accounted for as the effects of organic changes in the brain and nervous system.

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  • And the smooth hemispheres of the brain do not extend backwards so as to cover any part of the cerebellum.

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  • He was also a man of strong brain, generous nature and fine taste.

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  • In Fors, which was continued month by month for seven years, Ruskin poured out his thoughts, proposals and rebukes on society and persons with inexhaustible fancy, wit, eloquence and freedom, until he was attacked with a violent brain malady in the spring of 1878 (aet.

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  • In 1882 he had another serious illness, with inflammation of the brain; but he recovered sufficiently to travel to his old haunts in France and Italy - his last visit.

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  • He now suffered from frequent attacks of brain irritation and exhaustion, and had many causes of sorrow and disappointment.

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  • Although the brain is relatively larger, the bones of the limbs, especially the short, five-toed feet, approximate to those of the Amblypoda and Proboscidea; but in the articulation of the astragalus with both the navicular and cuboid Arsinoitherium is nearer the former than the latter group. It is probable, however, that these resemblances are mainly due to parallelism in development, and are in all three cases adaptations necessary to support the enormous weight of the body.

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  • br, Brain.

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  • Consciousness is entirely unaffected by physostigmine, there being apparently no action on any part of the brain above the medulla oblongata.

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  • Thus Karl Christoph Vogt repeated the saying of the French physician Cabanis, " The brain is determined to thought as the stomach is to digestion, or the liver to the secretion of bile," in the form, " Thought stands in the same relation to the brain as the bile to the liver or the urine to the kidneys."

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  • His definitely expressed view was that psychical activity is " nothing but a radiation through the cells of the grey substance of the brain of a motion set up by external stimuli."

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  • He is certain, however, that the law of substance somehow proves that conscious soul is a mere function of brain, that soul is a function of all substances, and that God is the force or energy, or soul or spirit, of nature.

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  • It is at least as materialistic to say that unconscious mind is an attribute of nature as to say that conscious mind is an attribute of brain; and this is the position of Haeckel.

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  • Matter, according to him, impresses the afferent nervous system, this the brain, this the efferent nervous system, while consciousness remains a mere spectator.

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  • The close dependency of all mental operations on brain also tempts them to the conclusion that brain is not only an organ, but the whole organ of conscious mind.'

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  • To the evolutionary biologist brain is apt to appear to be the crowning object of knowledge.

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  • (c) He explains the rise of consciousness by supposing that, while it requires brain as a condition, it consists in the emancipation of intelligence from will at the moment when in sensation the individual mind finds itself with an idea without will.

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  • Herbart and Lotze, both deeply affected by the Leibnitzian hypothesis of indivisible monads, supposed that man's soul is seated at a central point in the brain; and Lotze supposed that this supposition is necessary to explain the unity of consciousness.

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  • He rightly argued against the old theory that the continuity of nervous processes in the brain is interrupted by mental processes of thought and will: there is a nervous process for every mental process.

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  • Sigwart in his Logic has also opposed the parallelistic view itself; and James has criticized it from the point of view that the soul selects out of the possibilities of the brain means to its own ends.

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  • Within this essential co-ordination he distinguished three values: R-values of the environment as stimulus; C-values of the central nervous system; and E-values of human statements - the latter being characterized by that which at the time of its existence for the individual admits of being named, and including what we call sensations, &c., which depend indirectly on the environment and directly on the central nervous system, but are not, as the materialist supposes, in any way reducible to possessions of the brain or any other part of that system.

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  • Similarly, he supposes our personal individual will is a collective will containing simpler will-unities, and he thinks that this conclusion is proved by the continuance of actions in animals after parts of the brain have been removed.

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  • He agrees with du Bois-Reymond in refusing to regard the universe as a vast brain animated by conscious mind.

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  • The brain resembles that of typical ungulates far more than that of rodents.

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  • At the latter place he spent most of his later years; his health was, however, no longer as vigorous as his brain, and he suffered frequently from sleeplessness.

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  • In a complete albino not only is all pigment absent in the skin, but also that which is normally present in deeper organs, such as the sympathetic nervous system and in the substantia nigra of the brain.

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  • Brain >>

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  • Passion alone could shake the double fortress of her impregnable heart and ever-active brain.

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  • From that date until 1672 it was his brain and his will that guided the affairs of the United Netherlands.

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  • The soul, located in the ventricles of the brain, is affected by the temperament of the individual; the dry temperament produces acute intelligence; the moist, memory; the hot, imagination.

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  • Parker observes of their brain capacity and is an additional testimony to their low morphological rank.

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  • A post mortem examination was held, which showed not only grave derangement in the stomach and other organs, but a serious lesion of the brain.

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  • Then stealthily entering the box, he discharged a pistol at the head of the president from behind, the ball penetrating the brain.

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  • The body is composed of a large number of segments; the prostomium bears a pair of tentacles; the nervous system consists of a brain and longitudinal ventral nerve cords closely connected with the epidermis (without distinct ganglia), widely separated in Saccocirrus, closely approximated in Protodrilus, fused together in Polygordius; the coelom is well developed, the septa are distinct, and the dorsal and ventral longitudinal mesenteries are complete; the nephridia are simple, and open into the coelom.

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  • There is a welldeveloped brain dorsal, to the mouth; this gives off a pair of oesophageal commissures, which surround the oesophagus and unite in a median ventral nerve-cord which runs between the longitudinal muscles to the posterior end of the body.

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  • A pit or depression, known as "the cerebral organ," opens into the brain just above the mouth; this usually divides into two limbs, which are deeply pigmented and have been called eyes.

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  • d, Brain.

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  • 2, Pigmented pit leading to brain.

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  • 5, The brain.

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  • 6, Blood-sinus of dorsal side surrounding brain and giving off branches to the tentacles.

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  • Every efferent channel, after entrance in the central nervous system, subdivides; of its subdivisions some pass to efferent channels soon, others pass further and further within the cord and brain before they finally reach channels of outlet.

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  • In the monkey the proportions it assumes are still greater, and the number of foci, for distinct movements of this and that member, indeed for the individual joints of each limb, are much more numerous, and together occupy a more extensive surface, though relatively to the total surface of the brain a smaller one.

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  • All this means that the execution of natural movements employs simultaneous co-operative activity of a number of points in the motor fields on both sides of the brain together.

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  • The motor field of the cortex is, taken altogether, relatively to the size of the lower parts of the brain, larger in the anthropoid than in the inferior monkey brains.

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  • brain still more increased even than the motor field are:the great regions of the cortex outside that field, which yield no definite movements under electric excitation, and are for that reason known as "silent."

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  • The motor field, therefore, though absolutely larger, forms a smaller fraction of the whole cortex of the brain than in the lower forms. The statement that in the anthropoid (orang-outan) brain the groups of foci in the motor fields of the cortex are themselves separated one from another by surrounding inexcitable cortex, has been made and was one of great interest, but has not been confirmed by subsequent observat'on.

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  • The area in man is known as the motor centre for speech; in most persons it exists only in the left half of the brain and not in the right.

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  • In a similar way damage of a certain small portion of the temporal lobe of the brain produces loss of intelligent apprehension of words spoken, although there is no deafness and although words seen are perfectly apprehended.

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  • The nervous paths in the brain and cord, as they attain completion, Toes Ank,e Knee

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  • The respiratory rhythm is less frequent and the breathing less deep; the heart-beat is less frequent; the secretions are less copious; the pupil is narrow; in the brain there exists arterial anaemia with venous congestion, so that the blood-flow there is less than in the waking state.

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  • It has been suggested that the gradual cumulative result of the activity of the nerve cells during the waking day is to load the brain tissue with "fatigue-substances" Theories of which clog the action of the cells, and thus periodi cally produce that loss of consciousness, &c., which is sleep. Such a drugging of tissue by its own excreta is known in muscular fatigue, but the fact that the depth of sleep progressively increases for an hour and more after its onset prevents complete explanation of sleep on similar lines.

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  • The limbs were relatively slender, and the brain was small.

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  • It lies on the River Brain, an affluent of the Blackwater, also known as the Guith, a form connected with the name Witham.

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  • In 1858 he resigned his seat in the house, owing to incipient softening of the brain, of which he died on the 29th of August 1861.

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  • Lack of the power of brain concentration and severe inability to undergo the mental strain of arduous work are often the penalty which white races pay.

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  • A wound received at the battle of Woeringen had affected his brain, and an insurrection against him was in 1316 headed by his son Reinald, who assumed the government under the title of "Son of the Count."

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  • The mouth is terminal or subterminal; there is a weak sucking pharynx situated behind the brain, and a long intestine lying along the medio-ventral body-cavity; it ends in a cloaca which receives the vasa deferentia in the male.

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  • There is a single unsegmented nerve-cord which runs along the ventral middle line and enlarges posteriorly into a caudal ganglion and anteriorly in a ganglion, the brain, which is not supra-oesophageal.

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  • The exalted atmosphere of the great man's ideas was too rarefied for the child's intellectual health, and a brain well fitted to do excellent work in the world was ruined by the effort to live up to an impossible ideal.

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  • He was also regarded as an authority in diseases of the nerves and brain.

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