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bradford

bradford

bradford Sentence Examples

  • It has also been conferred during the closing years of the 19th century by letters patent on other cities - Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, Bristol, Sheffield, Leeds, Cardiff, Bradford, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Belfast, Cork.

  • He was president of the mathematical and physical section of the British Association at Bradford in 1873 and of the London Mathematical Society in 18 741876.

  • Part of the parish, Tyersall, is in the borough of Bradford.

  • The Kennet and Avon Canal, between Reading and the Avon, follows the river closely from Bradford down to Bath, where it enters it by a descent of seven locks.

  • The length of the river, excluding minor sinuosities, is about 75 m., the distance from Bradford to Bath being to m., thence to Bristol 12 m., and thence to the mouth 8 m.

  • Here also are a tablet marking the location of the old fort (1621), which was also used as a place of worship, a tablet showing the site of the watch-tower built in 1643, and a marble obelisk erected in 1825 in memory of Governor William Bradford.

  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.

  • Plymouth was the first permanent white settlement in New England, and dates its founding from the landing here from the "Mayflower" shallop of an exploring party of twelve Pilgrims, including William Bradford, on the 21st of December (N.s.) 1620.

  • - For the sources of the early history of Plymouth consult (George) Mourt's Relation, or Journal of the Plantation of Plymouth (Boston, 1865, and numerous other editions); William Bradford's History of the Plimouth Plantation (Boston, 1858, and several later editions), the most important source of information concerning Plymouth before 1646; the Plymouth Colony Records (12 vols., Boston, 1855-1861); the Records of the Town of Plymouth (3 vols., Plymouth, 1889-1903); J.

  • But the speech which most exasperated his political opponents was one which he delivered at Bradford in March 1914, just after the incident of the Curragh.

  • It was of about 180 tons burden, and in company with the "Speedwell" sailed from Southampton on the 5th of August 1620, the two having on board 120 Pilgrims. After two trials the "Speedwell" was pronounced unseaworthy, and the "Mayflower" sailed alone from Plymouth, England, on the 6th of September with the zoo (or 102) passengers, some 41 of whom on the lzth of November (o.s.) signed the famous "Mayflower Compact" in Provincetown Harbor, and a small party of whom, including William Bradford, sent to choose a place for settlement, landed at what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts, on the 11th of December (21st N.s.), an event which is celebrated, as Forefathers' Day, on the 22nd of December.

  • Dugmore who have done much remarkable work in bird photography; Dallas Lore Sharp, Bradford Torrey, E.

  • from Bradford, on the Great Northern and the Lancashire & Yorkshire railways.

  • Halifax ranks with Leeds, Bradford and Huddersfield as a seat of the woollen and worsted manufacture.

  • Bradford, who, as Miss Wilmot, had resided with the princess between 1803 and 1808, and had suggested their preparation.

  • Bradford (Bradauford, Bradeford) was the site of a battle in 652 between Kenwal and his kinsman Cuthred.

  • In 1001 Æthelred gave this monastery and the town of Bradford to the nunnery of Shaftesbury, in order that the nuns might have a safe refuge against the insults of the Danes.

  • Bradford appears as a borough in the Domesday survey, and is there assessed at 42 hides.

  • Bradford was at one time the centre of the clothing industry in the west of England, and was especially famous for its broadcloths and mixtures, the waters of the Avon being especially favourable to the production of good colours and superior dyes.

  • The industry declined in the 18th century, and in 1740 we find the woollen merchants of Bradford petitioning for an act of parliament to improve their trade and so re-establish their credit in foreign markets.

  • Bainbridge suggests that a retention of metabolic products may cause the oedema in renal disease, Bradford having previously shown that loss of a certain amount of renal tissue caused retention of metabolic products in the tissues.

  • JOSHUA REED GIDDINGS (1795-1864), American statesman, prominent in the anti-slavery conflict, was born at Tioga Point, now Athens, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, on the 6th of October 1795.

  • JOHN SHARP (1645-1714), English divine, archbishop of York, was born at Bradford on the 16th of February 1645, and was educated at Christ's College, Cambridge.

  • of the Cambridge Modern History, and edited William Bradford's History of the Plimouth Plantation (1896) and the Correspondence of Susan Ferrier (1898)'.

  • In 1782 he entered on the duties of the ministry, being appointed by Wesley to the Bradford (Wiltshire)circuit.

  • Franklin's rival, Andrew Bradford, forestalled him by three days with the American Magazine (1741) edited by John Webbe, which ran only to two numbers.

  • Among the Reformers were, of course, Martin Luther and most of his German collaborators; the Swiss Zwingli, Bullinger, Farel and Calvin; the English Latimer, John Bradford, John Jewel; the Scot John Knox.

  • of Bradford, on the Midland railway.

  • BRADFORD, a city of McKean county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.,.

  • Bradford is situated 1427 ft.

  • The place was first settled about 1827; in 1838 it was laid out as a town and named Littleton; in 1858 the present name, in honour of William Bradford (1755-1795), was substituted; and Bradford was incorporated as a borough in 1873, and was chartered as a city in 1879.

  • Kendall borough was annexed to Bradford in 1893.

  • Bradford clay >>

  • Upon the death of the first governor, John Carver, in the spring of 1621, the General Court chose William Bradford as his successor, and with him was chosen one assistant.

  • In 1629 Governor Bradford procured from the same council a definite grant of the tract which corresponds to the south-eastern portion of the present state.

  • In history, Winthrop and Bradford laid the foundations of her story in the very beginning; but the best example of the colonial period is Thomas Hutchinson, and in later days Bancroft, Sparks, Palfrey, Prescott, Motley and Parkman.

  • The colonial historical classics are William Bradford, History of Plimoth Plantation (pub.

  • There are eight colleges in England, viz., besides Mansfield and Cheshunt, New and Hackney Colleges, London; Western College, Bristol; Yorkshire United College, Bradford; Lancashire Independent College, Manchester; the Congregational Institute, Nottingham.

  • Men so moved so to act could hardly be commonplace; and so among them we find characters strong and marked, with equal ability to rule and to obey, as William Bradford (1590-1657) and Brewster, Edward Winslow (1595-1655) and Miles Standish (1584-1656), John Winthrop (1588-1649) and Dr Samuel Fuller, and men so inflexible in their love of liberty and faith in man as Roger Williams and young Harry Vane.

  • The first newspaper of New York, the New York Gazette, was established in 1725 by William Bradford as a semiofficial organ of the administration.

  • Bradford (New York, 1890-1891).

  • In the report of the joint committee appointed for the purpose by the county boroughs of Bradford, Hull, Leeds, Rotherham and Sheffield in 1908, the following conclusions were drawn: (I) Cows' milk freshly drawn from the udder by ordinary methods contains bacteria.

  • The schools of the city, both public and private, are of high standing; they include Bradford Academy (1803) for girls and the St James School (Roman Catholic).

  • Bradford, a town (largely residential) lying on the opposite bank of the river, became a part of the city in 1897.

  • Bradford.

  • In the measurement of woollen and other textile fabrics, as to quality, strength, number of threads, &c., there exists at Bradford a voluntary standardizing institution known as the Conditioning House (Bradford Corporation Act 1887), the work of which has been extended to a chemical analysis of fabrics.

  • See Bradford (disambiguation) for articles sharing the title Bradford.

  • BRADFORD, a city, and municipal, county and parliamentary borough, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England, 192 m.

  • The Temperance hall is of interest inasmuch as the first hall of this character in England was erected at Bradford in 1837.

  • As a commercial centre Bradford is advantageously placed with regard to both railway communication and connexion with the Humber and with Liverpool by canal, and through the presence in its immediate vicinity of valuable deposits of coal and iron.

  • Engineering and iron works (as at Bowling and Low Moor) are extensive; and the freestone of the neighbourhood is largely quarried, and in Bradford itself its use is general for building.

  • The trade of Bradford, according to an official estimate, advanced between 1836 and 1884 from a total of five to at least thirty-five millions sterling, and from not more than six to at least fifty staple articles.

  • Bradford was created a city in 1897.

  • One feature of municipal activity in Bradford deserves special notice - there is a municipal railway, opened in 1907, extending from Pateley Bridge to Lofthouse (6 m.) and serving the Nidd valley, the district from which the main water-supply of the city is obtained.

  • Bradford, which is mentioned as having belonged before 1 066, with several other manors in Yorkshire, to one Gamel, appears to have been almost destroyed during the conquest of the north of England and was still waste in r086.

  • The earl of Lancaster's attainder being reversed in 1327, Bradford, with his other property, was restored to his brother and heir, Henry Plantagenet, but again passed to the crown on the accession of Henry IV., through the marriage of John of Gaunt with Blanche, one of the daughters and heirs of Henry Plantagenet.

  • Bradford was evidently a borough by prescription and was not incorporated until 1847.

  • Before the 19th century Bradford was never represented in parliament, but in 1832 it was created a parliamentary borough returning two members.

  • granted to certain feoffees in whom he had vested his manor of Bradford a market on Thursday every week and two yearly fairs, one on the feast of the Deposition of St William of York and two days preceding, the other on the feast of St Peter in Cathedra and two days.

  • Leland in his Itinerary says that Bradford is "a praty quik Market Toune.

  • The first mill in Bradford was built in 1798; there were 20 mills in the town in 1820, 34 in 1833, and 70 in 1841; and at the present time there are over 300, of much greater magnitude than the earlier factories.

  • See John James, History of Bradford (1844, new and enlarged ed., 1866); A.

  • Bradford, Pennsylvania >>

  • Bradford and H.

  • JOHN BRADFORD (1510?- 1 555), English Protestant martyr, was born at Manchester in the early part of the reign of Henry VIII., and educated at the local grammar school.

  • William Bradford (Governor) >>

  • of Bradford, on the Lancashire & Yorkshire, Great Northern, and London & North-Western railways.

  • In 1794 William Bradford, attorney-general of the United States, decided that all rights in the 4,000,000 acres, on which the Ohio Company had secured an option for the Scioto Company, were legally vested in the Ohio Company.

  • The dairy business is largest in the regions around Philadelphia and Pittsburg, and in Erie and Bradford counties.

  • Cattle other than dairy cows as well as horses and sheep are most numerous in the western counties, in Bradford county on the north border, and in some of the counties of the south-east.

  • More than two-thirds of the state's crop of 1899 was produced in Lancaster county, which is one of the largest tobacco-producing counties in the United States, and most of the other third was produced in York, Tioga, Bradford and Clinton counties.

  • Bradford; all under Lt.-Comm.

  • Bradford ("Orion") got to the top of a derrick with a grapnel, leapt on to the mole, secured it and fell back shot into the water.

  • In 1549 he matriculated at Queens' College, Cambridge, and in May 1550 he migrated to Pembroke Hall, where he had the martyr John Bradford for a tutor.

  • He published Mourt's Relation, or Journal of the Beginning and Proceedings of the English Plantation at Plimoth (1622), apparently written by William Bradford and Edward Winslow, and went to Plymouth, Mass., in the "Anne" in 1623.

  • "I was in the depths of grief," said Bright, when unveiling the statue of his friend at Bradford in 1877, "I might almost say of despair, for the life and sunshine of my house had been extinguished."

  • He spoke at great gatherings at Edinburgh, Glasgow, Bradford and Manchester, and his speeches filled the papers.

  • The first settlement in the vicinity was made in May 1772, when Moravian Indian converts migrated from Pennsylvania (Friedenshiitten, Bradford county, and Friedenstadt, Lawrence county) to Schoenbrunn, called by the Indians Welhik-Tuppeek, a spring (now dry) a little south of the present New Philadelphia.

  • of Bradford, on the Lancashire & Yorkshire, Great Northern and London & North-Western railways.

  • He was at this time M.P. for Bradford (1869-1874), having previously (1852-1867) sat for Rochdale.

  • Walter Bradford Woodgate >>

  • Bradford Prince William T.

  • Bradford Prince, Historical Sketches of New Mexico (New York, 1883); H.

  • In the north of England a similar education society was formed in 1804 at Bradford, Yorkshire, which has since been removed to Rawdon, near Leeds.

  • It was not until the introduction of cotton warps into the Bradford trade about 1836 that the true qualities of alpaca could be developed in the fabric. Where the cotton warp and mohair or alpaca weft plain-cloth came from is not known, but it was this simple yet ingenious structure which enabled Titus Salt, then a young Bradford manufacturer, to utilize alpaca successfully.

  • Bradford is still the great spinning and manufacturing centre for alpacas, large quantities of yarns and cloths being exported annually to the continent and to the United States, although the quantities naturally vary in accordance with the fashions in vogue, the typical "alpaca-fabric" being a very characteristic "dress-fabric."

  • - 1905 4,954 Owing to the success in the manufacture of the various styles of alpaca cloths attained by Sir Titus Salt and other Bradford manufacturers, a great demand for alpaca wool arose, and this demand could not be met by the native product, for there never seems to have been any appreciable increase in the number of alpacas available.

  • Dwight, Minot Pratt (c. 1805-1878), the head farmer, who, like George Partridge Bradford (1808-1890), left in 1845, and Warren Burton (1810-1866) a preacher and, later, a writer on educational subjects.

  • of Bradford, on the Lancashire & Yorkshire, Great Nothern, and London & North Western railways.

  • See Justin Winsor, History of Duxbury (Boston, 1849); and Laurence Bradford, Historic Duxbury in Plymouth County (Boston, 1900) .

  • In 1627 Governor William Bradford of Plymouth protested by letter to the Dutch against their occupancy, and this warning from the Pilgrims was repeated at least twice.

  • Such are Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield, Huddersfield and Halifax on the great and densely peopled West Riding coal-field, which lies on the eastern slope of the Pennines.

  • Bradford; -ham (O.E.

  • Thus, an average below 4.4 is quoted for Rochdale, Halifax, Huddersfield, Yarmouth, Bradford and Stockport, while the average for London was 7.93, and for Gateshead, Newcastle-uponTyne and South Shields, in the northern industrial district of the Tyne, and for Devonport, the average exceeded 8.

  • Main line - Manchester, Rochdale, Tormorden, Wakefield and Normanton, with branches to Halifax, Bradford, Leeds, Huddersfield and other centres of the West Riding.

  • Donne soon after formed part of the brilliant assemblage which Lucy, countess of Bradford, gathered around her at Twickenham; we possess several of the verse epistles he addressed to this lady.

  • Becoming in due time a woollen manufacturer in a large way at Bradford, Yorkshire (from which after his marriage he moved to Burley-inWharf edale), he soon made himself known as a practical philanthropist.

  • But he was highly esteemed in the West Riding, and in 1861 he was returned unopposed for Bradford.

  • In 1874 he was again returned for Bradford, in spite of Dissenting attacks, and he took his full share of the work of the Opposition Front Bench.

  • When the Redistribution Act divided Bradford into three constituencies, Forster was returned for the central division, but he never took his seat in the new parliament.

  • Simms, was privately printed by the Bradford Club, New York, in 1867.

  • The community at Malmesbury increased, and Aldhelm was able to found two other monasteries to be centres of learning at Frome and at Bradford on Avon.

  • The little church of St Lawrence at Bradford dates back to his time and may safely be regarded as his.

  • From 1877 to 1886 he was principal of Airedale College, Bradford, a post which he gave up to become the first principal of Mansfield College, Oxford.

  • adjoining cottages from Lady Torrington, the daughter of the Earl of Bradford.

  • The book was launched to coincide with the Bradford Dementia Group's ten-year anniversary.

  • Dr. Charlotte Roberts is a Senior Lecturer in biological anthropology at the University of Bradford.

  • Carnival clubs from Bradford and Harrogate have made their debut appearance at Leeds.

  • Colin has personally driven the drugs agenda in Bradford, securing the backing of local authorities and partners to address drugs issues.

  • Protesters hung a banner at a Morrisons store in Bradford branding it the " UK's worst seafood retailer " .

  • bequeathed more than 200,000 glass negatives to Bradford Museums and Galleries.

  • brainchild of the academy director John Bradford.

  • POUND CAKE FROM BRADFORD 12oz Self raising flour 8 oz butter or margarine 8 oz sugar 1 lemon 4 eggs.

  • This ' floral ' temporary cenotaph was erected in Bowling Park, Bradford, shortly after the war.

  • The original Bradford shield featured a red and blue per pale field bearing an engrailed gold chevron between three hunting horns.

  • Titus Salt stood almost alone in fitting smoke burners to his factory chimneys in Bradford.

  • The second was to take my ONC in textile coloration at Bradford College.

  • There would be constant comings and goings of churchwardens and parishioners, as well as friends and family from Bradford.

  • findings of a survey of Asian older people in Bradford.

  • freight trains than the Bradford On Avon line is.

  • gallows signal was the last intact Midland signal in the Bradford district.

  • goal of the season in the match against Bradford.

  • Lincolnshire £ 4,500 Sep 26th 73 Maintenance joiner We require a maintenance joiner for an ongoing temporary contract in the Bradford area.

  • His cousin, Barbara, recalls his turning up back in Bradford on a motor bike sporting a Scottish kilt.

  • maxillofacial surgeon at St Luke's Hospital, Bradford.

  • John Hustler died 1790 A Bradford Quaker and wool merchant.

  • Despite the recent setbacks in Bradford and Oldham, we have become a more multicultural and mostly cosmopolitan society.

  • A pioneering conference introducing peacemakers from around the world will soon be held at the University of Bradford.

  • An internationally renowned photographer of the Islamic world will be hosting a creative workshop for teenage school children in Bradford next week.

  • picturesque village located in the moors above Keighley, near Bradford.

  • In 1918, Bradford et al described ' acute infective polyneuritis ' .

  • Christopher Angel was ordained priest by Bishop Roche in St Joseph's Catholic Church, Bradford on Saturday 17 June.

  • well-being profiling This one-day course is designed to facilitate the use of the Bradford Dementia Group's ' Well-Being Profiling Tool ' .

  • Coming from an inner city area of Bradford, Mohammed left school with no formal qualifications.

  • renowned photographer of the Islamic world will be hosting a creative workshop for teenage school children in Bradford next week.

  • run-down area of Bradford, lately the red light district - leaves much to be desired.

  • Coming from an inner city area of Bradford, Mohammed left school with no formal qualifications.

  • second-string clash against Bradford at Hillsborough yesterday did not go ahead due to a waterlogged pitch.

  • Stockport's success against Bradford - their first in almost four months - earned them a little self-respect.

  • The hard ' grit ' sandstones and intervening shales of the Millstone Grit outcrop west of Bradford and to the north of Leeds.

  • Next chance meeting finds the best Punk sneer in Bradford, ' Dave Wilcox ' .

  • Bradford Center Regeneration is hosting a VIP Marquee in the square, now sold-out, celebrating the city's changing landscape.

  • Dr. Steve Worrall is a consultant oral & maxillofacial surgeon at St Luke's Hospital, Bradford.

  • read a testimonial from our Ashford Office, our Bedford Office, or our Bradford Office.

  • tramrse drawn streetcars came to the streets of Bradford in 1882.

  • undersellfelt that these were often undersold and overwhelmed by the negative aspects of Bradford.

  • For example, a parish vicar in Bradford has enabled a major regeneration scheme to provide neighborhood facilities.

  • At Bradford a module has twelve weeks of teaching.

  • worsted manufacturer from Bradford, who agonized over the need to employ children in his factory.

  • PLG AQUATICS bradford west Yorkshire We travel the country sorting out pond proble.. .

  • It has also been conferred during the closing years of the 19th century by letters patent on other cities - Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, Bristol, Sheffield, Leeds, Cardiff, Bradford, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Belfast, Cork.

  • He was president of the mathematical and physical section of the British Association at Bradford in 1873 and of the London Mathematical Society in 18 741876.

  • Part of the parish, Tyersall, is in the borough of Bradford.

  • The Kennet and Avon Canal, between Reading and the Avon, follows the river closely from Bradford down to Bath, where it enters it by a descent of seven locks.

  • The length of the river, excluding minor sinuosities, is about 75 m., the distance from Bradford to Bath being to m., thence to Bristol 12 m., and thence to the mouth 8 m.

  • Here also are a tablet marking the location of the old fort (1621), which was also used as a place of worship, a tablet showing the site of the watch-tower built in 1643, and a marble obelisk erected in 1825 in memory of Governor William Bradford.

  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.

  • Plymouth was the first permanent white settlement in New England, and dates its founding from the landing here from the "Mayflower" shallop of an exploring party of twelve Pilgrims, including William Bradford, on the 21st of December (N.s.) 1620.

  • - For the sources of the early history of Plymouth consult (George) Mourt's Relation, or Journal of the Plantation of Plymouth (Boston, 1865, and numerous other editions); William Bradford's History of the Plimouth Plantation (Boston, 1858, and several later editions), the most important source of information concerning Plymouth before 1646; the Plymouth Colony Records (12 vols., Boston, 1855-1861); the Records of the Town of Plymouth (3 vols., Plymouth, 1889-1903); J.

  • But the speech which most exasperated his political opponents was one which he delivered at Bradford in March 1914, just after the incident of the Curragh.

  • It was of about 180 tons burden, and in company with the "Speedwell" sailed from Southampton on the 5th of August 1620, the two having on board 120 Pilgrims. After two trials the "Speedwell" was pronounced unseaworthy, and the "Mayflower" sailed alone from Plymouth, England, on the 6th of September with the zoo (or 102) passengers, some 41 of whom on the lzth of November (o.s.) signed the famous "Mayflower Compact" in Provincetown Harbor, and a small party of whom, including William Bradford, sent to choose a place for settlement, landed at what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts, on the 11th of December (21st N.s.), an event which is celebrated, as Forefathers' Day, on the 22nd of December.

  • Dugmore who have done much remarkable work in bird photography; Dallas Lore Sharp, Bradford Torrey, E.

  • from Bradford, on the Great Northern and the Lancashire & Yorkshire railways.

  • Halifax ranks with Leeds, Bradford and Huddersfield as a seat of the woollen and worsted manufacture.

  • Bradford, who, as Miss Wilmot, had resided with the princess between 1803 and 1808, and had suggested their preparation.

  • Bradford (Bradauford, Bradeford) was the site of a battle in 652 between Kenwal and his kinsman Cuthred.

  • In 1001 Æthelred gave this monastery and the town of Bradford to the nunnery of Shaftesbury, in order that the nuns might have a safe refuge against the insults of the Danes.

  • Bradford appears as a borough in the Domesday survey, and is there assessed at 42 hides.

  • Bradford was at one time the centre of the clothing industry in the west of England, and was especially famous for its broadcloths and mixtures, the waters of the Avon being especially favourable to the production of good colours and superior dyes.

  • The industry declined in the 18th century, and in 1740 we find the woollen merchants of Bradford petitioning for an act of parliament to improve their trade and so re-establish their credit in foreign markets.

  • Bainbridge suggests that a retention of metabolic products may cause the oedema in renal disease, Bradford having previously shown that loss of a certain amount of renal tissue caused retention of metabolic products in the tissues.

  • JOSHUA REED GIDDINGS (1795-1864), American statesman, prominent in the anti-slavery conflict, was born at Tioga Point, now Athens, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, on the 6th of October 1795.

  • JOHN SHARP (1645-1714), English divine, archbishop of York, was born at Bradford on the 16th of February 1645, and was educated at Christ's College, Cambridge.

  • of the Cambridge Modern History, and edited William Bradford's History of the Plimouth Plantation (1896) and the Correspondence of Susan Ferrier (1898)'.

  • In 1782 he entered on the duties of the ministry, being appointed by Wesley to the Bradford (Wiltshire)circuit.

  • Franklin's rival, Andrew Bradford, forestalled him by three days with the American Magazine (1741) edited by John Webbe, which ran only to two numbers.

  • Among the Reformers were, of course, Martin Luther and most of his German collaborators; the Swiss Zwingli, Bullinger, Farel and Calvin; the English Latimer, John Bradford, John Jewel; the Scot John Knox.

  • of Bradford, on the Midland railway.

  • BRADFORD, a city of McKean county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.,.

  • Bradford is situated 1427 ft.

  • The place was first settled about 1827; in 1838 it was laid out as a town and named Littleton; in 1858 the present name, in honour of William Bradford (1755-1795), was substituted; and Bradford was incorporated as a borough in 1873, and was chartered as a city in 1879.

  • Kendall borough was annexed to Bradford in 1893.

  • Bradford clay >>

  • Upon the death of the first governor, John Carver, in the spring of 1621, the General Court chose William Bradford as his successor, and with him was chosen one assistant.

  • In 1629 Governor Bradford procured from the same council a definite grant of the tract which corresponds to the south-eastern portion of the present state.

  • In history, Winthrop and Bradford laid the foundations of her story in the very beginning; but the best example of the colonial period is Thomas Hutchinson, and in later days Bancroft, Sparks, Palfrey, Prescott, Motley and Parkman.

  • The colonial historical classics are William Bradford, History of Plimoth Plantation (pub.

  • Ere long these were forced to seek refuge, in 1607 and 1608 respectively, at Amsterdam, whence the Scrooby ohurch moved to Leiden in 1609 (Bradford's History of Plymouth Plantation, chs.

  • There are eight colleges in England, viz., besides Mansfield and Cheshunt, New and Hackney Colleges, London; Western College, Bristol; Yorkshire United College, Bradford; Lancashire Independent College, Manchester; the Congregational Institute, Nottingham.

  • Men so moved so to act could hardly be commonplace; and so among them we find characters strong and marked, with equal ability to rule and to obey, as William Bradford (1590-1657) and Brewster, Edward Winslow (1595-1655) and Miles Standish (1584-1656), John Winthrop (1588-1649) and Dr Samuel Fuller, and men so inflexible in their love of liberty and faith in man as Roger Williams and young Harry Vane.

  • The first newspaper of New York, the New York Gazette, was established in 1725 by William Bradford as a semiofficial organ of the administration.

  • Bradford (New York, 1890-1891).

  • (7) The Jubilee bridge over the Hugli, designed by Sir Bradford Leslie, is a cantilever bridge of another type (fig.

  • In the report of the joint committee appointed for the purpose by the county boroughs of Bradford, Hull, Leeds, Rotherham and Sheffield in 1908, the following conclusions were drawn: (I) Cows' milk freshly drawn from the udder by ordinary methods contains bacteria.

  • The schools of the city, both public and private, are of high standing; they include Bradford Academy (1803) for girls and the St James School (Roman Catholic).

  • Bradford, a town (largely residential) lying on the opposite bank of the river, became a part of the city in 1897.

  • In the measurement of woollen and other textile fabrics, as to quality, strength, number of threads, &c., there exists at Bradford a voluntary standardizing institution known as the Conditioning House (Bradford Corporation Act 1887), the work of which has been extended to a chemical analysis of fabrics.

  • See Bradford (disambiguation) for articles sharing the title Bradford.

  • BRADFORD, a city, and municipal, county and parliamentary borough, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England, 192 m.

  • The Temperance hall is of interest inasmuch as the first hall of this character in England was erected at Bradford in 1837.

  • As a commercial centre Bradford is advantageously placed with regard to both railway communication and connexion with the Humber and with Liverpool by canal, and through the presence in its immediate vicinity of valuable deposits of coal and iron.

  • Engineering and iron works (as at Bowling and Low Moor) are extensive; and the freestone of the neighbourhood is largely quarried, and in Bradford itself its use is general for building.

  • The trade of Bradford, according to an official estimate, advanced between 1836 and 1884 from a total of five to at least thirty-five millions sterling, and from not more than six to at least fifty staple articles.

  • Bradford was created a city in 1897.

  • One feature of municipal activity in Bradford deserves special notice - there is a municipal railway, opened in 1907, extending from Pateley Bridge to Lofthouse (6 m.) and serving the Nidd valley, the district from which the main water-supply of the city is obtained.

  • Bradford, which is mentioned as having belonged before 1 066, with several other manors in Yorkshire, to one Gamel, appears to have been almost destroyed during the conquest of the north of England and was still waste in r086.

  • The earl of Lancaster's attainder being reversed in 1327, Bradford, with his other property, was restored to his brother and heir, Henry Plantagenet, but again passed to the crown on the accession of Henry IV., through the marriage of John of Gaunt with Blanche, one of the daughters and heirs of Henry Plantagenet.

  • Bradford was evidently a borough by prescription and was not incorporated until 1847.

  • Before the 19th century Bradford was never represented in parliament, but in 1832 it was created a parliamentary borough returning two members.

  • granted to certain feoffees in whom he had vested his manor of Bradford a market on Thursday every week and two yearly fairs, one on the feast of the Deposition of St William of York and two days preceding, the other on the feast of St Peter in Cathedra and two days.

  • Leland in his Itinerary says that Bradford is "a praty quik Market Toune.

  • The first mill in Bradford was built in 1798; there were 20 mills in the town in 1820, 34 in 1833, and 70 in 1841; and at the present time there are over 300, of much greater magnitude than the earlier factories.

  • See John James, History of Bradford (1844, new and enlarged ed., 1866); A.

  • Bradford, Pennsylvania >>

  • Bradford and H.

  • JOHN BRADFORD (1510?- 1 555), English Protestant martyr, was born at Manchester in the early part of the reign of Henry VIII., and educated at the local grammar school.

  • Bradford at this time was gay and thoughtless, and to support his extravagance he seems to have appropriated some of the money entrusted to him; but he afterwards made full restitution.

  • William Bradford (Governor) >>

  • of Bradford, on the Lancashire & Yorkshire, Great Northern, and London & North-Western railways.

  • In 1794 William Bradford, attorney-general of the United States, decided that all rights in the 4,000,000 acres, on which the Ohio Company had secured an option for the Scioto Company, were legally vested in the Ohio Company.

  • The dairy business is largest in the regions around Philadelphia and Pittsburg, and in Erie and Bradford counties.

  • Cattle other than dairy cows as well as horses and sheep are most numerous in the western counties, in Bradford county on the north border, and in some of the counties of the south-east.

  • More than two-thirds of the state's crop of 1899 was produced in Lancaster county, which is one of the largest tobacco-producing counties in the United States, and most of the other third was produced in York, Tioga, Bradford and Clinton counties.

  • Bradford; all under Lt.-Comm.

  • Bradford ("Orion") got to the top of a derrick with a grapnel, leapt on to the mole, secured it and fell back shot into the water.

  • In 1549 he matriculated at Queens' College, Cambridge, and in May 1550 he migrated to Pembroke Hall, where he had the martyr John Bradford for a tutor.

  • He published Mourt's Relation, or Journal of the Beginning and Proceedings of the English Plantation at Plimoth (1622), apparently written by William Bradford and Edward Winslow, and went to Plymouth, Mass., in the "Anne" in 1623.

  • "I was in the depths of grief," said Bright, when unveiling the statue of his friend at Bradford in 1877, "I might almost say of despair, for the life and sunshine of my house had been extinguished."

  • He spoke at great gatherings at Edinburgh, Glasgow, Bradford and Manchester, and his speeches filled the papers.

  • JOHN CAM HOBHOUSE BROUGHTON, Baron (1786-1869), English writer and politician, was the eldest son of Sir Benjamin Hobhouse, Bart., by his wife Charlotte, daughter of Samuel Cam of Chantry House, Bradford, Wiltshire.

  • The first settlement in the vicinity was made in May 1772, when Moravian Indian converts migrated from Pennsylvania (Friedenshiitten, Bradford county, and Friedenstadt, Lawrence county) to Schoenbrunn, called by the Indians Welhik-Tuppeek, a spring (now dry) a little south of the present New Philadelphia.

  • of Bradford, on the Lancashire & Yorkshire, Great Northern and London & North-Western railways.

  • He was at this time M.P. for Bradford (1869-1874), having previously (1852-1867) sat for Rochdale.

  • Walter Bradford Woodgate >>

  • Bradford Prince William T.

  • Bradford Prince, Historical Sketches of New Mexico (New York, 1883); H.

  • In the north of England a similar education society was formed in 1804 at Bradford, Yorkshire, which has since been removed to Rawdon, near Leeds.

  • It was not until the introduction of cotton warps into the Bradford trade about 1836 that the true qualities of alpaca could be developed in the fabric. Where the cotton warp and mohair or alpaca weft plain-cloth came from is not known, but it was this simple yet ingenious structure which enabled Titus Salt, then a young Bradford manufacturer, to utilize alpaca successfully.

  • Bradford is still the great spinning and manufacturing centre for alpacas, large quantities of yarns and cloths being exported annually to the continent and to the United States, although the quantities naturally vary in accordance with the fashions in vogue, the typical "alpaca-fabric" being a very characteristic "dress-fabric."

  • - 1905 4,954 Owing to the success in the manufacture of the various styles of alpaca cloths attained by Sir Titus Salt and other Bradford manufacturers, a great demand for alpaca wool arose, and this demand could not be met by the native product, for there never seems to have been any appreciable increase in the number of alpacas available.

  • Dwight, Minot Pratt (c. 1805-1878), the head farmer, who, like George Partridge Bradford (1808-1890), left in 1845, and Warren Burton (1810-1866) a preacher and, later, a writer on educational subjects.

  • of Bradford, on the Lancashire & Yorkshire, Great Nothern, and London & North Western railways.

  • See Justin Winsor, History of Duxbury (Boston, 1849); and Laurence Bradford, Historic Duxbury in Plymouth County (Boston, 1900) .

  • In 1627 Governor William Bradford of Plymouth protested by letter to the Dutch against their occupancy, and this warning from the Pilgrims was repeated at least twice.

  • Such are Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield, Huddersfield and Halifax on the great and densely peopled West Riding coal-field, which lies on the eastern slope of the Pennines.

  • Bradford; -ham (O.E.

  • Thus, an average below 4.4 is quoted for Rochdale, Halifax, Huddersfield, Yarmouth, Bradford and Stockport, while the average for London was 7.93, and for Gateshead, Newcastle-uponTyne and South Shields, in the northern industrial district of the Tyne, and for Devonport, the average exceeded 8.

  • Main line - Manchester, Rochdale, Tormorden, Wakefield and Normanton, with branches to Halifax, Bradford, Leeds, Huddersfield and other centres of the West Riding.

  • Donne soon after formed part of the brilliant assemblage which Lucy, countess of Bradford, gathered around her at Twickenham; we possess several of the verse epistles he addressed to this lady.

  • Becoming in due time a woollen manufacturer in a large way at Bradford, Yorkshire (from which after his marriage he moved to Burley-inWharf edale), he soon made himself known as a practical philanthropist.

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