This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

brackish

brackish

brackish Sentence Examples

  • Fish abound in its waters, which are sweet, save at low-level, when they become brackish.

  • The province of Buenos Aires has more than 600 lakes, the great majority small, and some brackish.

  • These lakes are expanses of brackish waters that spread or Lakes.

  • The so-called lakes on the coast of the Adriatic north and south of the promontory of Gargano are brackish lagoons communicating with the sea.

  • 5), a common British hydroid, produces gonophores; so also does Cordylophora, a form inhabiting fresh or brackish water.

  • Although many plants typical of fresh water are able to grow also in brackish water, there are only a few species which appear to be quite confined to the latter habitats in this country.

  • In the later stages arms of the sea were cut off and were converted at first into lagoons and then into brackish or fresh-water lakes which continued to occupy much of S.

  • They can live in brackish and even in sea water.

  • Between Hatteras and Lookout is Raleigh Bay and between Lookout and Fear is Onslow Bay; and between the chain of islands and the deeply indented mainland Currituck, Albemarle, Pamlico and other sounds form an extensive area, especially to the northward, of shallow, brackish and almost tideless water.

  • Shell with prominent spire; distant from right tentacle, generally appendiculated; brackish water or fluviatile.

  • Gobius alcocki, from brackish and fresh waters of Lower Bengal, is one of the very smallest of fishes, not measuring over 16 millimetres (= 7 lines).

  • There is an extensive swampy lagoon in Eleuthera, the water of which is fresh or nearly so; and brackish lagoons also occur, as in Watling Island.

  • Water is scarce and brackish, and is chiefly found at the bottom of low ranges of hills, which abound in some parts; and the inhabitants of the extensive sandy tracts suffer greatly from the want of it.

  • This was followed by the Sarmatian period, when Hungary was covered by extensive lagoons, the fauna being partly marine and partly brackish water.

  • which live in brackish water, especially Congeria.

  • The water in the pans is usually brackish.

  • This region is relatively flat, in some districts slightly marshy, but the water oozing from the soil is often brackish, and in places large shallow salt lakes are formed.

  • There is an abundant rainfall, but owing to the porous nature of the soil the water percolates into deep caves which have communication with the sea, and becomes brackish.

  • STICKLEBACK, the name applied to a group of small fishes (Gastrosteus) which inhabit the fresh and brackish waters as well as the coasts of the temperate zone of the northern hemisphere.

  • As far as the European kinds are concerned, all may be met with in the brackish water of certain littoral districts.

  • Harbours and shallows covered with Zostera are likewise favourite haunts of this species, although the water may be brackish.

  • Although drinkable, the water of the lake seems at times at least to be very slightly brackish, and it was supposed by some that no outlet existed until, in 1874, Lieutenant Cameron showed that the surplus water was discharged towards the upper Congo by the Lukuga river, about the middle of the west coast.

  • This is the case with all the other lakes except Rudolf, Albert Nyanza and Albert Edward, in which the water ranges from salt to slightly brackish.

  • For the water supply the Aztecs used the main causeway through their city as a dam to separate the fresh water from the hills from the brackish water of Texcoco, and obtained drinking water from a spring at the base of the hill of Chapultepec. The Spaniards added three other springs to the supply and constructed two long aqueducts to bring it into the city.

  • Within a recent geological period, central Aragon was undoubtedly submerged by the sea, and the parched chalky soil remains saturated with salt, while many of the smaller streams run brackish.

  • Tidal waters furnish minute whitebait, and the mud-flats of salt or brackish lagoons and estuaries flounders - both very delicate eating.

  • In the rainy season this valley becomes a sea, flooded by the discharge of the Khanega; in summer the Arabs dig holes here which supply them with brackish water.

  • All the fossil plants and animals of every kind are brought from this continent into a great museum; the latitude, longitude and relative elevation of each specimen are precisely recorded; a corps of investigators, having the most exact and thorough training in zoology and botany, and gifted with imagination, will soon begin to restore the geographic and physiographic outlines of the continent, its fresh, brackish and salt-water confines, its seas, rivers and lakes, its forests, uplands, plains, meadows and swamps, also to a certain extent the cosmic relations of this continent, the amount and duration of its sunshine, as well as something of the chemical constitution of its atmosphere and the waters of its rivers and seas; they will trace the progressive changes which took place in the outlines of the continent and its surrounding oceans, following the invasion§ of the land by the sea and the re-emergence of the land and retreatal of the seashore; they will outline the shoals and deeps of its border seas, and trace the barriers which prevented intermingling of the inhabitants of the various provinces of the continent and the surrounding seas.

  • From a study of remains of the mollusca, brachiopoda and other marine organisms they will determine the shallow water (littoral) and deep water (abyssal) regions of the surrounding oceans, and the clear or muddy, salt, brackish or fresh character of its inland and marginal seas; and even the physical conditions of the open sea at the time will be ascertained.

  • In the centre of Whairikauri is a large brackish lake called Tewanga, which at the southern end is separated from the sea by a sandbank only i 50 yds.

  • Cunnington, in the brackish water of lake Birket el Kerun in the Egyptian Fayum.

  • Its surroundings are bleak and sterile and its waters brackish and polluted with the drainage of the neighbouring city for nearly four centuries.

  • They consist, in most parts of the country, of unconsolidated sediments, consisting of gravel, sand, clay, &c., together with large quantities of tuff, volcanic agglomerate, &c. Some of the sedimentary formations are of marine, some of brackish water, and some of terrestrial origin.

  • The brackish water formations occur in some parts of the same general areas, while the terrestrial formations are found in and about the western mountains.

  • In \Vashington the Eocene is represented by the Puget series of brackish water beds, with an estimated thickness exceeding that of the marine formations of Oregon.

  • Mactra, the right valve of the Rangia; brackish water, Florida.

  • Glaucomyidae.-Siphons very long and united; foot small; shell thin, with deep pallial sinus; fresh or brackish water.

  • Limnocardiidae.-Siphons very long, united throughout; shell gaping; two adductors; brackish waters.

  • Capybaras are aquatic rodents, frequenting the banks of lakes and rivers, and being sometimes found where the water is brackish.

  • Andalusia consists of a great plain, the valley of the Guadalquivir, shut in by mountain ranges on every side except the S.W., where it descends to the Atlantic. This lowland, which is known as Andalucia Baja, or Lower Andalusia, resembles the valley of the Ebro in its slight elevation above sea-level (300-400 ft.), and in the number of brackish lakes or fens, and waste lands (despoblados) impregnated with salt, which seem to indicate that the whole surface was covered by the sea at no distant geological date.

  • The inhabitants of the waters of this geographical phase include mollusca, which are supposed to have lived in brackish or fresh water, such as Anthracomya, Naiadites, Carbonicola, and many forms of Crustacea, e.g.

  • The xerophytic structures found in some of the plants might seem to corroborate this view; but similar structures are assumed by many plants when dwelling in brackish marshes and morasses.

  • Its waters are brackish.

  • The water of the sea, though slightly brackish and not very clear, is generally used for drinking.

  • The Tabighah springs, though abundant, are warm and brackish.

  • At the north end of the plain is `Ain et-Tineh ("spring of the fig-tree"), also a brackish spring with a good stream; south of the plain is `Ain el-Bardeh ("the cold spring"), which is sweet, but scarcely lower in temperature than the others.

  • In its lower course it is much used for irrigation, and the valley is cultivated and populous; yet the water is said to be somewhat brackish.

  • All the lakes are shallow and thc water in them salt or brackish.

  • The _______________ water of el-Kerun is ___________ brackish, though de - -~--- 3/4 rived from the Nile, which has at all seasons _~ il amuchhighenlevel.

  • From the latter a canal or branch led to the Lake of Moeris, which, until the 3rd century B.C., filled the deep, depression of the Fayum, but is now represented only by the strongly brackish waters of the Birket el~KerUn, left in the deepest part.

  • Though situated near the mountainous section of southern Buenos Aires, the immediate vicinity of the city is low and swampy, its water is brackish, and it has been decidedly unhealthy; but a water supply from the Sauce Grande, 50 m.

  • p. 459), or by pouring the water of a brackish stream over a fire of (saline) wood and collecting the ashes, as was done in ancient Germany (Tac. Ann.

  • A considerable number of springs in the country are brackish, being impregnated with chemicals of various kinds or (when near a town) with sewage.

  • Lancelets are found in brackish or salt water, generally near the coast, and have been referred to several genera and many species.

  • In the brackish waters of the east coast sea fish are found, together with pike, perch and other fresh-water forms. The crayfish is common in many places in central and southern Sweden.

  • The water of its upper course and tributaries is sweet, and is conducted across the desert in pipes to some of the coast towns, but in its lower course, as in all the rivers of this region, it becomes brackish.

  • Beyond the Atrek and other rivers watering the northern valleys a few brackish and intermittent rivers lose themselves in the Great Kavir, which occupies the central and western parts of the province.

  • Experiments made by removing mussels from salt water to brackish, and finally to quite fresh water show that it is even more tolerant of fresh water than the oyster; of thirty mussels so transferred all were alive after fifteen days.

  • In this chain of lovely upland lakes, some fresh, some brackish, some completely closed, others connected by short channels, the chief links in their order from north to south are: - Zwai, communicating southwards with Hara and Lamina, all in the Arusi Galla territory; then Abai with an outlet to a smaller tarn in the romantic Baroda and Gamo districts, skirted on the west sides by grassy slopes and wooded ranges from 6000 to nearly 9000 ft.

  • On such an island, in the centre of which a borehole is put down, brackish water may be reached far below the sea-level; the salt water forming a saucer, as it were, in which the fresh water lies.

  • But before this was accomplished the filtration of the effluent became defective, and brackish water was received, which rapidly increased nearly to the saltness of the inflow.

  • During the rains they are formidable torrents, but with the return of the fair weather they dwindle away, and during the hot season, with a few exceptions, they almost dry up. Clear and rapid as they descend the hills, on reaching the lowlands of the Konkan they become muddy and brackish creeks.

  • Sluggish brackish streams creep along between banks of fetid black mud.

  • Regarding the Echinoderms as a whole in the light of the foregoing account, we may give the following analytic summary of the characters that distinguish them from other coelomate animals: They live in salt or brackish water; a primitive bilateral symmetry is still manifest in the right and left divisions of the coelom; the middle coelomic cavities are primitively transformed into two hydrocoels communicating with the exterior indirectly through a duct or ducts of the anterior coelom; stereom, composed of crystalline carbonate of lime, is, with few exceptions, deposited by special amoebocytes in the meshes of a mesodermal stroma, chiefly in the integument; reproductive cells are derived from the endothelium, apparently of the anterior coelom; total segmentation of the ovum produces a coeloblastula and gastrula by invagination; mesenchyme is formed in the segmentation cavity by migration of cells, chiefly from the hypoblast.

  • The tract in which Andkhui stands is fertile, but proverbially unhealthy; the Persians account it "a hell upon earth" by reason of its scorching sands, brackish water, flies and scorpions.

  • The eastern depression, known as the East African trough or rift-valley, contains much smaller lakes, many of them brackish and without outlet, the only one comparable to those of the western trough being Lake Rudolf or Basso Norok.

  • Fish, which abound in the Jordan and in the brackish spring-fed lagoons that exist in one or two places around its shores (such as `Ain Feshkhah), die in a very short time if introduced into the main waters of the lake.

  • 70.00 grains 163.39 175.01 1089 06 5106.00 594'46 7388.21 345.80 10 50 317.57 (1) the explanation of a remarkable line of white foam that extends along the axis of the lake amost every morning - supposed by Blanckenhorn to mark the line of a fissure, thermal and asphaltic, under the bed of the lake, but otherwise explained as a consequence of the current of the Jordan, which is not completely expended till it reaches the Lisän, or as a result of the mingling of the salt water with the brackish spring water especially along the western shore; (2) a northward current that has been observed along the east coast; (3) various disturbances of level, due possibly to differences of barometric pressure; (4) some apparently electrical phenomena that have been observed in the valley.

  • from the lake its waters become brackish, and the vegetation on its banks is scanty.

  • The lake water is clear of a light green colour, and distinctly brackish.

  • brackish water lagoon.

  • brackish marshes, sandy shores, natural wet meadows and sand dunes.

  • brackish lake.

  • brackish ponds of various sizes.

  • brackish water now to the fountain of life!

  • brackish water habitats, and both yield many different types of aquarium fish.

  • Slightly brackish water would perhaps be the ideal, with the specific gravity maintained around the 1.005 mark.

  • The water in these ditches is often brackish - a mixture of salt and fresh water.

  • Their land remained too acid for rice, and shrimp catches declined as the water became less brackish.

  • Estuaries and mangroves are the two best known brackish water habitats, and both yield many different types of aquarium fish.

  • Estuaries and mangroves are the two best known brackish water habitats, and both yield many different types of aquarium fish.

  • guppyt is optional, only some, not all wild guppies live in brackish conditions.

  • The Fleet The Fleet is one of the few remaining undisturbed brackish lagoons left in the world.

  • landlocked brackish lagoon approximately 1200 meters long and 50 meters at its widest point when the lagoon is in flood.

  • mainly marine, but some in brackish and fresh water.

  • tributary: This fish occurs in a massive variety of habitats, from mountain streams to brackish river tributaries.

  • An allied genus Zannichellia (named after Zanichelli, a Venetian botanist), occurring in fresh and brackish ditches and.

  • Fish abound in its waters, which are sweet, save at low-level, when they become brackish.

  • On the southern margin of the pampas are the Colorado and Negro, both large, navigable rivers flowing entirely across the republic from the Andes to the Atlantic. Many of the rivers of Argentina, as implied by their names (Salado and Saladillo), are saline or brackish in character, and are of slight use in the pastoral and agricultural industries of the country.

  • The province of Buenos Aires has more than 600 lakes, the great majority small, and some brackish.

  • These lakes are expanses of brackish waters that spread or Lakes.

  • The so-called lakes on the coast of the Adriatic north and south of the promontory of Gargano are brackish lagoons communicating with the sea.

  • 5), a common British hydroid, produces gonophores; so also does Cordylophora, a form inhabiting fresh or brackish water.

  • Although many plants typical of fresh water are able to grow also in brackish water, there are only a few species which appear to be quite confined to the latter habitats in this country.

  • In the later stages arms of the sea were cut off and were converted at first into lagoons and then into brackish or fresh-water lakes which continued to occupy much of S.

  • They can live in brackish and even in sea water.

  • Between Hatteras and Lookout is Raleigh Bay and between Lookout and Fear is Onslow Bay; and between the chain of islands and the deeply indented mainland Currituck, Albemarle, Pamlico and other sounds form an extensive area, especially to the northward, of shallow, brackish and almost tideless water.

  • Shell with prominent spire; distant from right tentacle, generally appendiculated; brackish water or fluviatile.

  • Gobius alcocki, from brackish and fresh waters of Lower Bengal, is one of the very smallest of fishes, not measuring over 16 millimetres (= 7 lines).

  • While a number of fresh-water, or in some cases brackish, lakes each less than ioo sq.

  • There is an extensive swampy lagoon in Eleuthera, the water of which is fresh or nearly so; and brackish lagoons also occur, as in Watling Island.

  • Water is scarce and brackish, and is chiefly found at the bottom of low ranges of hills, which abound in some parts; and the inhabitants of the extensive sandy tracts suffer greatly from the want of it.

  • This was followed by the Sarmatian period, when Hungary was covered by extensive lagoons, the fauna being partly marine and partly brackish water.

  • which live in brackish water, especially Congeria.

  • The water in the pans is usually brackish.

  • This region is relatively flat, in some districts slightly marshy, but the water oozing from the soil is often brackish, and in places large shallow salt lakes are formed.

  • There is an abundant rainfall, but owing to the porous nature of the soil the water percolates into deep caves which have communication with the sea, and becomes brackish.

  • STICKLEBACK, the name applied to a group of small fishes (Gastrosteus) which inhabit the fresh and brackish waters as well as the coasts of the temperate zone of the northern hemisphere.

  • As far as the European kinds are concerned, all may be met with in the brackish water of certain littoral districts.

  • Harbours and shallows covered with Zostera are likewise favourite haunts of this species, although the water may be brackish.

  • Although drinkable, the water of the lake seems at times at least to be very slightly brackish, and it was supposed by some that no outlet existed until, in 1874, Lieutenant Cameron showed that the surplus water was discharged towards the upper Congo by the Lukuga river, about the middle of the west coast.

  • This is the case with all the other lakes except Rudolf, Albert Nyanza and Albert Edward, in which the water ranges from salt to slightly brackish.

  • Lake Texcoco (Tezcoco or Tezcuco) is a comparatively shallow body of brackish water, with an area of about IIZ sq.

  • For the water supply the Aztecs used the main causeway through their city as a dam to separate the fresh water from the hills from the brackish water of Texcoco, and obtained drinking water from a spring at the base of the hill of Chapultepec. The Spaniards added three other springs to the supply and constructed two long aqueducts to bring it into the city.

  • Within a recent geological period, central Aragon was undoubtedly submerged by the sea, and the parched chalky soil remains saturated with salt, while many of the smaller streams run brackish.

  • Tidal waters furnish minute whitebait, and the mud-flats of salt or brackish lagoons and estuaries flounders - both very delicate eating.

  • In the rainy season this valley becomes a sea, flooded by the discharge of the Khanega; in summer the Arabs dig holes here which supply them with brackish water.

  • All the fossil plants and animals of every kind are brought from this continent into a great museum; the latitude, longitude and relative elevation of each specimen are precisely recorded; a corps of investigators, having the most exact and thorough training in zoology and botany, and gifted with imagination, will soon begin to restore the geographic and physiographic outlines of the continent, its fresh, brackish and salt-water confines, its seas, rivers and lakes, its forests, uplands, plains, meadows and swamps, also to a certain extent the cosmic relations of this continent, the amount and duration of its sunshine, as well as something of the chemical constitution of its atmosphere and the waters of its rivers and seas; they will trace the progressive changes which took place in the outlines of the continent and its surrounding oceans, following the invasion§ of the land by the sea and the re-emergence of the land and retreatal of the seashore; they will outline the shoals and deeps of its border seas, and trace the barriers which prevented intermingling of the inhabitants of the various provinces of the continent and the surrounding seas.

  • From a study of remains of the mollusca, brachiopoda and other marine organisms they will determine the shallow water (littoral) and deep water (abyssal) regions of the surrounding oceans, and the clear or muddy, salt, brackish or fresh character of its inland and marginal seas; and even the physical conditions of the open sea at the time will be ascertained.

  • In the centre of Whairikauri is a large brackish lake called Tewanga, which at the southern end is separated from the sea by a sandbank only i 50 yds.

  • Cunnington, in the brackish water of lake Birket el Kerun in the Egyptian Fayum.

  • Its surroundings are bleak and sterile and its waters brackish and polluted with the drainage of the neighbouring city for nearly four centuries.

  • They consist, in most parts of the country, of unconsolidated sediments, consisting of gravel, sand, clay, &c., together with large quantities of tuff, volcanic agglomerate, &c. Some of the sedimentary formations are of marine, some of brackish water, and some of terrestrial origin.

  • The brackish water formations occur in some parts of the same general areas, while the terrestrial formations are found in and about the western mountains.

  • In \Vashington the Eocene is represented by the Puget series of brackish water beds, with an estimated thickness exceeding that of the marine formations of Oregon.

  • Mactra, the right valve of the Rangia; brackish water, Florida.

  • Glaucomyidae.-Siphons very long and united; foot small; shell thin, with deep pallial sinus; fresh or brackish water.

  • Limnocardiidae.-Siphons very long, united throughout; shell gaping; two adductors; brackish waters.

  • Capybaras are aquatic rodents, frequenting the banks of lakes and rivers, and being sometimes found where the water is brackish.

  • Andalusia consists of a great plain, the valley of the Guadalquivir, shut in by mountain ranges on every side except the S.W., where it descends to the Atlantic. This lowland, which is known as Andalucia Baja, or Lower Andalusia, resembles the valley of the Ebro in its slight elevation above sea-level (300-400 ft.), and in the number of brackish lakes or fens, and waste lands (despoblados) impregnated with salt, which seem to indicate that the whole surface was covered by the sea at no distant geological date.

  • The inhabitants of the waters of this geographical phase include mollusca, which are supposed to have lived in brackish or fresh water, such as Anthracomya, Naiadites, Carbonicola, and many forms of Crustacea, e.g.

  • The xerophytic structures found in some of the plants might seem to corroborate this view; but similar structures are assumed by many plants when dwelling in brackish marshes and morasses.

  • Its waters are brackish.

  • The water of the sea, though slightly brackish and not very clear, is generally used for drinking.

  • The Tabighah springs, though abundant, are warm and brackish.

  • At the north end of the plain is `Ain et-Tineh ("spring of the fig-tree"), also a brackish spring with a good stream; south of the plain is `Ain el-Bardeh ("the cold spring"), which is sweet, but scarcely lower in temperature than the others.

  • Other marine forms are Rhizopoda (Rotalia and Textillaria), the sponge Amorphina, the Amphicteis worm, the molluscs Cardium edule and other Cardidae, and some Amphipods (Cumacea and Mysidae,), but they are forms which either tolerate variations in salinity or are especially characteristic of brackish waters.

  • In its lower course it is much used for irrigation, and the valley is cultivated and populous; yet the water is said to be somewhat brackish.

  • All the lakes are shallow and thc water in them salt or brackish.

  • The _______________ water of el-Kerun is ___________ brackish, though de - -~--- 3/4 rived from the Nile, which has at all seasons _~ il amuchhighenlevel.

  • From the latter a canal or branch led to the Lake of Moeris, which, until the 3rd century B.C., filled the deep, depression of the Fayum, but is now represented only by the strongly brackish waters of the Birket el~KerUn, left in the deepest part.

  • Though situated near the mountainous section of southern Buenos Aires, the immediate vicinity of the city is low and swampy, its water is brackish, and it has been decidedly unhealthy; but a water supply from the Sauce Grande, 50 m.

  • p. 459), or by pouring the water of a brackish stream over a fire of (saline) wood and collecting the ashes, as was done in ancient Germany (Tac. Ann.

  • The conceivable variations in the conditions which would count in algal life are variations in the chemical character of the water - whether fresh, brackish or salt; or in the rate of movement of the water, whether relatively quiet, or a stream or a surf; or in the degree of illumination with the depth and transparency of the water.

  • A considerable number of springs in the country are brackish, being impregnated with chemicals of various kinds or (when near a town) with sewage.

  • This the present writer is inclined to doubt, considering that he has received examples of the normal Amblystoma tigrinum from various parts of Mexico, and that Alfred Duges has described an Amblystoma from mountains near Mexico City; at the same time he feels very suspicious of the various statements to that effect which have appeared in so many works, and rather disposed to make light of the ingenious theories launched by biological speculators who have never set foot in Mexico, especially Weismann's picture of the dismal condition of the salt-incrusted surroundings which were supposed to have hemmed in the axolotl - the brackish Lago de Texcoco, the largest of the lakes near Mexico, being evidently in the philosopher's mind.

  • belong to the delta of the Volga and its brackish lagoons, and 62,290 sq.

  • Lancelets are found in brackish or salt water, generally near the coast, and have been referred to several genera and many species.

  • In the brackish waters of the east coast sea fish are found, together with pike, perch and other fresh-water forms. The crayfish is common in many places in central and southern Sweden.

  • The water of its upper course and tributaries is sweet, and is conducted across the desert in pipes to some of the coast towns, but in its lower course, as in all the rivers of this region, it becomes brackish.

  • Beyond the Atrek and other rivers watering the northern valleys a few brackish and intermittent rivers lose themselves in the Great Kavir, which occupies the central and western parts of the province.

  • Experiments made by removing mussels from salt water to brackish, and finally to quite fresh water show that it is even more tolerant of fresh water than the oyster; of thirty mussels so transferred all were alive after fifteen days.

  • In this chain of lovely upland lakes, some fresh, some brackish, some completely closed, others connected by short channels, the chief links in their order from north to south are: - Zwai, communicating southwards with Hara and Lamina, all in the Arusi Galla territory; then Abai with an outlet to a smaller tarn in the romantic Baroda and Gamo districts, skirted on the west sides by grassy slopes and wooded ranges from 6000 to nearly 9000 ft.

  • Shallow sheets of water termed vleis, usually brackish, accumulate after heavy rain at many places in the plateaus; in the dry seasons these spots, where the soil is not excessively saline, are covered with rich grass and afford favourite grazing land for cattle.

  • On such an island, in the centre of which a borehole is put down, brackish water may be reached far below the sea-level; the salt water forming a saucer, as it were, in which the fresh water lies.

  • But before this was accomplished the filtration of the effluent became defective, and brackish water was received, which rapidly increased nearly to the saltness of the inflow.

  • During the rains they are formidable torrents, but with the return of the fair weather they dwindle away, and during the hot season, with a few exceptions, they almost dry up. Clear and rapid as they descend the hills, on reaching the lowlands of the Konkan they become muddy and brackish creeks.

  • Sluggish brackish streams creep along between banks of fetid black mud.

  • Regarding the Echinoderms as a whole in the light of the foregoing account, we may give the following analytic summary of the characters that distinguish them from other coelomate animals: They live in salt or brackish water; a primitive bilateral symmetry is still manifest in the right and left divisions of the coelom; the middle coelomic cavities are primitively transformed into two hydrocoels communicating with the exterior indirectly through a duct or ducts of the anterior coelom; stereom, composed of crystalline carbonate of lime, is, with few exceptions, deposited by special amoebocytes in the meshes of a mesodermal stroma, chiefly in the integument; reproductive cells are derived from the endothelium, apparently of the anterior coelom; total segmentation of the ovum produces a coeloblastula and gastrula by invagination; mesenchyme is formed in the segmentation cavity by migration of cells, chiefly from the hypoblast.

  • The tract in which Andkhui stands is fertile, but proverbially unhealthy; the Persians account it "a hell upon earth" by reason of its scorching sands, brackish water, flies and scorpions.

  • The eastern depression, known as the East African trough or rift-valley, contains much smaller lakes, many of them brackish and without outlet, the only one comparable to those of the western trough being Lake Rudolf or Basso Norok.

  • Fish, which abound in the Jordan and in the brackish spring-fed lagoons that exist in one or two places around its shores (such as `Ain Feshkhah), die in a very short time if introduced into the main waters of the lake.

  • 70.00 grains 163.39 175.01 1089 06 5106.00 594'46 7388.21 345.80 10 50 317.57 (1) the explanation of a remarkable line of white foam that extends along the axis of the lake amost every morning - supposed by Blanckenhorn to mark the line of a fissure, thermal and asphaltic, under the bed of the lake, but otherwise explained as a consequence of the current of the Jordan, which is not completely expended till it reaches the LisÃn, or as a result of the mingling of the salt water with the brackish spring water especially along the western shore; (2) a northward current that has been observed along the east coast; (3) various disturbances of level, due possibly to differences of barometric pressure; (4) some apparently electrical phenomena that have been observed in the valley.

  • from the lake its waters become brackish, and the vegetation on its banks is scanty.

  • The lake water is clear of a light green colour, and distinctly brackish.

  • Habitat: This fish occurs in a massive variety of habitats, from mountain streams to brackish river tributaries.

Browse other sentences examples →