Brachial plexus sentence example

brachial plexus
  • The initial phase III studies involved patients with Multiple Sclerosis, neuropathic pain, brachial plexus avulsion and cancer pain.

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  • Question 17 A. false B. false C. true D. true E. true There are 3 common approaches to blocking the brachial plexus.

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  • This causes tension on the brachial plexus which may stretch or rupture the nerves.

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  • Air work with the breath to increase respiration and mobilize the shoulder girdle with brachial plexus work and trapezius release.

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  • The brachial plexus is formed by four or five of the lowest cervical nerves; the last nerve of this plexus often marks the boundary of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae.

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  • Injury to the brachial plexus is referred to by various names.

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  • Some names, such as obstetric Erb's palsy, refer to the specific region of the brachial plexus where the injury has occurred.

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  • The nerves of the brachial plexus are the fifth through the eighth cervical nerves (C5, C6, C7, and C8) and the first thoracic nerve (T1).

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  • Every brachial plexus injury is different, depending on the affected nerve or nerves and the extent and severity of the injury.

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  • Most brachial plexus injuries in newborns are of this type.

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  • An avulsion is the most severe form of brachial plexus injury.

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  • A minor brachial plexus injury can be a stretched nerve that results in a short-circuit in a few of the nerve fibers, causing temporary paralysis.

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  • Most injuries to the brachial plexus during birth involve the C5 and C6 nerve roots, affecting the movement of the shoulder, upper arm, and elbow.

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  • Obstetric Erb's palsy is an injury in the upper brachial plexus involving C5 and C6 and sometimes C7.

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  • Also called Erb/Klumpke palsy, total plexus palsy involves all of the nerve roots of the brachial plexus to at least some extent.

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  • An infant's shoulder becomes stuck on the mother's pelvic bone during birth; the infant's neck may be stretched and the brachial plexus injured as the physician pulls on the baby to free it before circulatory or respiratory stress occurs.

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  • Although brachial plexus injuries can occur during any birth, there are particular risk factors.

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  • The highest rates of brachial plexus injury (7.8%) occur in newborns weighing over 10 lb (4.5 kg) who are born by assisted vaginal delivery to diabetic mothers.

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  • Some 50-70 percent of brachial plexus injuries occur in larger-than-average newborns, usually those over 7.7 lb (3.5 kg).

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  • Breech deliveries increase the risk of brachial plexopathy by 175-fold, often causing bilateral injuries to the lower nerve roots of the brachial plexus.

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  • Therefore, stretch or praxis injuries to the brachial plexus usually heal on their own within about three months, leading to complete recovery.

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  • About ten percent of brachial plexus injuries in infants require surgery.

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  • In another study of 28 infants with damage to the upper brachial plexus and 38 infants with total plexus palsy, 92 percent recovered spontaneously.

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  • Total plexus palsy-Erb/Klumpke palsy; a condition resulting from injury involving all of the brachial plexus nerves and affecting the entire upper extremity of the body.

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  • Karaca, P., et al. "Painful paresthesiae are infrequent during brachial plexus localization using low-current peripheral nerve stimulation."

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  • If the delay occurs mainly in one developmental area, the child may have hemiplegia, a brachial plexus injury, such as Erb's or Klumple's palsy, or a broken clavicle.

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