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bowl

bowl

bowl Sentence Examples

  • Candy spilled across the coffee table and a glass bowl was shoved in front of her mouth.

  • Lisa stared at the bowl, the liquid frozen half way up her throat.

  • Lisa sat down and accepted the bowl full of scrambled eggs Sarah passed to her.

  • She tossed the chopped lettuce into a large stainless steel bowl.

  • She scooped the tomatoes into her hands and poured them into a bowl.

  • Maybe a bowl of cereal would help.

  • She pushed a bowl of mashed potatoes toward Adrienne and smiled warmly.

  • She grabbed a bowl and dipped out the last of the oatmeal.

  • Scruffy limped to the bowl and she kneeled beside him.

  • In his hand he held a bowl of ice cream, and his eyes held a welcome spark of humor.

  • He reached for the bowl.

  • She was setting the last bowl on the table when he returned.

  • Scraping the left-overs into a bowl, she ran water to wash the dishes.

  • Her prior night's transgressions were apparently forgotten as she and Betsy acted as compatible as guppies in a fish bowl.

  • The dining room table is cherry and topped with fresh flowers in a crystal bowl.

  • I lined up behind an old fellow whose odor almost caused me to skip the meal entirely but I stuck with it and was rewarded by a tasty bowl of chicken soup and a fresh baked roll.

  • He returned from the kitchen with tray holding a glass of orange juice, a plate with what looked like homemade granola bars, and a small bowl of sliced apples.

  • Sean brought her a bowl of thick beef stew, soda bread, and a Coke.

  • Yully ate slowly, enjoying the stew enough to start a second bowl.

  • Instead, she started a third bowl of the soup and watched the pub fill with people.

  • "Enjoy," Sean said, reappearing from the kitchen doors behind her to place a bowl of warm toffee pudding on the table.

  • He accepted the bowl of soup and sipped in silence for a few minutes.

  • She poured a bowl of cereal, something Martha would have done for herself on a usual day.

  • "Don't drink from your cereal bowl, Hon," she smiled.

  • "I only slurp it back here in the kitchen," she said, setting down the bowl and reaching for her spoon.

  • What about the World Series and the Super Bowl and all that nonsense?

  • The funny thing is, they're creeping up to the wrong food bowl.

  • The call caused Cynthia to tremble with nervous frustration to the point of dropping a favorite sugar bowl, snowing the kitchen floor in white.

  • He crossed to it and saw a shallow bowl filled with water.

  • Gabriel drained the bowl of water and placed the souls in his pocket.

  • "Take these," Gabriel said, handing him the souls he took from the bowl.

  • Gabriel finished collecting the souls from the bowl then straightened, motioning to Landon.

  • Spooning eggs into a plate for Jonathan and a bowl for Destiny, she returned the pan to the stovetop.

  • Leaving Him on the porch with a bowl full of food, she climbed into the car and headed for the hospital.

  • As she entered the kitchen, it was obvious he had made coffee and eaten a bowl of dry cereal.

  • His hands shook as he scooped them into a bowl.

  • Evelyn poured clear, steaming broth into a bowl beside her plate.

  • She hesitated, but Talal entered and reappeared several moments later with a small bowl of water.

  • She handed Evelyn a small bowl of water and then moved to Kiera, handing her a translator.

  • He poured a heaping bowl of Cheerios.

  • He gave no indication he and his mother were leaving and joined Fred at the table when the old man offered him a bowl of cereal.

  • The two fixed lunch—a tuna salad sandwich for Dean and a bowl of soup for Fred.

  • The you in my heaven is the person I create in my mind, the perfect you, who never drinks his milk from the cereal bowl and remembers every birthday and holiday with the nicest card he buys the day before, and he sends roses for no reason at all....

  • Honey, let's go in the kitchen for a few minutes and not bowl the poor woman over before she gets in the door.

  • Jackson picked up an apple from the bowl of fruit, tossed it in the air, caught it, then bit into it.

  • Sarah hurried to kitchen and returned with a bowl.

  • She stretched to capacity and gripped the edge of the bowl.

  • The heavy bowl made an uncontrolled dive off the shelf into her hand, flipping before she caught it with the other.

  • She eyed the bowl skeptically.

  • She left the bowl on the cabinet and settled into the chair, treating Alex to a wry smile.

  • "Goat," Carmen said, barely suppressing a smile as she plunged a spoon into the bowl of mashed potatoes.

  • His attention never wavered and Carmen kept her expression bland as she slapped the potatoes on her plate and then returned the spoon to the bowl.

  • He prepped bandages for her wrist, a bowl and washcloth, and a smaller version of the doc's med-gun, loading it with enough painkiller to knock her out.

  • A steaming bowl of soup awaited her on the coffee table.

  • She set down the bowl, emotions bubbling again.

  • He began his ritual of locking up and putting out a bowl of canned cat food for Mrs. Lincoln, who came on the run at the sound of the refrigerator door.

  • He had stopped off for a bowl of spaghet­ti so it was 7:00 before he dialed the girl's Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania number.

  • He poured a cup of cold coffee from the pot and picked up Mrs. Lincoln in one arm, interrupting her licking the remains of a bowl of chocolate pudding.

  • Dumping it in his food bowl, she watched a moment as he wolfed it down.

  • After cleaning his water bowl out in the big stainless steel sink, she filled the bowl with water and set it on the floor near his food bowl.

  • He sat down in his chair without assisting her and picked up the bowl of mashed potatoes.

  • She was putting the last bowl of food on the table when Alex walked into the kitchen.

  • "Supper will be ready by the time you get washed up," she called to him as she dumped the gravy into a bowl.

  • She filled a plastic bowl with water for the chickens and hauled buckets of water to the horses and buffalo.

  • He had a bowl in one hand and pulled the ottoman closer, seating himself close to her.

  • Hands in the bowl.

  • He gripped the bowl between his knees then took one of her hands in both of his.

  • When he didn't return immediately, her gaze fell to the warm bowl of water.

  • Carmen was standing at the punch bowl greeting people and Alex was behind her talking to someone when Candice stopped at the table.

  • Katie placed a bowl of mashed potatoes on the table and paused, hands on her hips as she gave Carmen an exasperated look.

  • His gaze shifted to a bowl of food.

  • Jessi whirled to see the cat huddled over its bowl of food.

  • She turned on the faucet and let it run until it was hot enough then filled the bowl.

  • She set it in the bowl in the sink then shook her hand.

  • She placed the shirt in the bowl.

  • A 14th-century MS. Book of Prayers in the Francis Douce collection in the Bodleian library at Oxford contains a drawing in which two persons are shown, but they bowl to no mark.

  • Strutt (Sports and Pastimes) suggests that the first player's bowl may have been regarded by the second player as a species of jack; but in that case it is not clear what was the first player's target.

  • The signboard of a wayside inn near Goring Heath in Oxfordshire long bore a portrait of the king with couplets reciting how his majesty "drank from the bowl, and bowl'd for what he drank."

  • In this picture three men are represented as having played a bowl, while the fourth is in the act of delivering his bowl.

  • No bowl must have less than No.

  • It is also a rule that the diameter of the bowl shall not be less than 411n.

  • The bowler delivers his bowl with one foot on a mat or footer, made of india-rubber or cocoanut fibre, the size of which is also prescribed by rule as 24 by 16 in., though, with a view to protecting the green, Australasian clubs employ a much larger size, and require the bowler to keep both feet on the mat in the act of delivery.

  • In theory the game of bowls is very simple, the aim of the player being to roll his bowl so as to cause it to rest nearer to the jack than his opponent's, or to protect a well-placed bowl, or to dislodge a better bowl than his own.

  • So he will endeavour to be "on the jack," the ideal position being a bowl at rest immediately in front of or behind it.

  • Most frequently he will be required either to protect a good bowl or to rectify a possible error of the leader.

  • The third player, who does any measuring that may be necessary to determine which bowl or bowls may be nearest the jack, holds almost as responsible a position as the captain, whose place, in fact, he takes whenever the skip is temporarily absent.

  • The leader having played his first bowl, the opposing leader will play his first and so on.

  • I), the object is to draw as near as possible to the jack, the player's bowl passing outside of two other bowls placed 5 ft.

  • Three points are scored if the bowl come to rest within I ft.

  • A bowl that comes to rest on the central line, or within 6 in.

  • of it, counts three points, a bowl 12 in.

  • away two points, and a bowl 18 in.

  • apart, and straight lines are chalked from bowl to bowl across their back and front faces, and a jack is then deposited equidistant from each bowl and immediately before the front line.

  • Three points are given to the bowl that trails the jack over both lines into the semicircle and goes over them itself.

  • If a bowl trail the jack over both lines, but only itself cross the first; or if it pass both lines, but the jack cross only the first, two points are awarded.

  • A bowl passing between the jack and either of the stationary bowls, and passing over the back line; or touching the jack, yet not trailing it past the first line, but itself crossing the back line; B I) 'B B ' S Feet---?

  • If it stop on the string, or outside of it, the bowl is "dead" and must be removed to the bank.

  • A "toucher" bowl is a characteristic of the Scottish game to which great exception is taken by many English clubs.

  • Should a bowl running jackwards touch the jack, however slightly, it is called a toucher and must be marked by the skip with a chalk cross as soon as it is at rest.

  • Such a bowl is alive until the end is finished wherever it may lie, within the limits of the space.

  • Even if it run into the ditch or be driven in by another bowl, it will yet count as alive.

  • A bowl, however, that is forced on to the jack by another is not a toucher.

  • In forehand play the bowl as it courses to the jack describes its segment of a circle on the right, in backhand play on the left.

  • If he pass between the jack and either bowl he scores one, although it is not easy to see what driving he has done.

  • The played bowl must itself run into the ditch without touching either of the stationary bowls.

  • Held between the thumb and fingers of the right hand, they are used as tongs to take up portions of the food, which is brought to table cut up into small and convenient pieces, or as means for sweeping the rice and small particles of food into the mouth from the bowl.

  • Many rules of etiquette govern the proper conduct of the chopsticks; laying them across the bowl is a sign that the guest wishes to leave the table; they are not used during a time of mourning, when food is eaten with the fingers; and various methods of handling them form a secret code of signalling.

  • These consisted of five vessels, two vases, a bowl and a casket being made of steatite, and the fifth, also a bowl, of crystal.

  • All these vessels are beautifully worked, the crystal bowl especially, with its fish-shaped cover handle, being as a work of art of high merit.

  • The Punch Bowl (behind the city), a hill rising about 500 ft.

  • It is found that the most accurate and convenient apparatus to use is a platinum bowl filled with a solution of silver nitrate containing about fifteen parts of the salt to one hundred of water.

  • Into the solution dips a silver plate wrapped in filter paper, and the current is passed from the silver plate as anode to the bowl as cathode.

  • The bowl is weighed before and after the passage of the current, and the increase gives the mass of silver deposited.

  • The censer used was a hemispherical cup or bowl of bronze, supported by a long handle, fashioned at one end like an open hand, in which the bowl was, as it were, held, while the other end within which the pastils of incense were kept was shaped into the hawk's head crowned with a disk, as the symbol of Re.'

  • Sufficient glass is first " gathered " on the end of a blowing iron to form the bowl of the wine-glass.

  • Under the old system the form of the bowl is gradually developed by blowing and by shaping the bulb with the sugar-tongs tool.

  • The leg is either pulled out from the substance of the base of the bowl, or from a small lump of glass added to the base.

  • The bowl is now severed from its blowing iron and the unfinished wine-glass is supported by its foot, which is attached to the end of a working rod by a metal clip or by a seal of glass.

  • The fractured edge of the bowl is heated, trimmed with scissors and melted so as to be perfectly smooth and even, and the bowl itself receives its final form from the sugar-tongs tool.

  • Under the new system the bowl is fashioned by blowing the slightly hollowed mass of glass into a mould.

  • The bowl is severed from the blowing iron, and the wine-glass is sent to the annealing oven with a bowl, longer than that of the finished glass, and with a rough fractured edge.

  • When the glass is cold the surplus is removed either by grinding, or by applying heat to a line scratched with a diamond round the bowl.

  • They, at any rate, seem to have been the first to grasp the idea that a wine-glass is not merely a bowl, a stem and a foot, but that, whilst retaining simplicity of form, it may nevertheless possess decorative effect.

  • Io, for oval cut-glass Waterford bowl).

  • Babylon; a bowl and a stela of storm-god, both with incised inscriptions; doubtless spoil of war or tribute brought from Syria.

  • The bowl is inscribed round the outside, the stela on the back.

  • inscribed basalt bowl found at Babylon) and fragments of ware painted with dark ornament on light body-clay, or in polychrome on a cream-white slip, or black burnished, found on N.

  • After bidding their family farewell they were carried to the sepulchral cave, nothing but a bowl of milk being left them.

  • The weight of these implements necessitates some provision for turning them at the headlands, and this is supplied either by a bowl wheel, enabling the plough to be turned on one side, or by a pair of wheels cranked so that they can be raised by a lever when the plough is working.

  • The early Jewish portable censer would seem to have been a bowl with a handle, resembling a ladle.

  • There are very numerous representations on the monuments; in some the censer appears as a small cup or bowl held by a human hand to which a long handle is attached on which is a small box to hold the incense.

  • The metallic bowl and mouthpiece of the pipe offered a tempting surface for embellishment, as well as the clasp of the pouch; and the netsuke, being made of wood, ivory or other material susceptible of carving, also gave occasion for art and ingenuity.

  • his aid was "compelled" by the magicians and necromancers to fetch the gods and entertain them with food (especially in the ceremony of gazing into the bowl of oil), and he is invoked by them sometimes as the "Good Ox-herd."

  • - Polychrome Clay Bowl, with incised curves and figure of the earth monster.

  • vii., where the gold spoon of 10 shekels is equal in value to the bowl of 130 shekels, or double that of 70, i.e.

  • And in Greek Panegureis or festivals the sacrificial wine had to be dispensed from one common bowl: " Unto a common cup they come together, and from it pour libations as well as sacrifice," says Aristides Rhetor in his Isthmica in Neptunum, p. 45.

  • The divide between the rivers flowing west and those flowing east and north is very sharp in the southern Rocky Mountains, but there are two lakes, the Committee's Punch Bowl and Fortress Lake, right astride of it, sending their waters both east and west; and there is a mountain somewhat south of Fortress Lake whose melting snows drain in three directions into tributaries of the Columbia, the Saskatchewan and the Athabasca, so that they are distributed between the Pacific, the Atlantic (Hudson Bay) and the Arctic Oceans.

  • In his translations of Euripides' Cyclops, 381, "a bowl I Three cubits wide and four in depth, as much i As would contain four amphorae" the Greek original clearly points to "ten amphorae" and four may have come from the previous line.

  • It consists of five principal parts - the card, the needles, the bowl, a jewelled cap and the pivot.

  • - Section of Thomson's Compass Bowl.

  • The section of a compass bowl in fig.

  • 4 shows the general arrangement of mounting all compass cards in the bowl.

  • The card nearly floats in a bowl filled with distilled water, to which 35% of alcohol is added to prevent freezing; the bowl is hermetically sealed with pure india-rubber, and a corrugated expansion chamber is attached to the bottom to allow for the expansion and contraction of the liquid.

  • All compasses are fitted with a gimbal ring to keep the bowl and card level under every circumstance of a ship's motion in a seaway, the ring being connected with the binnacle or pedestal by means of journals or knife edges.

  • To compensate (1) A, Bowl, partly in section.

  • L, Nut to expand chamber filling bowl.

  • It is said that the idea of a liquid compass was suggested to Crow -by the experience of the captain of a coasting vessel whose compass card was oscillating wildly until a sea broke on board filling the compass bowl, when the card became steady.

  • The Arab traders in the Levant certainly used a floating compass, as did the Italians before the introduction of the pivoted needle; the magnetized piece of iron being floated upon a small raft of cork or reeds in a bowl of water.

  • 11) is engraved upon the fragments of a bronze bowl dedicated by a certain governor of Qarth-hadasht (or Karti-Hadasti, " New City," i.e.

  • 1), in which the king is represented in Persian dress, and the goddess to whom he is offering a bowl looks exactly like an Egyptian Isis-Hathor; the inscription mentions the various objects of bronze and gold, engraved work and temple furniture, which the king dedicated.

  • Used in its widest sense this includes the Hysteriaceae, Phacidiaceae, Helvellaceae, &c. The group is characterized in general by the possession of an ascocarp which, though usually a completely closed structure during the earlier stages of development, at maturity opens out to form a bowl or saucer-shaped organ, thus completely exposing the layer of asci which forms the hymenium.

  • In the treasury of the cathedral is a magnificent silver monstrance dating from 1553, and an octagonal bowl, the Sacro Catino, brought from Caesarea in 1101, which corresponds to the descriptions given of the Holy Grail, and was long regarded as an emerald of matchless value, but was found when broken at Paris, whither it had been carried by Napoleon I., to be only a remarkable piece of ancient glass.

  • Their summits are open and covered with heath but their flanks and the lower ground are magnificently wooded The hills are deeply scored by steep and picturesque valleys, o which the most remarkable is the Devil's Punch Bowl, a hollo of regular form on the west flank of Hindhead.

  • Flat dishes were used in earlier times; gradually deeper forms appear, and lastly the deep bowl with turned-in edge belongs to the close of the prehistoric time and continued common in the earlier dynasties (P.D.P. 19).

  • A remarkable glass bowl with coloured reliefs, said to be Alexandrian work, was found at Olbia in 1913.

  • It appears to be connected with the modern French jale, a bowl, but the ultimate origin is unknown; it has been referred without much plausibility to Gr.

  • Chief among these vessels is the iota, or globular bowl, universally used in ceremonial ablutions.

  • In Annam where water spirits may take the form of serpents or of human beings, two deified heroes were said to have been serpents born of a childless woman, who drank from a bowl of water into which a star had fallen.

  • The fragment of a bronze bowl discovered in Cyprus in 1876, which bears round its edge an inscription dedicating it to BaalLebanon as a gift from a servant of Hiram, king of the Sidonians, is probably the oldest Phoenician document which we possess.

  • This bowl, though perhaps a little earlier than the Moabite stone, in all probability is not more than a century older, while some authorities think it is even later.

  • Next in date amongst Semitic records of the Phoenician type to the bowl of Baal-Lebanon and the Moabite stone comes the Hebrew inscription found in the tunnel at the Pool of Siloam in 1881, which possibly dates back to the reign of Hezekiah (700 B.C.).

  • Carapanos suggests, the statuette and bronze bowl by which divinations were carried on.

  • Besides the implements and weapons of iron there are fibulae and brooches of bronze, weaving combs and spindle-whorls, a bronze mirror and tweezers, wheel-made pottery as well as hand-made, ornamented with Late Celtic patterns, a bowl of thin bronze decorated with bosses, the nave of a wooden wheel with holes for twelve spokes, and a dug-out canoe.

  • The above problem is identical with that of the oscillation of a particle in a smooth spherical bowl, in the neighborhood of the lowest point, If the bowl has any other shape, the axes Ox, Oy may, ..--7 be taken tangential to the lines tof curvature ~ / at the lowest point 0; the equations of small A motion then are dix xdiy (II) c where P1, P2, are the principal radii of curvature at 0.

  • The case of a sphere spinning about a vertical axis at, the lowest point of a spherical bowl is obtained by reversing the signs of a and c. It appears that this position is always stable.

  • He is represented in works of art in the form of a serpent, or of a young man with a cornucopia and a bowl in one hand, and a poppy and ears of corn in the other.

  • He must indeed take with him the sacred fire and implements for domestic sacrifice, but until death overtakes him he must wander silent, alone, possessing no hearth nor dwelling, begging his food in the villages, firm of purpose, with a potsherd for an alms bowl, the roots of trees for a dwelling, and clad in coarse worn-out garments.

  • The chewed material is then placed in a bowl, and water or coco - nut milk is poured over it, the whole is well stirred, and subsequently the woody matter is removed by an ingenious but simple mechanical manipulation.

  • 2 Altar candlesticks consist of five parts: the foot, stem, knob in the centre, bowl to catch the drippings, and pricket (a sharp point on which the candle is fixed).

  • The opium must not be burnt or made too dry, but roasted gently till it looks like burnt worsted; every now and then he takes it away from the flame and rolls it (still on the end of the dipper) on the flat surface of the bowl.

  • When it is roasted and rolled to his satisfaction he gently heats the centre of the bowl, where there is a small orifice; then he quickly thrusts the end of the dipper into the orifice, twirls it round smartly and withdraws it; if this is properly done, the opium (now about the size of a grain of hemp-seed or a little larger) is left adhering to the bowl immediately over the orifice.

  • " The smoker assumes a comfortable attitude (lying down of course) at a proper distance from the lamp. He now puts the stem to his lips, and holds the bowl over the lamp. The heat causes the opium to frizzle, and the smoker takes three or four long inhalations, all the time using the dipper to bring every particle of the opium to the orifice as it burns away, but not taking his lips from the end of the stem, or the opium pellet from the lamp till all is finished.

  • deep. The bottom, slightly conical, has a groove near the circumference to catch the amalgam, which is withdrawn through a discharge-spout into a bowl.

  • The amalgam is dipped out from the bowl into a canvas bag (the strainer), to separate the excess of the quicksilver from the pasty amalgam, which is then retorted and melted.

  • The origin of the latter has been traced to the bowl of burning spice which in Talmudic times was introduced after each meal.

  • The next day, therefore, Gotama set out at the usual hour, carrying his bowl to beg for a meal.

  • Suddhodana, abashed, took his son's bowl and led him to his house.

  • The Didache bids us " pour water on the head," and Christian pictures and sculptures ranging from the 1st to the 10th century represent the baptizand as standing in the water, while the baptizer pours water from his hand or from a bowl over his head.

  • There are many examples in the British Museum from which the form of the various types can be ascertained, the chief points of difference being found in the junction of the bowl with the handle.

  • The earlier English spoon-handles terminate in an acorn, plain knob or a diamond; at the end of the 16th century the baluster and seal ending becomes common, the bowl being "fig-shaped."

  • At the Restoration the handle becomes broad and flat, the bowl is broad and oval and the termination is cut into the shape known as the pied de biche, or hind's foot.

  • In the first quarter of the 18th century the bowl becomes narrow and elliptical, with a tongue or "rat's tail" down the back, and the handle is turned up at the end.

  • The modern form, with the tip of the bowl narrower than the base and the rounded end of the handle turned down, came into use about 1760.

  • Candy spilled across the coffee table and a glass bowl was shoved in front of her mouth.

  • Lisa stared at the bowl, the liquid frozen half way up her throat.

  • Lisa sat down and accepted the bowl full of scrambled eggs Sarah passed to her.

  • She tossed the chopped lettuce into a large stainless steel bowl.

  • She scooped the tomatoes into her hands and poured them into a bowl.

  • Maybe a bowl of cereal would help.

  • She pushed a bowl of mashed potatoes toward Adrienne and smiled warmly.

  • She grabbed a bowl and dipped out the last of the oatmeal.

  • Scruffy limped to the bowl and she kneeled beside him.

  • She picked up her plate and scraped the food into a scrap bowl for the cat.

  • In his hand he held a bowl of ice cream, and his eyes held a welcome spark of humor.

  • He reached for the bowl.

  • She was setting the last bowl on the table when he returned.

  • Scraping the left-overs into a bowl, she ran water to wash the dishes.

  • Her prior night's transgressions were apparently forgotten as she and Betsy acted as compatible as guppies in a fish bowl.

  • The dining room table is cherry and topped with fresh flowers in a crystal bowl.

  • I lined up behind an old fellow whose odor almost caused me to skip the meal entirely but I stuck with it and was rewarded by a tasty bowl of chicken soup and a fresh baked roll.

  • He returned from the kitchen with tray holding a glass of orange juice, a plate with what looked like homemade granola bars, and a small bowl of sliced apples.

  • Sean brought her a bowl of thick beef stew, soda bread, and a Coke.

  • Yully ate slowly, enjoying the stew enough to start a second bowl.

  • Instead, she started a third bowl of the soup and watched the pub fill with people.

  • "Enjoy," Sean said, reappearing from the kitchen doors behind her to place a bowl of warm toffee pudding on the table.

  • He accepted the bowl of soup and sipped in silence for a few minutes.

  • She poured a bowl of cereal, something Martha would have done for herself on a usual day.

  • "Don't drink from your cereal bowl, Hon," she smiled.

  • "I only slurp it back here in the kitchen," she said, setting down the bowl and reaching for her spoon.

  • What about the World Series and the Super Bowl and all that nonsense?

  • The funny thing is, they're creeping up to the wrong food bowl.

  • Cynthia enthusiastically described Yankee Boy, a natural mountain bowl with its picture perfect waterfall and profusion of flowers.

  • The call caused Cynthia to tremble with nervous frustration to the point of dropping a favorite sugar bowl, snowing the kitchen floor in white.

  • He crossed to it and saw a shallow bowl filled with water.

  • Gabriel drained the bowl of water and placed the souls in his pocket.

  • "Take these," Gabriel said, handing him the souls he took from the bowl.

  • Gabriel finished collecting the souls from the bowl then straightened, motioning to Landon.

  • Spooning eggs into a plate for Jonathan and a bowl for Destiny, she returned the pan to the stovetop.

  • Leaving Him on the porch with a bowl full of food, she climbed into the car and headed for the hospital.

  • As she entered the kitchen, it was obvious he had made coffee and eaten a bowl of dry cereal.

  • His hands shook as he scooped them into a bowl.

  • Evelyn poured clear, steaming broth into a bowl beside her plate.

  • She hesitated, but Talal entered and reappeared several moments later with a small bowl of water.

  • She handed Evelyn a small bowl of water and then moved to Kiera, handing her a translator.

  • He poured a heaping bowl of Cheerios.

  • He gave no indication he and his mother were leaving and joined Fred at the table when the old man offered him a bowl of cereal.

  • The two fixed lunch—a tuna salad sandwich for Dean and a bowl of soup for Fred.

  • The you in my heaven is the person I create in my mind, the perfect you, who never drinks his milk from the cereal bowl and remembers every birthday and holiday with the nicest card he buys the day before, and he sends roses for no reason at all....

  • Honey, let's go in the kitchen for a few minutes and not bowl the poor woman over before she gets in the door.

  • Jackson picked up an apple from the bowl of fruit, tossed it in the air, caught it, then bit into it.

  • Sarah hurried to kitchen and returned with a bowl.

  • She stretched to capacity and gripped the edge of the bowl.

  • The heavy bowl made an uncontrolled dive off the shelf into her hand, flipping before she caught it with the other.

  • She eyed the bowl skeptically.

  • She left the bowl on the cabinet and settled into the chair, treating Alex to a wry smile.

  • "Goat," Carmen said, barely suppressing a smile as she plunged a spoon into the bowl of mashed potatoes.

  • His attention never wavered and Carmen kept her expression bland as she slapped the potatoes on her plate and then returned the spoon to the bowl.

  • He prepped bandages for her wrist, a bowl and washcloth, and a smaller version of the doc's med-gun, loading it with enough painkiller to knock her out.

  • A steaming bowl of soup awaited her on the coffee table.

  • She set down the bowl, emotions bubbling again.

  • He began his ritual of locking up and putting out a bowl of canned cat food for Mrs. Lincoln, who came on the run at the sound of the refrigerator door.

  • He had stopped off for a bowl of spaghet­ti so it was 7:00 before he dialed the girl's Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania number.

  • He poured a cup of cold coffee from the pot and picked up Mrs. Lincoln in one arm, interrupting her licking the remains of a bowl of chocolate pudding.

  • Dumping it in his food bowl, she watched a moment as he wolfed it down.

  • After cleaning his water bowl out in the big stainless steel sink, she filled the bowl with water and set it on the floor near his food bowl.

  • He sat down in his chair without assisting her and picked up the bowl of mashed potatoes.

  • She was putting the last bowl of food on the table when Alex walked into the kitchen.

  • "Supper will be ready by the time you get washed up," she called to him as she dumped the gravy into a bowl.

  • She filled a plastic bowl with water for the chickens and hauled buckets of water to the horses and buffalo.

  • He had a bowl in one hand and pulled the ottoman closer, seating himself close to her.

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