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bough

bough

bough Sentence Examples

  • Candidates had further to be fugitives (probably slaves), and as a preliminary had to break off a bough from a specified tree.

  • Frazer (The Golden Bough).

  • Frazer, Golden Bough, ii., iii.; W.

  • The counterspell took the form of a bronze image of the serpent-demon; see Frazer, Golden Bough, ii.

  • The story is compared by Frazer (Golden Bough, 2nd ed., ii.

  • According to this view, the prototypes of Demeter and Persephone are the corn-mother and harvest maiden of northern Europe, the corn-fetishes of the field (Frazer, Golden Bough, 2nd ed., ii.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (2nd ed.), ii.

  • Hence the disastrous effects supposed to follow a breach of taboo; the offender has thrust his hand into the divine fire, which shrivels up and consumes him on the spot" (Frazer, The Golden Bough, i.

  • 20), Sir Noel Paton's " Quarrel " and " Reconciliation of Oberon and Titania," several works by William Etty, Robert Scott Lauder and Sam Bough, Sir Edwin Landseer's " Rent Day in the Wilderness," and the diploma pictures of the academicians, besides many specimens of the modern Scottish school.

  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

  • On its topmost bough sits an eagle, between whom and Nidhug the squirrel Ratatbskr runs to and fro trying to provoke strife.

  • He finally gained possession of the city through the treachery of the king's daughter Scylla, who, enamoured of Minos, pulled out the golden (or purple) lock from her father's head, on which his life and the safety of the city depended (for similar stories, see Frazer, Golden Bough, iii.

  • The nest is a beautifully neat structure, often placed at no great height from the ground, but generally so well hidden by the leafy bough on which it is built as not to be easily found, until, the young being hatched, the constant visits of the parents reveal its site.

  • 2 The nests of the sun-birds, domed with a penthouse porch, and pensile from the end of a bough or leaf, are very neatly built.

  • They associate in parties and are mainly arboreal, leaping from bough to bough with an agility that suggests flying through the air.

  • It was a custom to make a cairn of stones near the wayside statues of Hermes, each passer-by adding a stone; the significance of the practice, which is found in many countries, is discussed by Frazer (Golden Bough, 2nd ed., iii.

  • According to Frazer (Early History of the Kingship, 1905; see also Golden Bough, i., 1 9 00, p. 82), the early Greek kings, who were expected to produce rain for the benefit of the crops, were in the habit of imitating thunder and lightning in the character of Zeus.

  • Thomas in Hastings' Dictionary of Religions; Frazer, Golden Bough; Campbell's Spirit Basis of Belief and Custom; Maclennan's Studies (series 2); V.

  • - Tylor, Primitive Culture; Frazer, Golden Bough; Id.

  • The neighbours said that the fairies caused the phenomenon, as the man had swept his chimney with a bough of holly, and the holly is "a gentle tree," dear to the fairies.

  • Frazer, Golden Bough, iii.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900); A.

  • Frazer connects Purim with the whole series of spring festivals current in western Asia, in which the old god of vegetation was put to death and a new human representative of him elected and allowed to have royal and divine rights, so as to promote the coming harvest (Golden Bough, 2nd.

  • His principal work, The Golden Bough, first published in 1890 (2nd ed.

  • Especial mention should be made of the ceremony of purifying the grove, which was held to be defiled by the felling of trees, the breaking of a bough or the presence of any iron tools, such as those used by the lapidary who engraved the records of the proceedings on stone.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough, ii.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (1900), i.

  • In confinement these apes (of which adult specimens have been exhibited in Calcutta) appear very slow and deliberate in their movements; but in their native forests they swing themselves from bough to bough and from tree to tree as fast as a man can walk on the ground beneath.

  • 9 See, for analogies, Frazer, Golden Bough (2nd ed.), ii.

  • 4 Examples in Frazer, Golden Bough, i.

  • 9 Frazer, Golden Bough, ii.

  • bathing and drenching willing or unwilling victims, dipping holy images in water, and otherwise disturbing springs and fountains (Frazer, Golden Bough, i.

  • A kind of sacramental communion with a snake is found among a Punjab snake-tribe (Frazer, Golden Bough, ii.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900), and Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Georges Lafay, Culte des divinites d'Alexandrie (Paris, 1884); Dollinger, Sectengeschichte des Mittelalters (Munich, 1890); Fr.

  • Frazer's definition in The Golden Bough (2nd ed.), i.

  • An important motif in magico-religious ritual, which may not have been without effect on the development of sacrifice, is, as Dr Frazer's main thesis in The Golden Bough asserts, the imparting of reproductive energy to animals, plants and man himself, its cessation being suggested by such phenomena as old age and the fall of the year.

  • Invested, as society grows more complex, with a sanctity increasingly superior to that of the layman, the priest-king becomes the representative of the community as repository of its luck, whilst, as controller of all sacred forces that bear thereon, he is, as Dr Frazer puts it, " dynamical centre of the universe" (The Golden Bough (2nd ed.), i.

  • 3 Frazer, The Golden Bough (2), ii.

  • For instances in the lower culture see Frazer, Golden Bough (2), i.

  • One form of plough still used consists of a crooked bough, with an iron share attached.

  • 17 See Frazer's Golden Bough, 2nd ed.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough, ii., 1900, p. 281).

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough, ii (1900), pp. 160, 291, who regards the bull and goat form of Dionysus as expressions of his proper character as a deity of vegetation; F.

  • These rites are found all over the world, and in his monumental work, The Golden Bough, Dr Frazer has traced a host of extant beliefs and practices to this source.

  • It will perch on the topmost bough of a tree, if a tree be near, to watch his proceedings, and the cock exhibits all the astounding gesticulations in which the males of so many other Limicolae indulge during the breeding-season - with certain variations, however, that are peculiarly its own.

  • kFrazer (Golden Bough, i.

  • Frazer's ideas are to be found in a work of immense erudition, The Golden Bough (London, 1900).

  • Lang, Magic and Religion (London, 1901), for a criticism in detail of the general theory as set forth in The Golden Bough.

  • Magic and Religion; Dennett, At the Back of the Black Man's Mind; Junod, Les Barotsa; Spieth, Die Ewe-Stamme; Frazer, The Golden Bough.

  • For the new theory of vegetation spirits and corn spirits see The Golden Bough.

  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States; Miss Jane Harrison, Prolegomena to Greek Religion; and Frazer, The Golden Bough, especially as regards the vegetable or " probably arboreal ".aspect of Zeus.

  • bough of a tall oak.

  • bough from the tree.

  • Anna's nephew, Matthew, has bough a cheap, pirated video from a market stall.

  • bough already damaged?

  • There are no more sins to be sinned On the dead oak tree bough.

  • Contents Winter Clouded with snow The bleak winds blow, And shrill on leafless bough The robin with its burning breast Alone sings now.

  • The center piece of the decorations was a large mistletoe bough.

  • In distance is an old tree bough swept down in last years floods.

  • All ignorant we dared to own The joys we now dissemble; The greenfinch on the apple bough Could make my enemies tremble.

  • mistletoe bough.

  • And poised on its top most bough, a crystal crescent moon glistened like spun glass.

  • Candidates had further to be fugitives (probably slaves), and as a preliminary had to break off a bough from a specified tree.

  • Frazer, Golden Bough (1900), ii.

  • Frazer (The Golden Bough).

  • Frazer, Golden Bough, ii., iii.; W.

  • The counterspell took the form of a bronze image of the serpent-demon; see Frazer, Golden Bough, ii.

  • The story is compared by Frazer (Golden Bough, 2nd ed., ii.

  • According to this view, the prototypes of Demeter and Persephone are the corn-mother and harvest maiden of northern Europe, the corn-fetishes of the field (Frazer, Golden Bough, 2nd ed., ii.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (2nd ed.), ii.

  • - Tylor, Primitive Culture; Frazer, Golden Bough; Skeat, Malay Magic; Bastian, Der Mensch in der Geschichte; Callaway, Religion of the Amazulu; Hild, Etude sur les demons; Welcker, Griechische GOtterlehre, i.

  • 28 seq.) exemplify the typical species of Dionysiac orgies that prevailed.4 On the summits of hills and mountains flourished the cult of the givers of increase, and "under every green tree" was practised the licentiousness which in primitive thought was held to secure abundance of crops) see Frazer, Golden Bough, 2nd ed.

  • Hence the disastrous effects supposed to follow a breach of taboo; the offender has thrust his hand into the divine fire, which shrivels up and consumes him on the spot" (Frazer, The Golden Bough, i.

  • 20), Sir Noel Paton's " Quarrel " and " Reconciliation of Oberon and Titania," several works by William Etty, Robert Scott Lauder and Sam Bough, Sir Edwin Landseer's " Rent Day in the Wilderness," and the diploma pictures of the academicians, besides many specimens of the modern Scottish school.

  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

  • On its topmost bough sits an eagle, between whom and Nidhug the squirrel Ratatbskr runs to and fro trying to provoke strife.

  • He finally gained possession of the city through the treachery of the king's daughter Scylla, who, enamoured of Minos, pulled out the golden (or purple) lock from her father's head, on which his life and the safety of the city depended (for similar stories, see Frazer, Golden Bough, iii.

  • The nest is a beautifully neat structure, often placed at no great height from the ground, but generally so well hidden by the leafy bough on which it is built as not to be easily found, until, the young being hatched, the constant visits of the parents reveal its site.

  • 2 The nests of the sun-birds, domed with a penthouse porch, and pensile from the end of a bough or leaf, are very neatly built.

  • They associate in parties and are mainly arboreal, leaping from bough to bough with an agility that suggests flying through the air.

  • It was a custom to make a cairn of stones near the wayside statues of Hermes, each passer-by adding a stone; the significance of the practice, which is found in many countries, is discussed by Frazer (Golden Bough, 2nd ed., iii.

  • 20 seq., that this phrase denotes a human holocaust,' and not, as sometimes has been thought, a mere consecration to Molech by passing through or between fires, as in the Roman Palilia and similar rites elsewhere (on which see Frazer, Golden Bough, 2nd ed., ii.

  • According to Frazer (Early History of the Kingship, 1905; see also Golden Bough, i., 1 9 00, p. 82), the early Greek kings, who were expected to produce rain for the benefit of the crops, were in the habit of imitating thunder and lightning in the character of Zeus.

  • Thomas in Hastings' Dictionary of Religions; Frazer, Golden Bough; Campbell's Spirit Basis of Belief and Custom; Maclennan's Studies (series 2); V.

  • - Tylor, Primitive Culture; Frazer, Golden Bough; Id.

  • The neighbours said that the fairies caused the phenomenon, as the man had swept his chimney with a bough of holly, and the holly is "a gentle tree," dear to the fairies.

  • Frazer, Golden Bough, iii.

  • Frazer's Golden Bough (2nd ed., 'goo) where full references will be found.

  • 1 There can be no doubt that a magical power was ascribed to the anointing oil (cf.Frazer, Golden Bough, 2nd ed., ii.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900); A.

  • Frazer connects Purim with the whole series of spring festivals current in western Asia, in which the old god of vegetation was put to death and a new human representative of him elected and allowed to have royal and divine rights, so as to promote the coming harvest (Golden Bough, 2nd.

  • His principal work, The Golden Bough, first published in 1890 (2nd ed.

  • As Frazer notes (Golden Bough, 2 227), this festival appears to belong to the large class of mimetic charms designed to quicken the growth of vegetation; the marriage of Zeus and Hera would in this case represent the union of the king and queen of May.

  • Especial mention should be made of the ceremony of purifying the grove, which was held to be defiled by the felling of trees, the breaking of a bough or the presence of any iron tools, such as those used by the lapidary who engraved the records of the proceedings on stone.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough, ii.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (1900), i.

  • In confinement these apes (of which adult specimens have been exhibited in Calcutta) appear very slow and deliberate in their movements; but in their native forests they swing themselves from bough to bough and from tree to tree as fast as a man can walk on the ground beneath.

  • 9 See, for analogies, Frazer, Golden Bough (2nd ed.), ii.

  • 4 Examples in Frazer, Golden Bough, i.

  • 9 Frazer, Golden Bough, ii.

  • bathing and drenching willing or unwilling victims, dipping holy images in water, and otherwise disturbing springs and fountains (Frazer, Golden Bough, i.

  • A kind of sacramental communion with a snake is found among a Punjab snake-tribe (Frazer, Golden Bough, ii.

  • 2 (see, however, Frazer, Golden Bough, iii.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900), and Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Georges Lafay, Culte des divinites d'Alexandrie (Paris, 1884); Dollinger, Sectengeschichte des Mittelalters (Munich, 1890); Fr.

  • Frazer's definition in The Golden Bough (2nd ed.), i.

  • An important motif in magico-religious ritual, which may not have been without effect on the development of sacrifice, is, as Dr Frazer's main thesis in The Golden Bough asserts, the imparting of reproductive energy to animals, plants and man himself, its cessation being suggested by such phenomena as old age and the fall of the year.

  • Invested, as society grows more complex, with a sanctity increasingly superior to that of the layman, the priest-king becomes the representative of the community as repository of its luck, whilst, as controller of all sacred forces that bear thereon, he is, as Dr Frazer puts it, " dynamical centre of the universe" (The Golden Bough (2nd ed.), i.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (2nd ed., Lond.

  • 3 Frazer, The Golden Bough (2), ii.

  • For instances in the lower culture see Frazer, Golden Bough (2), i.

  • One form of plough still used consists of a crooked bough, with an iron share attached.

  • 17 See Frazer's Golden Bough, 2nd ed.

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough, ii., 1900, p. 281).

  • Frazer, The Golden Bough, ii (1900), pp. 160, 291, who regards the bull and goat form of Dionysus as expressions of his proper character as a deity of vegetation; F.

  • These rites are found all over the world, and in his monumental work, The Golden Bough, Dr Frazer has traced a host of extant beliefs and practices to this source.

  • It will perch on the topmost bough of a tree, if a tree be near, to watch his proceedings, and the cock exhibits all the astounding gesticulations in which the males of so many other Limicolae indulge during the breeding-season - with certain variations, however, that are peculiarly its own.

  • kFrazer (Golden Bough, i.

  • Frazer's ideas are to be found in a work of immense erudition, The Golden Bough (London, 1900).

  • Lang, Magic and Religion (London, 1901), for a criticism in detail of the general theory as set forth in The Golden Bough.

  • Magic and Religion; Dennett, At the Back of the Black Man's Mind; Junod, Les Barotsa; Spieth, Die Ewe-Stamme; Frazer, The Golden Bough.

  • For the new theory of vegetation spirits and corn spirits see The Golden Bough.

  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States; Miss Jane Harrison, Prolegomena to Greek Religion; and Frazer, The Golden Bough, especially as regards the vegetable or " probably arboreal ".aspect of Zeus.

  • A bird sits on the next bough, life-everlasting grows under the table, and blackberry vines run round its legs; pine cones, chestnut burs, and strawberry leaves are strewn about.

  • When I approached carelessly and alarmed them, they made a sudden splash and rippling with their tails, as if one had struck the water with a brushy bough, and instantly took refuge in the depths.

  • The squirrel ran up the bough of the tree in an attempt to reach the cluster of acorns.

  • We chose the strongest-looking bough of the tree as the base for our treehouse.

  • Using a pine bough as the centerpiece for our dining-room table was a unique and stylish idea.

  • The bigger the bough, the more fruit is likely to sprout from it.

  • The bigger the bough, the more fruit is likely to sprout from it.

  • Susan needs to hire someone to cut down that large pine bough hanging over the power lines.

  • She laid out fake bough after fake bough of orange-tinted leaves in her excitement about fall.

  • In fact, wreaths have evolved from the basic evergreen bough and pine cone variety.

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