This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

botulism

botulism

botulism Sentence Examples

  • Treatment of food poisoning, except for botulism, focuses on preventing or correcting dehydration by replacing critical fluids and electrolytes lost through vomiting and diarrhea.

    2
    2
  • A toxic blue-green algae and botulism have been suspected as well as polluted silt in the lagoon.

    0
    0
  • It could also enables bacteria which cause the disease botulism to develop.

    0
    0
  • There is currently no licensed vaccine in the world to prevent botulism.

    0
    0
  • These bacteria produce a toxin in food which causes a severe illness called botulism which can be fatal.

    0
    0
  • Dr. Gardner theorized that the symptoms of C. perfringens could mimic botulism.

    0
    0
  • Of these, approximately 25% are food-borne, 72% are infant botulism, and the rest are wound botulism.

    0
    0
  • After some research I found:- This medication is actually derived from a bacteria that produces the deadly poison botulism.

    0
    0
  • In 1989 the largest ever outbreak of food-borne botulism in the UK affected 27 people who had consumed hazelnut yogurt.

    0
    0
  • This is due to the very low risk of infant botulism.

    0
    0
  • avian botulism is known to affect all waterfowl including ducks, pelicans, geese and swans.

    0
    0
  • Foodborne botulism is caused by ingestion of the botulinum neurotoxin, which is produced during growth of the organism in food.

    0
    0
  • Types A, B, E and, rarely, F and G are associated with human botulism.

    0
    0
  • botulism toxin.

    0
    0
  • botulism bugs to develop is a risk not worth taking.

    0
    0
  • botulism bacteria.

    0
    0
  • wound botulism is caused by toxin produced from a wound infected with Clostridium botulinum.

    0
    0
  • Intestinal colonization botulism results from colonization of the gut by vegetative cells.

    0
    0
  • clostridium botulinum, which can cause botulism.

    0
    0
  • The signs of botulism are a flaccid paralysis of the skeletal musculature, especially the neck and tongue.

    0
    0
  • Prior to the research, no proven vaccine existed for the deadly botulism toxin.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, honey should not be served to a child under two years of age as it may pose a risk of infant botulism.

    0
    0
  • Because of the high acid in fruits the risk of botulism is very low and it's unnecessary to can using a pressure cooker.

    0
    0
  • H., et al. "A case of type F botulism in southern California."

    0
    0
  • Botulinum toxin is made by the bacteria that cause botulism.

    0
    0
  • However, the amount of botulinum toxin injected to treat spasticity is so small that it would not cause botulism poisoning.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism: a type of botulism, in which Clostridium botulinum bacteria grow within an infant's digestive tract, producing a toxin which is potentially life-threatening.

    0
    0
  • C. botulinum causes both adult and infant botulism and differs significantly from other contaminants in its sources and symptoms.

    0
    0
  • Breathing may be severely compromised in progressive botulism because of failure of the muscles that control the airway and breathing.

    0
    0
  • In infants, botulism may be caused by specific types of clostridia obtained from soil, inhaled spores, or honey containing the spores.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism is a form of botulism first recognized in 1976 that differs from food-borne botulism.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism occurs when a child younger than one year ingests the spores of C. botulinum.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism is much more likely to be fatal than other food poisoning infections.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism is a special form of food poisoning not related to the food-borne toxins that cause adult botulism.

    0
    0
  • Adult botulism outbreaks are usually associated with toxins found in home-canned food, although poisoning occasionally results from eating commercially canned or vacuum-packed foods.

    0
    0
  • Symptoms of adult botulism appear about 18-36 hours after the contaminated food is eaten, although times of onset have been documented ranging from four hours to eight days.

    0
    0
  • Initially a person suffering from botulism feels weak and dizzy and later experiences double vision.

    0
    0
  • Individuals with any signs of botulism poisoning must receive immediate emergency medical care to increase their chance of survival.

    0
    0
  • Early diagnosis of botulism is critical so that treatment can begin in time to avoid neurological involvement.

    0
    0
  • Botulism is treated in an entirely different way.

    0
    0
  • Older children and adults can be treated with injections of a specific antitoxin for botulism if it can be administered within 72 hours after symptoms are first observed.

    0
    0
  • This antiserum is available in the United States through the Infant Botulism Treatment and Prevention Program in Berkeley, California.

    0
    0
  • For food poisoning other than botulism, two homeopathic remedies, either Arsenicum album or Nux vomica, are recommended to help reduce symptoms.

    0
    0
  • Most cases of food poisoning (except botulism) clear up on their own within one week without medical assistance.

    0
    0
  • Botulism is the deadliest of the bacterial food-borne illnesses.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism is perhaps the most difficult poisoning to prevent, because what goes into an infant's mouth is often beyond control.

    0
    0
  • One important preventative measure, however, is to avoid feeding honey to infants younger than 12 months since it is a known source of botulism spores.

    0
    0
  • Botulism is an acute, progressive condition caused by botulinum toxin, a natural poison produced by the spore-forming bacteria Clostridium botulinum.

    0
    0
  • Breathing may be severely compromised in progressive botulism because of failure of the muscles that control the airway and breathing.

    0
    0
  • Botulism occurs only rarely, but its high fatality rate makes it a great concern for those in the general public and in the medical community.

    0
    0
  • Clinical descriptions of botulism reach as far back in history as ancient Rome and Greece.

    0
    0
  • However, the relationship between contaminated food and botulism was not defined until the late 1700s.

    0
    0
  • In 1793 the German physician, Justinius Kerner (1786-1862), deduced that a substance in spoiled sausages, which he called wurstgift (German for sausage poison), caused botulism.

    0
    0
  • Three types of botulism have been identified: food-borne, wound, and infant botulism.

    0
    0
  • Food-borne botulism accounts for 25 percent of all botulism cases and can usually be traced to eating contaminated home-preserved food.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism accounts for 72 percent of all cases.

    0
    0
  • Although domestic food poisoning is a problem worldwide, concern is growing regarding the use of botulism toxin in biological warfare.

    0
    0
  • At the end of the twentieth century 17 countries were known to be developing biological weapons, including the culture of botulism toxins.

    0
    0
  • Botulism spores can cause widespread illness if introduced into the environment.

    0
    0
  • Botulism occurs worldwide, with 90 percent of the comparatively rare cases occurring in the United States.

    0
    0
  • Approximately 110 cases of botulism are reported annually in the United States, with 50 percent of cases in California alone.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism accounts for 72 percent of all cases, far exceeding both food-borne and wound botulism.

    0
    0
  • Food-borne botulism accounts for 25 percent of all cases, primarily due to eating contaminated home-preserved food.

    0
    0
  • Toxins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the main culprit in botulism.

    0
    0
  • The spores then germinate, and the growing bacteria produce the deadly botulism toxin.

    0
    0
  • Scientists have discovered that clostridia can produce at least seven types of botulism toxin, identified as A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.

    0
    0
  • Botulism D toxin can cause illness in cattle, and horses succumb to botulism A, B, and C toxin.

    0
    0
  • There have been no confirmed cases of human or animal botulism linked to the G toxin.

    0
    0
  • Human botulism (caused by botulism toxins A, B, and E) may stem from contaminated food, wound contamination, or the intestinal botulism toxin found in infants.

    0
    0
  • Canned or jarred baby food has also been known to cause botulism.

    0
    0
  • Symptoms of food-borne botulism typically appear within 18 to 36 hours of eating contaminated food, with extremes of four hours to eight days.

    0
    0
  • As botulism progresses, the victim experiences weakness or paralysis, starting with the head muscles and progressing down the body.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism was first described in 1976.

    0
    0
  • As infant botulism progresses, sucking and swallowing (thus eating) become difficult.

    0
    0
  • Confirmed cases of wound botulism have been linked to trauma such as severe crush injuries to the extremities, surgery, and illegal drug use.

    0
    0
  • Wound botulism occurs when Clostridia colonize an infected wound and produce botulinum toxin.

    0
    0
  • The symptoms usually appear four to 18 days after an injury occurs and are similar to food-borne botulism, although gastrointestinal symptoms may be absent.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism may be hard for parents to identify because the symptoms occur slowly.

    0
    0
  • Whether parents are aware of a possible source of the botulism toxin, the suggestive symptoms should not be ignored.

    0
    0
  • Differential diagnosis of botulism can be complex because the symptoms mimic those of other diseases, especially diseases characterized by muscle weakness.

    0
    0
  • Sepsis is the most common initial diagnosis for actual infant botulism, and meningoencephalitis may also be the diagnosis if irritability and lethargy are present.

    0
    0
  • Laboratory tests are used to make a definitive diagnosis, but if botulism seems likely, treatment starts immediately without waiting for test results, which may take up to two days.

    0
    0
  • In infant botulism, the infant's stool may be cultured to isolate the organism; this test may be performed by the state health department or the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

    0
    0
  • Older children and adults with botulism are sometimes treated with an antitoxin derived from horse serum that is distributed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    0
    0
  • For them, human botulism immune globulin (BIG) is the preferred treatment.

    0
    0
  • It is available in the United States through the Infant Botulism Treatment and Prevention Program in Berkeley, California.

    0
    0
  • Aside from the specific antitoxin, no therapeutic drugs are used to treat botulism.

    0
    0
  • Antibiotics are not effective for preventing or treating botulism because the Clostridium group of toxins are not sensitive to them.

    0
    0
  • When botulism in older children or adults is caused by food, it often is necessary to flush the gastrointestinal tract (gastric lavage).

    0
    0
  • Parents should avoid feeding honey to infants younger than 12 months because it is one known source of botulism spores.

    0
    0
  • With medical intervention, botulism victims can recover completely, though it may be a very slow recovery.

    0
    0
  • It takes weeks to months to recover from botulism, and severe cases can take years before a total recovery is attained.

    0
    0
  • Food safety is the surest prevention for botulism.

    0
    0
  • Infant botulism is difficult to prevent, because controlling what goes into an infant's mouth is often beyond control, especially in regard to airborne spores.

    0
    0
  • One concrete preventative is to never feed honey to infants younger than 12 months as it is one known source of botulism spores.

    0
    0
  • Because symptoms of infant botulism appear slowly, parents may be concerned that they will be missed or not found early.

    0
    0
  • Botulism. New York: Rosen Publishing Group, 2004.

    0
    0
  • Botulinum-toxin is made by the bacteria that cause botulism.

    0
    0
  • However, the amount of botulinum-toxin injected to treat spasticity is such a small amount that it would not cause botulism poisoning.

    0
    0
  • Botox is the brand name for the botulinum toxin, the poison involved in botulism.

    0
    0
  • Botulism is caused by a bacteria called Clostridium botulinum.

    0
    0
  • In the days when people did home canning of fruits and vegetables, botulism was a risk if the food wasn't prepared correctly.

    0
    0
  • Without medical support, botulism can be fatal.

    0
    0
  • It's possible to be allergic to this kind of dermal filler, especially if you've ever had botulism.

    0
    0
  • In high doses it can even cause botulism.

    0
    0
  • Although it does effectively paralyze, Botox should not be considered botulism.

    0
    0
  • Although these spores are commonly found in soil, honey is a more frequent source of spores causing infant botulism by lodging in the baby's intestinal tract and producing the neurotoxin.

    0
    1
  • In infant botulism, the infant's stool may be cultured to isolate the organism; this test may be performed by the state health department or the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

    0
    1
  • Infants, however, cannot receive this antitoxin and are usually treated instead with injections of human botulism immune globulin (BIG), an antiserum that neutralizes the botulinum toxin.

    0
    1
  • Domesticated animals such as dogs, cattle, and mink are affected by botulism C toxin, which also affects birds and has caused massive die-offs in domestic bird flocks and wild waterfowl.

    0
    1
  • Vaccines have not been developed directed against botulism, which makes prevention of infant botulism or other forms of the disease difficult, since exposure to the botulinum toxic is typically unrecognized.

    0
    1
  • It may be helpful to remember how rare botulism is, how easy it is to assure food safety, and also that morbidity and mortality can be avoided with early recognition of the symptoms.

    0
    1
  • Unless you've been living in a cave the last 10 years, you probably already know that Botox is a therapeutic agent derived from the bacterium Clostridium Botulinum, which in certain strains is botulism, a dangerous paralytic illness.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →