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botulinum

botulinum

botulinum Sentence Examples

  • Those which do not need oxygen are called anaerobes, e.g. Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum.

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  • trivalent botulinum antitoxin is accessed by telephoning the duty doctor at CDSC on 020 200 6868 (24 hour service ).

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  • bacterium clostridium botulinum, which occurs naturally in the soil.

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  • Foodborne botulism is caused by ingestion of the botulinum neurotoxin, which is produced during growth of the organism in food.

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  • wound botulism is caused by toxin produced from a wound infected with Clostridium botulinum.

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  • clostridium botulinum, which can cause botulism.

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  • Welcome to Herbal Fusion - Botox is made from ' botulinum toxin ', a poison produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum.

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  • PHLS informed the Agency that botulinum neurotoxin type B was detected in an opened can of SMA Gold infant milk formula.

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  • poison botulinum toxin-A, freezes facial muscles and eradicates unwanted lines.

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  • Key words: Lateral rectus palsy, Vertical rectus palsy, Vertical rectus transposition, Botulinum toxin.

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  • Protection of frontline workers The release of a Botulinum toxin aerosol will create an exposed zone that presents a high risk of inhaling toxin.

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  • At a secret meeting in Miami, they furnished him with tiny gelatine capsules filled with botulinum toxin.

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  • The initial objectives for these programs will be the development of both multivalent botulinum toxoid vaccines and multivalent recombinant botulinum vaccines.

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  • trivalent botulinum antitoxin is accessed by telephoning the duty doctor at CDSC on 020 200 6868 (24 hour service ).

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  • Key words: Lateral rectus palsy, Vertical rectus transposition, Botulinum toxin.

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  • Protection of frontline workers The release of a Botulinum toxin aerosol will create an exposed zone that presents a high risk of inhaling toxin.

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  • At a secret meeting in Miami, they furnished him with tiny gelatine capsules filled with botulinum toxin.

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  • The initial objectives for these programs will be the development of both multivalent botulinum toxoid vaccines and multivalent recombinant botulinum vaccines.

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  • Botulinum toxin type A (Botox, Dysport) or type B (Myobloc) is injected locally into the affected muscle group to relax the muscles.

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  • Botulinum toxin is made by the bacteria that cause botulism.

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  • However, the amount of botulinum toxin injected to treat spasticity is so small that it would not cause botulism poisoning.

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  • Short-term medications such as lidocaine, a local anesthetic, can be used to assess the potential benefit of botulinum toxin or alcohol and phenol injections.

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  • Infant botulism: a type of botulism, in which Clostridium botulinum bacteria grow within an infant's digestive tract, producing a toxin which is potentially life-threatening.

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  • In 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of botulinum toxin (Botox) for treatment of axillary (underarm) hyperhidrosis that resists treatment with topical drugs.

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  • "Treating Childhood Hyperhidrosis with Botulinum Toxin Type A."

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  • "Stopping Sweat . . . and Soon: Botulinum Toxin Effective for Pediatric Hyperhidrosis."

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  • Botulinum toxin (Botox), a highly effective treatment, is injected directly into the affected muscles.

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  • A variety of bacteria cause food poisoning, including Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, Shigella, and Clostridium botulinum.

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  • Each type of bacteria has a different incubation period and duration, and all except the botulinum toxin cause inflammation of the intestines and diarrhea.

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  • These toxins (except those from C. botulinum) cause inflammation of the stomach lining and the small and/or large intestines, resulting in abdominal muscle cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever.

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  • C. botulinum causes both adult and infant botulism and differs significantly from other contaminants in its sources and symptoms.

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  • C. botulinum's common food-borne form is an anaerobic bacterium that can only live and reproduce in the absence of oxygen.

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  • Exposure to the botulinum toxin usually occurs while eating contaminated food stored in an airless environment, as in home-canned or commercially canned or vacuum-packed food.

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  • Also, botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin that blocks the ability of motor nerves to release acetylcholine, the neurotransmitter that relays nerve signals to muscles.

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  • Infant botulism occurs when a child younger than one year ingests the spores of C. botulinum.

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  • C. botulinum grows well in non-acidic, oxygen-free environments, meaning that if the cooking temperatures are too low or the cooking time too brief the bacteria in the food are not killed.

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  • Although the definitive diagnosis comes from laboratory tests, it can usually be diagnosed by recognizing the distinctive neurological symptoms typical of contamination with C. botulinum.

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  • Infants, however, cannot receive this antitoxin and are usually treated instead with injections of human botulism immune globulin (BIG), an antiserum that neutralizes the botulinum toxin.

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  • In an experimental procedure, botulinum toxin (Botox) may be injected into the larynx.

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  • Botulism is an acute, progressive condition caused by botulinum toxin, a natural poison produced by the spore-forming bacteria Clostridium botulinum.

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  • The toxin's origin and identity remained vague until Emile van Ermengem (1851-1932), a Belgian professor, isolated Clostridium botulinum in 1895 and identified it as the source of food poisoning.

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  • Toxins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the main culprit in botulism.

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  • Other members of the Clostridium genus can produce botulinum toxin, namely C. argentinense, C. butyricum, and C. baratii, but these are minor sources.

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  • In humans, botulinum toxin latches onto specific proteins in nerve endings and irreversibly destroys them.

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  • Ironically, this action of the botulinum toxin has given it a beneficial niche in the world of medicine.

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  • Medical researchers have discovered that injecting a strictly controlled dose of botulinum toxin into affected muscles inhibits excessive muscle contractions.

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  • Food that has been improperly preserved or stored can harbor botulinum toxin-producing clostridia.

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  • Unlike adults, infants younger than 12 months are vulnerable to C. botulinum colonizing the intestine.

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  • Wound botulism occurs when Clostridia colonize an infected wound and produce botulinum toxin.

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  • Laboratory tests look for the presence of botulinum toxin or Clostridia in suspected foods and/or the child's blood serum, feces, or other specimens for traces of botulinum toxin or Clostridia.

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  • The antitoxin (effective against toxin types A, B, and E) inactivates only the botulinum toxin that is unattached to nerve endings.

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  • Recovery depends on the nerve endings building new proteins to replace those destroyed by botulinum toxin.

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  • Vaccines have not been developed directed against botulism, which makes prevention of infant botulism or other forms of the disease difficult, since exposure to the botulinum toxic is typically unrecognized.

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  • Botox (Botulinum toxin) injections can temporarily control the eye movements, but because of side effects such as double vision and ptosis or drooping of the eyelid, and because it is not a permanent solution, Botox is not used often.

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  • Botulinum toxin (Botox) is a protein produced from bacteria.

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  • Botox is the brand name for the botulinum toxin, the poison involved in botulism.

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  • Botulism is caused by a bacteria called Clostridium botulinum.

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  • C. botulinum lives in soil and marine sediment and can appear on fruit, vegetables, and seafood.

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  • C. botulinum releases a poison called Botulinum Toxin Type A.

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  • In very small doses, however, botulinum toxin can be a useful medicine.

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  • According to the official website, as of 2011, over 11 million men and women have used botulinum to fight wrinkles.

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  • Botulinum was first approved for use in treating two different eye problems.

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  • Since 2002, Botulinum has been approved by the FDA as a wrinkle treatment.

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  • However, botulinum toxin can be very dangerous if not properly prepared.

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  • Unless you've been living in a cave the last 10 years, you probably already know that Botox is a therapeutic agent derived from the bacterium Clostridium Botulinum, which in certain strains is botulism, a dangerous paralytic illness.

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