Botanists sentence example

botanists
  • Baeyers hypothesis was entertained by botanists partly because it explained the gaseous interchanges accompanying photosynthesis.
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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia about botanists.
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  • There is at present also a want of agreement among botanists as to the path which the water takes in the structural elements of the tree, two views being held.
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  • Such terms as hydrophytes, xerophytes, and halophytes had been used by plant geographers before Warmings time e.g., by Schouw;4 and the terms evidently supply a want felt by botanists as they have come into general use.
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  • The Norway spruce seems to have been the "Picea" of Pliny, but is evidently often confused by the Latin writers with their "Abies," the Abies pectinate of modern botanists.
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  • Thus it was that the so-called " Natur-philosophen " of the last decade of the 18th century, and their successors in the first quarter of the 19th, found few adherents among the working zoologists and botanists.
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  • In arranging plants according to a natural method, we require to have a thorough knowledge of structural and morphological botany, and hence we find that the advances made in these departments have materially aided the efforts of systematic botanists.
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  • The place is a centre for artists, geologists and botanists, for the ascent of Snowdon, Moel Siabod, Glydyr Fawr, Glydyr Fach, Tryfan, &c., and for visiting Llyn Ogwen, Llyn Idwal, Twll du (Devil's Kitchen), Nant Ffrancon and the Penrhyn quarries.
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  • We give below that which seems to us to be the most satisfactory (based very largely on personal acquaintance with most parts of the range), considering, as in the case of the limits of the chain, only its topographical aspect, as it exists at the present day, while leaving it to geologists, botanists and zoologists to elaborate special divisions as required by these various sciences.
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  • The occurrence of hybrids in nature explains the difficulty experienced by botanists in deciding on what is a species, and the widely different limitations of the term adopted by different observers in the case of willows, roses, brambles, &c. The artificial process is practically the same in hybridization as in cross-fertilization, but usually requires more care.
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  • Apart from this, botanists are generally agreed that the concrescence of parts of the flower-whorls - in the gynaeceum as the seed-covering, and in the corolla as the seat of attraction, more than in the androecium and the calyx - is an indication of advance, as is also the concrescence that gives the condition of epigyny.
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  • Dr Engler is the principal editor of a large series of volumes which, under the title Die naturlichen Pflanzenfamilien, is a systematic account of all the known genera of plants and represents the work of many botanists.
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  • As an attempt at a phylogenetic arrangement, Engler's system is now preferred by many botanists.
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  • Before leaving the Chlorophyceae, it should be mentioned that the genus Volvox has been included by some zoologists (Btitschli, for example) among Flagellata; on the other hand, certain green Flagellata, such as Euglena, are included by some botanists (for example, van Tieghem) among unicellular plants.
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  • The flora of the Quito basin has been well studied by various European botanists, more especially by Dr William Jameson (1796-1873) of the university of Quito, who began the preparation of a synopsis of the Ecuadorean flora in 1864-1865 (Synopsis plantarum Quitensium, 2 vols., Quito, 1865).
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  • The wood used in building is obtained from trees of the class known to botanists as exogens, or those trees which grow larger by the addition each year of a layer of new wood on their outer surface.
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  • The Poinsettia pulcherrima of gardens (Euphorbia pulcherrima of botanists), a native of Mexico and Central America, with its brilliant scarlet bracts, stands unrivalled amongst decorative plants.
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  • Zermatt was long known to botanists and geologists only, and has an interesting though very local history.
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  • The botanist Clusius (Charles de l'Escluse or Lecluse, 1526-1609) first cultivated it at Vienna from a root received from Asia Minor in 1574, and distributed it to other botanists in central and western Europe, and it was probably introduced into England about 1596 by the herbalist Gerard.
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  • The flora of Finland has been most minutely explored, especially in the south, and the Finnish botanists were enabled to divide the country into twenty-eight different provinces, giving the numbers of phanerogam species for each province.
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  • Alphonse de Candolle (Geographic botanique, p. 798) informs us that several botanists of Paris, Geneva, and especially of Montpellier, have sown the seeds of many hundreds of species of exotic hardy plants, in what appeared to be the most favourable situations, but that in hardly a single case has any one of them become naturalized.
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  • Botanists are agreed that the only species in general cultivation in Great Britain is the one which Bauhin, in his Phytopinax, p. 89 (1596), called Solanum tuberosum esculentum, a name adopted by Linnaeus (omitting the last epithet), and employed by all botanical writers.
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  • These plants grow in swampy forests, and, being dioecious and varying much in the form of leaf in different individuals, are imperfectly known to botanists, only two species having been identified with certainty.
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  • All these terms, including the usual one of bacteria, are unsatisfactory; for " bacterium," " bacillus " and " micrococcus " have narrow technical meanings, and the other terms are too vague to be scientific. The most satisfactory designation is that proposed by Nageli in 1857, namely " schizomycetes," and it is by this term that they are usually known among botanists; the less exact term, however, is also used and is retained in this article since the science is commonly known as " bacteriology."
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  • It had been, however, an axiom with botanists that the green plants were unable to use the nitrogen of the air.
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  • Yet the first attempts at a classification of plants recognized and separated a group of Gramina, and this, though bounded by nothing more definite than habit and general appearance, contained the Gramineae of modern botanists.
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  • The morphology of the female flowers has been variously interpreted by botanists; the peduncle bearing the ovules has been described as homologous with the petiole of a foliage-leaf and as a shoot-structure, the collar-like envelope at the base of the ovules being referred to as a second integument or arillus, or as the representative of a carpel.
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  • It may be that the interpretation of the female cone of the Abietineae as an inflorescence, which finds favour with many botanists, cannot be applied to the cones of Agathis and Araucaria.
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  • It is held by some botanists (Celakovsky) that the seminiferous scale of the Abietineae is homologous with the arillus or second integument of the Taxaceae, but this view is too strained to gain general acceptance.
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  • The abundance of petrified coniferous wood in rocks of various ages has led many botanists to investigate the structure of modern genera with a view to determining how far anatomical characters may be used as evidence of generic distinctions.
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  • The mature cone is fleshy, with the succulent scales fused together and forming the fruit-like structure known to the older botanists as the galbulus, or berry of the juniper.
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  • The classification of the different varieties of cultivated wheat has occupied the attention of many botanists and agriculturists.
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  • In Cycas the altered leaf, upon the margin of which the ovule is produced, and the peltate scales, from which they are pendulous in Zamia, are regarded by all botanists as carpellary leaves.
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  • Other news For all you budding botanists out there (excuse the pun ), the Garden Picture Library might be for you.
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  • The fertile soil and gentle climate of Perthshire have long inspired botanists, gardeners and horticulturalists.
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  • Right: Short-styled form.) It has long been known to botanists that the common cowslip (Primula veris, Brit.
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  • Seeds of Revolution Scottish botanists braved tempests and conflicts to discover new flowers and fauna.
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  • Many botanists are even of opinion that the sweet chestnut, which now constitutes so large a part of the forests that clothe the sides both of the Alps and the Apennines, and in some districts supplies the chief food of the inhabitants, is not originally of Italian growth; it is certain that it had not attained in ancient times to anything like the extension and importance which it now possesses.
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  • The old doctrine of types, which was used by the philosophically minded zoologists (and botanists) of the first half 1 A very subtle and important qualification of this generalization has to be recognized (and was recognized by Darwin) in the fact that owing to the interdependence of the parts of the bodies of living things and their profound chemical interactions and peculiar structural balance (what is called organic polarity) the variation of one single part (a spot of colour, a tooth, a claw, a leaflet) may, and demonstrably does in many cases entail variation of other parts - what are called correlated variations.
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  • The subject of palaeontological botany (see Palaeobotany) has been advanced by the researches of both botanists and geologists.
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  • It wasn't long before tulips were introduced to Holland, where botanists experimented with different colors and petal shapes.
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  • As understood by botanists, this now includes the groups long known as Echeveria and Umbilicus.
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  • Hemerocallis Minor - Known in many gardens under the name of H. graminea, from its grass-like foliage, was formerly classed by the older botanists as a variety of H. flava, though now considered distinct.
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  • C. japonica, C. cordata, and C. laxiflora, the last belonging to the true Hornbeams typfied in our native species C. betulus; the other two to the group which some botanists have made a separate genus.
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  • Pulmonaria Azurea - Flower stems about 8 inches high, flowers a full, perfect blue in bunchy heads, what botanists call a "twin capitale" raceme.
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  • Pear and Apple (Pyrus) - Beautiful flowering trees and bushes of which there is now a bewildering number, since botanists have classed all Apples, Pears, and their allies under the one family.
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  • To me it appears to have a character altogether its own, and the many botanists and gardeners to whom I have shown it have without exception come round to my opinion.
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  • Recently, the German traveler, Dr Purpus, and various American botanists have found in the mountains of Arkansas, Texas, Colorado, and Arizona a rich variety of hardy Cacti thriving at elevations of 5,000 to 8,000 feet.
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  • As more people plant vegetables, there is a growing trend among botanists and seed companies to create small plants that produce like large ones.
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  • These children are likely to make good farmers, gardeners, botanists, geologists, florists, and archaeologists.
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  • Many botanists point out that coconut is actually a nut and a fruit, since fruits are any part of the plant that carries the seeds of that plant.
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  • Many botanists believe that this allows coconut to be classified as a nut; however, other botanists disagree.
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  • This causes some botanists to classify the coconut as a dry drupe.
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  • Founded in the 1950s by the Mühlethaler family, the French-owned business was helmed by experienced botanists and experts in phytotherapy and esthetic aromatherapy.
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  • In some instances these differences are so marked that they have led some botanists to regard as distinct species many forms usually esteemed by others as varieties only.
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  • Mr Charles Green was commissioned to conduct the astronomical observations, and Sir Joseph Banks and Dr Solander were appointed botanists to the expedition.
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  • It has been suggested by several botanists, with considerable plausibility, that the ultra-violet or chemical rays can be absorbed and utilized by the protoplasm without the intervention of any pigment such as chlorophyll.
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  • The Forest Region of the Russian botanists includes the greater part of the country, from the Arctic tundras to the steppes, and over this immense expanse it maintains a remarkable uniformity of character.
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  • Of the two Italian botanists who in comparatively recent years have monographed the group, Parlatore (Le Specie dei cotoni, 1866) recognizes seven species, whilst Todaro (Relazione sulla culta dei cotoni, 18 7718 78) describes over fifty species: many of these, however, are of but little economic importance, and, in spite of the difficulties mentioned above, it i s possible for practical purposes to divide the commercially important plants into five species, placing these in two groups according to the character of the hairs borne on the seeds.
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  • Between the years 1788 and 1850 numerous attempts were made by the East India Company to improve the cultivation and to increase the supply of cotton in India, and botanists and American planters were engaged for the purpose.
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  • It is admitted, however, by all competent botanists that the almond is wild in the hotter and drier parts of the Mediterranean and Levantine regions.
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  • The expedition, including naturalists, botanists, a mineralogist, taxidermists, a philologist, &c., was carried by the sloops-of-war "Vincennes" and "Peacock," the brig "Porpoise," the storeship "Relief" and two tenders.
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  • The investigations of Japanese botanists are adding constantly to the above number, and it is not likely that finality will be reached for some time.
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  • The greatest difference of opinion exists among botanists as to their number and the bounds to be assigned to each; and the cross-fertilization that takes place between the species intensifies the difficulty.
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  • Some botanists have enumerated 80 species from Great Britain alone, while others count only 12 or i 5.
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  • The work was continued after his death, by his son Alphonse de Candolle, with the aid of other eminent botanists, and embraces descriptions of the genera and species of the orders of Dicotyledonous plants.
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  • Soon after the promulgation of Linnaeus's method of classification, the attention of botanists was directed to the study of Cryptogamic plants, and the valuable work of Johann Hedwig (1730-1799) on the reproductive organs of mosses made its appearance in 1782.
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  • Botanists were for a long time content to know that the scattering of the pollen from the anther, and its application to the stigma, were necessary for the production of perfect seed, but the stages of the process of fertilization remained unexplored.
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  • C. Treviranus, professor of botany in Bonn, roused the attention of botanists to the development of the embryo, but although he made valuable researches, he did not add much in the way of new information.
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  • The subject of palaeontological botany has been advanced by the researches of both botanists and geologists.
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  • Among the scientific celebrities were de Saussure, the most many-sided of all; de Candolle and Boissier, the botanists; Alphonse Favre and Necker, the geologists; Marignac, the chemist; Deluc, the physicist, and Plantamour, the astronomer.
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  • The inference is almost irresistible that the law of gradual transformation through minute continuous change is by far the most universal; but many palaeontologists as well as zoologists and botanists hold a contrary opinion.
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  • Explorations by botanists of the United States Department of Agriculture have been made in many localities, in Jalisco, Zacatecas, Michoacan and Tamaulipas, but many years must elapse before the whole ground can be covered.
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  • The type form is the Caucasian species roseum of botanists, hardy perennial, with finely cut leaves and large flower heads, having a ray of deep rosecoloured ligulate florets surrounding the yellow centre or disk.
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  • Naturalists will of course prefer other limits according as they are geologists, botanists or zoologists.
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