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boswell

boswell

boswell Sentence Examples

  • Even Boswell was forced to own that in this unfortunate piece he could detect no trace of his master's powers.

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  • See Hill's Boswell, iii.

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  • Even Boswell was forced to own that in this unfortunate piece he could detect no trace of his master's powers.

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  • The story of his triumphs belongs to the story of English literature: to it we leave James Thomson, Adam Smith, David Hume, James Boswell and Sir Walter Scott.

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  • in the possession of Sir William Boswell; its title is De mundo nostro sublunari philosophia nova (Amsterdam, 1651).

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  • in the possession of Sir William Boswell; its title is De mundo nostro sublunari philosophia nova (Amsterdam, 1651).

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  • Luria himself wrote no mystical works; what we know of his doctrines and habits comes chiefly from his Boswell, Ilayim Vital.

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  • in height, the slim legs, the large turned-in feet, the shrill piercing voice; but almost every one will remember, from Croker's Boswell, Colman's account of the great historian " tapping his snuff-box, smirking and smiling, and rounding his periods " from that mellifluous mouth.

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  • He was essentially humane; and it is worthy of notice that he was in favour of the abolition of slavery, while humane men like his friend Lord Sheffield, Dr Johnson and Boswell were opposed to the antislavery movement.

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  • There is also a school founded by Lady Margaret Boswell, wife of Sir William Boswell, ambassador to Charles I.

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  • discuss hard cases of conscience, as a very cursory glance at Fielding's novels (r742-175r) or Boswell's Life of Johnson (1791) will show.

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  • His conversational powers rivalled those of Dr Johnson; and, if more of his sayings have not been chronicled for the benefit of posterity, the defect is due to the absence of a Boswell.

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  • Johnson, of whose various and often merely churlish remarks on Garrick and his doings many are scattered through the pages of Boswell, spoke warmly of the elegance and sprightliness of his friend's conversation, as well as of his liberality and kindness of heart; while to the great actor's art he paid the exquisite tribute of describing Garrick's sudden death as having " eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure."

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  • 4to), which includes his extensive Foreign Correspondence with distinguished French men and women, and the notices of him in the memoirs of Cumberland, Hannah More and Madame D'Arblay, and above all in Boswell's Life of Johnson, bear testimony to his many attractive qualities as a companion and to his fidelity as a friend.

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  • His great reputation and the influence of Sir William Boswell, the English resident, with the states-general procured his election in 1643 to the chair of mathematics in Amsterdam, whence he removed in 1646, on the invitation of the prince of Orange, to Breda, where he remained till 1652.

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  • Therese travelled separately, and was entrusted to the charge of James Boswell, who had already made Rousseau's acquaintance.

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  • It appears, however, from Boswell's Life, under date of 29th April 1778, that Johnson had on one occasion quarrelled with Smith at Strahan's house, apparently in London; it is clear that the "unlucky altercation" at Strahan's must have occurred in 1761 or 1763, and could have had nothing to do with the letter on Hume's death.

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  • Pennant's Tour in Scotland and Voyage to the Hebrides (1774); James Boswell's Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

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  • This was James Boswell, a young Scots lawyer, heir to an honourable name and a fair estate.

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  • To a man of Johnson's strong understanding and irritable temper, the silly egotism and adulation of Boswell must have been as teasing as the constant buzz of a fly.

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  • Johnson hated to be questioned; and Boswell was eternally catechizing him on all kinds of subjects, and sometimes propounded such questions as, "What would you do, sir, if you were locked up in a tower with a baby ?"

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  • Johnson was a water-drinker and Boswell was a winebibber, and indeed little better than an habitual sot.

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  • Boswell practised in the Parliament House of Edinburgh, and could pay only occasional visits to London.

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  • Soon after the club began to exist, Johnson formed a connexion less important indeed to his fame, but much more important to his happiness, than his connexion with Boswell.

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  • But it is not probable that his curiosity would have overcome his habitual sluggishness, and his love of the smoke, the mud, and the cries of London, had not Boswell importuned him to attempt the adventure, and offered to be his squire.

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  • In March 1783 Boswell was glad to discover Johnson well looked after and staying with Mrs Thrale in Argyll Street, but in a bad state of health.

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  • In June 1784 he went with Boswell to Oxford for the last time.

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  • Though the tender care which had mitigated his sufferings during months of sickness at Streatham was withdrawn, and though Boswell was absent, he was not left desolate.

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  • The chief constituents are Johnson's own Letters and Account of his Life from his Birth to his Eleventh Year (1805), a fragment saved from papers burned in 1784 and not seen by Boswell; the life by his old but not very sympathetic friend and club-fellow, Sir John Hawkins (1787); Mrs Thrale-Piozzi's Anecdotes (1785) and Letters; the Diary and Letters of Fanny Burney (D'Arblay) (1841); the shorter Lives of Arthur Murphy, T.

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  • Tyers, &c.; far above all, of course, the unique Life by James Boswell, first published in 1791, and subsequently encrusted with vast masses of Johnsoniana in the successive editions of Malone, Croker, Napier, Fitzgerald, Mowbray Morris (Globe), Birrell, Ingpen (copiously illustrated) and Dr Birkbeck Hill (the most exhaustive).

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  • Statues both of Johnson and Boswell are in the market-place at Lichfield.

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  • Boswell's Life of Johnson gives an account of the lexicographer's visit to Burnett at Monboddo, and is full of references to the natural contemporary view of a man who thought that the human race could be descended from monkeys.

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  • (London, 1780-1790), and in Boswell's Life of Johnson.

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  • But remarkable as these are for the breadth of sympathy and extent of reading disclosed, they will hardly convey the impressions furnished in a dramatic form, as in Boswell's great work.

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  • He was twice married: in 1787 to Jane Mercer, daughter of Colonel William Mercer of Aldie; and in 1808 to Hester Maria Thrale, who is spoken of as "Queenie" in Boswell's Life of Johnson and Mme.

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  • Dr Nugent eventually took up his residence with his son-in-law in London, and became a popular member of that famous group of men of letters and artists whom Boswell has made so familiar and so dear to all later generations.

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  • Both Boswell and Hawkins had dipped into Johnson's diaries without his permission; no doubt each felt somewhat ashamed of such sneaky behavior.

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  • On his father's deathbed in 1782, Boswell succeeded to the family estate of Auchinleck.

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  • The story of the award of Johnson's honorary doctorate in March 1775 is told in Boswell's Life of Johnson.

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  • honorary doctorate in March 1775 is told in Boswell's Life of Johnson.

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  • In fact Boswell himself skilfully manipulates the scene to place Johnson, and not the King, at its center.

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  • Boswell is buried in the family Mausoleum next to church.

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  • The son of a Scottish millwright, he was born in Auchinleck, Ayrshire, on the estate of James Boswell's father.

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  • Boswell says he's just rapt to have lasted the full distance.

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  • Not long ago I bought a new electric toaster at Boswell's in Broad Street, Oxford.

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  • Luria himself wrote no mystical works; what we know of his doctrines and habits comes chiefly from his Boswell, Ilayim Vital.

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  • in height, the slim legs, the large turned-in feet, the shrill piercing voice; but almost every one will remember, from Croker's Boswell, Colman's account of the great historian " tapping his snuff-box, smirking and smiling, and rounding his periods " from that mellifluous mouth.

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  • He was essentially humane; and it is worthy of notice that he was in favour of the abolition of slavery, while humane men like his friend Lord Sheffield, Dr Johnson and Boswell were opposed to the antislavery movement.

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  • There is also a school founded by Lady Margaret Boswell, wife of Sir William Boswell, ambassador to Charles I.

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  • Gray, writing to Horace Walpole (August, 1757), said that the author "seemed to have retrieved the true language of the stage, which has been lost for these hundred years," but Samuel Johnson held aloof from the general enthusiasm, and averred that there were not ten good lines in the whole play (Boswell, Life, ed.

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  • discuss hard cases of conscience, as a very cursory glance at Fielding's novels (r742-175r) or Boswell's Life of Johnson (1791) will show.

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  • His conversational powers rivalled those of Dr Johnson; and, if more of his sayings have not been chronicled for the benefit of posterity, the defect is due to the absence of a Boswell.

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  • Johnson, of whose various and often merely churlish remarks on Garrick and his doings many are scattered through the pages of Boswell, spoke warmly of the elegance and sprightliness of his friend's conversation, as well as of his liberality and kindness of heart; while to the great actor's art he paid the exquisite tribute of describing Garrick's sudden death as having " eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure."

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  • 4to), which includes his extensive Foreign Correspondence with distinguished French men and women, and the notices of him in the memoirs of Cumberland, Hannah More and Madame D'Arblay, and above all in Boswell's Life of Johnson, bear testimony to his many attractive qualities as a companion and to his fidelity as a friend.

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  • His great reputation and the influence of Sir William Boswell, the English resident, with the states-general procured his election in 1643 to the chair of mathematics in Amsterdam, whence he removed in 1646, on the invitation of the prince of Orange, to Breda, where he remained till 1652.

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  • Therese travelled separately, and was entrusted to the charge of James Boswell, who had already made Rousseau's acquaintance.

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  • It appears, however, from Boswell's Life, under date of 29th April 1778, that Johnson had on one occasion quarrelled with Smith at Strahan's house, apparently in London; it is clear that the "unlucky altercation" at Strahan's must have occurred in 1761 or 1763, and could have had nothing to do with the letter on Hume's death.

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  • Kilbourne, Sketches and Chronicles of the Town of Litchfield, Connecticut (Hartford, Conn., 1859); George C. Boswell, The Litchfield Book of Days (Litchfield, 1900); and for an account of the Litchfield Female Seminary, Emily N.

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  • Pennant's Tour in Scotland and Voyage to the Hebrides (1774); James Boswell's Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

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  • This was James Boswell, a young Scots lawyer, heir to an honourable name and a fair estate.

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  • To a man of Johnson's strong understanding and irritable temper, the silly egotism and adulation of Boswell must have been as teasing as the constant buzz of a fly.

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  • Johnson hated to be questioned; and Boswell was eternally catechizing him on all kinds of subjects, and sometimes propounded such questions as, "What would you do, sir, if you were locked up in a tower with a baby ?"

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  • Johnson was a water-drinker and Boswell was a winebibber, and indeed little better than an habitual sot.

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  • Boswell practised in the Parliament House of Edinburgh, and could pay only occasional visits to London.

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  • Soon after the club began to exist, Johnson formed a connexion less important indeed to his fame, but much more important to his happiness, than his connexion with Boswell.

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  • But it is not probable that his curiosity would have overcome his habitual sluggishness, and his love of the smoke, the mud, and the cries of London, had not Boswell importuned him to attempt the adventure, and offered to be his squire.

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  • In March 1783 Boswell was glad to discover Johnson well looked after and staying with Mrs Thrale in Argyll Street, but in a bad state of health.

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  • In June 1784 he went with Boswell to Oxford for the last time.

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  • Though the tender care which had mitigated his sufferings during months of sickness at Streatham was withdrawn, and though Boswell was absent, he was not left desolate.

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  • The chief constituents are Johnson's own Letters and Account of his Life from his Birth to his Eleventh Year (1805), a fragment saved from papers burned in 1784 and not seen by Boswell; the life by his old but not very sympathetic friend and club-fellow, Sir John Hawkins (1787); Mrs Thrale-Piozzi's Anecdotes (1785) and Letters; the Diary and Letters of Fanny Burney (D'Arblay) (1841); the shorter Lives of Arthur Murphy, T.

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  • Tyers, &c.; far above all, of course, the unique Life by James Boswell, first published in 1791, and subsequently encrusted with vast masses of Johnsoniana in the successive editions of Malone, Croker, Napier, Fitzgerald, Mowbray Morris (Globe), Birrell, Ingpen (copiously illustrated) and Dr Birkbeck Hill (the most exhaustive).

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  • Statues both of Johnson and Boswell are in the market-place at Lichfield.

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  • Boswell's Life of Johnson gives an account of the lexicographer's visit to Burnett at Monboddo, and is full of references to the natural contemporary view of a man who thought that the human race could be descended from monkeys.

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  • No one, said Boswell, should persuade him to make his lion into a cat.

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  • The story of his triumphs belongs to the story of English literature: to it we leave James Thomson, Adam Smith, David Hume, James Boswell and Sir Walter Scott.

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  • See Hill's Boswell, iii.

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  • (London, 1780-1790), and in Boswell's Life of Johnson.

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  • But remarkable as these are for the breadth of sympathy and extent of reading disclosed, they will hardly convey the impressions furnished in a dramatic form, as in Boswell's great work.

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  • To St Louis Joinville is a nobler Boswell; and heroworshipper, hero, and heroic ideal all have something of the sublime about them.

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  • He was twice married: in 1787 to Jane Mercer, daughter of Colonel William Mercer of Aldie; and in 1808 to Hester Maria Thrale, who is spoken of as "Queenie" in Boswell's Life of Johnson and Mme.

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  • Dr Nugent eventually took up his residence with his son-in-law in London, and became a popular member of that famous group of men of letters and artists whom Boswell has made so familiar and so dear to all later generations.

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  • Boswell says he 's just rapt to have lasted the full distance.

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  • Not long ago I bought a new electric toaster at Boswell 's in Broad Street, Oxford.

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  • Shaun Boswell, played by Lucas Black, is sent to Japan in an attempt to outrun the law.

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