Borrowed sentence example

borrowed
  • Perhaps my sister borrowed it.
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  • The new creed, the new speech, the new social system, had taken such deep root that the descendants of the Scandinavian settlers were better fitted to be the armed missionaries of all these things than the neighbours from whom they had borrowed their new possessions.
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  • Deidre borrowed her sandals and trotted down the stairs.
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  • I borrowed it on my responsibility so I feel obligated to get it back to them first.
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  • The book appears to have been printed in France, and the idea of Dame Scotia's exhortations to her sons, the Three Estates, is borrowed from Alain Chartier's Quadrilogue invectif, some passages of which are appropriated outright.
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  • When this consonantal u (English w as seen in words borrowed very early from Latin like wall and wine) passed into the sound of English v (labio-dental) is not certain, but Germanic words borrowed into Latin in the 5th century A.D.
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  • A ring (which may be borrowed) is placed into a crystal casket and the top is closed.
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  • Glossy Finish - A smear of borrowed lipstick penetrates a spectator's tightly clenched fist.
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  • As a result, they had to evolve a new past-tense conjugation, which they borrowed from a different conjugation type.
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  • Earlier on, Tertullian had borrowed from the stoics the doctrine of the soul's corporeality as well as God's own corporeality.
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  • We are on borrowed time coz they are being taught how to catch.
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  • Lewknor School borrowed an incubator to hatch a dozen eggs.
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  • The story told in Brecht's The Caucasian Chalk Circle is borrowed from an ancient Chinese fable and echoes the Judgment of Solomon.
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  • Some doctors have borrowed large sums to train in the UK.
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  • It is well known that the Romans borrowed their methods of hepatoscopy from the Etruscans, and, apart from the direct evidence for this in Latin writings, we have, in the case of the bronze model of a liver found near Piacenza in 1877, and of Etruscan origin, the unmistakable proof that among the Etruscans the examination of the liver was the basis of animal divination.
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  • An early Coprario 4-part fantasia will demonstrate that he borrowed motives directly from a Ferrabosco madrigal.
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  • My girl already has the new dress, the borrowed veil and the blue garter.
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  • This evening event borrowed the television format of getting professionals to state how they would react to a hypothetical scenario.
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  • The satellites themselves have a completely new tweeter, which has been ' borrowed ' from KEF's luxury Q Range speakers.
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  • A sneer and a borrowed witticism, a detached, dispassionate veneer intended to convey intelligence.
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  • Based on material borrowed from the Sachsische Weltchronik (formerly called Repgowische Chronik from its dubious assignment to Eime von Repgow), the oldest prose chronicle of the world in German (c. 1248 or 1260).
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  • His Recherche de la verite, in 1674, was the baptism of the system into a theistic religion which borrowed its imagery from Augustine; it brought into prominence the metaphysical base which Louis Delaforge, Jacques Rohault and Regis had neither cared for nor understood.
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  • Taylor's theology was distinctively infra-lapsarian; it disagreed with Samuel Hopkins and Emmons in rejecting the theory of "divine efficiency" and in arguing that man can choose the right "even if he won't" - distinguishing like Edwards between natural ability and moral inability; it distinguished sensibility or susceptibility as something different from will or understanding, without moral qualities, to which the appeal for right choice may be made; and it made selflove (a term borrowed from Dugald Stewart, connoting the innocent love of happiness and distinct from selfishness) the particular feeling appealed to by the influences of the law and gospel.
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  • The very phrase 'Xcboaais XaX€Zv, "to speak with tongues," was not invented by the New Testament writers, but borrowed from ordinary speech.
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  • True, the commission proposed and the Chamber adopted a vote of censure upon Crispis conduct in 1894, when, as premier and minister of the interior, he had borrowed ~1 2,000 from Favilla to replenish the secret service fund, and had subsequently repaid the money as instalments for secret service were in due course furnished by the treasury.
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  • Later in Englnd it became usual to appoint one man to the two offices and to call him chancellor, a word perhaps borrowed from cathedral chapters, and not in use for a diocesan officer till the time of Henry VIII.
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  • It is quite true that Paul does not directly attack the speculative position, but rather indicates the practical dangers inherent therein (the denial of the supremacy of Christ and of full salvation through Him); he does not say that the errorists hold Christ to be a mere angel or an aeon, or that words like pleroma (borrowed perhaps from their own vocabulary) involve a rigorous dualism.
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  • Justin Martyr writes a Dialogue with Trypho; Origen deals with many anti-Christian arguments borrowed by Celsus from a certain nameless Jew.
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  • Some had mortgaged their houses, fields and vineyards to buy corn; others had borrowed to pay the taxes, and had sold their children to their richer brethren to repay the debt.
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  • In 1589 it was introduced into Russia, when the tsar Theodore erected the Russian patriarchate and bestowed on the new patriarch the right to wear the mitre, sakkos and mandyas, all borrowed from the Greek rite.
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  • It is usually accompanied by the use of the Arabic alphabet, and in the languages of Moslem nations (notably Turkish, Persian, Hindustani and Malay) a large proportion of the vocabulary is borrowed from Arabic. Hindi and Hindustani, two forms of the same language as spoken by Hindus and Mahommedans respectively, are a curious example of how deeply religion may affect culture.
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  • Even Hecataeus of Miletus (549-472 B.C.), the author of a Periodos or description of the earth, of whom Herodotus borrowed the terse saying that Egypt was the gift of the Nile, retained this circular shape and circumfluent ocean when producing his map of the world, although he had at his disposal the results of the voyage of Scylax of Caryanda from the Indus to the Red Sea, of Darius' campaign in Scythia (513), the information to be gathered among the merchants from all parts of the world who frequented an emporium like Miletus, and what he had learned in the course of his own extensive travels.
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  • In Rome philosophy never became more than a secondary pursuit; naturally, therefore, the Roman thinkers were for the most part eclectic. Of this tendency Cicero is the most striking illustration - his philosophical works consisting of an aggregation, with little or no blending, of doctrines borrowed from Stoicism, Peripateticism, and the scepticism of the Middle Academy.
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  • Eberhard, Ernst Platner, and to some extent Schelling, whom, however, it would be incorrect to describe as merely an eclectic. In the first place, his speculations were largely original; and in the second place, it is not so much that his views of any time were borrowed from a number of philosophers, as that his thinking was influenced first by one philosopher, then by another.
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  • The same historian tells us that Gerbert borrowed from the Arabs (Saraceni) the abacus with ciphers (see Numerals).
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  • Well acquainted with the doctrines of Galen, he rejected them as thoroughly as Paracelsus did, and borrowed from the latter some definite ideas as well as his revolutionary spirit.
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  • Soon after this king obtained the throne he borrowed the sum of 3000 marks from the city, and moreover founded the excellent precedent of repaying it at the appointed time.
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  • The story of Siegfried in Richard Wagner's famous opera-cycle Der Ring der Nibelungen is mainly taken from the northern version; but many features, especially the characterization of Hagen, are borrowed from the German story, as is also the episode of Siegfried's murder in the forest.
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  • He was thus a "familiar spirit," akin to the "daemon" of Socrates; and if he was also half the devil of theology, half the kobold of old German myth, this was only because such "objectivations" are apt to clothe themselves in forms borrowed from the common stock of ideas current at the time when the seer lives; and Faust lived in an age obsessed with the fear of the devil, and by no means sceptical of the existence of kobolds.
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  • The only way of removing the, president from office is by impeachment, an institution borrowed from Great Britain, where it had not become obsolete at the time when the United States constitution was adopted.
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  • If any money-lender, or any manager, agent or clerk of a moneylender, or any person being a director, manager or other officer of a corporation carrying on the business of a money-lender, by any false, misleading or deceptive statement, representation or promise, or by any dishonest concealment of material facts, fraudulently induces, or attempts to induce, any person to borrow money or to agree to the terms on which money is to be borrowed, he is declared by the act to be guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable on indictment to imprisonment with or without hard labour for a term not exceeding two years, or to a fine not exceeding five hundred pounds, or to both.
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  • It has been largely borrowed either from previous English or from later German idealism, and what originality it has possessed has been mainly shown in that spirit of eclectic compromise which is so dear to the English mind.
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  • The national type of writing, generally known as Runic, must have been fully developed by the 4th century, when some of its letters were borrowed by Ulfilas (Wulfila) for his new alphabet (see Goths: § C.).
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  • Its use would seem to have been borrowed, not from the robes of the Eastern emperors, but from the church, and to symbolize with the other robes the quasisacerdotal character of the kingship (see Coronation).
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  • Even the title "king" (ava) 3 appears to have been borrowed by Greek from Phrygian.
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  • But he admits that " some of the old poems may have been borrowed from tradition, without any intermediary " (ibid.); and when it is considered that the traces of the " cantilenes " are slight, and that the degree in which they inspired the later poetry must be a matter of impression rather than of proof, it does not surprise us to find other scholars (notably Paul Meyer) attaching less importance to them, or even doubting their existence.2 When Leon Gautier shows how history passes into legend, and legend again into romance, we are reminded of the difference 1 Die exegetischen Scholien der Ilias, p. vii.
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  • Otherwise, the name is only found among the Phrygians, who, according to Hesychius, called the Heaven-god (Zeus) Bagaeus; there, however, it may have been borrowed from the Persians.
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  • Marco Polo visited it between 1271 and 1275, and Goes in 1603; but the continuous wars (see Turkestan) prevented Europeans from frequenting it, so that until 1863 the information borrowed from medieval travellers and from Chinese sources, with that supplied by the pundit Mir Isset Ullah in 1812, was all that was known about the Yarkand region.
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  • The poor man was obliged to issue a special almanac to assure his clients and the public that he was not dead: he was fatuous enough to add that he was not only alive at the time of writing, but that he was also demonstrably alive on the day when the knave Bickerstaff (a name borrowed by Swift from a sign in Long Acre) asserted that he died of fever.
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  • The Latin alphabet is used, with special signs to represent sounds borrowed from Slavonic, &c. All the unaccented vowels except e are pronounced as in Italian; e has the same phonetic value as in Old Slavonic (=French e) and is often similarly preiotized (= ye in yet), notably at the beginning of all words except neologisms. The accented vowels é and ó are pronounced as ea and oa (petra, rock, = peatra; morte, death, = moarte); they are written in full, as diphthongs, at the end of a word and sometimes in other positions.
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  • Lessing set about the translation and annotation of it, and Moses Mendelssohn borrowed from Burke's speculation at least one of the most fruitful and important ideas of his own influential theories on the sentiments.
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  • He borrowed from the ancien régime its plenipotentiaries; its over-centralized, strictly utilitarian administrative and bureaucratic methods; and afterwards, inorder to bring them into line, the subservient pedantic scholasticism of its university.
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  • Signs are not the reflection of a basic reality any more; they become simulacra, a term borrowed by Baudrillard from Ecclesiates.
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  • I borrowed a friends steam generator iron last summer when she was on holiday and that persuaded me.
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  • Please note that certain classes of material, particularly journals and tripos projects may not be borrowed.
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  • The satellites themselves have a completely new tweeter, which has been ' borrowed ' from KEF 's luxury Q Range speakers.
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  • Typewriters The Library has a portable electronic typewriter which may be borrowed for 48 hours.
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  • Lighter Than Air: A borrowed lighter is used for a quick and funny gag, then suddenly vanishes in a flash of fire !
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  • Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;mso-style-noshow:yes;mso-style-priority:99;mso-style-parent:"";mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;mso-para-margin:0in;mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;mso-pagination:widow-orphan;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}The girl was peeved when her girlfriend borrowed her purse and broke the strap.
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  • Even if you've determined that the baby crib you've purchased from a local consignment shop or borrowed from your sister is safe, you'll still need to pay attention to crib maintenance.
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  • Sayings can be created by you or borrowed from famous authors, film stars, and even sports figures.
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  • Others, however, still seek to give their babies names that are borrowed from ancient ancestors.
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  • Before 1914, the U.S. borrowed money from Europe, but with European countries involved in the war, there was no money to borrow.
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  • Bankruptcy allows a borrower to come forward and state that he or she is unable to make payments on the borrowed funds.
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  • So using the home as collateral for a borrowed lifestyle is very risky.
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  • Additionally, most people have spent that borrowed money and do not have it available to pay the taxes.
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  • With the increased cash flow, lawyers could invest borrowed money into a case, instead of their own funds on which they'd already paid taxes.
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  • If given an interest rate of 5.99 percent, for example, this will result in a monthly payment of nearly $1800, even though the same amount of money was borrowed.
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  • You can obtain additional cards for others to use, but this does not mean those individuals gain responsibility for repaying the borrowed funds.
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  • Use them wisely, repaying the borrowed funds each month on time.
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  • Some believe it was borrowed from the 1970s green politics.
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  • Most of these qualities are borrowed from the southern region of France and give the best representation of French country design style.
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  • The Southwestern designs are borrowed from the Spanish and Mexican cultures as well as the Native American artforms.
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  • Much of the architectural influences of the Southwestern designs are borrowed from Mexican-Spanish home designs.
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  • Decorations: An elaborate theme may be a great idea, but can decorations be made, purchased, or borrowed to create the right effect?
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  • Use eclectic arrangements of borrowed vases to decorate tables, use a favorite decorative item as a cake topper, or used borrowed baskets to provide homes for things like wedding programs or wedding cards.
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  • Many wedding dress salons now have a "rental" section where dresses can be borrowed for up to one week.
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  • Traditions demand something borrowed and blue.
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  • While it may be tempting to haul a few personal or borrowed tables and chairs to the beach reception yourself, remember that the sand, water and wind can cause quite a bit of wear and tear on your tables.
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  • Additional information, such as a short paragraph on any memorial rituals or information about the bride's "something borrowed, something blue" may also be included in the program.
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  • Romantic wedding vows can be whatever you want them to be-short, long, borrowed, original.
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  • Wearing a wedding dress borrowed from family members or friends can be very meaningful for all parties involved.
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  • Critics claimed it borrowed from other successful films including Office Space, Empire Records and The 40-Year-Old Virgin.
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  • While students have always borrowed papers from friends, the Internet has made it even easier to engage in plagiarism.
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  • Even if a school doesn't subscribe to a plagiarism-checking program, suspicious professors can type a few sentences into Google and bring up the original source of borrowed content.
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  • Often these methods and designs have been borrowed from anthropological texts about ancient cultures and related tattooing practices.
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  • In small gardens, shakkei, borrowed views, created the impression of a larger space.
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  • He borrowed money from his wealthy mother and established the Burpee Seed Company.
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  • Later records like Physical Graffiti and In Through the Out Door saw the band dabbling in keyboards, psychedelic textures and dance grooves that borrowed from reggae and disco.
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  • These companies have borrowed the yin yang symbol found on the Korean flag that depicts the yin yang moving in a counter-clock movement.
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  • The symbolism has been borrowed to be used in many pendants as a symbol of friendship and love.
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  • Should a financial need arise in the future, these funds may be borrowed from the insurance company.
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  • Gameplay effects were borrowed from Wind Waker, but the top-down view was taken from A Link to the Past.
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  • Even so, they clearly borrowed many elements from the original.
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  • Many story and graphical elements were borrowed from the Prime series, though the game itself is not part of the storyline.
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  • Nintendo (and developer Next Level Games of Canada) borrowed several nostalgic elements, while implementing several new features.
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  • "He's a Hunter vamp we borrowed from Jonny," she explained.
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  • These rules were borrowed almost word for word from the project drawn up at the Brussels international conference of 1874, which, though never ratified, was practically incorporated in the army regulations issued by the Russian government in connexion with the war of 18 77-7 8.
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  • In 27 B.C. Augustus planted new colonists there, and divided the city into seven vici after the model of Rome, from which the names of the vici were borrowed.
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  • The Armenians in the south-east of Asia Minor borrowed feudal institutions from the Franks and the feudal vocabulary itself.
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  • It is not so much that the West came into contact with a particular civilization in the East, or borrowed from that civilization; it is simply that the West came into contact with something unlike itself, yet in many ways as high as, if not higher than, itself.
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  • These legends show how closely the heroine is associated with the cult of Artemis, and with the human sacrifices which accompanied it in older times before the Hellenic spirit had modified the barbarism of this borrowed religion.
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  • Whether borrowed or not, it must be late; and its resemblance to Greek ideas suggests Greek influence.
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  • Throughout, however, the superstitions of the Malays show indications of this Hindu influence, and many of the demons whom their medicine-men invoke in their magic practices are clearly borrowed from the pantheon of India.
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  • Nothing is more likely than that Christianity gained adherents among the Therapeutae, and that their institutions were adapted to the new religion, just as they seem to have been borrowed by the Jews from the Egyptians.
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  • Both Baal and Astarte were venerated in Egypt at Thebes and Memphis in the XIXth Dynasty, and the former, through the influence of the Aramaeans who borrowed the Babylonian spelling Bel, ultimately became known as the Greek Belos who was identified with Zeus.
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  • The earlier part of it treated of the mythical adventures of Aeneas in Sicily, Carthage and Italy, and borrowed from the interview of Zeus and Thetis in the first book of the Iliad the idea of the interview of Jupiter and Venus; which Virgil has made one of the cardinal passages in the Aeneid.
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  • Sometimes he thinks that they came direct from God, like all good things, but he is also fond of maintaining that many of Plato's best thoughts were borrowed from the Hebrew prophets; and he makes the same statement in regard to the wisdom of the other philosophers.
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  • For his moral doctrine he borrowed freely from Stoicism.
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  • - The liturgical vestments of the Catholic Church, East and West, are not, as was at one time commonly supposed, borrowed from the sacerdotal ornaments of the Jewish ritual, although the obvious analogies of this ritual doubtless to a certain extent determined their sacral character; they were developed independently out of the various articles of everyday dress worn by citizens of the Graeco-Roman world under the Empire.
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  • If Spain and Gaul borrowed from Rome, they also exercised a reciprocal influence on the Roman use; it is interesting to note in this connexion, that of the names of the liturgical vestments a very large proportion are not of Roman origin, and that the non-Roman names tended to supersede the Roman in Rome itself.'
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  • In spite of the phrase renatus in aeternum, there is no reason to suppose that the ceremony was in any way borrowed from Christianity.
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  • From the Greek sophists they borrowed ingenious ways of playing off one duty against another, or duty in general against self-interest - leaving the doubter in the alternative of neglecting the one and being a knave, or neglecting the other and being a fool.
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  • The term was certainly borrowed by the Romans from the language of the natives.
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  • He has, indeed, a system, but it is a singular medley of doctrines borrowed, not only from Saint-Simonian, but from Pythagorean and Buddhistic sources.
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  • The word iriCrK07r03 or overseer may be of Gentile origin, just as presbyter may have been borrowed from the Jews.
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  • The Latins, and Armenians who have borrowed from the Latins, have subdeacons, acolytes, exorcists, readers and doorkeepers.
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  • Of the institutions thus borrowed and adapted the most notable was the famous county system which still plays so conspicuous a part in Hungarian national life.
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  • The question as to whether the Greeks borrowed their algebra from the Hindus or vice versa has been the subject of much discussion.
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  • The newcomers adopted the language of the conquered, but brought with them new customs and a new artistic taste probably largely borrowed from the metal-working tribes of Siberia.
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  • He recognized also Ideas and Matter, and borrowed largely from Aristotle and the Stoics.
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  • Certainly in happier times, when the worst period of storm and stress was over, there would be a desire to enliven the services with music, which would naturally be borrowed from the traditional music of the great national sanctuary.
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  • A parliamentary commission, appointed to inquire into the charges against him, discovered only that Crispi, on assuming office in 1893, had found the secret service coffers empty, and had borrowed from a state bank the sum of £12,00o for secret service, repaying it with the monthly instalments granted in regular course by the treasury.
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  • They had from early times a very complicated system of superstitious medicine, or religion, related to disease and the cure of disease, borrowed, as is thought, from the Etruscans; and, though the saying of Pliny that the Roman people got on for six hundred years without doctors was doubtless an exaggeration, and not, literally speaking, exact, it must be accepted for the broad truth which it contains.
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  • Something was borrowed even from the school of Salerno, and thus the close of Byzantine medicine is brought into connexion with the dawn of science in modern Europe.
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  • It accumulates in the brain, and there generates the" nervous fluid "or pneuma - a theory closely resembling that of Mead on the" nervous liquor,"unless indeed Mead borrowed it from Hoffmann.
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  • As in the case of nearly all the great works of Roman literary genius, the form of the poem was borrowed from the Greeks.
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  • Its motive was borrowed to some extent from Othello, but that matters little.
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  • Besides the annual expenditure of the various authorities large sums have been borrowed to defray the cost of works of a permanent nature.
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  • If so, the word " pont " may have been borrowed by the Britons before the commencement of the Roman occupation.
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  • The Burmese alphabet is borrowed from the Aryan Sanskrit through the Pali of Upper India.
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  • The cuneiform system of writing Semitic. w as still in process of growth when it was borrowed influence p g and adapted by the new comers, and the Semitic Babylonian language was profoundly influenced by the older language of the country, borrowing its words and even its grammatical usages.
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  • Sumerian in its turn borrowed from Semitic Babylonian, and traces of Semitic influence in some of the earliest Sumerian texts indicate that the Semite was already on the Babylonian border.
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  • During the administration (1872-1876) of President Pardo the government borrowed heavily from the banks to avoid the suspension of work on the railways and port improvements.
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  • There is a public debt of about £340,000, borrowed for public works, which is being paid off by a sinking fund.
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  • Elliott lost all his money, and when he was forty years old began business again in Sheffield on a small borrowed capital.
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  • The nymphaea of the Roman period were borrowed from the constructions of the Hellenistic east.
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  • This was at one time claimed as the original source of all the Perceval romances, but this theory cannot be maintained in face of the fact that the writer gives in one place what is practically a literal translation of Chretien's text in a passage which there is strong reason to believe was borrowed by Chretien from an earlier poem.
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  • Therefore he took his motives from nature rather than from history; or, if he borrowed from the latter, what he selected was a scene, not the pains or the passions of its actors, Moreover, he never exhausted his subject, but was always careful to leave a wide margin for the imagination of the spectator.
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  • During the long apprenticeship that educated Japanese serve to acquire the power of writing with the brush the complicated characters borrowed from Chinese, they unconsciously cultivate the habit of minute observation and the power of accurate imitation, and with these the delicacy of touch and freedom of hand which only long practice can give.
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  • The modern faience of Ito TOzan of KiOto, decorated with color under the glaze, is incomparably more artistic than the Tokyo asahi-yaki, from which, nevertheless, the KiOto master doubtless borrowed some ideas.
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  • The first idea is due to Motteux, from whom the title, motto and general plan were borrowed.
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  • It is clear from the traditions about Lycurgus, for example, that even the Spartans had been a long while in Laconia before their state was rescued from disorder by his reforms; and if there be truth in the legend that the new institutions were borrowed from Crete, we perhaps have here too a late echo of the legislative fame of the land of Minos.
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  • The artist must indeed start with imaginative types, revealed to him in visions or borrowed from current myths.
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  • Fortunately it chanced that another people, the Persians, had adopted the Assyrian wedge-shaped stroke as the foundation of a written character, but making that analysis of which the Assyrians had fallen short, had borrowed only so many characters as were necessary to represent the alphabetical sounds.
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  • For this purpose they adopted a cycle of eighty-four years, which is mentioned by several of the ancient fathers of the church, and which the early Christians borrowed from them for the regulation of Easter.
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  • The symbols and myths in these are not the creation of the writer, but borrowed from the past, and in not a few instances the materials are too foreign to his subject to lend themselves to his purpose without the help of artificial and violent expedients.
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  • 1-13 is borrowed from Jewish sources, and that this fragment really consists of two smaller fragments, xi.
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  • The insertion of the alien matter 7-12 between 1-5 and 13-17 may be due to our author's wish to show that the expulsion of Satan from heaven after Christ's birth and ascension to heaven was owing in some measure to Christ, although he has allowed Michael's name to remain in the borrowed passage, 7-12 - a fact which shows how dependent the writer was on tradition.
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  • - This section describes in prophetic language borrowed almost wholly from Isaiah and Jeremiah the coming judgment of Rome, and gives the ten lamentations of the kings and the merchants and the seamen over her, and the thanksgivings in heaven for her overthrow.
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  • The main features of this section have been borrowed from Judaism.
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  • He started a perfumery shop in Athens on borrowed capital, became bankrupt and retired to the Syracusan court, where he was well received by Aristippus.
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  • For this purpose he borrowed much money on his personal security, and sometimes neglected to secure proper vouchers.
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  • Finally the word (confused not unnaturally with the particle usually attached to it) was borrowed by the West, and is the origin of the English "admiral."
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  • At a later period, however, the difficulty of screening the rites of baptism and Eucharist from the eyes of catechumens and from their ears the creeds and liturgies - a difficulty which had ever been formidable and which after the overthrow of paganism must have become insurmountable - seems to have provoked not only a great outpouring on the part of the Christian rhetors, like Basil, Chrysostom, the Gregories and the Cyrils, of phrases borrowed from the Greek mysteries, but perhaps an actual use of precautions.
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  • From the East it was borrowed by Rome, where there is evidence of its existence so early as the 7th century.
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  • The expression was borrowed from Josephus by Luke, who wrongly imagined that Lysanias I.
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  • (I) De Thematibus, an account of the military districts (Themata) of the empire during the time of Justinian, chiefly borrowed from Hierocles and Stephanus of Byzantium.
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  • Fourteen millions of borrowed money, spent in ten years, were on the whole well laid out.
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  • It may be noticed that a Thamudaean legend has been found on a Babylonian cylinder of about woo B.C., and it is remarkable that the Sabaean satara, " write," seems to be borrowed from Assyrian shataru.
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  • From a personal friend, James Coggeshall, he borrowed $1000, on which capital and the editor's reputation The Tribune was founded.
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  • Lightfoot, indeed, dwells on the all-round "comprehensiveness" with which Clement, as the mouthpiece of the early Roman Church, utters in succession phrases or ideas borrowed impartially from Peter and Paul and James and the Epistle to Hebrews.
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  • See also the Letters of Queen Victoria (1907), and the obituary published by The Times, from which some passages have been borrowed above.
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  • Seven of the twenty days constituting the Aztec month bore names evidently borrowed from those of the Chinese horary signs.
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  • The Aztec calendar includes nakshatra titles borrowed, not only through the medium of the Tatar zodiac, but likewise straight from the Indian scheme, apart from any known intervention.
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  • His materials are borrowed from the cyclic poems from which Virgil (with whose works he was probably acquainted) also drew, in particular the Aethiopis of Arctinus and the Little Iliad of Lesches.
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  • This latter was the continuation through southern Siam of the line already constructed from Bangkok south-west to Petchaburi (110 m.), with funds borrowed, under a recent agreement, from the Federated (British) Malay States government, which work, following upon surveys made in 1907, was begun in 1909 under the direction of a newly constituted southern branch of the Royal Railways department.
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  • The government has since 1903 given attention to sericulture, and steps have been taken to improve Siamese silk with the aid of scientists borrowed from the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture.
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  • A further sum of £4,000,000 was borrowed in 1909 from the government of the Federated (British) Malay States at par and bearing interest at 4%, also for railway construction.
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  • He is possibly the Harpocration mentioned by Julius Capitolinus (Life of Verus, 2) as the Greek tutor of Antoninus Verus (2nd century A.D.); some authorities place him much later, on the ground that he borrowed from Athenaeus.
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  • The administration was corrupt, largely because of the vast powers given to officials, who were invariably underpaid; and the financial methods of the company precipitated its ruin, large dividends being paid out of borrowed money.
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  • As a continuation of the Chronicon of Prosper of Aquitaine, Marius wrote a short Chronicon dealing with the period from 455 to 581; and although he borrowed from various sources his work has some importance for the history of Burgundy.
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  • But the pressure from the representatives of some of the states, notably Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, compelled him to incorporate in the Tariff Act certain specific duties borrowed from the Tariff Acts then in force in these states, which had a distinctly protective aim.
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  • The Uighurs employed an alphabet based upon the Syriac and borrowed from the Nestorian missionaries.
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  • Curiously enough, these champions of orthodoxy borrowed the name, which has stuck to them ever since, from their "dogheaded" adversaries.
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  • For instance, there are no bilinf or legendary poems, such as are found among the Russians, although many passages in the ancient chroniclers from their poetical colouring seem to be borrowed from old songs or legends, and the first verses of some of these compositions have been preserved.
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  • 46); the legend of the young woman (borrowed from the Greek story of Mycon and Pero, Val.
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  • He published his books either anonymously or under borrowed names, and was forced to have them printed out of France.
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  • Probably the idea of providing vowel points was borrowed from the Syrians.
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  • In 1871 the government contracted aloanof £1,000,0001n London, and in 1872 it borrowed an additional £2,400,000 for railway construction.
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  • In admitting that the name was borrowed, we are not by any means shut up to suppose that the Hebrew nebhiim simply copied their Canaanite neighbours.
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  • It should be borne in mind that in early times the larger values, such as minae, would be transmitted by commerce, while after the introduction of coinage the lesser values of shekels and drachmae would be the units; and this needs notice, because usually a borrowed unit was multiplied or divided according to the ideas of the borrowers, and strange modifications thus arose.
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  • Neoplatonism, coming last, borrowed something from all the schools.
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  • For Philo pays no respect to any cultus except the Jewish; and he believed that all the fragments of truth to be found amongst Greeks and Romans had been borrowed from the books of Moses.
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  • This verdict of Porphyry's is at all events more just and apt than that of the theologians on the Greek philosophers, when they accused them of having borrowed all their really valuable doctrines from the ancient Christian books.
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  • These Persian fancies can hardly be borrowed from the Christian Gnostic systems, their definiteness and much more strongly dualistic character recalling the exposition of the Mandaean (and Manichaean) system, are proofs to the contrary.
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  • The foreign debt dates from 1825, when £10,000,000 were borrowed in London through two loans.
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  • Moreover there are details of Mexican civilization which are most easily accounted for on the supposition that they were borrowed from Asia.
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  • At last he borrowed sixpence from the stage-manager and returned home, carrying all his property tied up in a handkerchief.
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  • It is very difficult to determine what was the extent of Mani's knowledge of Christianity, how much he himself borrowed from it, and through what channels it reached him.
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  • From Catholicism, which he very probably had no detailed knowledge of, he borrowed nothing, rejecting it as devilish error.
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  • The only way of removing the president from office is by impeachment, an institution borrowed from Great Britain, where it had not become obsolete at the time when the United States constitution was adopted.
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  • Between it and the transept we find the sacristy (X), and a small book-room (Y), armariolum, where the brothers deposited the volumes borrowed from the library.
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  • As an office it appears to be of local origin, and is entirely unknown in the Eastern Church, with the exception of the Armenians who borrowed it from the West.
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  • The ancient Saxons had borrowed the week from some Eastern nation, and substituted the names of their own divinities for those of the gods of Greece.
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  • The Mean Length Of The Year Was Thus Reduced To 365.4 Days; But It Is Not Certain At What Time The Octennial Periods, Borrowed From The Greeks, Were Introduced Into The Roman Calendar, Or Whether They Were At Any Time Strictly Followed.
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  • Sikes's hydrometer, on account of its similarity to that of Bories, appears to have been borrowed from that instrument.
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  • The form of government was borrowed largely from those prevailing in the mendicant orders.
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  • He endeavoured to prove that early Greek philosophers had borrowed largely from certain parts of Scripture, and quoted from Linus, Orpheus, Musaeus and others, passages which strongly resemble the Mosaic writings.
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  • Since the beginning of the 20th century large sums have been borrowed and expended on new avenues, the widening and straightening of old streets, and the improvement of the water-front between the Passeio Publico and the southern extremity of the Praia de Botafogo by the construction of a grand boulevard, partly on reclaimed land.
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  • These were certainly known to Cranmer, but it is remarkable how little he borrowed from them.
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  • It struck out no original line of its own, and borrowed freely from foreign, especially Egyptian, models.
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  • The absence of the author's final revision may partly account for many repetitions, and for some contradictions, for mistakes in passages borrowed from Greek authors, and for the insertion of marginal additions at wrong places in the text.
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  • His indices auctorum are, in some cases, the authorities which he has actually consulted (though in this respect they are not exhaustive); in other cases, they represent the principal writers on the subject, whose names are borrowed second-hand for his immediate authorities.
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  • However, it is practically certain, both from the etymology of the word Purim and from the resemblance of the festivals, that the feast, as represented in the Book of Esther, was borrowed from the Persians, who themselves appeared to have adapted it from the Babylonians.
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  • In general design and construction, the manner of moving the rotating plate and in the use of the two Leyden jars in connexion with the discharge balls, Voss borrowed his ideas from Holtz.
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  • The "three hours" service, borrowed from Roman Catholic usage and consisting of prayers, addresses on the "seven last words from the cross" and intervals for meditation and silent prayer, has become very popular in the Anglican Church, and the observance of the day is more marked than formerly among Nonconformist bodies, even in Scotland.
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  • The earliest record in the West of the blessing of the palms and the subsequent procession is the liber ordinum of the West Gothic Church (published by Fhrotin, Paris, 1904, pp. 178 sqq.), which dates from the 6th century; this shows plainly that the ceremonial of the procession had been borrowed from Jerusalem.
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  • From the Eastern Empire the title was borrowed by the West, though it only became firmly established in Sicily, where the logotheta occupied the position of chancellor elsewhere, his office being equal if not superior to that of the magnus cancellarius.
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  • He borrowed a grammar and other books,.
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  • He wrote Brevis Annotatio, a short history of the church of Hexham from 674 to 1138, for which he borrowed from Bede, Eddius and Simeon of Durham.
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  • These young men went out into the villages, borrowed a chair of a cottager, and spoke from it at open-air meetings.
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  • There is no doubt that Indian astronomy shows marked Hellenic features, including actual Greek words borrowed.
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  • It is uncertain whether his account of Alexander was borrowed from Jews or Christians, since the romance of Alexander belonged to the stereotyped literature of that age.
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  • On the other hand, it is yet more remarkable that several of such borrowed words in the Koran have a sense which they do not possess in the original language.
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  • The word shaitan " Satan," which was likewise borrowed, at least in the first instance, from the Abyssinian, had probably been already introduced into the language.
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  • On the other hand, the question must remain open whether Mahomet only gave free renderings of the several borrowed formulae, or whether in actually composing them he kept existing models.
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  • This character of the offended wife was borrowed by later poets from the Greek epic; but it belongs to literature rather than to cult, in which the dignity and power of the goddess is naturally more emphasized.
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  • The Greek alphabet, reinforced by a few signs borrowed from demotic, rendered the spoken tongue so accurately that four distinct, though closely allied, dialects are readily distinguishable in Coptic MSS.; ample remains are found of renderings of the Scriptures into all these dialects.
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  • Egypt had long been bilingual when, in papyri of the 2nd century AD,, we begin to find transcripts of the Egyptian language into Greek letters, the latter reinforced by a few signs borrowed from the demotic alphabet: so written we have a magical text and a horoscope, probably made by foreigners or for their use.
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  • Mahmud also was already planning reforms borrowed from the West, and Mehemet Ali, who had had plenty of opportunity of observing the superiority of European.
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  • Some of the subjects are borrowed in altered form from the old mythology, while a few derive from Christian legend, and many deal with national history.
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  • The attacks of rationalism, aided by Greek philosophy, were repelled and vanquished by the weapons of scholastic dialectic borrowed from the enemy; on most points of dispute discussion was forbidden altogether, and faith in what is written in Koran and tradition was enjoined without question as to how these things were true (bila kaifa).
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  • Thus there have always been two kinds of Sufis, and, though the course of history and the wandering habits which various orders borrowed from Buddhism Zaid and `Amr are the Caius and Sempronius of Arabian law.
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  • The Servian, Bulgarian and Rumanian languages have borrowed largely from the Turkish in their vocabularies, but not in their structural forms, and have adopted many words from the Greek.
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  • The Assyrian kings also maintained magnificent parks, or "paradises," in which game of every kind was enclosed; and perhaps it was from them that the Persian sovereigns borrowed the practice mentioned both by Xenophon in the Cyropaedia and by Curtius.
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  • That the Romans had borrowed some things in the art of hunting from the Gauls may be inferred from the name canis gallicus (Spanish galgo) for a greyhound, which is to be met with both in Ovid and Martial; also in the words (canis) vertragus and segusius, both of Celtic origin.'
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  • In a few years the bank failed, and the state in 1831 borrowed money to redeem the depreciated notes issued by the bank.
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  • In his characterizations of persons, borrowed from Socrates, he is more dull and colourless.
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  • After Socrates he has indeed repeated the caution not to be too rash in discerning the finger of God; but his way of looking at things is throughout mean and rustic. Two souls inhabit his book; one, the better, is borrowed from Socrates; another, the worse, is his own.
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  • It is probable that many passages of St Luke's Gospeel which have no parallel in St Matthew were also derived from this early source; but this is not easily capable of distinct proqf; and, therefore, in order to gain a secure conception of the document we must confine ourselves at first to those parts of it which were borrowed by both writers.
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  • He wrote a great work on the doctrines of the Pythagoreans, and tried to show that the successors of Pythagoras had made no additions to the views of their founder, but had merely borrowed and altered the phraseology.
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  • But although he goes to the Scriptures, and tastes the mystical spirit of the medieval saints, the Christ of his conception has traits that seem borrowed from Socrates and from the heroes of Attic tragedy, who suffer much, and yet smile gently on a destiny to which they were reconciled.
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  • At first he expressed himself in the phrases common to scholastic theology, when these were found to be inadequate in words borrowed from the mystical writers of the 14th and 15th centuries, and then in new phrases more appropriate to the circle of fresh thoughts.
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  • In any case Joseph borrowed money from his friends in Samaria; and this point in the story proves that the Jews were supposed to have dealings with the Samaritans at the time and could require of them the last proof of friendship. Armed with his borrowed money, Joseph betook himself to Egypt; and there outbid the magnates of Syria when the taxes of the province were put up to auction.
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  • The king gave him troops and he borrowed more money from the king's friends.
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  • The entire vocabulary of the present land system is borrowed from the Mogul administration.
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  • The balance of trade is always against India, because she is a debtor country, and has to pay interest on borrowed capital, and the " home charges " for the upkeep of the civil and military services and of the secretary of state's establishment in London.
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  • The dates of these documents dispose effectually of Borel's statement that Lippershey borrowed the ideas of Jansen in 1610.
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  • We have thus followed somewhat minutely the history of the gradual process by which Dollond arrived independently at his invention of the refracting telescope, because it has been asserted that he borrowed the idea from others.
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  • The international position of the Ottoman empire was strengthened by the able, if Machiavellian, statecraft of the sultan; while the danger of disruption from within was lessened by the more effective central control made possible by railways, telegraphs, and the other mechanical improvements borrowed from western civilization.
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  • Both titles were borrowed by the Merovingian kings for the administrative machinery of the Frank empire, and under them the functions of the duke remained substantially unaltered.
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  • According to this view the alphabet was borrowed by the Phoenicians from the cursive (hieratic) form of Egyptian hieroglyphics.
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  • That the alphabet was borrowed and adapted independently by different places not widely separated, and that the earliest Greek alphabets did not spread from one or a few centres in Greek lands, seem clear (a) from the different Greek sounds for which the Phoenician symbols were utilized; (b) from the different symbols which were employed to represent sounds which the Phoenicians did not possess, and for which, therefore, they had no symbols.
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  • On the other hand, if we remember the large number of symbols belonging to the prehistoric script, it will seem at least as easy to believe that the persons who, by adding new letters to the Phoenician alphabet, attempted to bring the symbols more into accordance with the sounds of the Greek language, may have borrowed from this older script.
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  • If the Carian alphabet goes back to the prehistoric script, why should not Miletus have borrowed them from it?
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  • The inscription runs from right to left, and is in letters which show more clearly than ever that the Roman alphabet is borrowed from the alphabets of the Chalcidian Greek colonies in Italy.
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  • It is certain from the symbols which they develop or drop that the people of Campania and Samnium borrowed their alphabet from the Etruscans, who held dominion in Campania from the 8th to the 5th century B.C. Previous to the Punic wars Campania had reached a higher stage of civilization than Rome.
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  • That it was borrowed at an early date is shown by the fact that most of its numerous inscriptions run from right to left, though some are written govarp04q 6v.
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  • If it ever existed in Etruscan, it had been lost before the Oscans and Umbrians borrowed their alphabets.
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  • This form was adopted for d because had already been borrowed from Etruscan as the symbol for r, although 9 is also found on Etruscan inscriptions.
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  • For the Greek digamma Etruscan used both 3 and q, but the former only was borrowed by the other languages.
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  • As the old digamma was kept, this new sign was placed after those borrowed from the Chalcidian - alphabet.
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  • Similarly it used 4 and z for the Chalcidian Umbrian borrowed the first, Oscan the second form.
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  • The form for m has five strokes; from a later form HA the Oscan form was borrowed.
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  • It has, however, been contended that a system of primitive runes existed whence some at least of the later runes were borrowed, and the ownership marks of the Lapps, who have no knowledge of reading and writing, have been regarded as borrowed from these early Teutonic runes.
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  • But he rejects Taylor's derivation of this alphabet from the Sabaean script, and contends that it is borrowed from the North Semitic. To the pedantry of the Hindu he attributes its main characteristics, viz.
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  • Of the poetical aorists in Attic the larger part are also Homeric. Others are not really Attic at all, but borrowed from earlier Aeolic and Doric poetry.
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  • They were only inspired by these popular songs; they only borrowed from them the traditional and legendary elements.
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  • There is nothing to ensure that the supply will be equal to the demand, and Nature has not arranged that the borrowed tenement shall continue to grow with the growth of its new tenant.
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  • Speaking strictly, England borrowed little in the region of the arts from other nations, and developed still less that was original.
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  • The general type of architecture is Gothic, but the rich details, which are lavished with especial freedom in the interior courts, are usually borrowed from the Renaissance.
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  • The author has borrowed some 70 lines from the beginning of a poetical rendering of the Prayer of Azarias and the Song of the Three Children, of which there is a copy in the Exeter Book.
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  • The borrowed portion ends with verse 3 of the canticle, the remainder of which follows in a version for the most part independent, though containing here and there a line from Azarias.
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  • Even before the appearance of Sidgwick's book utilitarianism had entered upon its third or evolutional phase, in which principles borrowed from biological science make their entrance into moral philosophy.
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  • This, according to 1 The word Idola is manifestly borrowed from Plato.
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  • Unfortunately, the extant remains of Brythonic are scanty; but in the Roman period it borrowed a large number of Latin words, which, as we know their original forms, and as they underwent the same modifications as other words in the language, enable us to trace the phonetic changes by which Brythonic became Welsh.
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  • Others said, "We have borrowed money for the king's tribute, and that upon our lands and vineyards ...
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  • "The judges," says Ross, "could not award interest for the money; that would have been contrary to law, a moral evil, and an oppression of the debtor; but, upon the idea of damages and the failure of the debtor in performance, they unmercifully decreed for double the sum borrowed."
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  • It also appears in the pages of Albert of Aix, who wrote somewhere about 1130; and from Albert it was borrowed by William of Tyre.
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  • Most of the money borrowed is at 12 to 15% interest.
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  • In Firdousi, the legendary princes are followed, almost without a break, by Ardashir, the founder of the Sassanid dynasty: the intervening episode of Darius and Alexander is not drawn from native tradition, but borrowed from Greek literature (the Alexander-romance of the Pseudo-Callisthenes) in precisely the same way as among the nations of the Christian East in the middle ages.i Needless to say, however, this long period saw the Saga much recast and expanded.
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  • All their external institutions were borrowed from the Seleucid Empire:
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  • This stipulation was agreed to in principle by the grand vizier, Amin ad-daulah, who in March, in order to meet some pressing demands on the treasury borrowed 50,000 on the customs receipts of Kermnshah and Bushire, and agreed to the lenders, the Imperial Bank of Persias agents, being placed as cashiers in the custom-houses of both cities.
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  • From Schelling, whom he praised as having developed Kant where Fichte failed to do so, he borrowed much and often, not only in the metaphysical sections of the Biographia but in his aesthetic lectures, and further in the cosmic speculations of the posthumous Theory of Life.
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  • These books do not display the apocalyptic style which, partly borrowed from Lamennais, characterizes Michelet's later works, but they contain in miniature almost the whole of his curious ethicopolitico-theological creed - a mixture of sentimentalism, communism, and anti-sacerdotalism, supported by the most eccentric arguments, but urged with a great deal of eloquence.
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  • These he developed along lines of his own, where Christian Neoplatonism curiously mingles with theories of chivalry and disinterestedness, borrowed from the precieuses of his own time.
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  • In the latter the words in use for common objects and acts are nearly all pure Baluchi, the remainder of the language being borrowed from Persian, Sindhi and Panjabi.
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  • From the astronomers the Stoics borrowed their picture of the universe - a plenum in the form of a series of layers or concentric rings, first the elements, then the planetary and stellar spheres, massed round the earth as centre - a picture which dominated the imagination of men from the days of Eudoxus down to those of Dante or even Copernicus.
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  • Antiochus of Ascalon, the professed restorer of the Old Academy, taught a medley of Stoic and Peripatetic dogmas, which he boldly asserted Zeno had first borrowed from his school.
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  • So Tertullian writes: "The water which carried the Spirit of God (probably regarded as a shadow or reflection-soul) borrowed holiness from that which was carried upon it; for every underlying matter must needs absorb and take up the quality of that matter which overhangs it; especially does a corporeal so absorb a spiritual, as this can easily penetrate and settle into it owing to the subtlety of its substance."
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  • It was admitted that he had borrowed largely from the treasury, on the security of his civil list, and the Republican deputies accused him of endeavouring to assign the tobacco monopoly to one of his own foreign creditors, in settlement of the debt.
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  • In entering upon the work of public improvements in 1837 the state borrowed $5,200,000, and the greater portion of the bonds were sold to the Morris Canal and Banking Company and to the Pennsylvania United States Bank, both of which failed when they had only in part paid for the bonds.
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  • The bishop of the chief city in each diocese naturally rose to a pre-eminence, and was commonly called exarch - a title borrowed from the civil jurisdiction.
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  • The supposed allusions to the Pleiade date from a time when Ronsard was a small boy, and are mainly borrowed from an earlier writer still, Geoffroy Tory.
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  • At last the Land of Lanterns, borrowed from Lucian, is reached, and the Oracle of the Bottle is consulted.
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  • As an institution (supposed by some to have been borrowed from Etruria) they went back to the regal period and continued to exist till imperial times.
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  • The state pays, on an average, 3.69% for the money borrowed to construct the lines, and there is therefore a considerable surplus to the advantage of the revenue.
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  • If, however, the total debt of the council will, with the amount proposed to be borrowed, exceed onetenth of the annual rateable value of the property in the county, the money cannot be borrowed unless under a provisional order made by the Local Government Board and confirmed by parliament.
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  • The money must be borrowed for permanent works, the expenses of which ought in the opinion of the powers.
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  • The sums borrowed must not exceed, with the outstanding loans, the amount of the assessable value for two years of the district for which the money is borrowed; and if the sum borrowed would, with the outstanding loans, exceed the assessable value for one year, the sanction of the Local Government Board may not be given except after local inquiry.
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  • Land may be acquired, and money borrowed, for the purposes of the acts.
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  • The title of Lucian's most famous collection was borrowed in the i 7th century by two French writers of eminence, each of whom prepared Dialogues des morts.
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  • He is of opinion that neither borrowed much from, nor exercised much influence on, the cult and character of the other.
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  • The Australian and English languages each consist mainly of a series of words having no apparent connexion with the ideas they signify, and differing utterly; of course, accidental coincidences and borrowed words must be excluded from such comparisons.
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  • Such an idea was distinctly foreign to the primitive Israelitish conception of the indivisibility of Yahweh's power, and must consequently have been a borrowed one.
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  • If "the idea of humanity," as Kant called it, has ethical perfection at its core, then a universe which is really an organic whole must be ultimately representable as a moral order or a spiritual kingdom such as Leibnitz named, in words borrowed from St Augustine, a city of God.
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  • Next year Wotton declared that Swift had borrowed his Combat des livres from the Histoire poetique de la guerre nouvellement declaree entre les anciens et les modernes (Paris, 1688).
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  • This was St Francis's root idea, and there is no doubt - though it has been disputed - that it was borrowed from him by St Dominic and the other Mendicant founders.
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  • But the facility with which money had always been borrowed gave rise to great extravagance.
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  • The Latin alphabet is used, with special signs to represent sounds borrowed from Slavonic, &c. All the unaccented vowels except e are pronounced as in Italian; e has the same phonetic value as in Old Slavonic (=French e) and is often similarly preiotized (= ye in yet), notably at the beginning of all words except neologisms. The accented vowels é and ó are pronounced as ea and oa (petra, rock, = peatra; morte, death, = moarte); they are written in full, as diphthongs, at the end of a word and sometimes in other positions.
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  • The accentuation of Rumanian, though complex, is governed by certain broad principles, except in the case of neologisms, many of which have been borrowed from French and Italian without change of accent.
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  • The title of " princess royal, " bestowed on the eldest daughter of the sovereign was borrowed by King George II.
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  • His failure to pay the interest of the money borrowed in Rome, and the desire of Urban VIII.
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  • It was at this time that the Latin collection of Dionysius Exiguus became known; and just as he had given the Greek councils a place in his collection, so from him were borrowed the canons of councils which did not appear in the Greek collection - the twenty canons of Sardica (343), in the Greek text, which differs considerably from the Latin; and the council of Carthage of 419, which itself included, more or less completely, in 105 canons, the decisions of the African councils.
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  • Much of it, no doubt, was borrowed from the Corpus juris canonici and the English provincial canons.
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  • - By consulting an account of my expenses at Cambridge, in the years 1663 and 1664, I find that in the year 1664 a little before Christmas, I, being then Senior Sophister, bought Schooten's Miscellanies and Cartes' Geometry (having read this Geometry and Oughtred's Clavis clean over half a year before), and borrowed Wallis's works, and by consequence made these annotations out of Schooten and Wallis, in winter between the years 1664 and 1665.
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  • But it is not to be supposed that the Christians borrowed from these or from any Gentile source any essential features of their baptismal rites.
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  • Yet there is not much evidence that the church directly borrowed many of its ceremonies or interpretations from outside sources.
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  • They for the most part originated among the believers, and not improbably the outside cults borrowed as much from the church as it from them.
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  • Legends of the part played by Joseph of Arimathea in the conversion of Britain are closely connected with Glastonbury, the monks of which foundation showed, in the 12th century, considerable literary activity, and it seems a by no means improbable hypothesis that the present form of the Grail legend may be due to a monk of Glastonbury elaborating ideas borrowed from Fecamp. This much is certain, that between the Saint-Sang of Fecamp, the Volto Santo of Lucca, and the Grail tradition, there exists a connecting link, the precise nature of which has yet to be determined.
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  • They dared heir had obviously borrowed the expedient from the terms of the treaty of Troyes.
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  • They borrowed his money and his armies, but fed him with vain promises and illusory treaties.
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  • Its leaders were obscure and usually illiterate men, who delighted to propound their theories for the universal reformation of society and the state in rhetoric of which tile characteristic phrases were borrowed from the tribune of the Jacobi.
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  • They only become original and contemporary authorities towards the end of their appointed tasks, and the bulk of their work is borrowed from their predecessors.
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  • By order of the Sibylline books, a temple was built to these three deities near the Circus Flaminius; the whole cultus was borrowed from the Greeks, down even to the terminology, and priestesses were brought from the Greek cities.
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  • The followers of Islam, whose common law and religion know only of a temporary possession of the land, which belongs wholly to the Prophet, cannot accept the principles of unlimited property in land which European civilization has borrowed from Roman law; to do so would put an end to all public irrigation works and to the system by which water is used according to each family's needs, and so would be fatal to agriculture.
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  • He wore the royal diadem, assumed the title of lord, and introduced a complicated system of ceremonial and etiquette, borrowed from the East, in order to surround the monarchy and its representative with mysterious sanctity.
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  • Like all borrowed religions in Rome, it must have retained the rites and the terminology of its Greek original (Festus p. 257).
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  • Sometimes the dominance of a particular science or branch of study is the occasion of an attempt to apply to ethics ideas borrowed from Sciences or analogous to the conceptions of that science.
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  • The influence of ideas borrowed from biology is everywhere manifest in the ethical speculations of modern times.
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  • If, as has already been said, one of the chief tasks of ethics is to prevent the intrusion into its own sphere of inquiry of ideas borrowed from other and alien sources, then obviously these sources must be investigated.
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  • The attempt to Christianize the old Platonic list of virtues, which we have noticed in Augustine's system, was probably due to the influence of his master Ambrose, in whose treatise De officiis ministrorum we find for the first time an exposition of Christian duty systematized on a plan borrowed from a pre-Christian moralist.
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  • Finally in the exposition of Christian Justice the Stoic doctrine of the natural union of all human interests is elevated to the full height and intensity of evangelical philanthropy; the brethren are reminded that the earth was made by God a common possession of all, and are bidden to administer their means for the common benefit; Ambrose, we should observe, is thoroughly aware of the fundamental union of these different virtues in Christianity, though he does Cicero's works are unimportant in the history of ancient ethics, as their philosophical matter was entirely borrowed from Greek treatises now lost; but the influence exercised by them (especially by the De officiis) over medieval and even modern readers was very considerable.
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  • This and the necessity of indemnifying the people from whom, during the wars with Turkey (1876-1878), requisitions had been taken and money borrowed, forced the government to enter the European financial markets.
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  • Kugler 7 that the various periods underlying their lunar predictions were identical with those heretofore believed to have been independently arrived at by Hipparchus, who accordingly must be held to have borrowed from Chaldaea the lengths of the synodic, sidereal, anomalistic and draconitic months.
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  • Names borrowed from geography and classical mythology are assigned to the regions and features.
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  • As a complement to the Land Act and Arrears Act, boards of guardians were this year empowered to build labourers' cottages with money borrowed on the security of the rates and repayable out of them.
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  • Milchhdfer believes that the story was a mere invention of Greek fancy, an attempt to interpret the mysterious figure which Greek art had borrowed from the East.
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  • The Greek " key " pattern found on objects in Peruvian graves was not necessarily borrowed from Greece, nor did Greeks necessarily borrow from Aztecs the " wave " pattern which is common to both.
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  • Borrowed they may have been, but they may as probably have been independent inventions.
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  • Isis wandered, mourning, in search of the body, as Demeter sought Persephone, and perhaps in Plutarch's late version some incidents may be borrowed from the Eleusinian legend.
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  • He borrowed the hawk-dress of Freya, when he recovered the apples of Iduna.
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  • In this sketch of mythology that of Rome is not included, because its most picturesque parts are borrowed from or adapted into harmony with the mythology of Greece.
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  • He borrowed from the ancien régime its plenipotentiaries; its over-centralized, strictly utilitarian administrative and bureaucratic methods; and afterwards, inorder to bring them into line, the subservient pedantic scholasticism of its university.
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  • The permanence of individual souls he supports by arguments borrowed from those of Plato.
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  • On the, pronouns it has only to be remarked that the modern language has borrowed from Castilian the composite forms nosaltres and voseltres (pronounced also nosaltros and nosatrus), as also the form vosti, vust (Castilian usted for vuestra merced).
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  • The words in which i and have kept their ground are either learned words like mdi-co,mrsbo, or have been borrowed from dialects which do not suffer diphthongization.
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  • Portuguese and Galician even now are practically one language, and still more was this the case formerly: the identity of the two idioms would become still more obvious if the orthography employed by the Galicians were more strictly phonetic, and if certain transcriptions of sounds borrowed from the grammar of the official language (Castilian) did not veil the true pronunciation of the dialect.
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  • Their substance is borrowed from the Ada of St Irenaeus of Sirmium.
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  • And, if this be so, the Nights must have been composed very soon after 1450.1 No doubt the Nights have borrowed much from the Hezar Afsane, and it is not improbable that even in the original Arabic translation of that work some of the Persian stories were replaced by Arab ones.
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  • But that our Nights differ very much from the Hezar Afsane is further manifest from the circumstance that, even of those stories in the Nights which are not Arabian in origin, some are borrowed from books mentioned by Mas`udi as distinct from the Hezar Afsane.
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  • While still a youth, he entered the service of King Sigismund, who appreciated his qualities and borrowed money from him; he accompanied that monarch to Frankfort in his quest for the imperial crown in 1410; took part in the Hussite War in 1420, and in 1437 drove the Turks from Semendria.
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  • In the Egyptian churches the cross was a pagan symbol of life borrowed by the Christians and interpreted in the pagan manner.
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  • Voltaire said that it was full of commonplaces, and that what was original was false or problematical; Rousseau declared that the very benevolence of the author gave the lie to his principles; Grimm thought that all the ideas in the book were borrowed from Diderot; according to Madame du Deffand, Helvetius had raised such a storm by saying openly what every one thought in secret; Madame de Graffigny averred that all the good things in the book had been picked up in her own salon.
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  • Fra Salimbene says in his Chronicle (Parma ed., p. 108): "All who wished to found a new rule borrowed something from the Franciscan order, the sandals or the habit."
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  • Dean was wise enough not to ask what guise Fred used to cover his snooping—surely a technique borrowed from a mystery book hero and borderline ille­gal.
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  • Darian had never seen anything half as beautiful as the pale, exhausted warrior in oversized clothing she must've borrowed from the beefier Guardians who lived at the station.
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  • Can be complicated transaction settlement vehicle aftermarket is needed or borrowed without.
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