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borne

borne

borne Sentence Examples

  • You have borne arms against us.

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  • The sadness she felt as his truck disappeared down the road was borne of fear.

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  • Both women took the knives, handling them with awkwardness borne of a lack of familiarity with handling deadly weapons.

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  • As far as he could tell, she had borne it all without breathing a word to anyone else.

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  • The bullfrogs trump to usher in the night, and the note of the whip-poor-will is borne on the rippling wind from over the water.

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  • Before I left New York, these bright days were darkened by the greatest sorrow that I have ever borne, except the death of my father.

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  • The name was borne also by four Parthian kings.

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  • A soldier on the march is hemmed in and borne along by his regiment as much as a sailor is by his ship.

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  • The change of fortune proved disastrous to many families, previously to all appearances in opulent circumstances, but by all classes alike their reverses were borne with the greatest bravery.

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  • The few records during the middle ages are borne out by what is known of famines and pestilence.

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  • During his journey of pacification, Faustina, who had borne him eleven children, died.

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  • Once more, it must be borne in mind that, while it is essential to the idea of nobility that it should carry with it some hereditary privilege, the nature and extent of that privilege may vary endlessly.

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  • The desire for union which led to the formation of the alliance has, since 1875, borne remarkable fruit.

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  • Above all it should be borne in mind that nearly all the last subdivisions or provinces are of very little real value and most of them are inapplicable to other classes of animals.

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  • In Scotland the title of justiciar was borne, under the earlier kings, by two high officials, one having his jurisdiction to the north, the other to the south of the Forth.

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  • Natasha, who had borne the first period of separation from her betrothed lightly and even cheerfully, now grew more agitated and impatient every day.

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  • He chiefly had borne the brunt and won the laurels of the unprecedented fight against deficit in which Italy had been involved since 1862.

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  • The gills, borne on four arches, are internal and enclosed in the branchial chambers.

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  • He and Pierre were borne along lightly and joyously, nearer and nearer to their goal.

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  • He could sell a slave-hostage, unless she 'were a slave-girl who had borne her master children.

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  • Historic figures were not borne by the waves from one shore to another as before.

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  • As provided by the law of 1900 all local charges are borne by the colonies-supplemented at need by grants in aidbut the military expenses are borne by the state.

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  • To obtain a correct idea of this region it must be borne in mind also that the course of the river and the features of the country on both banks are subject to constant fluctuation.

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  • The interior is in the form of a basilica, the double aisles being borne by ancient columns, and contains ambones and a candelabrum of 1311, the former resting on columns supported by lions, and decorated with reliefs and coloured marble mosaic. The castle at the highest point of the town was erected in the 14th century.

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  • His father's most trusted advisor had done the unthinkable, and yet, Ne'Rin had borne all the sacrifices that A'Ran had by coming with him.

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  • Only Jonny's was a high borne of blood and sex.

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  • But during the whole of this active life, many details of which are very interesting as illustrative of the life and manners of the time, he never lost sight of a design which he had formed at a very early period, of writing the history of those civil wars in France in which he had borne a part, and during which he had had so many opportunities of closely observing the leading personages and events.

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  • Her birth itself was romantic. Her father was playing a country dance at the house of a fellow officer, the future husband of Sophie's sister, when he was told that his wife, who had not long left the room, had borne him a daughter.

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  • The expense of enlisting io,000 Swiss was to be borne equally by pope and emperor.

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  • It should, however, be borne in mind that the apparent differences between different species may be partly Table Xiv.

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  • Having borne the title of duke of Montpensier until his grandfather's death in 1752, he became duke of Chartres, and in 1769 married Louise Marie Adelaide de Bourbon-Penthievre, daughter and heiress of the duke of Penthievre, grand admiral of France, and the richest heiress of the time.

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  • as it was borne to its resting-place at La Fleche.

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  • The arrival of these first-fruits of the mineral wealth of the southern continent gained for the estuary of the Parana the name which it has since borne, that of Rio de la Plata, the silver river.

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  • The similar expenses of Algeria borne by the state are not separately shown, but are estimated at 2,000,000.

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  • This Indo - Aryan origin for the Australian blackfellows is borne out by their physique.

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  • The egg-shaped acorns are placed singly or two together on short stalks; they are in most years sparing].y produced, but are occasionally borne in some abundance.

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  • Although married she always remained a member of her father's house - she is rarely named wife of A, usually daughter of B, or mother of C. Divorce was optional with the man, but he had to restore the dowry and, if the wife had borne him children, she had the custody of them.

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  • The two governments frequently discussed the situation, but although they had agreed to a selfdenying ordinance whereby each bound itself not to occupy any part of Albanian territory, Austrias declarations and promises were hardly borne out by the activity of her agents in the Balkans.

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  • 7 His proposed advancement in rank was severely reflected upon in the Lords, Halifax declaring it in the king's presence the recompense of treason, "not to be borne"; and in the Commons his retirement from office by no means appeased his antagonists.

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  • The ancient name (Acerrae) was also borne by a town in Umbria and another in Gallia Transpadana (the latter now Pizzighettone on the Adda, 13 m.

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  • The gonads are borne on the manubrium, either forming a continuous ring (Codonid type), or four masses or pairs of masses (Oceanid type).

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  • Ocelli, if present, are borne on the tentacle-bulbs.

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  • Each such projection is regarded as representing a cup or hydrotheca, similar to those borne by a calyptoblastic hydroid, such as Sertularia.

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  • Divergent views have been held by different authors both as regards the nature of the cormus as a whole, and as regards the homologies of the different types of appendages borne by it.

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  • The spores, as in the heterosporous Pteridophyta, are of two kindsmicrospores (pollen grains) borne in microsporangia (pollen sacs) on special leaves (sporophylls) known as stamens, and macrospores (embryo-sac) borne in macrosporangia (ovules) on sporophylls known as carpels.

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  • In GY~~1NospERMsso-called because the ovules (and seeds) are borne on an open sporophyll or carpelthe microsporophylls and macrosporophylls are not as a rule associated in the same shoot and are generally arranged in cone-like structures; one or two small prothallial cells are formed in the germination of the microspore; the male cells are in some older members of the group motile though usually passive.

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  • This is the case in the Fucaceae, and in a very marked degree in the Laminariaceae in question, where the assimilative frond is borne at the end of an extremely long supporting and conducting stipe.

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  • Outside this are three arcs of large cells showing characters typical of the endodermis in a vascular plan.t; these are interrupted by strands ofnarrow, elongated, thick-walled cells, which send branches into the little brown scales borne by the rhizome.

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  • The water of the soil, which in well-drained soil is met with in the form of delicate films surrounding the particles of solid matter, is absorbed into the plant by the delicate hairs borne by the young roots, the entry being effected by a process of modified osmosis.

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  • The extraordinary malformations known as Witches Brooms, caused by the repeated branching and tufting of twigs in which the mycelium of Exoascus (on birch) or Aecidium (on silver fir) are living, may be borne in considerable ntimbers for years without any very extensive apparent injury to the tree.

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  • the numerous galls on the oakbut the gall itself furnishes well adapted protection and abundant stores of nutriment to its particular larva, and often appears to be borne without injury to the plant.

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  • This, new system of Warmings, whilst probably too involved Cl ~er to come into general use, must be taken as superseding his der one;1 and perhaps the best course open to botanists is to dect such terms as appear to be helpful, and to use the selected I rrms in a general kind of way and without demanding any prese definitions of them: it must also be borne in mind that the g Ibid.

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  • The leaf (phyllome) is an appendicular member only borne by a stem, but differing from it more or less obviously in form and development, though co-ordinate with it in complexity of structure.

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  • The hair (trichome) is a superficial appendage of simple structure, which may be borne by any of the other members.

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  • However, they belong respectively to two different forms in the life-history of the plants; the leaves of the mosses are borne by the gametophyte, those of the club-mosses by the sporophyte.

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  • speed to 60 fathoms for 20 knots, the pull of the line and rotator is borne by coned rollers, having their outlines tapering to a common point in their rotation, thus giving a broad rolling surface.

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  • The justice of Gerson's protest was borne out by events.

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  • To appreciate the significance of the doctrines of Heraclitus, it must be borne in mind that to Greek philosophy the sharp distinction between subject and object which pervades modern thought was foreign, a consideration which suggests the conclusion that, while it is a great mistake to reckon Heraclitus with the materialistic cosmologists of the Ionic schools, it is, on the other hand, going too far to treat his theory, with Hegel and Lassalle, as one of pure Panlogism.

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  • In any comparison between British and American records the first point to be borne in mind is the difference in mileage and traffic. The American railways aggregate approximately ten times the length of the British lines; but in train miles the difference is far less.

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  • At intermediate stations the roofs are often carried on brackets fixed to the walls of the station buildings, and project only to the edge of the platforms. At larger stations where both the platforms and the tracks are covered in, there are two broad types of construction, with many intermediate variations: the roof may either be comparatively low, of the " ridge and furrow " pattern, borne on a number of rows of pillars, or it may consist of a single lofty span extending clear across the area from the side walls.

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  • The name Arsaces of Persia is also borne by some kings of Armenia, who were of Parthian origin.

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  • Yahweh now becomes the supreme deity of the Hebrew people, and an ark analogous to the Egyptian and Babylonian arks portrayed on the monuments' was constructed as embodiment of the rumen of Yahweh and was borne in front of the Hebrew army when it marched to war.

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  • The careful methods of work which he had adopted from the outset had borne admirable fruit.

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  • The main points in the general conclusions of these chapters have been borne out by subsequent research.

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  • On the other hand, the opinion of Cardinal Pitra, who referred the Physiologus to the more orthodox though somewhat peculiar teaching of the Alexandrians, is fully borne out by a close examination of the irregularities of doctrine pointed out in the Physiologus by Cahier, all which are to be met with in Origen.

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  • Conquered by Charlemagne, the most of the district was bestowed on the duke of Friuli; but in the 10th century the title of margrave of Carniola began to be borne by a family resident in the castle of Kieselberg near Krainburg.

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  • Generally it may be said that throughout his long reign Francis Joseph remained the real ruler of his dominions; he not only kept in his hands the appointment and dismissal of his ministers, but himself directed their policy, and owing to the great knowledge of affairs, the unremitting diligence and clearness of apprehension, to which all who transacted business with him have borne testimony, lie was able to keep a very real control even of the details of government.

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  • 5 that Zedekiah would die in peace is not borne out by the history, nor does Josiah's fate agree with the promise in 2 Kings xxii.

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  • In violation of the Law he married a brother's widow, who had already borne children, and in general he showed himself so fierce and tyrannical that the Jews joined with the Samaritans to accuse him before the emperor.

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  • But in England, France and Germany persecution altogether failed to shake the courage of the Jews, and martyrdom was borne in preference to ostensible apostasy.

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  • Setae always present and often very large, much varied in form and very numerous, borne by the dorsal and ventral parapodia (when present).

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  • Koresh), the Latinized form of a Persian name borne by two prominent members of the Achaemenid house.

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  • His father is generally described as a butcher, but he sold other things than meat; and although a man of some property and a churchwarden of St Nicholas, Ipswich, his character seems to have borne a striking resemblance to that of Thomas Cromwell's father.

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  • In Egypt, if not even before leaving Italy, he had become intimately acquainted with Melania, a wealthy and devout Roman widow; and when she removed to Palestine, taking with her a number of clergy and monks on whom the persecutions of the Arian Valens had borne heavily, Rufinus (about 378) followed her.

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  • In estimating Brewster's place among scientific discoverers the chief thing to be borne in mind is that the bent of his genius was not characteristically mathematical.

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  • SALOME, in Jewish history the name borne by several women of the Herod dynasty.

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  • Pear trees may 2, Section of leaf surface showing the also be attacked by a great spores or conidia, c, borne on long variety of insect pests.

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  • Whatever " method " of economic investigation we employ, we must at every stage see how far our reasoning is borne out by the actual experience of life.

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  • Pulmonata with two pairs of tentacles, except Janellidae and Vertigo; these tentacles are invaginable, and the eyes are borne on the summits of the posterior pair.

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  • He, therefore, despite Napoleon's repeated demands, refused to subject his empire to the hardships imposed by the Continental System; at the close of the year 1810 he virtually allowed the entry of colonial goods (all of which were really British borne) and little by little broke away from Napoleon's system.

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  • He had with consummate ability exposed the terrors of 2 This is borne out by the register of his birth and baptism, and by words in his last letter to his wife, - "I die at thirty-four."

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  • Two pairs of wings are present in the vast majority of insects, borne respectively on the mesothorax and metathorax.

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  • Paired erectile plates (patagia) are borne on the prothorax in moths, while in moths, sawflies, wasps, bees and other insects there are small plates (tegulae) - see Fig.

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  • In them the vomer, however variable, always tapers to a point anteriorly, while behind it includes the basisphenoidal rostrum between the palatals; but neither these nor the pterygoids are borne by its posterior divergent ends.

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  • They reaped no fruits from the victory, and Cyprus was taken from her after the heroic defence of Famagusta by Bragadino, who was flayed alive, and his skin, stuffed with straw, borne in triumph to Constantinople.

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  • It must be borne in mind, however, that the designation " Catholic " was equally claimed by all the warring parties within the church at various times; thus, the followers of Arius and Athanasius alike called themselves Catholics, and it was only the ultimate victory of the latter that has reserved for them in history the name of Catholic, and branded the former as Arian.

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  • The chief of these silk cottons is kapok, consisting of the hairs borne on the interior of the pods (but not attached to the seeds) of Eriodendron anfractuosum, the silk cotton tree, a member of the Bombacaceae, an order very closely allied to the Malvaceae.

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  • Of the two Italian botanists who in comparatively recent years have monographed the group, Parlatore (Le Specie dei cotoni, 1866) recognizes seven species, whilst Todaro (Relazione sulla culta dei cotoni, 18 7718 78) describes over fifty species: many of these, however, are of but little economic importance, and, in spite of the difficulties mentioned above, it i s possible for practical purposes to divide the commercially important plants into five species, placing these in two groups according to the character of the hairs borne on the seeds.

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  • The flowers, which are borne in the leaf-axils at the ends of the stem, are very handsome, the six, generally narrow, petals are bent back and stand erect, and are a rich orange yellow or red in colour; the six stamens project more or less horizontally from the place of insertion of the petals.

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  • It must be borne in mind that although the explosion may increase the production for a time, it is by no means certain that the actual output of a well is increased in all such cases, though from some wells there would be no production without the use of the torpedo.

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  • The name was also borne by the following saints: (1) a Roman tribune who suffered martyrdom under Hadrian; (2) a bishop of Siscia in Pannonia; (3) the patron of the Tegernsee in Bavaria, beheaded in Rome in 269 and invoked by those suffering from gout.

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  • On early Greek vases he is represented as borne through the air; this is the sun making his way to his place of departure in the west.

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  • This prospect, however, was dissipated by the invasions of the Magyar hordes in the 10th century, the brunt of which was borne by Moravia.

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  • The doctors declared that the leg needed to be broken and set again; and the operation was borne without a sign of pain beyond a clenching of his fist.

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  • What happened between the two does not appear; but henceforth Caraffa seems to have borne ill will towards Ignatius and his companions.

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  • Owing to failing health he gave up his lectures in 1904, and in May 1906 resigned his mastership, in which he was succeeded by James Leigh Strachan-Davidson, who had previously for some time, as senior tutor and fellow, borne the chief burden of college administration.

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  • Ramsay; and it is borne out by the Armenian name Kermanig, which has been given to the place since at least the 12th century.

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  • Two short treatises exist, purporting to be lives of Gildas, and ascribed respectively to the 11th and 12th centuries; but the writers of both are believed to have confounded two, if not more, persons that had borne the name.

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  • The map is supposed to be based upon actual surveys or rather reconnaissances, and if it be borne in mind that.

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  • There is evidence to show that the arrangement for this " publishing of Truth" rested mainly with Fox, and that the expenses of it and of the foreign missions were borne out of a common fund.

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  • The Book of Discipline in its successive printed editions from 1783 to 1906 contains the working rules of the organization, and also a compilation of testimonies borne by the Society at different periods, to important points of Christian truth, and often called forth by the special circumstances of the time.

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  • BETHLEHEMITES, a name borne at different times by three orders in the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • Now the Maccabean high-priests were the first to assume the title ` priests of the Most High God ' - the title anciently borne by Melchizedek.

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  • Antony, Octavius, and Sextus Pompeius employed them in the Second Civil War; and it is recorded by Augustus on the Monumentum Ancyranum that he gave back to their masters for punishment about 30,000 slaves who had absconded and borne arms against the state.

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  • 4), Surely He bath borne our griefs and carried our sorrows " (Zohar, ii.

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  • The proportion borne to one another by the different religions, as estimated in 1910, is: 50% Mussulman, 41% Orthodox, 6% Catholic, 3% all others (Jews, Druses, Nestorians, &c.).

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  • At the same time it was granted an extension of penal powers, and the losses on reftieh (duty on tobacco exported to Egypt) were to be partially borne by the public debt administration.

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  • The title of vizier was borne by six or seven persons simultaneously; the grand vizier was the chief of these and exercised supreme authority, being invested with the sultan's signet.

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  • sbot) is borne among the Syrians only by the patriarch, in all the other rites by all bishops, in the Greek 1 Among curious exceptions is the pastoral staff still carried by the Lutheran abbot of Lokkum.

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  • In general terms the peach may be said to be a medium-sized tree, with lanceolate, stipulate leaves, borne on long, slender, relatively unbranched shoots, and with the flowers arranged singly, or in groups of two or more, at intervals along the shoots of the previous year's growth.

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  • The blossoms of the peach are formed the autumn previous to their expansion, and this fact, together with the peculiarities of their form and position, requires to be borne in mind by the gardener in his pruning and training operations.

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  • In the following winter this will take the place of the branch which has just borne, and which is to be cut out.

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  • The ark was borne by the Levites (Deut.

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  • Various charges had been brought against him by his enemies, among them that of illiteracy, the truth of which is borne out by the crudeness of his style, and is fully admitted by the writer himself.

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  • This is fully borne out by the experiments of Julius Thomsen, who found that the heat of neutralization of one gramme-molecule of a strong base by an equivalent quantity of a strong acid was nearly constant, and equal to 13,700 or 13,800 calories.

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  • In the additional explanatory notes at the end of the book, after directions as to the wearing of surplice and hood in quire, in cathedral and collegiate churches (they are not made obligatory elsewhere), bishops are directed to wear, besides the rochet, a surplice or alb, and a cope or vestment, with a pastoral staff borne either by themselves or their chaplains.'

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  • From the end of the 16th century the inheritors of the Hussite tradition in Bohemia were included in the more general name of "Protestants" borne by the adherents of the Reformation.

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  • The leaves when borne on an elongated stem are arranged alternately and have no stipules.

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  • None of these alliances has borne close scrutiny.

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  • Van Buren was not an orator, but... the oft-repeated charge that he refrained from declaring himself on crucial questions is hardly borne out by an examination of his senatorial career.

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  • The honorary title of count of Galicia has frequently been borne by younger sons of the Spanish sovereign.

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  • 'HABAKKUK, the name borne by the eighth book of the Old Testament "Minor Prophets."

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  • But it can be shown conclusively that the river has borne its present designation from the earliest times.

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  • - The possibility of another interpretation of the anterior somites of the mesosoma and the prae-genital somite must be borne in mind.

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  • The flowers are borne in a terminal raceme, the anthers open introrsely and the fruit is a capsule, very rarely, as in Dianella, a berry.

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  • evergreen shrub with flattened leaf-like cladodes, native in the southerly portion of England and Wales; the small flowers are unisexual and borne on the face of the cladode; the male contains three stamens, the filaments of which are united to form a short stout column on which are seated the diverging cells of the anthers; in the female the ovary is enveloped by a fleshy staminal tube on which are borne three barren anthers.

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  • 2 This title is borne by certain English families, e.g.

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  • The style Altgraf (old count), occasionally found, is of some antiquity, and means that the title of count has been borne by the family from time immemorial.

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  • As for the papal countships, which are still freely bestowed on those of all nations whom the Holy See wishes to reward, their prestige naturally varies with the religious complexion of the country in which the titles are borne.

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  • The hero seized it by the horns and was borne headlong in the flight of the animal, which he finally subdued and dragged into a cavern.

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  • Almost every English landholder of importance was dispossessed, though only those who had actually borne arms against William should have been so treated.

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  • " Personal rule," they declared, " supplies the keynote of successful native control " - a statement amply borne out by the influence over the natives exercised by Sir T.

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  • The title is not actually correct, and might be more fitly borne by Francisco Suarez, who died in 1617.

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  • A name which is apt to be forgotten in the period between Cuvier and Darwin, because its possessor occupied an isolated position in England and was not borne up by any j.

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  • It must, however, be borne in mind that errors can sometimes be compensated by altering adjustments.

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  • The description is generally borne out by the evidence of the tombs opened in the Scythic area.

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  • In the year named a special commission was appointed for the regulation of the Moldau and Elbe between Prague and Aussig, at a cost estimated at about I, 000,000, of which sum two-thirds were to be borne by the Austrian empire and one-third by the kingdom of Bohemia.

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  • The fatty matter, however, it must be borne in mind, is the expression of dissimilation of the actual substance of the proteids of the tissues, not of the splitting up of proteids or other carbonaceous nourishment supplied to them.

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  • Still, it must be borne in mind that this alleged autonomy of action is said to be founded upon an erroneous supposition, on the supposition that each cell is structurally, and it may be said functionally, separated from those in its neighbourhood.

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  • Large "incense trees" resembling our Christmas trees, formed of incense-sticks and pastils and osselets, and alight all over, are borne by the Shiah Mussulmans in the solennial procession of the Mohurrum, in commemoration of the martyrdom of the sons of Ali.

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  • Conduit Street off Bond Street, Lamb's Conduit Street, Bloomsbury); and water was also supplied by the company of water-bearers in leathern panniers borne by horses.

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  • On the 8th February the body of Nelson was borne with great pomp from the Admiralty to St Paul's Cathedral, where it was interred in the presence of the prince of Wales and the royal dukes.

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  • The title of count of Artois was borne by Charles X.

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  • The thin line of the defenders was borne back and King Henry was almost beaten to the ground.

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  • It may appear a somewhat exaggerated assertion that glass was used for more purposes, and in one sense more extensively, by the Romans of the imperial period than by ourselves in the present day; but it is one which can be borne out by evidence.

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  • - In the early days of the decipherment of the cuneiform inscriptions, the reading of the proper names borne by Babylonians and Assyrians occasioned great difficulties; and though most of these difficulties have been overcome and there is general agreement among scholars as to the principles underlying both the formation and the pronunciation of the thousands of names that we encounter in historical records, business documents, votive inscriptions and literary productions, differences, though mostly of a minor character, still remain.

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  • In this case, to add to the other obvious elements of uncertainty, it must be borne in mind that the location of Carchemish at Jerablus is not proved, though it is very probable.

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  • The small yellow flowers are borne in compound umbels.

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  • Such remains as there are of their language, a few expressions and the proper names of ancient chieftains still borne by certain families, connect it with the Berber dialects.

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  • The small flowers or spikelets are borne in pairs on the ultimate branches of a much branched feathery plume-like terminal grey inflorescence, 2 ft.

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  • The process of continuous defecation which was introduced into Cuba from Santo Domingo about 1900 had by 1910 borne the test of some ten years' use with notable success.

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  • With ordinary care on the part of the men in charge Hatton defecators will work continuously for several days and nights, and the number required to deal with a given volume of juice is half the number of ordinary defecators of equal capacity which would do the same work; for it must be borne in mind that an ordinary double-bottomed defecator takes two hours to deliver its charge and be in readiness to receive a fresh charge, i.e.

    0
    0
  • He assumed the title of Alphonso XII.; for although no king of united Spain had previously borne the name, the Spanish monarchy was regarded as continuous with the more ancient monarchy, represented by the eleven kings of Leon and Castile already referred to.

    0
    0
  • These complex organs have apparently arisen by the increase in depth and differentiation of an accessory sucker such as is borne on the phyllidia of the former group. Lastly, the scolex of the more familiar Taeniidae (Tetracotylea) carries a rostellum encircled with hooks and four cup-shaped suckers the margins of which do not project beyond the surface of the body.

    0
    0
  • In stature they range from the size of a hare to that of a rhinoceros; and their horns vary in size and shape from the small and simple spikes of the oribi and duiker antlers to the enormous and variously shaped structures borne respectively by buffaloes, wild sheep and kudu and other large antelopes.

    0
    0
  • The flowers are unisexual and monoecious, the numerous males borne in thick catkins proceeding from the side of last year's shoot.

    0
    0
  • The female flowers are solitary or few in number, and borne on Short terminal spikes of the present season's growth.

    0
    0
  • 87, 88), was a wandering rock borne about by the waves till it was fixed to the bottom of the sea for the birth of Apollo and Artemis.

    0
    0
  • "That Alexandria, the place of its earliest reception, was also the place of its birth, is borne out by the internal evidence of style and interpretation, which is Alexandrian throughout" (Lightfoot).

    0
    0
  • CHOSROES, in Middle and Modern Persian Khosrau (" with a good name "), a very common Persian name, borne by a famous king of the Iranian legend (Kai Khosrau); by a Parthian king, commonly called by the Greeks Osroes; and by the following two Sassanid kings.

    0
    0
  • From his great dialectical skill he earned the title 6 &caXEKTLKOS, or SCaXEKTCKCJTaTos, a title which was borne by his five daughters, who inherited his ability.

    0
    0
  • Great part of the burden has been borne throughout by the "City Extension Fund," realized from the utilization of the ground formerly occupied by the fortifications and glacis.

    0
    0
  • In Ezekiel the throne of Yahweh is borne up on Cherubim, the noise of whose wings is like thunder.

    0
    0
  • The headsman's axe proved more fatal, and the martyr's body was borne by angels to Mount Sinai, where Justinian I.

    0
    0
  • It must, however, be borne in mind that a Trematode may develop in an "aberrant" manner in one host and "normally" in another; and unless we knew the initial stock, the two forms would be regarded as distinct species,.

    0
    0
  • This view of the distinction seems to be borne out by the division of the work of Tacitus into the Historiae, relating the events of his own time, and the Annales, containing the history of earlier periods.

    0
    0
  • 2 It was also borne among others by the Danite whose history is given in Judges xvii.

    0
    0
  • The hope of Zion is in future restoration after she has patiently borne the chastisement of her sins.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, but for the unceasing simultaneous struggle with the Teutonic knights, the burden of which was heroically borne by Kiejstut, Russian historians frankly admit that Lithuania, not Muscovy, must have become the dominant power of eastern Europe.

    0
    0
  • Bolingbroke's conversation, described by Lord Chesterfield as "such a flowing happiness of expression that even his most familiar conversations if taken down in writing would have borne the press without the least correction," his delightful companionship, his wit, good looks, and social qualities which charmed during his lifetime and made firm friendships with men of the most opposite character, can now only be faintly imagined.

    0
    0
  • Showing in borne on the spadix.

    0
    0
  • The other provinces were governed by dukes and magistri militum, titles which were generally, but not always, borne by the same person.

    0
    0
  • It is, however, still borne by the Lutheran bishop of Upsala, who is metropolitan of Sweden, and by the Lutheran bishop of tkbo in Finland.

    0
    0
  • By the treaty of Utrecht (1713) Victor received the long-coveted Montferrat and was made king of Sicily; but in 1718 the powers obliged him to exchange that kingdom for Sardinia, which conferred on the rulers of Savoy and Piedmont the title subsequently borne by them until they assumed that of kings of Italy.

    0
    0
  • He was succeeded by his only son, Victor Emmanuel III., bornborn in 1869, who during his father's lifetime had ul borne the title of prince of Naples.

    0
    0
  • He calls it " the beautiful confession " to which Christ Jesus had borne witness before Pontius Pilate, and charges Timothy before God, who quickeneth all things, to keep this commandment.

    0
    0
  • The interior was restored in 1 559, though the pointed arches of the nave, borne by ancient granite columns, are still visible: and the only mosaics preserved are those of the apse and the last bay of the choir: they are remarkably fine specimens of the art of the period (1148) and, though restored in 1859-1862, have suffered much less than those at Palermo and Monreale from the process.

    0
    0
  • The plants are apparently stemless, bearing a rosette of large, thick, fleshy leaves, or have a shorter or longer (sometimes branched) stem, along which, or towards the end of which and its branches, the generally fleshy leaves are borne.

    0
    0
  • The rather small tubular yellow or red flowers are borne on simple or branched leafless stems, and are generally densely clustered.

    0
    0
  • On the 1st, they marched in procession through the city, dressed in an embroidered tunic, a brazen breastplate and a peaked cap; each carried a sword by his side and a short staff in his right hand, with which the shield, borne on the left arm, was struck from time to time.

    0
    0
  • Essex (Letter to Sir Philip Stapleton, Rushworth Collection) calls him "an honest, judicious and stout man," an estimate of Deane borne out by Clarendon's "bold and excellent officer" (book xiv.

    0
    0
  • It was borne by three kings of the Achaemenian dynasty of ancient Persia; though, so long as its meaning was understood, it can have been adopted by the kings only after their accession to the throne.

    0
    0
  • It was borne by several dynasts of Persis, when it formed an independent kingdom in the time of the Parthian empire (on their coins they call themselves Artakhshathr; one of them is mentioned by Lucian, Macrobii, 15), and by three kings of the Sassanid dynasty, who are better known under the modern form Ardashir.

    0
    0
  • In this sense, however, it must be borne in mind that the Roman Catholic Church distinguishes three kinds of worship: (I) latria, the worship due to God alone (from Gr.

    0
    0
  • Charles had previously contracted a union, probably of an irregular nature, with a Frankish lady named Himiltrude, who had borne him a son Pippin, the " Hunchback."

    0
    0
  • He is the Christian emperor directly inspired by angels; his sword Joyeuse contained the point of the lance used in the Passion; his standard was Romaine, the banner of St Peter, which, as the oriflamme of Saint Denis, was later to be borne in battle before the kings of France; and in 1164 Charles was canonized at the desire of the emperor Frederick I.

    0
    0
  • Just as the Confederate troops reached the Union line Hancock was struck in the groin by a bullet, but continued in command until the repulse of the attack, and as he was at last borne off the field earnestly recommended Meade to make a general attack on the beaten Confederates.

    0
    0
  • It must be borne in mind that the signification now attached to the word coal is different from that which formerly obtained when wood was the only fuel in general use.

    0
    0
  • By her marriage with Claude of Lorraine, duke of Chevreuse, Marie de Rohan, the widow of the first duke of Luynes, acquired in 1655 the duchy of Chevreuse, which she gave in 1663 to Louis Charles d'Albert, her son by her first husband; and from that time the title of duke of Chevreuse and duke of Luynes was borne by the eldest sons of the family of Luynes, which also inherited the title of duke of Chaulnes on the extinction of the descendants of Honore d'Albert in 1698.

    0
    0
  • He was the tenth son of Josiah Franklin, and the eighth child and youngest son of ten children borne by Abiah Folger, his father's second wife.

    0
    0
  • Israel was a name borne by their ancestor Jacob the father of the twelve tribes.

    0
    0
  • His infatuation for Kunigunde of Eisenberg caused his wife to leave him, a.nd after her death in 1270 he married Kunigunde, who had already borne him a son, Apitz or Albert.

    0
    0
  • The title of "praefect" was borne by various other Roman officials, of whom we may mention the following

    0
    0
  • The title Amir ul Muminim, or "commander of the faithful," now borne by the sultan of Turkey, was first assumed by Abu Bekr, and was taken by most of the various dynasties which claimed the caliphate, including the Fatimites, the Spanish Omayyads and the Almohades.

    0
    0
  • " lord of the treasury"), sometimes mere dignity, as in the case of the title of honour borne by all descendants of the Prophet, or of the title Mir assumed by men of great rank in the Far East.

    0
    0
  • The old religious exclusiveness had already been greatly lessened: the clergy were less powerful, heresy had thrived under repression, Anglican churchmen had come to the colony and were borne with perforce, devotion to trade and commerce had weakened theological tests in favour of ideals of mere good order and prosperity, and a spirit of toleration had grown.

    0
    0
  • The results of these peace efforts were perhaps surprisingly mediocre, but it must be borne in mind that not only was the military organization of the dioceses always very imperfect, but feudal society, so long as it retained political power, was inherently hostile to the principle and practice of private peace.

    0
    0
  • While leading one of the charges in person his horse was shot and fell under him, but he was rescued and borne in a semi-conscious condition from the field.

    0
    0
  • (i) The double aspect of an area should be borne in mind; i.e.

    0
    0
  • The name was subsequently borne by the kings of Commagene (69 B.C.-A.D.

    0
    0
  • BLADDER-WORT, the name given to a submerged water plant, Utricularia vulgaris, with finely divided leaves upon which are borne small bladders provided with trap-door entrances which open only inwards.

    0
    0
  • " He who saw " the lance-thrust " hath borne witness, and his witness is true," is asserted (xix.

    0
    0
  • We can only conclude that it depends on wave form, a conclusion fully borne out by investigation.

    0
    0
  • From 1900 to 1905 the schools were managed, teachers selected and appointed and all expenses borne by the government.

    0
    0
  • As we have found it necessary to distinguish between the original composition by Mark, to whom in the main the work appears to be due, and some enlargement and alteration which it subsequently underwent whereby it reached its present form, these stages must be borne in mind in considering dates that may be assigned in connexion with this Gospel.

    0
    0
  • Enormous quantities of cherries, plums and apples are annually borne by the trees round Leipzig, Dresden and Colditz.

    0
    0
  • The name of Saxony has been borne by two distinct blocks of territory.

    0
    0
  • The conditions were, however, not observed and Harun, learning that 'Abbasa had borne a son, caused Ja`far suddenly to be arrested and beheaded, and the rest of the family except Mahommed, Yahya's brother, to be imprisoned and deprived of their property.

    0
    0
  • xxiv.); that the ark was borne not by priests (I Kings viii.

    0
    0
  • Borne by the eagle, he soared high up into the ether, but became afraid.

    0
    0
  • Male and female flowers are borne on distinct plants.

    0
    0
  • in length; and from forty to fifty of them are borne upon a common stem.

    0
    0
  • Louis fought a battle beneath the walls of Zara (July ist, 1346), which has been immortalized by Tintoretto, but was defeated and compelled to abandon the city to the republic. The struggle was renewed eleven years later when Louis, having formed, with infinite trouble, a league of all the enemies of Venice, including the emperor, the Habsburgs, Genoa and other Italian towns, attacked his maritime rival with such vigour that she sued for peace, and by the treaty of Zara (February 18th, 1358) ceded most of the Dalmatian towns and renounced the title of duke of Dalmatia and Croatia, hitherto borne by the doge.

    0
    0
  • ROQUELAURE, a title derived from a small commune in France (dep. of Gers), and borne by a French family of Armagnac, one member of which was Antoine, baron de Roquelaure (1544-1625), who was in the service of Henry IV.

    0
    0
  • The queen was very anxious that he should receive the title of "King Consort," and that the crown should be jointly borne as it was by William III.

    0
    0
  • The queen had borne so well the fatigue of the Jubilee that during the succeeding years she was encouraged to make somewhat more frequent appearances among her subjects.

    0
    0
  • The title is not borne by the eldest son of the king of Spain, who is prince of Asturias, Il principe de Asturias.

    0
    0
  • After remaining in the Philippines under orders from his government to maintain control, Dewey received the rank of admiral (March 3, 1899) - that title, formerly borne only by Farragut and Porter, having been revived by act of Congress (March 2, 1899), - and returned home, arriving in New York City, where, on the 3rd of October 1899, he received a great ovation.

    0
    0
  • The original name was Buonaparte, which was borne in the early middle ages by several distinct families in Italy.

    0
    0
  • In later times the title of tetrarch is familiar from the New Testament as borne by certain princes of the petty dynasties which the Romans allowed to exercise a dependent sovereignty within the province of Syria.

    0
    0
  • Unlike the army, which is purely colonial, the navy in Netherlands India is partly colonial, partly belonging to the royal navy of the Netherlands, and its expenses are therefore borne partly by the mother country and partly by the colony.

    0
    0
  • CONDE The French title of prince of Conde, assumed from the ancient town of Conde-sur-1'Escaut, was borne by a branch of the house of Bourbon.

    0
    0
  • He decided, therefore, to go, though with regrets; which returned upon him sometimes in after years, when the English hopes had not borne fruit.

    0
    0
  • With reference to all such further refinements of theory, it is to be borne in mind that the perfect fluid of hydrodynamic analysis is not a merely passive inert plenum; it is also a continuum with the property that no finite internal slip or discontinuity of motion can ever arise in it through any kind of disturbance; and this property must be postulated, as it cannot be explained.

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    0
  • On the 31st they were borne to the guillotine in five tumbrils, the corpse of Dufriche de Valaze - who had killed himself - being carried with them.

    0
    0
  • But the Teutonic elements maintained their place in the law of the Frankish Church; and this was not altered by the fact that, since Christmas Boo, the king of the Franks and Lombards had borne the title of Roman emperor.

    0
    0
  • It must be borne in mind that primitive humanity is not governed by logical distinctions.

    0
    0
  • Adoniyyah or Adoniyyahu, " Yah is Lord"), a name borne by several persons in the Old Testament, the most noteworthy of whom was the fourth son of David.

    0
    0
  • The differences asserted by later writers are not borne out on investigation.

    0
    0
  • That glorious epithet belonged of right to Hungary,which g p g g had already borne the brunt of the struggle with the Ottoman power for more than a century.

    0
    0
  • The authenticity of this effigy is fairly well borne out by what is known of him from other sources.

    0
    0
  • Both these items are borne by France.

    0
    0
  • This is borne out by Ignatius with his strong emphasis on the reality of the Gospel history (Eph.

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    0
  • APOSTOLIC MAJESTY, a title borne by the kings of Hungary.

    0
    0
  • Hence the proportion of purely oceanic area to the total area is greater in the Pacific than in the Atlantic, the supply of detritus being smaller, and terrigenous deposits are not borne so far from land.

    0
    0
  • Like the teraphim it was part of the common stock of Hebrew cult; it is borne (rather than worn) by persons acting in a priestly character (Samuel at Shiloh, priests of Nob, David), it is part of the worship of individuals (Gideon at Ophrah), and is found in a private shrine with a lay attendant (Micah; Judg.

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    0
  • 18,23), and it is far from certain that the later records of the ark (which was too heavy to be borne by one), like those of the ephod, are valid for earlier times.

    0
    0
  • Abu Bekr and his three (or four) immediate successors are known as the "perfect" caliphs; after them the title was borne by the thirteen Omayyad caliphs of Damascus, and subsequently by the thirty-seven Abbasid caliphs of Bagdad whose dynasty fell before the Turks in 1258.

    0
    0
  • It should be borne in mind, first, that wherever a new animal suddenly appears or a new character suddenly arises in a fossil horizon we must consider whether such appearance may be due to the non-discovery of transitional links with older forms, or to the sudden invasion of a new type or new organ which has gradually evolved elsewhere.

    0
    0
  • Thus Caesar's work remained unfinished, and this must be borne in mind in considering his record of legislative and administrative reform.

    0
    0
  • These traditions, in some measure borne out by linguistic evidence of names, point to the immigration of detachments of a widespread race speaking a common language, which is represented by the Aztec, still a spoken language in Mexico.

    0
    0
  • The small greenish flowers are borne on branched panicles; and the male ones are characterized by having a disgusting odour.

    0
    0
  • This edition was mainly due to the combined efforts of William Whittingham, Anthony Gilby and Thomas Sampson, and the expenses towards printing and publication were borne by members of the congregation at Geneva.

    0
    0
  • Needless to say this faint hope was not borne out by results.

    0
    0
  • The boy died in 1553, and Joachim, who had up to this time borne the title of sieur de Lire, became seigneur of Gonnor.

    0
    0
  • The male catkins are small, solitary, and are borne at the ends of the twigs; the cones are from 12 to 3 in.

    0
    0
  • The name Nina, was borne also by the goddess Ishtar, whose worship was the special cult of Nineveh, and Ninua may well be a hypocoristicon of Nina,.

    0
    0
  • The world is represented as an orderly structure of various heavens and various earths, which is borne and supported by the aeons, the angels of light.

    0
    0
  • The load of silt borne down stream by the river finally, after many halts on the way, reaches the waters of the Gulf, where the decrease of velocity, aided by the salinity of the sea water, causes the formation of a remarkable delta, leaving less aggraded areas as shallow lakes (Lake Pontchartrain on the east, and Grand Lake on the west of the river).

    0
    0
  • From these high lands sediments were borne down to lodge on the low lands adjacent.

    0
    0
  • Cagli occupies the site of an ancient vicus (village) on the Via Flaminia, which seems to have borne the name Cale, 24 m.

    0
    0
  • In the market square stands a fine market cross of the 16th century, borne upon an octagonal battlemented basement.

    0
    0
  • The mantle-skirt is always long, and hides the rest of the animal from view, its dependent margins meeting in the middle line below the ventral surface when the animal is retracted; it is, as it were, slit in the median line before and behind so as to form two flaps, a right and a left; on these the right and the left calcareous valves of the shell are borne respectively, connected by an uncalcified part of the shell called the ligament.

    0
    0
  • It must, however, be distinctly borne in mind that there is a fundamental difference between the eye of Vertebrates and of all other groups in the fact that in the Vertebrata the retinal body is itself a part of the central nervous system, and not a separate C E k e FIG.

    0
    0
  • The importance of this must be borne in mind when we are dealing with transmitted texts, which have passed through many stages of copying.

    0
    0
  • The male and female flowers are borne on separate catkins in April and May.

    0
    0
  • AURIFABER (the latinized form of Goldschmidt), a surname borne by three prominent men of the Reformation period in Germany.

    0
    0
  • The amount of solid matter borne by large streams is enormous; many rivers derive their names from the colour thereby imparted to the water, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The flowers are borne singly in the leaf-axils on a stalk about half the length of the leaf and jointed and bent in the middle; the corolla is blue-purple.

    0
    0
  • The spikelets are borne on a compound or branched spike, erect at first but afterwards bent downwards.

    0
    0
  • Whenever a bishop was celebrant he was to wear, "beside his rochette, a surplice or albe, and a cope or vestment," and also to carry " his pastoral staff in his hand, or else borne or holden by his chaplain."

    0
    0
  • HYRCANUS ('Tprcavos), a Greek surname, of unknown origin, borne by several Jews of the Maccabaean period.

    0
    0
  • The expenses connected with elections, such as the renting and preparing of the polling-places, the payment of the clerks and other officers who conduct the elections and count the vote, are borne by the community.

    0
    0
  • The suffix-ensi-can be shown to have borne a political significance, 1 This statement with those which follow is based upon the collections of the place-names of ancient Italy, arranged according to their locality, by R.

    0
    0
  • In considering the origins of medieval churches, moreover, it must be borne in mind that as a general rule their builders were not actuated by the motives usual in modern times, at least among Protestants.

    0
    0
  • The stronger the solution administered, the greater is the quantity of water that passes into the bowel, a fact to be borne in mind when the salt is administered for the purpose of draining superfluous fluid from the system, as in dropsy.

    0
    0
  • The royal title, however, was frequently borne by more than one person.

    0
    0
  • Other places had been honoured by the presence and preaching of these great leaders of new-born Christianity; but it is at Rome that they had borne witness to the Gospel by the shedding of their blood; there they were buried, and their tombs were known and honoured.

    0
    0
  • Yet it should be borne in mind, that, when Clement VII.

    0
    0
  • "A lytil tale Set herd I tel, Pat in to my tyme befel, of a gudman, in murrefe [Moray] borne in elgyne [Elgin], and his kine beforne, and callit was a faithful man vith al Jame fat hyme knew than; fis mare trastely I say, for I kend hyme weile mony day.

    0
    0
  • The possibility of these phenomena should be borne in mind when attempts are made to interpret the structure of crystalline bodies in terms of the theory of equilibrium.

    0
    0
  • During the time that it was occupied by the Romans, a period estimated at 320 years, the city was called Victoria; but shortly after their withdrawal it seems to have borne the Celtic appellation of Aber-tha ("at the mouth of the Tay").

    0
    0
  • The reason of this is readily understood when it is borne in mind how disadvantageous to the function of sight is the unpigmented condition of an albino's eyeball; a disadvantage which would be probably much accentuated, in the cases now under consideration, by the bright glare from the surface of the snow, which forms the natural environment of these animals at the particular period of the year when the winter change occurs.

    0
    0
  • For it must be borne in mind that animals are not only coloured but the colour is arranged in a more or less definite pattern.

    0
    0
  • Some of the individuals will be one or other of the two colours, the determinants of which were borne by the albino, and others the colour of the pigmented parent.

    0
    0
  • And, when the whole facts are borne in mind, there can be no reasonable doubt that the Mendelian principles offer an intelligible solution of the problem.

    0
    0
  • vi.) points out how much England relied at this time on what would now be called conscription: and his remarks are entirely borne out by the Norwich documents published by Mr W.

    0
    0
  • And after he had worthily and bravely, borne himself for six or seven years as a squire, the time came when it was fitting that he should be made a knight.

    0
    0
  • In Scotland, even as late as the reign of James VI., lords of parliament were always created bannerets as well as barons at their investiture, " part of the ceremony consisting in the display of a banner, and such ` barones majores ' were thereby entitled to the privilege of having one borne by a retainer before them to the field of a quadrilateral form."

    0
    0
  • In one view they are mere asexual conidia, and the term pycnoconidia is accordingly applied since they are borne in structures like the non-sexual pycnidia of other fungi.

    0
    0
  • The hypothecium is the basal part of the apothecium on which the hymenium is borne; the latter consists of asci (thecae) with ascospores, and paraphyses.

    0
    0
  • The baldacchino, with sculptures of the 12th or early 13th century, is borne by four ancient columns of porphyry, with 9th-century capitals.

    0
    0
  • It should be borne in mind that the limits adopted above refer purely to the topographical aspect of the Alps as they exist at the present day.

    0
    0
  • It should always be borne in mind that in the Western and Central Alps there is but one ridge to cross, to which access is gained by a deep-cut valley, though often it would be shorter to cross a second pass in order to gain the plains, e.g.

    0
    0
  • It should, however, be borne in mind that the resisting mass is not necessarily at the surface.

    0
    0
  • The chief point to be borne in mind in making these mixtures is not to combine in the same compost any bodies that are antagonistic in their nature, as for example lime and ammonia.

    0
    0
  • In the pear and apple the fruit is borne principally on spurs, and hence what is known as spur-pruning has to be adopted, the young shoots being all cut back nearly to their base, so as to cause fruit buds to evolve from the remaining eyes or buds.

    0
    0
  • The flowers are borne on erect branching stems and are chiefly white in colour.

    0
    0
  • The old stems of raspberries and blackberries that have borne fruit should be cut away, and the young shoots thinned to three or four canes to each hill or plant.

    0
    0
  • The reproductive spores are borne in sacs (asci) which form a dense layer on the surface, appearing like a bloom in July; they are scattered by the wind and propagate the disease.

    0
    0
  • It has narrow, shortstalked leaves and inconspicuous, apetalous, unisexual flowers borne in short spikes.

    0
    0
  • Abiyyah and Abiyyahu, "Yah is father"), a name borne by nine different persons mentioned in the Old Testament, of whom the most noteworthy are the following.

    0
    0
  • It is well, however, to guard against an over-estimation of this exuberance; it must be borne in mind that the physiographic conditions were peculiarly favourable to the preservation of plant remains, conditions that do not appear to have obtained so completely in any other period.

    0
    0
  • Many of the smaller towns, such as Assen, Enschede, Helmond, Hengelo, Tiel, Venlo, Vlaardingen, Zaandam, Yerseke, show a great development, and it is a noteworthy fact that the rural districts, taken as a whole, have borne an equal share in the general increase of population.

    0
    0
  • The name Achaemenes is borne by a son of Darius I., brother of Xerxes.

    0
    0
  • The same laws apply to the individual hyphae and their branches as to simple sporophores, and as long as the conidia, sporangia, gametes, &c., are borne on their external surfaces, it is quite consistent to speak of these as compound sporophores, &c., in the sense described, however complex they may become.

    0
    0
  • Conidia (basidiospores) borne in fours on a special conidiophore, the basidium.

    0
    0
  • Life-history always very simple, no wellmarked alternation of generations; basidium borne directly on the mycelium.

    0
    0
  • The asci are borne directly on the mycelium and are therefore fully exposed, being devoid from the beginning of any investment.

    0
    0
  • Besides peritheca the members of the Erysiphaceae possess conidia borne in simple chains.

    0
    0
  • There is also a further reduction in that the basidium is not derived from a teleutospore but is borne directly on the mycelium.

    0
    0
  • Most of Basidiomycetes are characterized by the large sporophore on which the basidia with its basidiospores are borne.

    0
    0
  • It must be clearly borne in mind that though the Basidiomycetes show no traces of differ entiated sexual organs yet, like the micro and lepto forms of the Uredineae, they still show (in the association of nuclei and later fusion of From Annals of Botany, by permission of the Clarendon Press.

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    0
  • In this by far the larger division of the Basidiomycetes the basidia are undivided and the four basidiospores are borne on short sterigmata nearly always at the apex of the basidium.

    0
    0
  • Exobasidium) the basidia are borne directly on the ordinary mycelium, but in the majority of cases the basidia are found developed in layers (hymenium) on special sporophores of characteristic form in the various groups.

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    0
  • His name is now borne by a larger watercourse which flows some distance from the scene of his death.

    0
    0
  • A favourite mode of travelling in the bush is in a palanquin borne on the heads of four carriers.

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    0
  • The first view seems to be borne out by the language of contemporary chroniclers.

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    0
  • irp€Q/3(TEpos, elder, the comparative of irpEoj3vs, an old man), the title borne from very early times by certain officers or ministers of the Christian Church intermediate between "bishops" and "deacons."

    0
    0
  • The tendency to recurrence in persons who have previously miscarried is well known, and should ever be borne in mind with the view of avoiding any cause likely to lead to a repetition of the accident.

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  • X irECV, to peel, strip), the name given in popular language to all the green expanded organs borne upon an axis, and so applied to similar objects, such as a thin sheet of metal, a hinged flap of a table, the page of a book, &c.

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  • This site is not identified; the suggestion that it is Gamala is doubtful, and not borne out by Josephus (War, iv.

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    0
  • The flowers are borne in enormous fleshy spadices, the male and female on distinct plants.

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    0
  • Tithe rent charge under these acts is subject to the same liabilities and incidents as tithes, such as parliamentary, parochial, county and other rates, especially the poor rate and highway rate; but the owner of tithe rent charge attached to a benefice has been exempted by an act of 1899 from payment of half the amount of any rate which he would be liable to pay under the Agricultural Rates Act 1896, the other half being borne by the Inland Revenue Commissioners.

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    0
  • Thus the title was borne by Pietro della Vigna, the all-powerful minister of the emperor Frederick II., king of Sicily.

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  • The wounded president was borne to a house across the street, where he breathed his last at 7 A.M.

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    0
  • On this point it must be borne in mind that the population of the larger towns, on account of the greater mobility of the population since the introduction of railways and the abolition of restrictions upon free settlement, has become more mixedBerlin, Leipzig, Hamburg, &c., showing proportionally more Roman Catholics, and Cologne, Frankfort-onMain, Munich more Protestants than formerly.

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    0
  • Men belonging to previous years who had been put back for re-examination, &c., still borne on the lists ..

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    0
  • Before the latter event, in order to assert his right of sovereignty over Rome, he called himself king of the Romans, a designation which henceforth was borne by his successors until they received the higher title from the pope.

    0
    0
  • The result was that the sum to be contributed by the individual states constantly increased, and the amount to be raised by direct taxation, including local rates, threatened to become greater than could conveniently be borne.

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    0
  • His remaining years were full of troubles and persecutions nobly borne, till at last, worn out by them, he died on the 17th of November 1668; and the mourners, remembering their beloved minister's words while yet with them, "If I should die fifty miles away, let me be buried at Taunton," found a grave for him in St Mary's chancel.

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  • Flinders Petrie then pointed out a group of kings named on scarabs of peculiar type, which, including Khyan, he attributed to the period between the Old Kingdom and the New, while others were in favour of assigning them all to the Hyksos, whose appellation seemed to be recognizable in the title Hek-khos, "ruler of the barbarians," borne by Khyan.

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  • To the otherwise unfinished brick façade a portal borne by marble columns was added in 1843.

    0
    0
  • Besides the debts of each state of the Dual Monarchy, there is a general debt, which is borne jointly by Austria and Hungary.

    0
    0
  • The king of the mainland is often spoken of for convenience as king of Naples, but that description was never borne as a formal title save in the 16th century by Philip, king of England and Naples, and in the 19th by Joseph Buonaparte and Joachim Murat.

    0
    0
  • Shortly after he entered Attica plague broke out in Athens, borne thither by traders from Carthage or Egypt (Holm, Greek History, ii.

    0
    0
  • But the Greek language makes an occasional appearance; Greek names are borne by others beside Pericles.

    0
    0
  • Amenemhe, the name of the founder of the XIIth dynasty, was compounded with that of Amun and was borne by three of his successors.

    0
    0
  • In the great majority of cases there can be no doubt whatever whether a piece first saw the light in Mecca or in Medina; and for the most part the internal evidence is borne out by Moslem tradition.

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  • A man may, however, possess any number of concubines, who, though objects of jealousy to the legal wife, are tolerated by her in consideration of her superior position and power over them, a power which she often uses with great tyranny; but certain privileges are possessed by concubines, especially if they have borne Sons to their master.

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  • Then follows the bier, borne on the shoulders of friends, who are relieved by the passers-by, such an act being deemed highly meritorious.

    0
    0
  • The amount of debt in the hands of the public was therefore only 87,714,000, that is to say 8,743,000 less than in 1883, while the interest charge to be borne by the taxpayer of Egypt was 3,378,000, being 890,000 less than in 1883.

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  • Then the 9th (Sudanese) Battalion was created for service at Suakin, and four others having been successively added, these (with one exceptionat Gedaref) have since borne the brunt of all the fighting which has been done by the khedivial troops.

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  • These, however, may have borne little resemblance to C later conceptions of the same gods with which we are made Egl siliar by the Pyramid texts.

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  • In the following year ai~ther firman bestowed upon him the title of khedive in lieu of that of vali, borne by Mehemet Ali and his immediate successors.

    0
    0
  • Towards this expense the British government gave a grant-in-aid of ~8oo,ooo, and the balance was borne by the Egyptian treasury.

    0
    0
  • The title archduke (or archduchess) is now borne by all members of the Austrian imperial house.

    0
    0
  • Thus at the peace of Fontainebleau (September 2, 1679) Denmark, which had borne the brunt of the struggle in the Baltic, was compelled by the inexorable French king to make full restitution to Sweden, the treaty between the two northern powers being signed at Lund on the 26th of September.

    0
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  • 15B-22 speak of one son being born to Moses at this period, a statement which is borne out by iv.

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    0
  • In rare cases the main axis is unbranched and ends in a flower, as, for instance, in the tulip, where scale-leaves, forming the underground bulb, green foliage-leaves and coloured floral leaves are borne on one and the same axis.

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    0
  • These, as in Gymnosperms, are of two kinds, microspores or pollen-grains, borne in the stamens (or microsporophylls) and megaspores, in which the egg-cell is developed, contained in the ovule, which is borne enclosed in the carpel (or megasporophyll).

    0
    0
  • The ovary contains one or more ovules borne on a placenta, which is generally some part of the ovary-wall.

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    0
  • He died at Sanssouci on the 17th of August 1786; his death being hastened by exposure to a storm of rain, stoically borne, during a military review.

    0
    0
  • His family has been variously conjectured, on the strength of the proper names which its members are stated to have borne, to have been Teutonic or Slavonic. The latter seems the more probable view.

    0
    0
  • The truth is that so far as the British effort is concerned, the main burden was borne by troops furnished from Great Britain.

    0
    0
  • The plants have a creeping stem, on the upper face of which is borne a row of leaves.

    0
    0
  • The sexual organs - oogonia and antheridia - are borne on special portions of the thallus in cavities known as conceptacles.

    0
    0
  • Here the asexual cells are borne upon the so-called Aglaozonia reptans and the sexual cells upon the plants known as Cutleria.

    0
    0
  • It bears to ordinary slowly-cooled slag a similar relation to that borne by plastic sulphur to ordinary crystalline sulphur.

    0
    0
  • The cost of the undertaking was borne by some of the German Protestant princes.

    0
    0
  • Thus remains of Highland schists have been borne across the Central Plain and deposited on the northern margin of the Southern Uplands.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the climates of the east are dry, because the surface is lower and more level; and the breezes borne thither from the west, being robbed of most of their superabundant moisture in crossing the western hills, are drier and precipitate a greatly diminished rainfall.

    0
    0
  • Only a little more than one-fourth of the area of Scotland is cultivated, while in England only one-fourth is left uncultivated; but it should be borne in mind that " permanent pasture " does not include the mountainous districts, which not only form so large a proportion of the surface but also, in their heaths and natural grasses, supply a scanty herbage for sheep and cattle, 9,104,388 acres being used for grazing in 1905.

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    0
  • On her return she fell into an almost fatal illness and prepared for her end with great courage and piety; Darnley now visited her, but was ill-received, while Bothwell was borne to Jedburgh from Hermitage in a litter.

    0
    0
  • Serially homologous structures, borne on the same body, are commonly differ s entiated into sets, the mean character of a set produced in one part of the body, or during one period of life, differing from the mean character of a set produced in a different region or at a different time.

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  • An excellent example of structures differentiated according to position is given by the appendages borne on the stem of an ordinary flowering plant-the one or two seed leaves; the stem leaves, which may or may not be differentiated into secondary sets; and the various floral organs borne at the apex of the stem or its lateral branches.

    0
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  • If, however, a series of leaves from the same tree be examined in pairs, the fact that one leaf from the tree is known to possess an abnormal number of veins makes it probable that the next leaf chosen from the same tree will also be abnormal-or, in other words, the fact that leaves are borne by the same tree establishes a correlation between them.

    0
    0
  • Each clan has a name which is usually borne by one of the oldest members, who is the chief or head for the time being.

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    0
  • This title, a higher distinction than that of rabbi, is in tradition borne only by the descendants of Gamaliel I., the last being Gamaliel III., the son of Jehuda I.

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  • The expenses of this very interesting venture were borne entirely by Morris, but after the issue of No.

    0
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  • In the case of the alps belonging to the Swiss communes, it must be borne in mind that "commune" here does not signify either Einwohnergemeinden or Biirgergemeinden, but a special class called Alpgemeinden (for instance in the well-known valley of Grindelwald there is one Einwohnergemeinde, but seven Alpgemeinden).

    0
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  • Finally, if Luther advanced in his contest with the papacy with greater and greater energy, he did so because he was borne on by 1 Latin text by Sackur, cf.

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  • Genoa and Venice, the term was applied to the hereditary aristocracy (patrizio), and in the free cities of the German Empire it was borne by distinguished citizens (patrizier).

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  • Since the plebeian element in the state had an immense numerical preponderance over the patrician these disabilities were not widely spread, and seem generally to have been cheerfully borne as the price of belonging to the families still recognized as the oldest and noblest in Rome.

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  • subsequently conferred on Charlemagne at his coronation, and borne, as we gather from medieval documents, indiscriminately, not only by subsequent emperors, but also by a long line of Burgundian rulers and minor princes of the middle ages generally.'

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    0
  • It should be borne in mind that in census years, when comparison can be made, the two sets of statistics often vary considerably.

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    0
  • of Qishm, she has at no time acquired territory in that region, although she has for generations borne an honourable burden there which no other nation has ever undertaken anywhere, except in the capacity of sovereign.

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  • I.) gives an illustration of Ganymede borne aloft by an eagle.

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  • The title of " vicar of Jesus Christ," borne by the popes, was introduced as their special designation during the 8th century, in place of the older style of " vicar of St Peter " (or vicarius principis apostolorum).

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  • He then threw himself overboard; but instead of perishing, he was miraculously borne up in safety by a dolphin, supposed to have been charmed by the music. Thus he was conveyed to Taenarum, whence he proceeded to Corinth, arriving before the ship from Tarentum.

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  • A religious epic, DieGeheimnisse, and a tragedy Elpenor, did not, it is true, advance much further than plans; but in 1777, under the influence of the theatrical experiments at the Weimar court, Goethe conceived and in great measure wrote a novel of the theatre, which was to have borne the title Wilhelm Meisters theatralische Sendung; and in 1779 himself took part in a representation before the court at Ettersburg, of his drama I phigenie auf Tauris.

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  • To maintain himself on the same height as his grandfather, and to make the name of Goethe illustrious in his descendants also, became Wolfgang's ambition; and his incapacity to realize this, very soon borne in upon him, paralyzed his efforts and plunged him at last into bitter revolt against his fate and gloomy isolation from a world that seemed to have no use for him but as a curiosity.

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  • In fact Jason established in Jerusalem the institutions which Strabo expressly describes as visible signs of the Greek way of life - " gymnasia and associations of ephebi and clans and Greek names borne by Romans " (v.

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  • Omar and his followers in person cleaned it, and established the place of prayer which, though later rebuilt, has borne his name ever since.

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  • On the other hand it may be mentioned that on the 30th of June 18J5 the cross was for the first time since the crusades borne aloft through the streets of Jerusalem on the occasion of the visit of a European prince; and that in 1858 the sacred area of the Haramesh-Sherif - the mosque on the site of the Temple of Jerusalem - was for the first time thrown open to Christian visitors.

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    0
  • The Bagirmese proper are a vigorous, well-formed race of NegroidArab blood, who, according to their own traditions, came from the eastward several centuries ago, a tradition borne out by their language, which resembles those spoken on the White Nile.

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  • 8r - is borne witness to by Pausanias's mention of the bronze temple of Athena X aXKioucos in Sparta, and the bronze chamber dedicated to Myron in 648 B.C., as well as by the discovery of the stains and bronze nails, which show that the whole interior of the so-called treasury of Atreus at Mycenae was once covered with a lining of bronze plates.

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  • The greater portion of all the soda-ash of commerce is now made by Solvay's apparatus, which alone we shall describe in this place, although it should be borne in mind that the principles laid down by Dyar and Hemming have been and are still successfully carried out in a number of factories by an entirely different kind of apparatus.

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  • Her native name was Septimia Bathzabbai, a name also borne by one of her generals, Septimius Zabbai.'

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  • For this Tait was by no means responsible as a whole: some of the provisions which proved most irksome were the result of amendments by Lord Shaftesbury which the bishops were unable to resist; and it must be borne in mind that the most disastrous results of the measure were not contemplated by those who were instrumental in passing it.

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  • True, her birth is regarded as an event of no moment, while that of a boy is celebrated by great rejoicings, and his mother acquires the right to wear on her forehead the tafzint, a mark which only the women who have borne an heir can assume.

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  • Messina), the title of " King of Naples " having only actually been borne by Philip II.

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  • of country (in the beginning very steep, and at intervals almost level), where certainly it would have been arrested and all accumulated in a mound; but it must have been borne along by a great quantity of water, the effects of which may be distinctly recognized, not only in the filling and choking up even of the most narrow, intricate and remote parts of the buildings, but also in the formation of the tufa, in which water has so great a share; for it cannot be supposed that enough of it has filtered through so great a depth of earth.

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  • GEORGE LOCKHART (1673-1731), of Carnwath, Scottish writer and politician, was a member of a Lanarkshire family tracing descent from Sir Simon Locard (the name being originally territorial, de Loch Ard), who is said to have accompanied Sir James Douglas on his expedition to the East with the heart of Bruce, which relic, according to Froissart, Locard brought home from Spain when Douglas fell in battle against the Moors, and buried in Melrose Abbey; this incident was the origin of the "man's heart within a fetterlock" borne on the Lockhart shield, which in turn perhaps led to the altered spelling of the surname.

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  • The name Abigail was also borne by a sister of David (2 Sam.

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    0
  • When Governor Andros and his Council in 1687 issued an order for levying a tax, a special town meeting of Ipswich promptly voted "that the s'd act doth infringe their Liberty as Free borne English subjects of His Majestic by interfearing with ye statutory Laws of the Land, By which it is enacted that no taxes shall be levied on ye Subjects without consent of an assembly chosen by ye Freeholders for assessing the same," and refused to assess the tax.

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    0
  • The flowers, which appear in March and April, are borne on pendulous hairy catkins, 2 -3 in.

    0
    0
  • In 18 3 a select committee of the House of Commons went into the whole subject of secondary punishment and reported that, as the difficulties in the way of an effective classification of prisoners were insurmountable, they were strongly in favour of the confinement of prisoners in separate cells, recommending that the whole of the prisons should be altered accordingly and the expense borne by the public exchequer.

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  • Crime, with the many facilities offered for rapid locomotion to those who committed it, had ceased to be merely local, and the whole state rather than individual communities ought to be taxed; prison charges should be borne by the public exchequer and not by local rates.

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  • It must be borne in mind that the marks thus earned may be forfeited at any time by misconduct, but affect remission to this extent only.

    0
    0
  • It must be borne in mind in the case of heavy charges, such as four or five days' week-work, that only one labourer from the whole holding is meant, while generally there were several men living on every holding - otherwise the service of five days would be impossible to perform.

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  • The tide of strict construction was setting in strongly in his state, and he was borne along with the flood.

    0
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  • The future of symbolic logic as coherent with the rest of logic, in the sense which the word has borne throughout its history seems to be bound up with the question of the nature of the analysis that lies behind the symbolism, and of the way in which this is justified in the setting of a doctrine of validity.

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  • Anc. 34), and borne by him as the first of the Roman emperors.

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  • On the day of the funeral it was borne to the Campus Martius on the shoulders of senators and there burnt.

    0
    0
  • aopcpvpoyivvnros) was borne particularly by Constantine VII., Byzantine emperor, but was also used generally of those born of the Byzantine imperial family.

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  • All these rulers appear to have borne the name of Pylaemenes, as a token that they claimed descent from the chieftain of that name who figures in the Iliad as leader of the Paphlagonians.

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  • 2 The special census of the manufacturing industry for 1905 was concerned only with the establishment conducted under the socalled " factory system "; for purposes of comparison the figures for 1900 have been reduced to the same standard, and this fact should be borne in mind with regard to the percentages of increase given above.

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    0
  • Of the current expenses of the common schools about three-fourths is borne by the localities; the state distributes its contribution annually among the counties.

    0
    0
  • The title is now rare; it is borne by the former sovereign of Hesse-Homburg, now incorporated in Prussia, the heads of the various branches of the house of Hesse, and by a branch of the family of Fiirstenberg.

    0
    0
  • In other cases the title of landgrave is borne by German sovereigns as a subsidiary title; e.g.

    0
    0
  • The name of Kalamantan has been given by some Europeans (on what original authority it is not possible now to ascertain) as the native name for the island of Borneo considered as a whole; but it is safe to aver that among the natives of the island itself Borneo has never borne any general designation.

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    0
  • Prof. Kayser suggests that there was also a Pacific basin more extensive than at present; this is borne out by the similarity between the Cambrian faunas of China, Siberia and Argentina.

    0
    0
  • This view is borne out by the experience in hospitals and with " contacts," which goes to show that with reasonable care and under fair conditions the risk of infection from ordinary plague patients is very small.

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    0
  • It was foreordained that Messiah's witnesses should be borne by Divine power through all obstacles and to ever-widening circles, until they reached and occupied Rome itself for the God of Israel - now manifest (as foretold by Israel's own prophets) as the one God of the one race of mankind.

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    0
  • It was borne by one of the 'early settlers in Iceland, and a monk named Biuulf is commemorated in the Liber Vitae of the church of Durham.

    0
    0
  • Of the five sons borne to him by Gisela, only Emerich reached manhood, and this welleducated prince was killed by a wild boar in 1031.

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    0
  • It consists of two elements, the velocity ratio, which is the ratio of any two magnitudes bearing to each other the proportions of the respective velocities of the two points at a given instant, and the directional relation, which is the relation borne to each other by the respective directions of the motions of the two points at the same given instant.

    0
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  • The appeal of Wolf to the " voice of all antiquity " is by no means borne out by the different statements on the subject.

    0
    0
  • His argument, however, rests on an assumption which we are apt to bring with us to the reading of the Iliad, but which is not borne out by its language, viz.

    0
    0
  • Similar absorptions no doubt account for the disappearance of the Culdees of York, a name borne by the canons of St Peter's about 925, and of Snowdon and Bardsey Island in north Wales mentioned by Giraldus Cambrensis (c. 1190) in his Speculum Ecclesiae and Itinerarium respectively.

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  • the far higher proportion borne in them of the young, as compared with the more recent returns.

    0
    0
  • the average proportion borne by wives under 30 to the total under 45 is just over one-third.

    0
    0
  • The proportion borne by this group to the total population is in most cases fairly up to that set forth by Dr Sundbarg in his standard.

    0
    0
  • It is borne by the parties to whose property the misfortune happens or by their insurers.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, expenditure in the port which is incurred in protecting the cargo as in warehousing it, is by English practice treated as a charge to be borne by the cargo for whose benefit it was incurred.

    0
    0
  • The expenses of these missions are borne by private charity, and by a general annual collection.

    0
    0
  • The vintage date, therefore, which is borne by " vintage champagne," refers rather to the date of vintage prior to bottling than to the age of the wine, although the main bulk of the wine of a certain " vintage " will actually have been made in the year indicated.

    0
    0
  • The name Caedwalla or Ceadwalla was borne by a British king mentioned by Beeda and by a king of the West Saxons.

    0
    0
  • The initial element Caed - or Cead (probably adopted from British names in which it represents catu, war) appears combined with an Old English terminal element in the name Caedbaed (cp., however, the Irish name Cathbad), and hypocoristic forms of names containing it were borne by the English saints Ceadda (commonly known as St Chad) and his brother Cedd, called Ceadwealla in one MS. of the Old English Martyrology.

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  • All pretence of moderation was put aside, and he marched on London, using the full arms of England, and with his sword borne upright before him.

    0
    0
  • It was in every way fitting, however, that he who had been the mainspring of the war from the beginning, and had borne far more than his share of its burdens and discouragements, should end it with the campaign of Yorktown, conceived by himself, and the surrender of Cornwallis (October 1781).

    0
    0
  • A long leaf (spathe) borne immediately below the spike forms an apparent continuation of the scape, though really a lateral outgrowth from it, the spike of flowers being terminal.

    0
    0
  • An act of 1909 provides that election campaign expenses shall be borne "only by the state and by the candidates," and authorized appropriations for this purpose.

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    0
  • The last lines of this, as rendered by Dr Gilbert Murray, are as follows:- "Robed in pure white, I have borne me clean From man's vile birth and coffined clay, And exiled from my lips alway Touch of all meat where life bath been."

    0
    0
  • He aimed a further blow at Fustel's system by showing that the Frankish kings had never borne the Roman title of vir inluster, and that they could not therefore be considered as being in the first place Roman magistrates; and that in the royal diplomas the king issued his commands as rex Francorum and addressed his functionaries as viri inlustres.

    0
    0
  • The old ecclesiastical policy of Elizabeth, which had hitherto borne such good fruit in Wales, was now gradually relaxed under the later Stuarts and definitely abandoned under Anne, during whose reign only Englishmen were appointed to the vacant Welsh sees.

    0
    0
  • If this evil were secret [he adds], it might perhaps be borne."

    0
    0
  • By these means the benches of the galleys were filled, and Colbert took no thought of the long unrelieved agony borne by those who filled them.

    0
    0
  • The foregoing views of the sacred, though starting from distinct conceptions, converge in a single complex notion, as may be seen from the many-sided sense borne by such a term as wakan, which may stand not only for " mystery," but also for " power, sacred, ancient, grandeur, animate, immortal " (W J McGee, 15th Report of U.

    0
    0
  • It has been suggested that it was really Cornelius, not Helvius Cinna, who was slain at Caesar's funeral, but this is not borne out by the authorities.

    0
    0
  • It should, however, be borne in mind that immersion is not peculiar to the modern Baptists.

    0
    0
  • A great deal has been said about the upsetting of the balance of nature by naturalization, and as to the ill-doing of exotic forms. But certain considerations should be borne in mind in this connexion.

    0
    0
  • The handsome funnel-shaped flowers are borne in a cluster of two to many, at the end of a short hollow scape.

    0
    0
  • The conviction was borne in upon him that scientific explanation could never do more than systematize and classify the mass of appearances which to our habit-blinded eyes seem to be the reality.

    0
    0
  • The home government raises, pays and controls the regular army, its reserves, the territorial force, and some few details such as the militia of the smaller possessions, Indian native battalions employed on imperial service out of India, &c. But the cost of that portion of the regular army which is in India is borne by the Indian government, which is not the case with the regulars serving in other colonies or in the dominions.

    0
    0
  • The cost of the Indian army, and of the British forces on the Indian establishment, borne by the Indian government in 1909 was £20,558,000.

    0
    0
  • In the 15th century it was divided into upper and lower Barnim, and these names are now borne by two, circles (Kreise) in the kingdom of Prussia.

    0
    0
  • 1340), archbishop of York, had passed through its streets with his cross borne erect before him.

    0
    0
  • The title of exarch has been borne by the head of the Bulgarian Church, since in 1872 it repudiated the jurisdiction of the Greek patriarch of Constantinople.

    0
    0
  • Hence arms were not borne in times of peace but stored away under charge of a slave, and Tacitus suggests in explanation that the royal policy did not commit this trust to noble, freeman or freedman.

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  • His full name appears to have been Yngvifreyr or Ingunar Freyr and his descendants are collectively termed Ynglingar, though we also occasionally meet with the name Skilfingar, which corresponds with the name Scilfingar borne by the Swedish royal family in Beowulf.

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  • It must be borne in mind that.

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  • This is, as a rule, cast off in summer, save on formal occasions, and is often borne by a servant, or carried over the shoulder by the owner.

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  • Later still, in the Assyrian inscriptions we occasionally meet with Iranian names borne by North-Syrian princese.g.

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  • That these were conscious of their Aryan origin is proved by the names Ariantas and Ariapeithes borne by Scythian (Scolot) kings (Herod, iv.

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  • dians (Urartu, Ararat), in the country which has since borne their name; and the entry of the Cappadociansfirst mentioned in the Persian periodinto the east of Asia Minor.

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  • In considering, however, the subsequent disorders and wars, it must be borne in mind that they affected only individual portions of the empire, and only on isolated occasions involved more extensive areas in long and serious strife.

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  • Arsacids now began to assume the old title king of kings (the s/iahanshah of modern Persia),though previously their coins, as a rule, had borne only the legend great king.

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  • Then follow the surnames Epiphanes the revealed god, Dicaeus the just, Euergetes the benefactor, all of them essentially Greek in their reference, and also regularly borne by all the kings.

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  • The labours of Aristarchus seem to have borne fruit.

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  • 258), his body was borne to the grave praelucentibus cereis, and Prudentius, in his hymn on the martyrdom of St Lawrence (Peristeph.

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  • As to the question of "altar lights," however, it must be borne in mind that these were not placed upon the altar, or on a retable behind it, until the 12th century.

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  • It must be borne in mind that the Boers of every grade have always been more or less sedulously instructed in religious subjects, at all events to the extent required to fit them for formal membership of their church, and in all their wanderings they have usually been attended by their pastors.

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  • When it is borne in mind that the Dutch at the Cape were for one hundred and forty-three years under the rule of the Dutch East India Company, the importance of a correct appreciation of the nature of that rule to any student of South African history is obvious.

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  • Strong testimony to the beneficial result of their labours was borne by a thoroughly impartial commission, presided over by Sir Godfrey Lagden, which in1903-1905investigated the status and condition of the natives of South Africa.

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  • The flowers are borne in long pendulous racemes, and the two wings of the fruit are ascending.

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  • It has also been borne by two scholars of extraordinary eminence.

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  • Siebeck would reduce it within very small dimensions, but this is not borne out by the concise history found at Herculaneum (Index herc., ed.

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  • This view, however, is not borne out by a comparison of the two chapters, for four of the cases mentioned in chap. xviii.

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  • The introduction of many of the insignia both of war and of civil office is assigned to his reign, and he was the first to celebrate a Roman triumph, after the Etruscan fashion, in a robe of purple and gold, and borne on a chariot drawn by four horses.

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  • The leaves are small and imbricate, and are borne on flattened branches, which are apt to be mistaken for the leaves.

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  • SULTAN (an Arabic word meaning "victorious" or "a ruler," sultat, dominion), a title of honour borne by a great variety of rulers of very varying powers and importance in Mahommedan Africa and the East.

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  • 2 The 1 The title of consul was borne by the chief municipal officers of several cities of the south of France during the middle ages and up to the Revolution.

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  • or loo p, per second - appears to be darting across the field with great velocity, because its own small size - say 5 X i µ - comes into comparison, it should be borne in mind that if a mouse 2 in.

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  • It must be borne in mind that the reports of these speeches which have come down to us were made from hearsay, or at best from recollection, and are necessarily therefore most imperfect.

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  • In Pitt's case, too, it is to be borne in mind that the opposition with which he had acted gradually dwindled away, and that it ceased to have any organized existence after the death of the prince of Wales in 1751.

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  • The latter are borne three together, invested by a cupule of four green bracts, which, as the fruit matures, grow to form the tough green prickly envelope surrounding the group of generally three nuts.

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  • In the war between Japan and China two or three small vessels, and accompanied by his wife, who had borne him one or two children.

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  • The lime trees, species of Tilia, are familiar timber trees with sweet-scented, honeyed flowers, which are borne on a common peduncle proceeding from the middle of a long bract.

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  • The sexual cells are borne on the mesenteries in positions irrespective of obvious developmental radii.

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  • He was not, moreover, like his great leader, a non-resistant, nor was he, on the other hand, like John Brown, borne on by irresistible necessity to overt action.

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  • The royal title had not been borne by their leaders in the Roman service.

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  • And, further, this matter seems to belong to the same cycle of tradition as the story of Pilate's wife and his throwing the guilt of the Crucifixion of Jesus upon the Jews, and the testimony borne by the Roman guard (as well as the centurion) who kept watch by the cross (xxvii.

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  • Already a physical wreck, he was borne into Edinburgh Castle in April 1571 and with Kirkcaldy he held this fortress against the regent Morton and his English auxiliaries.

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  • "Had I borne the whole world on my back," he said, "it could not have weighed heavier than thou!"

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  • the child replied, "for thou hast borne upon thy back the world and him who created it!"

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  • On the floor of the stomach are borne the conspicuous gonads (ov), and also tentacle-like processes termed gastric filaments or phacellae, projecting into the cavity of the stomach.

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  • In the western division, or great plains, severe heat is experienced throughout the summer, and on occasional days the thermometer in the shade ranges above ioo° Fahrenheit, but it is a dry heat and more easily borne than a much less degree of temperature at the sea-board.

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  • Meanwhile, however, the territory of Aumale shared the fate of the rest of Normandy, and was annexed to the French crown by King Philip Augustus; but the title of earl of Albemarle, derived from it, continued to be borne in England by William de Fortibus, and was passed on to his heirs (see Albemarle).

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  • Since the reign of Louis Philippe, king of the French, the title of duke of Aumale has been borne by a son of the duke of Orleans.

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  • In many Crustacea the eyes are borne on stalks which are movably articulated with the head and which may be divided into two or three segments.

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  • The maxillulae and maxillae (or, as they are often termed, first and second maxillae) are nearly always flattened leaf-like appendages, having gnathobasic lobes or endites borne by the segments of the protopodite.

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  • Moreover, nearly every Rose has borne the Christian name of Hugh, and only one attained to a higher social rank than that of laird.

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  • The narrow, pointed leaves are spirally arranged and persist for four or five years; the cones are small, globose and borne at the ends of the branchlets, the scales are thickened at the extremity and divided into sharply pointed lobes, three to five seeds are borne on each scale.

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  • But it had little vogue, except among Socialists, until the third volume of Das Kapital was published in 1894, when its importance was borne in upon continental scholars.

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  • It has been asserted, and with some degree of plausibility, that a fish might swim, and that a bird lighter it ought, however, to be borne in mind FIG.

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  • The statements here advanced are borne out by the fact that the wings of insects, bats and birds may be materially reduced without impairing their powers of flight.

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  • The Lancashire coal-field, and the portion of the bounding plain between it and the seaport of Liverpool, contain a population greater than that borne by any equal area in the country, the county of London and its surroundings not excepted.

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  • The most satisfactory method of characterizing English place-nomenclature is to deal with it historically and chronologically, showing the influence of the successive nations who have borne sway in this island.

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  • This is in a measure borne out by the movement of population in the districts classed as purely rural in 1901.

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  • It declared that thereafter not only the half but the whole cost of maintenance should be borne by the county.

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  • And it must be borne in mind that in a borough the borough council is the urban district council.

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  • Even then the amount of the rate is left to the council, any deficiency in the cost of the water, in so far as it is not defrayed out of water rates or rents, being borne in an urban district by the general district rate, and in a rural district by the separate sanitary rates made for the parish or contributory place supplied.

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  • But it has to be borne in mind that it is not every highway that is repairable by the inhabitants at large.

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  • For to do so is to act against the law of God as spoken through Moses, the eternal duration of which is borne witness to by our Lord.

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  • Haritha), the Greek form of a name borne by kings of the Nabataeans resident at Petra in Arabia.

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  • As for the story of the orang-utan cabin boy, this may even be verbally true, it being borne in mind that in the Malay languages the term orang-utan, " man of the forest," was originally used for inland forest natives and other rude men, rather than for the miyas apes to which it has come to be generally applied by Europeans.

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  • It has to be borne in mind that Linnaeus, plainly as he recognized the likeness of the higher simian and the human types, does not seem to have entertained the thought of accounting for this similarity by common descent.

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  • (15) In order to attain a clear view of native Abyssinian history, as distinct from the visits and influence of Europeans, it must be borne in mind that during the last three hundredears and indeed for a longer period for Position of S' ?

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