How to use Boris in a sentence

boris
  • Boris became court chamberlain in 1676.

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  • His son and successor, Theodore (Feodor), was a weak man of saintly character, very ill fitted to consolidate his father's work and maintain order among the ambitious, turbulent nobles; but he had the good fortune to have an energetic brother-in-law, with no pretensions to sanctity, called Boris Godunov, who was able, with the tsar's moral support, to keep his fellow-boyars in order.

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  • Boris has often been called the creator of serfage in Russia, but in reality he merely accelerated a process which was the natural result of economic conditions.

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  • Having thus gained the support of a large majority of the landed proprietors and the ecclesiastics, Boris Godunov increased his influence to such an extent that on the Boris death of Tsar Feodor without male issue in 1598 he Godunov, was elected his successor by a Great National Assembly.

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  • In reality the younger son of Ivan the Terrible had been strangled before his brother's death - by orders, it was said, of Godunov - and the mysterious individual who was impersonating him was an impostor; but he was regarded as the rightful heir by a large section of the population, and immediately after Boris's death in 1605 he made his triumphal entry into Moscow.

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  • The Uspensky cathedral was erected in 1585; close beside it are the graves of Tsar Boris Godunov (died in 1605) and his family.

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  • On the death of the childless tsar, he was the popular candidate for the vacant throne; but he acquiesced in the election of Boris Godunov, and shared the disgrace of his too-powerful family three years later, when Boris compelled both him and his wife, Xenia Chestovaya, to take monastic vows under the names of Philaret and Martha respectively.

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  • Its historical remains are mostly associated with Prince Dmitri, son of Ivan the Terrible, who was believed to have been murdered (1591) here by Boris Godunov.

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  • His life was spared owing to the supplications of his cousin Boris, but he was deprived of his boyardom, his estates were confiscated and he was banished successively to Kargopol, Mezen and Kologora, where he died on the 21st of April 1714.

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  • Boris' career of service began at the court of Ivan the Terrible.

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  • In 1580 the tsar chose Irene, the sister of Boris, to be the bride of the tsarevich Theodore, on which occasion Boris was promoted to the rank of boyar.

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  • On his deathbed Ivan appointed Boris one of the guardians of his son and successor; for Theodore, despite his seven-and-twenty years, was of somewhat weak intellect.

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  • On the occasion of the tsar's coronation (May 31, 1584), Boris was loaded with honours and riches, yet he held but the second place in the regency during the lifetime of his co-guardian Nikita Romanovich, on whose death, in August, he was left without any serious rival.

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  • A conspiracy against him of all the other great boyars and the metropolitan Dionysy, which sought to break Boris' power by divorcing the tsar from Godunov's childless sister, only ended in the banishment or tonsuring of the malcontents.

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  • Boris' most important domestic reform was the ukaz (1587) forbidding the peasantry to transfer themselves from one landowner to another, thus binding them to the soil.

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  • The sudden death of the tsarevich Demetrius at Uglich (May 15, 1591) has commonly been attributed to Boris, because it cleared his way to the throne; but this is no clear proof that he was personally concerned in that tragedy.

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  • On the death of the childless tsar Theodore (January 7, 1598), self-preservation quite as much as ambition constrained Boris to seize the throne.

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  • His election was proposed by the patriarch Job, who acted on the conviction that Boris was the one man capable of coping with the extraordinary difficulties of an unexampled situation.

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  • Boris, however, would only accept the throne from a Zemsky Sobor, or national assembly, which met on the 17th of February, and unanimously elected him on the 21st.

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  • That Boris was one of the greatest of the Muscovite tsars there can be no doubt.

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  • Boris died suddenly (April 13, 1605), leaving one son, Theodore II., who succeeded him for a few months and then was foully murdered by the enemies of the Godunovs.

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  • On the abdication of King Ferdinand, immediately after the Armistice which put an end to Bulgaria's disastrous share in the World War, Boris succeeded his father, Oct.

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  • The strangest of his hearers was an Esthonian baron, Boris d'Yrkull, who after serving in the Russian army came to Heidelberg to hear the wisdom of Hegel.

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  • Above all, when Prince Boris, the heir-apparent of the principality, was received into the Bulgarian Church on 14th February 1896, the emperor of Russia was his godfather.

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  • His greatest opera, Boris Godounov, based on Pushkin's drama, was produced in St Petersburg in 1874, and on it his reputation stands as one of the finest creative composers in the ranks of the modern Russian school.

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  • A youth at his father's death (1645), he was committed to the care of the boyarin Boris Ivanovich Morozov, a shrewd and sensible guardian, sufficiently enlightened to recognize the needs of his country, and by no means inaccessible to Western ideas.

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  • The tsar Boris Godunov (1598-1605) threw the trade open to all nations; and the chief participants in it were England, Holland and Germany.

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  • Boris Pasternak 's the military before they pronounce soviet citizens who.

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  • Boris Vaselev and the Master of the Onyx Tower were engaged in a magical duel.

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  • The two contending candidates were the former speaker of the state Duma, Gennady Seleznyov (KPRF ), and General Boris Gromov.

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  • But even so, just one of Boris ' several jobs would be enough to keep most ordinary mortals busy and out of mischief.

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  • Here was one place where Boris was n't pestered by his fans.

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  • Now I don't know what Boris thinks of this, but I find the whole idea repellent.

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  • Boris was right to go and expose himself to their withering scorn.

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  • Servia received financial assistance; a large consignment of arms was sent openly from St Petersburg to the prince of Montenegro; Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria became ostensibly reconciled with the Russian emperor, and his son Boris was received into the Eastern Orthodox Church; the Russian embassy at Constantinople tried to bring about a reconciliation between the Bulgarian exarch and the oecumenical patriarch; Bulgarians and Servians professed, at the bidding of Russia, to lay aside their mutual hostility.

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  • Prince Vasili kept the promise he had given to Princess Drubetskaya who had spoken to him on behalf of her only son Boris on the evening of Anna Pavlovna's soiree.

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  • The matter was mentioned to the Emperor, an exception made, and Boris transferred into the regiment of Semenov Guards with the rank of cornet.

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  • Boris was tall and fair, and his calm and handsome face had regular, delicate features.

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  • Boris on the contrary at once found his footing, and related quietly and humorously how he had known that doll Mimi when she was still quite a young lady, before her nose was broken; how she had aged during the five years he had known her, and how her head had cracked right across the skull.

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  • Boris did not laugh.

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  • Boris quietly left the room and went in search of Natasha.

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  • And she's in love with Boris already.

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  • There she paused and stood listening to the conversation in the drawing room, waiting for Boris to come out.

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  • Boris paused in the middle of the room, looked round, brushed a little dust from the sleeve of his uniform, and going up to a mirror examined his handsome face.

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  • Hardly had Boris gone than Sonya, flushed, in tears, and muttering angrily, came in at the other door.

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  • Boris followed her, smiling.

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  • Boris looked attentively and kindly at her eager face, but did not reply.

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  • Boris and Natasha were at the other window and ceased talking when Vera entered.

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  • And at your age what secrets can there be between Natasha and Boris, or between you two?

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  • But I'll just tell Mamma how you are behaving with Boris.

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  • Would you believe it, I have literally not a penny and don't know how to equip Boris.

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  • Still, I will take Boris and go to see him at once, and I shall speak to him straight out.

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  • Boris said no more, but looked inquiringly at his mother without taking off his cloak.

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  • Prince Vasili stared at her and at Boris questioningly and perplexed.

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  • This is my son, she added, indicating Boris.

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  • Boris bowed again politely.

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  • And I should so like to thank Uncle once for all his kindness to me and Boris.

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  • A footman conducted Boris down one flight of stairs and up another, to Pierre's rooms.

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  • He had left Moscow when Boris was a boy of fourteen, and had quite forgotten him, but in his usual impulsive and hearty way he took Boris by the hand with a friendly smile.

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  • I am Boris, son of Princess Anna Mikhaylovna Drubetskaya.

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  • So you are Boris?

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  • Boris knew nothing about the Boulogne expedition; he did not read the papers and it was the first time he had heard Villeneuve's name.

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  • But Boris spoke distinctly, clearly, and dryly, looking straight into Pierre's eyes.

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  • For a long time Pierre could not understand, but when he did, he jumped up from the sofa, seized Boris under the elbow in his quick, clumsy way, and, blushing far more than Boris, began to speak with a feeling of mingled shame and vexation.

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  • But Boris again interrupted him.

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  • And Boris, having apparently relieved himself of an onerous duty and extricated himself from an awkward situation and placed another in it, became quite pleasant again.

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  • Pierre saw that Boris wished to change the subject, and being of the same mind he began explaining the advantages and disadvantages of the Boulogne expedition.

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  • A footman came in to summon Boris--the princess was going.

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  • Pierre, in order to make Boris' better acquaintance, promised to come to dinner, and warmly pressing his hand looked affectionately over his spectacles into Boris' eyes.

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  • This is for Boris from me, for his outfit.

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  • This was Lieutenant Berg, an officer in the Semenov regiment with whom Boris was to travel to join the army, and about whom Natasha had teased her elder sister Vera, speaking of Berg as her "intended."

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  • Boris was telling his new friend Pierre who the guests were and exchanging glances with Natasha, who was sitting opposite.

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  • Natasha, who sat opposite, was looking at Boris as girls of thirteen look at the boy they are in love with and have just kissed for the first time.

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  • Boris, come here, said Natasha.

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  • And Boris says it is quite possible.

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  • You know, Uncle promised me only the day before yesterday not to forget Boris.

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  • But I don't remember Boris.

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  • You don't remember Boris? asked Sonya in surprise.

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  • Him--I just shut my eyes and remember, but Boris...

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  • And I should be ashamed to write to Boris.

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  • And so it was decided to send the letters and money by the Grand Duke's courier to Boris and Boris was to forward them to Nicholas.

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  • That day Nicholas Rostov received a letter from Boris, telling him that the Ismaylov regiment was quartered for the night ten miles from Olmutz and that he wanted to see him as he had a letter and money for him.

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  • On receiving Boris' letter he rode with a fellow officer to Olmutz, dined there, drank a bottle of wine, and then set off alone to the Guards' camp to find his old playmate.

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  • Boris, during the campaign, had made the acquaintance of many persons who might prove useful to him, and by a letter of recommendation he had brought from Pierre had become acquainted with Prince Andrew Bolkonski, through whom he hoped to obtain a post on the commander-in-chief's staff.

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  • Berg and Boris, having rested after yesterday's march, were sitting, clean and neatly dressed, at a round table in the clean quarters allotted to them, playing chess.

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  • Boris, in the accurate way characteristic of him, was building a little pyramid of chessmen with his delicate white fingers while awaiting Berg's move, and watched his opponent's face, evidently thinking about the game as he always thought only of whatever he was engaged on.

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  • Oh, you petisenfans, allay cushay dormir! he exclaimed, imitating his Russian nurse's French, at which he and Boris used to laugh long ago.

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  • Boris rose to meet Rostov, but in doing so did not omit to steady and replace some chessmen that were falling.

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  • But notwithstanding this, Boris embraced him in a quiet, friendly way and kissed him three times.

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  • You'll frighten them! said Boris.

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  • Yes, yes! said Boris, with a smile.

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  • Boris made a grimace.

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  • Again Rostov looked intently into Boris' eyes and sighed.

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  • But Boris noticed that he was preparing to make fun of Berg, and skillfully changed the subject.

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  • Prince Andrew, who liked to help young men, was flattered by being asked for his assistance and being well disposed toward Boris, who had managed to please him the day before, he wished to do what the young man wanted.

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  • Glancing, however, at Boris, he saw that he too seemed ashamed of the hussar of the line.

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  • Boris inquired what news there might be on the staff, and what, without indiscretion, one might ask about our plans.

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  • He ordered his horse at once and, coldly taking leave of Boris, rode home.

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  • The day after the review, Boris, in his best uniform and with his comrade Berg's best wishes for success, rode to Olmutz to see Bolkonski, wishing to profit by his friendliness and obtain for himself the best post he could--preferably that of adjutant to some important personage, a position in the army which seemed to him most attractive.

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  • None of these gentlemen changed his position on seeing Boris.

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  • The one who was writing and whom Boris addressed turned round crossly and told him Bolkonski was on duty and that he should go through the door on the left into the reception room if he wished to see him.

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  • Boris thanked him and went to the reception room, where he found some ten officers and generals.

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  • More than ever was Boris resolved to serve in future not according to the written code, but under this unwritten law.

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  • Boris smiled, as if he understood what Prince Andrew was alluding to as something generally known.

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  • He would say a lot of pleasant things, ask you to dinner" ("That would not be bad as regards the unwritten code," thought Boris), "but nothing more would come of it.

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  • He very readily took up Boris' cause and went with him to Dolgorukov.

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  • The council of war was just over when Prince Andrew accompanied by Boris arrived at the palace to find Dolgorukov.

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  • Prince Andrew introduced his protege, but Prince Dolgorukov politely and firmly pressing his hand said nothing to Boris and, evidently unable to suppress the thoughts which were uppermost in his mind at that moment, addressed Prince Andrew in French.

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  • And the talkative Dolgorukov, turning now to Boris, now to Prince Andrew, told how Bonaparte wishing to test Markov, our ambassador, purposely dropped a handkerchief in front of him and stood looking at Markov, probably expecting Markov to pick it up for him, and how Markov immediately dropped his own beside it and picked it up without touching Bonaparte's.

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  • Boris was excited by the thought of being so close to the higher powers as he felt himself to be at that moment.

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  • Next day, the army began its campaign, and up to the very battle of Austerlitz, Boris was unable to see either Prince Andrew or Dolgorukov again and remained for a while with the Ismaylov regiment.

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  • Rostov without hearing Boris to the end spurred his horse.

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  • Count! shouted Berg who ran up from the other side as eager as Boris.

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  • And so you no longer wish to marry Boris?

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  • He has forwarded me a letter from Boris.

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  • Thank God, Boris is now on the staff.

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  • The novelty Anna Pavlovna was setting before her guests that evening was Boris Drubetskoy, who had just arrived as a special messenger from the Prussian army and was aide-de-camp to a very important personage.

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  • Boris, grown more manly and looking fresh, rosy and self-possessed, entered the drawing room elegantly dressed in the uniform of an aide-de- camp and was duly conducted to pay his respects to the aunt and then brought back to the general circle.

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  • Thanks to Anna Mikhaylovna's efforts, his own tastes, and the peculiarities of his reserved nature, Boris had managed during his service to place himself very advantageously.

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  • After that Anna Pavlovna led up to the courage and firmness of the King of Prussia, in order to draw Boris into the conversation.

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  • Speaking of the position of Prussia, Anna Pavlovna very naturally asked Boris to tell them about his journey to Glogau and in what state he found the Prussian army.

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  • Boris, speaking with deliberation, told them in pure, correct French many interesting details about the armies and the court, carefully abstaining from expressing an opinion of his own about the facts he was recounting.

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  • The greatest attention of all to Boris' narrative was shown by Helene.

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  • When Boris and Anna Pavlovna returned to the others Prince Hippolyte had the ear of the company.

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  • Boris smiled circumspectly, so that it might be taken as ironical or appreciative according to the way the joke was received.

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  • When everybody rose to go, Helene who had spoken very little all the evening again turned to Boris, asking him in a tone of caressing significant command to come to her on Tuesday.

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  • It seemed as if from some words Boris had spoken that evening about the Prussian army, Helene had suddenly found it necessary to see him.

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  • During that stay in Petersburg, Boris became an intimate in the countess' house.

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  • Boris Drubetskoy had asked the important personage on whom he was in attendance, to include him in the suite appointed for the stay at Tilsit.

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  • Boris looked at his general inquiringly and immediately saw that he was being tested.

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  • Boris was among the few present at the Niemen on the day the two Emperors met.

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  • Since he had begun to move in the highest circles Boris had made it his habit to watch attentively all that went on around him and to note it down.

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  • Boris lodged with another adjutant, the Polish Count Zhilinski.

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  • Zhilinski, a Pole brought up in Paris, was rich, and passionately fond of the French, and almost every day of the stay at Tilsit, French officers of the Guard and from French headquarters were dining and lunching with him and Boris.

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  • That same day, Rostov, profiting by the darkness to avoid being recognized in civilian dress, came to Tilsit and went to the lodging occupied by Boris and Zhilinski.

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  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.

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  • Boris, hearing a strange voice in the anteroom, came out to meet him.

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  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.

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  • He rose and went up to Boris.

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  • They went into the little room where Boris slept.

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  • When he and Boris were alone, Rostov felt for the first time that he could not look Boris in the face without a sense of awkwardness.

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  • Boris, with one leg crossed over the other and stroking his left hand with the slender fingers of his right, listened to Rostov as a general listens to the report of a subordinate, now looking aside and now gazing straight into Rostov's eyes with the same veiled look.

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  • Rostov almost shouted, not looking Boris in the face.

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  • At that moment Zhilinski's voice was heard calling Boris.

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  • He could not himself go to the general in attendance as he was in mufti and had come to Tilsit without permission to do so, and Boris, even had he wished to, could not have done so on the following day.

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  • Rostov felt so ill at ease and uncomfortable with Boris that, when the latter looked in after supper, he pretended to be asleep, and early next morning went away, avoiding Boris.

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  • Boris doesn't want to help me and I don't want to ask him.

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  • The members of his suite, guessing at once what he wanted, moved about and whispered as they passed something from one to another, and a page--the same one Rostov had seen the previous evening at Boris'--ran forward and, bowing respectfully over the outstretched hand and not keeping it waiting a moment, laid in it an Order on a red ribbon.

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  • Boris, too, with his friend Zhilinski, came to see the Preobrazhensk banquet.

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  • Among the many young men who frequented her house every day, Boris Drubetskoy, who had already achieved great success in the service, was the most intimate friend of the Bezukhov household since Helene's return from Erfurt.

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  • It was Boris Drubetskoy who was admitted.

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  • Afterwards Boris Drubetskoy came and began relating various adventures.

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  • Among the men who very soon became frequent visitors at the Rostovs' house in Petersburg were Boris, Pierre whom the count had met in the street and dragged home with him, and Berg who spent whole days at the Rostovs' and paid the eldest daughter, Countess Vera, the attentions a young man pays when he intends to propose.

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  • Natasha was sixteen and it was the year 1809, the very year to which she had counted on her fingers with Boris after they had kissed four years ago.

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  • Before Sonya and her mother, if Boris happened to be mentioned, she spoke quite freely of that episode as of some childish, long-forgotten matter that was not worth mentioning.

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  • But in the secret depths of her soul the question whether her engagement to Boris was a jest or an important, binding promise tormented her.

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  • Since Boris left Moscow in 1805 to join the army he had not seen the Rostovs.

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  • When the Rostovs came to Petersburg Boris called on them.

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  • Boris kissed Natasha's hand and said that he was astonished at the change in her.

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  • Natasha sat down and, without joining in Boris' conversation with the countess, silently and minutely studied her childhood's suitor.

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  • Boris' uniform, spurs, tie, and the way his hair was brushed were all comme il faut and in the latest fashion.

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  • This gaze disturbed and confused Boris more and more.

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  • Boris made up his mind to avoid meeting Natasha, but despite that resolution he called again a few days later and began calling often and spending whole days at the Rostovs'.

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  • It seemed to her mother and Sonya that Natasha was in love with Boris as of old.

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  • You say Boris is nice.

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  • But this is what I'll do, Natasha, I'll have a talk with Boris.

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  • Next day the countess called Boris aside and had a talk with him, after which he ceased coming to the Rostovs'.

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  • Boris passed them twice and each time turned away.

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  • Before long Boris, Berg's old comrade, arrived.

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  • After Boris came a lady with the colonel, then the general himself, then the Rostovs, and the party became unquestionably exactly like all other evening parties.

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  • She was sitting by her sister at the tea table, and reluctantly, without looking at him, made some reply to Boris who sat down beside her.

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  • Natasha on one side was talking with Sonya and Boris, and Vera with a subtle smile was saying something to Prince Andrew.

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  • Now you know, Count," she said to Pierre, "even our dear cousin Boris, who, between ourselves, was very far gone in the land of tenderness..."

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  • She told her how he had complimented her, how he told her he was going abroad, asked her where they were going to spend the summer, and then how he had asked her about Boris.

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  • I was in love with Boris, with my teacher, and with Denisov, but this is quite different.

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  • Well, I don't like Anna Mikhaylovna and I don't like Boris, but they were our friends and poor.

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  • These guests--the famous Count Rostopchin, Prince Lopukhin with his nephew, General Chatrov an old war comrade of the prince's, and of the younger generation Pierre and Boris Drubetskoy--awaited the prince in the drawing room.

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  • She did not even notice the special attentions and amiabilities shown her during dinner by Boris Drubetskoy, who was visiting them for the third time already.

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  • Boris had not succeeded in making a wealthy match in Petersburg, so with the same object in view he came to Moscow.

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  • Boris read 'Poor Liza' aloud to her, and more than once interrupted the reading because of the emotions that choked him.

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  • Meeting at large gatherings Julie and Boris looked on one another as the only souls who understood one another in a world of indifferent people.

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  • Boris says his soul finds repose at your house.

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  • Ah, Boris, Boris!--she paused.

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  • Boris smiled almost imperceptibly while listening to his mother.

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  • Boris began, wishing to sting her; but at that instant the galling thought occurred to him that he might have to leave Moscow without having accomplished his aim, and have vainly wasted his efforts--which was a thing he never allowed to happen.

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  • The scantily clad Helene smiled at everyone in the same way, and Natasha gave Boris a similar smile.

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  • Boris was now a rich man who had risen to high honors and no longer sought patronage but stood on an equal footing with the highest of those of his own age.

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  • He was meeting Helene in Vilna after not having seen her for a long time and did not recall the past, but as Helene was enjoying the favors of a very important personage and Boris had only recently married, they met as good friends of long standing.

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  • Helene, not having a suitable partner, herself offered to dance the mazurka with Boris.

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  • Boris, coolly looking at Helene's dazzling bare shoulders which emerged from a dark, gold-embroidered, gauze gown, talked to her of old acquaintances and at the same time, unaware of it himself and unnoticed by others, never for an instant ceased to observe the Emperor who was in the same room.

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  • As the mazurka began, Boris saw that Adjutant General Balashev, one of those in closest attendance on the Emperor, went up to him and contrary to court etiquette stood near him while he was talking to a Polish lady.

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  • Boris noticed Arakcheev's excited face when the sovereign went out with Balashev.

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  • All the time Boris was going through the figures of the mazurka, he was worried by the question of what news Balashev had brought and how he could find it out before others.

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  • Boris, fluttering as if he had not had time to withdraw, respectfully pressed close to the doorpost with bowed head.

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  • It seemed to Boris that it gave the Emperor pleasure to utter these words.

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  • He was satisfied with the form in which he had expressed his thoughts, but displeased that Boris had overheard it.

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  • Boris understood that this was meant for him and, closing his eyes, slightly bowed his head.

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  • Boris was thus the first to learn the news that the French army had crossed the Niemen and, thanks to this, was able to show certain important personages that much that was concealed from others was usually known to him, and by this means he rose higher in their estimation.

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  • Boris Drubetskoy, brushing his knees with his hand (he had probably soiled them when he, too, had knelt before the icon), came up to him smiling.

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  • Boris was elegantly dressed, with a slightly martial touch appropriate to a wartime wedding.

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  • Pierre stopped some thirty paces from Kutuzov, talking to Boris.

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  • Boris shrugged his shoulders, his Serene Highness would not have it, or someone persuaded him.

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  • You see... but Boris did not finish, for at that moment Kaysarov, Kutuzov's adjutant, came up to Pierre.

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  • Though Kutuzov had dismissed all unnecessary men from the staff, Boris had contrived to remain at headquarters after the changes.

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  • Boris belonged to the latter and no one else, while showing servile respect to Kutuzov, could so create an impression that the old fellow was not much good and that Bennigsen managed everything.

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  • So Boris was full of nervous vivacity all day.

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  • Boris evidently said this to Pierre in order to be overheard by his Serene Highness.

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  • Boris said a few words to his general, and Count Bennigsen turned to Pierre and proposed that he should ride with him along the line.

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  • On returning to Gorki after having seen Prince Andrew, Pierre ordered his groom to get the horses ready and to call him early in the morning, and then immediately fell asleep behind a partition in a corner Boris had given up to him.

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  • Now I do n't know what Boris thinks of this, but I find the whole idea repellent.

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  • You can always impress your friends if they never knew that Terry Jean Bollette is now better known as Hulk Hogan or that Boris Karloff was once known only as William Henry Pratt.

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  • Sandra Knight plays his opposite and Boris Karloff appears as the Baron.

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  • The original version of Monster Mash was recorded and released as a single in October 1962, by Bobby "Boris" Pickett and The Crypt Kickers.

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  • He did an imitation of horror movie actor Boris Karloff, which was a big hit with the audience.

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  • Mary Shelley's Frankenstein has been brought to the stage and screen in numerous incarnations, most notably in the 1931 film starring Boris Karloff as the monster.

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  • The 1931 film classic Frankenstein is always associated with creepy great Boris Karloff.

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  • The image that people associate with the name "Frankenstein" is the one created by/for Boris Karloff as the monster.

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  • Boris Karloff is credited in the opening credits as '?', presumably to preserve an air of mystery before hand.

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  • Other artists like, Boris Vallejo, have given us many images of vampires and other creatures in a crisp and realistic fine art style that many can easily appreciate.

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