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bore

bore

bore Sentence Examples

  • I don't want to bore you to death.

  • Yes, they admitted it appeared a large volume of tips bore mutual similarities.

  • She's not as beautiful as the one who bore the infant and until, and until today lived in this house.

  • The skull of the driver bore the distinctive damage Howie had received in his earlier accident.

  • She still bore the bruises from upsetting him two days ago.

  • She took the hint but wondered who had hurt him so badly that he still bore a grudge thousands of years later.

  • His nose bore the appearance of having been broken and set incorrectly more than once.

  • She bore a look of defeated resignation as Dean and his wife joined her.

  • She was plotting her return with a chain of events that ended with the human that bore her likeness being turned over to Darkyn.

  • While she looked healthy, she bore blood on her neck that made him feel ill at the thought that Darkyn was bleeding her dry.

  • Or that she bore them no ill will.

  • The firm assertion of Darkyn's mate that she bore no one ill-will made more sense when he understood why she said it.

  • The human bore her no ill-will.

  • Whatever it was, I apologize for hurting you so much that you bore a grudge for thousands of years.

  • She didn't know how humans bore through it.

  • While Gabriel was written at the center of the geometric designs on Deidre's shoulders, the tattoo on the woman before her bore the name Rhyn.

  • Rhyn gave Katie a long, withering look that she bore with crossed arms.

  • And yet, he couldn't help feeling as if he alone bore the weight of his planet on his back as he struggled to pay for food, water, and weapons.

  • One bore the same image of a man, the second of the woman.

  • A blue-green tint shone through the sunlight while frozen waterfalls, hanging from the upstream cliffs, bore a hint of the rust-orange hue from the natural deposits of Red Mountain above.

  • Her face bore a Christmas morning smile.

  • A tiny red haired woman, under five feet, Dean guessed, emerged from the vehicle that bore Colorado license plates.

  • Jackson is a real bore, he's Dracula every single year, ughh.

  • Her expression bore pain.

  • Bore him completely out of her hair.

  • The Ice Lady, Linda Segal, was going full bore at the Sentinel, trying to convince her reading public that the poor lad might have been saved had the local police properly conducted the search for the missing boy in a timely fashion.

  • Had she been a complete bore lately?

  • His gaze bore into her eyes.

  • Born to a wealthy merchant family, she'd been disowned when it became known what kind of deformed child she bore.

  • Her body wouldn't be placed in a funeral pyre or surrounded by family and friends who bore her gifts one last time.

  • Albert married Elizabeth, daughter of Meinhard IV., count of Gdrz and Tirol, who bore him six sons and five daughters.

  • These dukes all bore the name of Godfrey (Godefroy) and the fifth of them was the great crusader.

  • She bore him two children, of whom one died in infancy at Murshidabad, and was shortly followed to the grave by her mother.

  • This office did not become hereditary, however, and his descendants bore simply the title of counts of Scheyern until about 1116, when the emperor Henry V.

  • Albany had to blockade Margaret in Stirling Castle before she would surrender her sons, After being obliged to capitulate, Margaret returned to Edinburgh, and being no longer responsible for the custody of the king she fled to England in September, where a month later she bore to Angus a daughter, Margaret, who afterwards became countess of Lennox, mother of Lord Darnley and grandmother of James I.

  • After their junction it is probable that the road bore the name Via Latina rather than Via Labicana.

  • The signboard of a wayside inn near Goring Heath in Oxfordshire long bore a portrait of the king with couplets reciting how his majesty "drank from the bowl, and bowl'd for what he drank."

  • This site of the Prytaneum at Athens cannot be definitely fixed; it is generally supposed that in the course of time several buildings bore the name.

  • In 1316 she was married to Ulf Gudmarson, lord of Nericia, to whom she bore eight children, one of whom was afterwards honoured as St Catherine of Sweden.

  • There she became more and more Jansenist in opinion, and her piety and the remembrance of her influence during the disastrous days of the Fronde, and above all the love her brother, the great Conde, bore her, made her conspicuous.

  • 340), wherein he gave an account of it under the name of "Saria," which it bore among the Guaranis, - that of "Cariama" being applied to it by the Portuguese settlers, and both expressive of its ordinary cry.'

  • The staff officers bore similar titles, relics of the time when the order existed only for amusement: Genii, Hydras, Furies, Goblins, Night Hawks, Magi, Monks and Turks.

  • But whether the city really bore the name of the people and the country is another question.

  • The second son of the duke of Maine, Louis Charles de Bourbon (1701-1775), bore the title of count of Eu.

  • They are also preserved in basins on the western plateau, as shown by brown coal deposits passed through in the Lake Phillipson bore.

  • The Blackhall bore, put down at his advice from 1885 to 1888, reached a water-bearing layer at the depth of 1645 ft.

  • Thus, the sons inherited their fathers' hunting-ground, but bore their mothers' name and therewith the right to certain women for wives.

  • After a visit to the Mauritius, then a Dutch possession, Tasman bore away to the south-east, and on the 24th of November sighted the western coast of the land which he named Van Diemen's Land, in honour of the governor under whose directions he was acting.

  • Once this goodwill had been shown, he bore no malice towards those who rendered him his liberty by preferring Gambetta.

  • The Gallo-Celtic tribes bore the general appellation of Belgae, and among these the Nervii, inhabiting the district between the Scheldt and the Sambre were at the date of Caesar's invasion, 57 B.C., the most warlike and important.

  • The branch of the Franks - who were a confederacy, not a people - which gradually overspread Gallia Belgica, bore the name of the Salian Franks..

  • of Holland) who bore the brunt of the fighting and specially distinguished themselves.

  • The magistrates bore the name of scabini (schepenen or echevins), and at their head was the seigneurial official - the schout or baljuw.

  • This hierarchical tie was soon snapped, but the Hellenizing influence continued to work, and bore its most abundant fruit in the 5th century.

  • She bore him, besides his two sons Stephen and Bela, seven daughters, of whom St Margaret was the most famous.

  • The adult worm, which is of extremely minute size, the male being only Fi l sth and the female s of an inch in length inhabits the alimentary canal of man and many other carnivorous mammalia; the young bore their way into the tissues and become encysted in the muscles - within the muscle-bundles according to Leuckart, but in the connective tissue between them according to Chatin and others.

  • Next the larvae make their way into the connective tissue in the pro-thorax, and ultimately bore a channel into the base of the piercing apparatus and come to rest between the hypopharynx and the labium.

  • St Mary's church was opened in 1903, but occupies a site which bore a church in Saxon times, though the previous building dated only from 1786.

  • A slave bore an identification mark, which could only be removed by a surgical operation and which later consisted of his owner's name tattoed or branded on the arm.

  • A definite area was bound to find a bowman together with his linked pikeman (who bore the shield for both) and to furnish them with supplies for the campaign.

  • It was thus that in 1720 the house~ of Savoy assumed, the regal title which it bore until the declaration of the Italian kingdom in the last century.

  • He received his early education, according to Morice his secretary, from " a marvellous severe and cruel schoolmaster," whose discipline must have been severe indeed to deserve this special mention in an age when no schoolmaster bore the rod in vain.

  • Their language bore the same relation to the Vedic speech as the various Italian dialects bore to Latin.

  • The full name he then bore was Marcus Aelius Aurelius Antoninus, Aelius coming from Hadrian's family, and Aurelius being the original name of Antoninus Pius.

  • This triumph was universally considered at the time, and for long afterwards, to have been a miracle, and bore the title of "The Miracle of the Thundering Legion."

  • We now know that many at least of the Cycadofilices bore seeds, of a type much more complex than that of most modern seed plants, and in some cases approximating to the seeds of existing Cycads.

  • Hawkins declared his object to be discovery and the survey of unknown lands, and his voyage, though terminating in disaster, bore good fruit.

  • But a romantic interest attaches to the wreck of the " Wager," one of Anson's fleet, on a desert island near Chiloe, for it bore fruit in the charming narrative of Captain John Byron, which will endure for all time.

  • The work of Captain Cook bore fruit in many ways.

  • His monument bore an inscription written by himself, to the effect that he had always fully repaid the kindnesses of his friends and the wrongs done him by his enemies.

  • After Edward's burial, at which he bore the king's banner, Howard, an enemy of the Wydviles, linked his fortunes with those of the duke of Gloucester.

  • 155), the crowd shouted, "This is the father of the Christians" 2; but the words were probably prompted by the Jews, who took a prominent part in the martyrdom, and who naturally viewed Polycarp in the light of a great Christian rabbi, and gave him the title which their own teachers bore.

  • His interest also in public matters was incessant, especially ecclesiastical questions, and such as bore upon the social welfare and moral improvement of the masses.

  • The gifts of each were adopted and bore fruit on both sides of the Channel.

  • Their exclusive possession of power made the commonwealth in which they bore rule an aristocracy; but they were a democracy among themselves.

  • One editor of his De Consolatione, Bertius, thinks that he bore the praenomen of Flavius, but there is no authority for this supposition.

  • Beetles and larvae are frequently carnivorous in habit, hunting for small insects under stones, or pursuing the soft-skinned grubs of beetles and flies that bore in woody stems or succulent roots.

  • Clinging to her hairs they are carried to the nest, where they bore into the body of a bee or wasp larva, and after a moult become soft-skinned legless maggots.

  • Without his assent and blessing no important decisions were taken, all state documents emanating from the highest authority bore his signature, and he was regarded, both in the official world and by the xxru.

  • It had a vertical boiler, and was carried on four wheels all coupled, the two cylinders being placed in an inclined position and having a bore of about 6 in.

  • Except in hard rock, the top width of a cutting, and therefore the amount of material to be excavated, increases rapidly with the depth; hence if a cutting exceeds a certain depth, which varies with the particular circumstances, it may be more economical, instead of forming the sides at the slope at which the material of which they are composed will stand, to make them nearly vertical and support the soil with a retaining wall, or to bore a tunnel.

  • The Iroquois sacrifice of the white dog bore in later times the character of a scapegoat festival; but it is doubtful how far this was an original feature.

  • The highest officer of the confederacy was the general (oTparnyos), who was assisted by a treasurer (raµias), while the chief magistrates of the several communities bore the title of ephors (g 4 opoc).

  • During that time the earth bore no fruit, and the inhabitants of the world were threatened with starvation.

  • In Hyginus's version of the legend, founded apparently on a tragedy by some follower of Euripides, Antigone, on being handed over by Creon to her lover Haemon to be slain, was secretly carried off by him, and concealed in a shepherd's hut, where she bore him a son Macon.

  • After the modification of the Pelloux cabinet (May 1899) he became leader of the ministerial majority, and bore the brunt of the struggle against Socialist obstruction in connexion with the Public Safety Bill.

  • He died within a few months; but his wife bore a posthumous son, who became Baldwin V.

  • Others shared this conviction: Strabo speaks of embassies from Egypt and Judaea bearing presents - one deposited in the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus bore the inscription of Alexander, the king of the Jews.

  • His coins bore the heads of Augustus and Tiberius, and his government was worthy of the best Roman traditions - he succeeded where proconsuls had failed.

  • But Domitian, according to pagan historians, bore hardly on them.

  • The American Jews bore their share in the Civil War (7038 Jews were in the two armies), and have always identified themselves closely with national movements such as the emancipation of Cuba.

  • high, and bore the paschal candle proper, and together they reached a combined height of about 70 ft., the candle being lighted from an opening above.

  • If the clans of Moses' kin which moved into Judah bore the ark (Num.

  • There are, however, in the Eudrilidae, as already mentioned, sacs envolving the ovaries which bore their own way to the exterior, and thus may be termed coelomoducts.

  • Eleanor bore Louis two daughters but no sons.

  • Eleanor bore to her second husband five sons and three daughters; John, the youngest of their children, was born in 1166.

  • His widow, however, bore a posthumous child, also named Germanus, of whom Jordanes speaks (cap. 60) as "blending the blood of the Anicii and the Amals, and furnishing a hope under the divine blessing of one day uniting their glories."

  • The caterpillars of the leopard moth (Zeuzera pyrina) and of the goat moth (Cossus ligniperda) sometimes bore their way into the trunks and destroy the sap channels.

  • It has been the custom to speak of Thomas Corneille as of one who, but for the name he bore, would merit no notice.

  • He got into some trouble with the chancellor, Gardiner, over a ribald play, "Pammachius," performed by the students, deriding the old ecclesiastical system, though Bonner wrote to Parker of the assured affection he bore him.

  • Bruce with the reserve planted his standard at the Bore Stone, whence there is the best view of the field.

  • 1327), daughter of Richard de Burgh, earl of Ulster, whom he had married about 1304, and who bore him late his only son, David, who succeeded him.

  • The most noteworthy are the Dialogues of a certain Adamantius "de recta in Deum fide," which seem to have been erroneously attributed to Origen so early as the 4th century, one reason being the fact that Origen himself also bore that name.

  • Bonaparte's essay bore signs of study of Rousseau and of the cult of Lycurgus which was coming into vogue.

  • Napoleon, therefore, had Prussia completely at his mercy; and his conditions to that power bore witness to the fact.

  • When about 255 B.C. Diodotus had made himself king of Bactria and tried to expand his dominions, the chieftain of a tribe of Iranian nomads (Dahan Scyths) east of the Caspian, the Parni or Aparni, who bore the Persian name Arsaces, fled before him into Parthia.

  • He promoted the union of the Greek and Latin Churches as far as possible, but his efforts in this direction bore no permanent fruit.

  • 25, he was one of the original members and, along with the Prime Minister and Lord Kitchener, bore the main responsibility.

  • Other European countries, though not quite so prolific as Germany, bore some ornithological fruit at this period; but.

  • To provide the requisite funds for this vast undertaking, a forced loan of% on net incomes was raised; the money bore interest at the rate of 4%.

  • set forth the doctrine of lecherous demons as an indisputable fact; and in the history of the Inquisition and of trials for witchcraft may be found the confessions of many who bore witness to their reality.

  • His first wife, Ersilia Santa Croce, bore him twelve children, and nine years after her death he married Lucrezia Petroni, a widow with three daughters, by whom he had no offspring.

  • They bore holes and penetrate into flower-buds and young bolls, causing them to drop. Fortunately the " worms " prefer maize to cotton, and the inter-planting at proper times of maize, to be cut down and destroyed when well infested, is a method commonly employed to keep down this pest.

  • In addition to the appliances mentioned the tools comprise reamers to enlarge the bore of the well, the winged-substitute which is fitted above the bit to prevent it from glancing off, and above the round reamer to keep it in place, a temper-screw with clamps and wrenches.

  • The bore is then reduced to 5Z-in., and a bevelled shoulder being made in the rock, a 5$-in.

  • In a more noble fashion the Crusade survived in the minds of the navigators; "Vasco da Gama, Christopher Columbus, Albuquerque, and many others dreamed, and not insincerely, that they were labouring for the deliverance of the Holy Land, and they bore the Cross on their breasts."

  • Nothing marks the secular attitude of the Italians at an epoch which decided the future course of both Renaissance and Reformation more strongly than the mundane proclivities of this apostolic secretary, heart and soul devoted to the resuscitation of classical studies amid conflicts of popes and antipopes, cardinals and councils, in all of which he bore an official part.

  • The capital, which bore the same name as the island, was at PaleoKastro, about 3 m.

  • While the Malays were famous almost exclusively for their piratical expeditions they naturally bore an evil reputation among Europeans, but now that we have come into closer Character, contact with them,, and have learned to understand aca them better, the old opinions concerning them have been greatly modified.

  • Both pillars and cross-bars were elaborately carved in bas-relief, and most of them bore inscriptions giving either the name of the donor, or the subject of the bas-relief, or both.

  • As the eastern frontier of Palestine, Gilead bore the first brunt of Syrian and Assyrian attacks.

  • The Federalists bore down on him unmercifully, and even attempted (1798) a constitutional amendment in regard to citizenship, partly, it appears, in order to drive him from office.

  • This, the most celebrated of the Marguerites, bore no less than four surnames.

  • But Henry and Marguerite still continued friends; she still bore the title of queen; she visited Marie de' Medici on equal terms; and the king frequently consulted her on important affairs, though his somewhat parsimonious spirit was grieved by her extravagance.

  • His joy was complete when on the 10th of March 1811 she bore him a son who was destined to bear the empty titles of "king of Rome" and "Napoleon II."

  • Long before the tidings of the death of Napoleon at St Helena reached her she was living in intimate relations with Neipperg at Parma, and bore a son to him not long after that event.

  • Another far more obscure town in Gaul, near Reims, also bore the name.

  • After the Jameson raid and the Emperor's telegram to President Kruger, in the drafting of which Baron Marschall, according to the later testimony now available, bore a leading part, it was he who declared in the Reichstag that the maintenance of the independence of the Boer republics was a " German interest."

  • corps under Logan again bore the brunt of Hood's attack.

  • The medieval studies which Wagner had begun for his work at the libretto of Tannhauser bore rich fruit in his next opera Lohengrin, in which he also developed his principles on a larger scale and with a riper technique than hitherto.

  • They bore by old custom the name of the king's Companions (raapot), and were distributed into 8 territorial squadrons Oat) of probably some 250 men each, making a normal total of 2,000.

  • In the cavalry also the most privileged squadron bore the name of the agema.

  • There does not seem any clear proof that the surnames which the Hellenistic kings in Asia and Egypt bore were necessarily connected with the cult, even if they were used to describe g.Surnames.

  • In 819 he married Judith, daughter of Welf I., count of Bavaria, who in 823 bore him a son Charles, afterwards called the Bald.

  • The connexion began in 1470, and she bore him many children whom he openly acknowledged as his own: Giovanni, afterwards duke of Gandia (born 1474), Cesare (born 1476), Lucrezia (born 1480), and Goffredo or Giuffre (born 1481 or 1482).

  • Of foreigners, the Asiatics bore the greatest value, as most amenable to command, and most versed in the arts of luxurious refinement.

  • The repressive measures following on the Test Act bore hardly upon him, and in December 1678 he was imprisoned in Dublin Castle for six weeks.

  • The first sheet of a roll was named the last, Under the Romans, the former bore the name of the comes largitionum, who had control of the manufacture, with the date and name of place.

  • In the district that bore this designation, lying close to the Appian Way, the basilica of San Sebastiano was erected, and the extensive burial-vaults beneath that church - in which, according to tradition, the bodies of the apostles St Peter and St Paul rested for a year and seven months previous to their removal to the basilicas which bear their names - were, in very early times, called from it coemeterium ad catacumbas, or catacumbas alone.

  • The base of a similar column has only feet in the same attitude, and probably bore the name Nereus.

  • Too many causes operated in favour of their depreciation: the enormous issue, the uncertainty as to their value if the Revolution should fail, the relation they bore to both specie and commodities, which retained their value and refused to be exchanged for a money of constantly diminishing purchasing power.

  • Though introduced with success from Santo Domingo about the middle of the T 8th century, the sugar industry practically dates from 1796, when Etienne Bore first succeeded in crystallizing and clarifying the syrup. Steam motive power was first introduced on the plantations in 1822.

  • He bore throughout his career the reputation of an intelligent and upright public servant.

  • 1 7 So) this tomb bore an inscription setting forth that Ayesha Khanum, the wife of the governor of Bagdad, was buried here in 1488, her grave having been made in the ancient sepulchre of the lady Zobeide (Zobaida), granddaughter of Caliph Mansur and wife of Harun al-Rashid, who died in A.D.

  • It was the religious capital of all Islam, and the political capital of the greater part of it, at a time when Islam bore the same relation to civilization which Christendom does to-day.

  • The two French painters who bore these names are also called by the Italian equivalents Giacomo (or Jacopo) Cortese and Guglielmo Cortese.

  • The Berber tribes, whose racial unity is attested by their common spoken language and by the comparatively numerous Berber inscriptions that have come down to us, bore in ancient times the generic names of Numidians, Gaetulians and Moors or Maurusiani.

  • The carapace of the prosoma was unsegmented and often bore a pair of eyes.

  • These works bore, perforce, the names of ancient Hebrew worthies in order to procure them a hearing among the writers' real contemporaries.

  • Now the current religious literature of Judaism outside the canon was composed of apocryphal books, the bulk of which bore an apocalyptic character, and dealt with the coming of the Messianic kingdom.

  • sacristan) being merely the title which he bore as an official of the great parish church of Haarlem.

  • Upon the whole subject of the codification and legislation in which Tribonian bore a part, see JusTINIAN.

  • The count of the stable, originally the imperial master of the horse, developed into the "illustrious" commander-in-chief of the imperial army (Stilicho, e.g., bore the full title as given above), and became the prototype of the medieval constable.

  • In medieval France the significance of the title of count varied with the power of those who bore it; in modern France it varies with its historical associations.

  • Gladstone, in the early days of English sympathy with the South, said that he had "made a nation" - bore himself in his most responsible position during the gigantic conflict which ensued, cannot here be related in detail.

  • Bharatpur rose into importance under Suraj Mall, who bore a conspicuous part in the destruction of the Delhi empire.

  • Beust was the only " imperial chancellor " in Austro-Hungarian history; even Metternich bore only the title of " chancellor "; and Andrassy, who succeeded Beust, styled himself " minister of the imperial and royal household and for foreign affairs."

  • But sometimes the counts of Bar bore arms against France.

  • A chief merit of Ray is to have limited the term " species " and to have assigned to Ray it the significance which it bore till the Darwinian era, whereas previously it was loosely and vaguely applied.

  • It is impossible to enumerate or to give due consideration to all the names in the army of anatomical and embryological students of the middle third of the 19th century whose labours bore fruit in the modification of zoological theories and in the building up of a true classification of animals.

  • Another historic site is Horace Street near Edgware Road, formerly Cato Street, from which the conspiracy which bore that name was directed against the ministry in 1820.

  • Although saline springs are mentioned here as early as the 13th century, the first attempt to bore for salt was not made until 1839, while the systematic exploitation of the salt-beds, to which the town is indebted for its prosperity, dates only from 1856.

  • A third hypothesis is that advanced by Karl Rieder (Der Gottesfreund von Oberland, Innsbruck, 1905), who thinks that not even Merswin himself wrote any of the literature, but that his secretary and associate Nicholas of Lowen, head of the House of St John at Griinenworth, the retreat founded by Merswin for the circle, worked over all the writings which emanated from different members of the group but bore no author's names, and to glorify the founder of the house attached Merswin's name to some of them and out of his imagination created "the Friend of God from the Oberland," whom he named as the writer of the others.

  • The " breastplate of judgment " was set with twelve jewels engraved with the names of the tribes; the foreordained covering of the semidivine being in the garden of the gods bore the same number of stones (Ezek.

  • Each of the nine cunei bore a name: the inscriptions of five of them, still preserved on the rock, are in honour of Zeus, Heracles, King Hiero II., his wife Philistis, and his daughterin-law Nereis.

  • The duke married Louise Henriette de Bourbon-Conti, who bore him a son Philip (Egalite), duke of Orleans, and a daughter, who married the last duke of Bourbon.

  • The people bore their troubles heroically, and Henry Oldenburg, writing to the Hon.

  • bore, provided with a lateral branch b near its upper end, which latter, by an india-rubber joint governable by a screw-clamp, communicates with a funnel.

  • Although the bore of the thermometer-tube is exceedingly small, it is made in the same way as ordinary tube.

  • The white line of enamel, which is seen in some thermometers behind the bore, is introduced before the mass of glass is pulled out.

  • If the section of the finished tube is to be a triangle, with the enamel and bore at the base, the molten mass is pressed into a V-shaped mould before it is pulled out.

  • Under the Persian empire Cilicia was apparently governed by tributary native kings, who bore a name or title graecized as Syennesis; but it was officially included in the fourth satrapy by Darius.

  • He worked as a designer in Paris, and became prominent as a member of the municipal council of Paris, rousing much angry discussion by a proposal to rename the Parisian streets which bore saints' names.

  • Six of the statues bore special names, and offerings were made to them as to the statues of the gods.

  • Certain clay sealings, eight of which bore pictographic signs, found by A.

  • These, he now saw, bore Hittite pictographs.

  • On the death of his maternal grandfather in 1384 he received the title of count of Nevers, which he bore until his father's death.

  • In some towns all the crafts were thus consolidated into a single fraternity; in this case a body was reproduced which regulated the whole trade monopoly of the borough, and hence bore some resemblance to the old gild merchant.

  • From this time the rulers of Bundi bore the title of rao raja.

  • The estuary or bay is funnel-shaped, and its configuration produces at spring tides a " bore " or tidal wave, which at its maximum reaches a height of 15 to 20 ft.

  • It already, however, bore within it the germ of decay; the accumulation of treasure in the capital had led to a corruption of the simple manners of the earlier times; the exhaustion of the tribes through the heavy blood tax had roused discontent among them; the plundering of the holy places, the attacks on the pilgrim caravans under the escort of Turkish soldiers, and finally, in 1810, the desecration of the tomb of Mahomet and the removal of its costly treasures, raised a cry of dismay throughout the Mahommedan world, and made it clear even to the Turkish sultan that unless the Wahhabi power were crushed his claims to the caliphate were at an end.

  • This very likely formed the nucleus of a book which bore the name of that sheik and was much read in the 3rd century from the Flight.

  • - In Turkey these consist of the Dominican mission, established at Mosul during the 18th century, and in Persia of the French Lazarist mission, which sprang out of some schools established by a French layman and scientific traveller, Eugene Bore, in 1838.

  • Bore's entreaty the Propaganda sent the first Lazarist father to Persia in 1840.

  • They bore the brunt of each of the great waves of Tatar conquests, and were eventually overwhelmed.

  • By this means they were enabled to capture the island of Giglio, and, attacking the Pisan harbour, carried off its chains, bore them in triumph to Florence, and suspended them in front of the baptistery, where they remained until 1848.

  • It was armed with 10 guns-2 (rifled) 7 in., 2 (rifled) 6 in., and 6 (smooth bore Dahlgren) 9 in.

  • of Cephaloedium [[[Cefalu]]], to the east of the modern Castel di Tusa, founded in 403 B.C. by Archonides, tyrant of Herbita, whose name it sometimes bore: we find, e.g.

  • When Adelaide bore a son, and a report gained currency that Otto intended to make this child his heir, Ludolf rose in revolt and was joined by Conrad of Lorraine and Frederick of Mainz.

  • The heir-apparent and his son, the prime minister and the leader of the House of Commons, were among those who bore the pall.

  • They had geometric patterns with birds, trees, &c., and bore inscriptions in mosaic with the names of the donors.

  • He was first married to his cousin Teresa of Portugal, who bore him two daughters, and a son who died young.

  • In the second of the above books his idea of religion is somewhat of an anachronism; as he himself confessed, he " used the word in the sense which it invariably bore half a century ago," as denoting " belief in an ever-living God, a divine mind and will ruling the universe and holding moral relations with mankind."

  • It is not too much to say, indeed, that when Japan opened her doors to foreigners in the middle of the 19th century, she possessed a system of roads some of which bore striking testimony to her medieval greatness.

  • It is equally certain that almost every one of the long line of princes and voivods bore a Slavonic surname, perhaps due to the influence of the Slavonic Church, to which the Rumanians belonged.

  • In 1836 it was joined to the London Review (1829), founded by Sir William Molesworth, and then bore the name of the London and Westminster Review till 1851, when it returned to the original title.

  • Tarentum (whether or no founded by pre-Dorian Greeks - its founders bore the unexplained name of Partheniae) became a Laconian colony at some unknown date, whence a legend grew up connecting the Partheniae with Sparta, and 707 B.C. was assigned as its traditional date.

  • Here, being already pregnant, she gave birth to a daughter, who in turn bore the twins Joskeha and Tawiscara (myth of hostile brothers).

  • The measures for the rehabilitation of the states that had seceded from the Union occupied the chief attention of Congress for several years, and Blaine bore a leading part in framing and discussing them.

  • In the limiting case of a long fine tube, the bore of which varies in such a manner that U is constant, the state of the substance along a line of flow may be represented by the line of constant total heat, d(E+pv) = o; but in the case of a porous plug or small throttling aperture, the steps of the process cannot be followed, though the final state is the same.

  • His marriage with the fierce witch-woman, Olympias, daughter of the Epirote king, falls in this period, and in 356 she bore him his greater son, Alexander.

  • As an example of the minuteness of description, an inquirer, thinking of a brother in India, an officer in the army, whose hair had suffered in an encounter with a tiger, had described to her an officer in undress uniform, with bald scars through the hair on his temples, such as he really bore.

  • The waters of the firth are shallow, and a tidal bore occurs periodically.

  • His wisdom is shown by the prudent measures which he took by enacting the Nizam-ijedid, or new regulations for the improvement of the condition of the Christian rayas, and for affording them security for life and property; a conciliatory attitude which at once bore fruit in Greece, where the people abandoned the Venetian cause and returned to their allegiance to the Porte.

  • Victor Emmanuel had married in 1842 Maria Adelaide, daughter of the archduke Rainer, who bore him several children, viz.

  • In 1867 he married Princess Maria Vittoria dal Pozzo della Cisterna, who bore him three sons, viz.

  • The original seceders in Virginia and North Carolina bore for a time the name "Republican Methodists," and then called themselves simply "Christians," a designation which with the pronunciation "Christ-yans" is still of ten applied to them.

  • This arch appears on Roman coins from Augustus to Commodus; according to Pausanias it bore two four-horse chariots, one driven by Helios and the other by Phaethon, his son, all in gilded bronze.

  • His arguments and exhortations may be gathered from many of his epistles and from his tract Adversus Helvidium, in which he defends the perpetual virginity of Mary against Helvidius, who maintained that she bore children to Joseph.

  • It bore a considerable part in the national risings of 1848-1859 against Austrian rule.

  • The Prussian cavalry promptly bore away to cover to the westward, and reported what they had seen to superior authority, but not to the advanced guard of the 5th infantry division, which, emerging in its turn from the defile, ran right against the deployed French infantry moving to meet them.

  • His first wife bore Bela two sons, Emerich and Andrew.

  • This army engaged the Royalists under Prince Rupert at Marston Moor, and Leslie bore a particularly distinguished part in the battle.

  • At first the English were to windward and they bore down with Rear-Admiral John Lawson in command of the van.

  • On the ist the Dutch van, under Cornelius van Tromp, bore the brunt of the English attack.

  • The French, with more recklessness than was usual with them in later times, bore down on their enemy courageously but in some disorder.

  • Operations On Land The contemporary military history of Europe included, first, the war between France and Spain, 1654-59, usually called the Spanish Fronde, of which the most notable incident was the great battle of the Dunes fought on the 14th of June 1658 between the French and English under Turenne and the Spaniards under Conde, in which a contingent of Cromwell's soldiers bore a conspicuous part.

  • I), of uniform bore, terminating in a cup PE, the mouth of which can be rendered airtight by the plate of glass E.

  • In 1502 Machiavelli married Marietta Corsini, who bore him several children, with whom, in spite of his own infidelities, he lived on good terms, and who survived him twenty-six years.

  • In 1543 he had been married to his cousin Mary of Portugal, who bore him a son, the unhappy Don Carlos, and who died in 1545.

  • He bore the acute agony of the disease which killed him with manly patience, and he died piously at the Escorial on the 13th of September 1598.

  • Her two sons, at their dying father's request, were entrusted to the guardianship of Augustus, to whom she bore no children.

  • His wife Maria Theresa bore him children but there was no community of.

  • In other words, it has been taken over from pre-existing material - either Christian or Jewish - and the materials of which it is composed are ultimately derived from non-Jewish sources - either Babylonian, Greek or Egyptian - and bore therein very different meanings from those which belong to them in their present connexion.

  • Doubtless there were many who bore the name of John in the early Christian communities; we read, for instance, of ` John, whose surname was Mark,' and there may have been a second John in Asia, since at Ephesus, we are told, there were two tombs said to be John's..

  • He bore a prominent part in the council of Trent, 1562-1563.

  • i bore is commenced at the dip, and reaches a seam of coal A, at 40 fathoms; at this depth it is considered proper to remove nearer to the outcrop so that lower strata may be bored into at a less depth, and a second bore is commenced.

  • bore No.

  • But there is generally a certain depth of alluvial cover which requires to be deducted, and which we call a fathoms, then (40 - 3 =37)X 8 = 296 fathoms; or say 286 fathoms is the distance that the second bore should be placed to the rise of the first, so as to have, for certain, the seam of coal A in clear connexion with the seam of coal B.

  • In bore No.

  • This derangement being carefully noted, another bore to the outcrop on the same principle is put down for the purpose of proving the seam C; the nature of the strata at first is found to agree with the latter part of that bored through in No.

  • 2 Many of these portraits bore inscriptions, the most famous of which was Turgot's line, " Eripuit fulmen coelo sceptrumque tyrannis."

  • She bore him two children, one a son, Francis Folger, " whom I have seldom since seen equal'd in everything, and whom to this day [thirty-six years after the child's death] I cannot think of without a sigh," who died (1736) when four years old of small-pox, not having been inoculated; the other was Sarah (1744-1808), who married Richard Bache (1737-1811), Franklin's successor in 1776-1782 as postmastergeneral.

  • Speranski's labours also bore fruit in the constitutions granted by Alexander to Finland and Poland.

  • The earthworks, commanding a ford of the river, are apparently of very early date, and probably bore a castle from Norman times.

  • The country on Portal's arrival bore every mark of prosperity and revival.

  • He subjected Talleyrand to violent reproaches, which the ex-minister bore with his usual ironical calm.

  • Under the later Roman Empire the city dwindled into a mere village, which since the 6th century bore the Slavonic name of Goritza.

  • To this journal Bain contributed many important articles and discussions; and in fact he bore the whole expenses of it till Robertson, owing to ill-health, resigned the editorship in 1891, when it passed into other hands.

  • Brittany, belonged in early times to a house which bore its name, and of which the eldest branch became extinct in the 13th century in the Chabot family.

  • The state, however, bore her full part in the war, and much of its naval success was due to her sailors.

  • SIGHTS, the name for mechanical appliances for directing the axis of the bore of a gun or other firearm on a point whose position relative to the target fired at is such that the projectile will strike the target.

  • In a vacuum, the projectile acted on by the force of projection begins to fall under the action of gravity immediately it leaves the bore, and under the combined action of these two forces the path of the projectile is a parabola.

  • AG is the axis of the bore, ab the dispart, A'DG' is parallel to AG.

  • This is called " quadrant elevation," and the proper inclination was given by means of the " gunner's quadrant," a quadrant and plumb bob, one leg being made long to rest in the bore, or by bringing lines scribed on the breech of the gun in line with a pointer on the carriage; these were called " quarter sights."

  • It had already reached the edge of the Ligny battlefield when the counter-order arrived, and conceiving that he was still under Marshal Ney (for the officer who bore the pencil-note directing Ney to detach Quatre Bras.

  • when passing the promontory which bore her name (the Punta Campanella at Sorrento).

  • " They bore witness to the loss of the true idea of the Christian church," though they did not avail to restore it.

  • He belonged to the leading family of Palmyra, which bore, in token of Roman citizenship, the gentilicium of Septimius; hence his full name was Septimius Odainath (Vogue, Syrie centrale, Nos.

  • This great fortress was taken by assault, in which Serbian troops bore a part, during the last days of March, and a second armistice was arranged soon afterwards.

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