Bordeaux sentence example

bordeaux
  • This here is Chauncey Bordeaux.
    3
    1
  • Bordeaux dismounted, surveying the camp, landscape and men in one rolling glance.
    2
    0
  • Davis was watching Bordeaux intently with an unreadable expression.
    2
    0
  • Bordeaux, this saucy little peach is Cassie Rinehart.
    2
    0
  • I don't think she's as impressed with your hunting skills as you are, Bordeaux.
    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • Cassie glanced sharply at Bordeaux.
    1
    0
  • Bordeaux was retrieving the rabbits from the sand.
    0
    0
  • One thing was obvious about Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux, this is Casey Fritz, Hank Royce, and John Davis.
    0
    0
  • Apparently Pete wasn't concerned about Bordeaux getting lost.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Her thoughts turned to Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Her voice trailed off as realized he was talking to Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux studied the dust through a pair of field glasses.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux lowered the glasses and shrugged in a way that was both elegant and masculine.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux slung a long leg around his saddle horn and tucked the glasses into his saddlebag.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The captain chewed on his mustache and eyed Bordeaux thoughtfully.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux casually lifted his gaze to the captain.
    0
    0
  • The captain glanced at Pete and then addressed Bordeaux again.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux was watching her in a way that brought color to her cheeks again.
    0
    0
  • Pete squinted up at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Had he hired Bordeaux?
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux turned his mount to walk beside her.
    0
    0
  • She peered out from under her wagon and found the smiling face of Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Maybe Bordeaux had already talked to him.
    0
    0
  • She shrugged and glanced at Bordeaux, who was approaching the fire.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • She handed Bordeaux a plate full of flapjacks she had been keeping warm by the fire and poured some honey over the top.
    0
    0
  • I thought maybe you were sick this morning when I saw Bordeaux harnessing your mules.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux lifted a quizzical brow.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux helped her up on her wagon seat and she smiled down at him.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux jumped back as her wagon moved to catch up with the others.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • If she encouraged Bordeaux, the others would think the door was open.
    0
    0
  • Of course, Bordeaux wasn't part of the group.
    0
    0
  • If Bordeaux was around, he kept out of sight.
    0
    0
  • Wherever Bordeaux was, he was probably more comfortable than the rest of them.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux sat on his horse, looking genuinely surprised at her reaction.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • By the time Bordeaux returned with the cut up snakes, she had lard sizzling in a large skillet.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux's shadowy form materialized out of the darkness.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux stepped forward, and before she had time to protest, he swept her up and deposited her on the back of the bay.
    0
    0
  • She misjudged the distance in the dark and landed on Bordeaux's foot.
    0
    0
  • Maybe it was Bordeaux.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • She glanced at Bordeaux, who was squatting near the fire, putting his breakfast away.
    0
    0
  • Noticing Bordeaux was the only one who didn't have coffee, she poured another cup and handed it to him.
    0
    0
  • They thought she was setting her cap for Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • She glanced quickly at Bordeaux, who was giving his coffee undue attention.
    0
    0
  • Did Bordeaux think she was flirting?
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Bordeaux's eyes twinkled and a wry smile tugged at the corner of his mouth.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux was the closest thing she'd had to a friend in a long time... other than Pete, of course.
    0
    0
  • But Bordeaux had a sense of humor that sought and found her own.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux was stretched on the sand outside the firelight, leaning on one elbow while he ate.
    0
    0
  • Both Fritz and Royce laughed, but Davis and Pete glanced sharply at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Did you see something today that we should know about, Bordeaux?
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux stood and moved around the fire, careful to keep outside the circle of light.
    0
    0
  • Davis glanced sharply up at her and then at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Obviously they all thought she was leaving with Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux, are you going to throw in with the Army again?
    0
    0
  • That was where she had seen Bordeaux!
    0
    0
  • The photo was fuzzy and the boy was young, but the eyes - she was sure it was Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Pete frowned at Bordeaux, who was carefully stacking the plates.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux didn't look up when he replied.
    0
    0
  • It wasn't merely chance that Bordeaux had found her.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux seemed to be at a loss for words.
    0
    0
  • It was all a ploy to get the ranch, and Bordeaux was right in the middle.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux wasn't giving up easily.
    0
    0
  • But Bordeaux was ready.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux pushed to his feet and moved away from her, careful not to make any sudden movements that might be misinterpreted.
    0
    0
  • She snatched the whip from the ground and glared at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Davis kept his eyes and gun on Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Much as she was tempted to punish him, Bordeaux wasn't guilty of what Davis thought.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux picked his hat off the ground and dusted himself off.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux watched her silently for a moment.
    0
    0
  • Where did her father get the money to pay Bordeaux?
    0
    0
  • She pored herself a cup and started breakfast, wondering where Bordeaux was.
    0
    0
  • She clamped her mouth shut and watched Bordeaux mount his bay.
    0
    0
  • She knew by the way he rode that it was Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • She glanced up as Bordeaux stopped beside her.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux filled the canteen and headed into the sand again.
    0
    0
  • Cassie, if things get rough, you find Bordeaux and stay with him.
    0
    0
  • She watched the dunes anxiously for Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Her feelings for Bordeaux had become more than mere friendship.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux was still out there somewhere.
    0
    0
  • And yet, Pete had told her to seek out Bordeaux if something happened.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux hit the sand on his feet, a rifle in his hands.
    0
    0
  • Oblivious to her frozen stare, his black eyes fixed on Bordeaux as he dashed for cover.
    0
    0
  • Gentle hands lifted her from the ground, and she buried her face in Bordeaux's chest, sobbing.
    0
    0
  • We could take two wagons, but that would mean we'd have to travel slow, and there wouldn't be any animals for riding except Bordeaux's horse.
    0
    0
  • He glanced at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux took a sip of coffee, considering the possibilities.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux stared at him.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux shook his head.
    0
    0
  • Cassie had to smile when Bordeaux positioned himself in a spot less than ten feet from her and pretended to settle down for the night.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux helped her into the saddle and then mounted one of the mules.
    0
    0
  • Everyone was supposed to ride out in a different direction, but Bordeaux never left her side.
    0
    0
  • That was probably why Bordeaux had instructed each of them to take a separate direction.
    0
    0
  • She wanted to talk to Bordeaux about it, but they were moving so fast that conversation was impossible.
    0
    0
  • As Cassie mounted, she frowned at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • She shuddered as she urged the bay closer to Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • She moved closer to Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • A month ago she would have said she might never marry, and yet it had crossed her mind a number of times since she met Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • But Bordeaux was an unusually good-looking man - and that spelled trouble.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux took her hand in his and she gazed up into his solemn features.
    0
    0
  • As they approached, Royce eyed Bordeaux with a smirk.
    0
    0
  • You want to lend me them glasses, Bordeaux?
    0
    0
  • But if they thought she and Bordeaux were engaged, the matter would be closed.
    0
    0
  • He fixed inquiring eyes on Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux picked up his saddle.
    0
    0
  • She rolled over and glanced at Bordeaux, who seemed to be resting comfortably.
    0
    0
  • How would they fit into Bordeaux's plans?
    0
    0
  • Cassie glanced at Bordeaux, who was watching the horizon apprehensively.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux glanced at her lips and smiled.
    0
    0
  • Could Bordeaux resist temptation - and if not, would he expect forgiveness from her?
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux paused beside Pete and spoke to him for a moment before he strolled over to join Cassie.
    0
    0
  • Cassie tugged at Bordeaux's sleeve.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux paused and lit the lantern.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux tugged her away from the entrance.
    0
    0
  • In any case, Bordeaux slipped a comforting arm around her shoulders.
    0
    0
  • She leaned against Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • If Bordeaux hadn't caught her, she would have fallen.
    0
    0
  • Where was Bordeaux - and the lamp?
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux lay against her back, one arm around her waist and one leg thrown carelessly over hers.
    0
    0
  • Pete would expect Bordeaux to take care of her.
    0
    0
  • If anything happens, find Bordeaux and stay with him.
    0
    0
  • If Pete had that much faith in Bordeaux, he had good reason.
    0
    0
  • She glanced up at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux smiled down at her.
    0
    0
  • She forced her eyes open to find Bordeaux's face above her.
    0
    0
  • Her whispered calls for Bordeaux received no response so she felt around in the darkness.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux would be back.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux wouldn't have left her unless he felt she was safe, she was sure of that.
    0
    0
  • How far had Bordeaux carried her?
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux said it was north of Ashley, or was it north of the desert?
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux clamped a hand over her mouth before she could speak.
    0
    0
  • She stared up at Bordeaux, whose attention was focused on the rock above them.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux frowned and then his jaw tightened.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux was leading his horse.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux lead the horse out of the ravine and behind a slab of rock.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux had been leading the horse along the ravine to spare its hooves, but it had been a risk that hadn't paid off.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux pulled the saddle off and rubbed him down with the blanket.
    0
    0
  • Cassie glanced at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux nodded and removed his hat, wiping sweat from the band.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux cupped a hand over its muzzle, silencing the horse.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux stepped from behind the rock and called to the Indians.
    0
    0
  • Then he motioned to the others and pointed up at Bordeaux, speaking in guttural tones.
    0
    0
  • The only word she understood was Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux led his horse down the embankment and Cassie hesitantly followed.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux helped her down the hill and they joined the Indians.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux urged the bay after them.
    0
    0
  • Cassie leaned sideways and looked up at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Cassie cringed against Bordeaux and clutched the arm that encircled her waist.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux whispered in her ear.
    0
    0
  • The old Indian gripped Bordeaux's arm and nodded, his mouth working into a snaggletoothed grin.
    0
    0
  • After what seemed like hours, but probably wasn't more than thirty minutes in the hot sun, Bordeaux stood.
    0
    0
  • She turned her back on Bordeaux and pulled her shirt from her pants, unbuttoning it so that the water could reach the sweat stained area under her breasts.
    0
    0
  • That night they slept under the stars - Bordeaux a respectable distance from her, but close enough to assist if anything went wrong in the night.
    0
    0
  • She glanced at the spot where Bordeaux had slept, but he was gone.
    0
    0
  • She filled the canteens and started back to camp, pausing when Bordeaux emerged from the bushes below.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux smiled and said something in return.
    0
    0
  • As she watched, Bordeaux glanced up and met her gaze.
    0
    0
  • She slid down the rock and joined them, casting a sour look at Bordeaux as she brushed by him.
    0
    0
  • Cassie glanced back at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux turned her to face him.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux said nothing was going on and he had never given her reason to think he was anything but truthful.
    0
    0
  • They were served a kind of pancake that Bordeaux said was made from ground Mesquite beans.
    0
    0
  • In dry gourds, they were served a hot tea made from the ground leaves of something Bordeaux called the lip fern.
    0
    0
  • Breakfast over, Bordeaux saddled his horse and pulled the field glasses from his saddlebag.
    0
    0
  • Pete allowed as how Bordeaux would take care of you.
    0
    0
  • We let Bordeaux's horse loose a ways down the trail, hopin' he'd find it.
    0
    0
  • I thought Bordeaux said it wasn't far.
    0
    0
  • Their food arrived about the same time as Pete and Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Pete and Davis had searched for Cassie and Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Even Bordeaux seemed to be in good spirits.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux grinned and tossed her a key.
    0
    0
  • Did Bordeaux actually love her or was it a contrived affair to get her back to the ranch?
    0
    0
  • As he had promised, Bordeaux was demanding a decision to his proposal of marriage.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux might not want to take them into their home.
    0
    0
  • What if Bordeaux bought it?
    0
    0
  • Was that what Bordeaux had in mind?
    0
    0
  • She knew little about Bordeaux except that she loved him.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux wasn't like her father, and it wasn't fair to keep comparing them.
    0
    0
  • The decision made, she left the room to find Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux had one arm wrapped fondly around the shoulders of a saloon girl.
    0
    0
  • The girl turned to face Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux lifted her chin in his hand.
    0
    0
  • A side-glance led her gaze to the startled eyes of Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • But if Bordeaux wasn't a Mormon, why would he propose to two women in one day?
    0
    0
  • Did Bordeaux feel pressured into marrying the girl - to save her reputation?
    0
    0
  • No, Bordeaux had only one reason for wanting to marry Cassie - the ranch.
    0
    0
  • Not the way you love Bordeaux?
    0
    0
  • How could she have fallen in love with Bordeaux, knowing how unfaithful men could be?
    0
    0
  • No wonder Bordeaux was so taken with her.
    0
    0
  • So, Bordeaux had coerced her to meet him at the church after all.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux was a persuasive man with a tendency to move fast - apparently not only with women.
    0
    0
  • Maybe Bordeaux would stay with this woman.
    0
    0
  • So, Bordeaux had told Darcie about the ranch.
    0
    0
  • Did Darcie think that she had gone because of Bordeaux?
    0
    0
  • Judging by the conversation she had overheard yesterday between Darcie and Bordeaux, the woman had lived through quite an experience of her own.
    0
    0
  • For Bordeaux, the experience made him valuable.
    0
    0
  • Well, Bordeaux was just the man to help her forget it - if he'd only dedicate his attentions to Darcie.
    0
    0
  • She wanted to hate Bordeaux for what he had done, but like a shameless hussy, she still longed to hear his voice - feel his touch.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux had found what he wanted and claimed his prize.
    0
    0
  • Right now she didn't want to think about Bordeaux or her father.
    0
    0
  • She tried not to think of Bordeaux, instead focusing her attention on the twins and what she was going to say to her father.
    0
    0
  • Would Bordeaux be there?
    0
    0
  • Why did every thought train follow the tracks to Bordeaux?
    0
    0
  • Glancing up, she found herself staring into the eyes of Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux shook his head as he stepped down from the buggy.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux shrugged and glanced down at Darcie.
    0
    0
  • Cassie clung to the seat to keep from falling out of the lurching buggy as Bordeaux took them out of town at a run.
    0
    0
  • She glared at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux kept his eyes on the road.
    0
    0
  • Timmy beamed up at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • There was no point in telling them that riding with Bordeaux hadn't been her idea.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux said he couldn't get you to come back with him, but I guess he was wrong.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux was watching her, probably wondering what she would do next.
    0
    0
  • She glanced at Bordeaux, who was watching her expectantly.
    0
    0
  • Besides, he did come back Cassie could feel Bordeaux's intent gaze.
    0
    0
  • Cassie glanced up at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux shook his head, his gaze fixed on her face.
    0
    0
  • Cassie tore her gaze from Bordeaux and fixed her father with a level look.
    0
    0
  • I told Bordeaux if he wanted to buy it, he'd have to talk to you.
    0
    0
  • She caught her breath and turned on Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Darcie Bordeaux was his sister?
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux jerked the buggy to a halt.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux pulled the team off the road, following a trail off through the pasture.
    0
    0
  • Pete hugged her and looked at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux slipped an arm around her waist.
    0
    0
  • Afterward they moved Darcie's things to Bordeaux's ranch.
    0
    0
  • After studying the arts at Toulouse and law at Orleans and Bologna, he became a canon at Bordeaux and then vicar-general to his brother the archbishop of Lyons, who in 1294 was created cardinal bishop of Albano.
    0
    0
  • At Bordeaux Bertrand was formally notified of his election and urged to come to Italy; but he caused his coronation to take place at Lyons on the 14th of November 1305.
    0
    0
  • To the maritime ports mentIoned above must be added the river pcsrts of Bayonne (on the Adour), Bordeaux (on the Garonne), Nantes (on the Loire), Rouen (on the Seine).
    0
    0
  • The greatest number of Jews is to be found at Paris, Lyons and Bordeaux, while the departments of the centre and of the south along the range of the Cvennes, where Calvinism flourishes, are the principal Protestant localities, Nimes being the most important centre.
    0
    0
  • The Jewish parishes, called synagogues, are grouped into departmental consistories (Paris, Bordeaux, Nancy, Marseilles, Bayonne, Lille, Vesoul, Besancon and three in Algeria).
    0
    0
  • It is grown largely in the departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais and in those of the Seine basin, the southern limit of its cultivation being roughly a line drawn from Bordeaux to Lyons.
    0
    0
  • The state railways served a large portion of western France, their chief lines being from Nantes via La Rochelle to Bordeaux, and from Bordeauxvia Saintes, Niort and Saumur to Chartres.
    0
    0
  • The Orleans, running from Paris to Orleans, and thence serving Bordeaux via Tours, Poitiers and Angoulflme, Nantes via Tours and Angers, and Montauban and Toulouse via Vierzon and Limoges.
    0
    0
  • The Midi (Southern) has lines radiating from Toulouse to Bordeaux via Agen, to Bayonne via Tarbes and Pau, and to Cette via Carcassonne, Narbonne and Bziers.
    0
    0
  • From Bordeaux there is also a direct line to Bayonne and Irun (for Madrid), and at the other end of the Pyrenees a line leads from Narbonne to Perpignan and Barcelona.
    0
    0
  • Other schools are the school of naval medicine at Bordeaux with annexes at Toulon, Brest and Rochefort; schools of torpedoes and mines and of gunnery at Toulon, &c., &c. The coles dhydro graphic established at various ports are for theoretical training for the higher grades of the merchant service.
    0
    0
  • Examples of such bodies are the Society for Elementary Instruction the Polytechnic Association, the Philotechnic Association and the French Union of the Young at Paris; the Philomathic Society of Bordeaux; the Popular Education Society at Havre; the Rhone Society of Pro-, fessional Instruction at Lyons; the Industrial Society of Amiens and others.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux, the French envoy in England, wrote that, in spite of the severe laws, the Romanists received better treatment under the Protectorate than under any other government.
    0
    0
  • He held several minor philosophical lectureships, and from 1864 was professor of philosophy at the lycees of Douai, Montpellier and Bordeaux successively.
    0
    0
  • The quality, too, owing to bad weather at the time of vintage, was not good; Italian wine, indeed, never is sufficiently good to compete with the best wines of other countries, especially France (thotigh there is more opening for Italian wines of the Bordeaux and,Burgundy type); nor will many kinds of it stand keeping, partly owing to their natural qualities and partly to the insufficient care devoted to their preparation.
    0
    0
  • When, however, he was again attacked by Charles Martel, the Saracens renewed their ravages, and Odo was defeated near Bordeaux; he was compelled to crave protection from Charles, who took up this struggle and gained his momentous victory at Poitiers in 732.
    0
    0
  • Joseph Maxwell, of Bordeaux, has published accounts 8 of raps and movements of objects without contact, witnessed with private and other mediums, which he appears to have observed with care, though he does not describe the conditions sufficiently for others to form any independent judgment about them.
    0
    0
  • He was forced to abandon all attempts at reconquest, but proposed to decide the question by single combat between himself and Peter, to take place at Bordeaux under English protection.
    0
    0
  • Elected to the National Assembly, he retired from Bordeaux with Henri Rochefort and others until such time as the "parricidal" vote for peace should be annulled.
    0
    0
  • This sacrifice of territory was afterwards ratified by the National Assembly at Bordeaux, though not without a protest from the representatives of the departments about to be given up; and thus Alsace once more became German.
    0
    0
  • As a preventive repeated spraying with dilute Bordeaux mixture is recommended, during the flowering season and early development of the fruit.
    0
    0
  • To continue the strife when Wellington was firmly established on the line of the Garonne, and Lyons and Bordeaux had hoisted the Bourbonfleur de lys, was seen by all but Napoleon to be sheer madness; but it needed the pressure of his marshals in painful interviews at Fontainebleau to bring him to reason.
    0
    0
  • Judicially it was under the authority of the parlement of Bordeaux; for financial purposes it was part of the generalite of Montauban.
    0
    0
  • The revolt at Bordeaux, supported as it was by material aid from Spain, gave him the opportunity of at once serving his country and gratifying his long-cherished hatred of the Spaniards.
    0
    0
  • Graillot of the University of Bordeaux, member of the French School of Rome, but after two weeks' work was suspended by order of the Italian government, and then resumed under the supervision of their own officials.
    0
    0
  • Through its excellent water communication it affords an outlet for the agricultural produce of the district, and forms an entrepot of trade between Bordeaux and Toulouse.
    0
    0
  • From St Sever Soult turned eastwards to Aire, where he covered the roads to Bordeaux and Toulouse.
    0
    0
  • Beresford, with 12,000 men, was now sent to Bordeaux, which opened its gates as promised to the Allies.
    0
    0
  • Its principal imports are coffee (of which it is the greatest continental market), tea, sugar, spices, rice, wine (especially from Bordeaux), lard (from Chicago), cereals, sago, dried fruits, herrings, wax (from Morocco and Mozambique), tobacco, hemp, cotton (which of late years shows a large increase), wool, skins, leather, oils, dyewoods, indigo, nitrates, phosphates and coal.
    0
    0
  • It lies, amidst a network of canals, immediately to the west and south of its port, which disputes with Bordeaux the rank of third in importance in France.
    0
    0
  • In 1272 it was the first of the towns of Guyenne to join the confederation headed by Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • After his death she went through various adventures recorded in her memoirs, first published at Bordeaux in 1815.
    0
    0
  • In 1814 they took an active part in the royalist movement in and about Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Campardon, Le Tribunal revolutionnaire de Paris (Paris, 2nd ed., 2 vols., 1866); C. Berriat SaintPrix, La Justice revolutionnaire a Paris, Bordeaux, Brest, Lyon, Nantes, .
    0
    0
  • For the next few months he remained comparatively quiet, but on the 23rd of September 1793, he was sent with Claude Alexandre Ysabeau (1754-1831) on his mission to Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • From Campania Paulinus returned to his native place and came into correspondence or personal intimacy with men like Martin of Tours and Ambrose of Milan, and ultimately (about 389) he was formally received into the church by bishop Delphinus of Bordeaux, whence shortly afterwards he withdrew with his wife beyond the Pyrenees.
    0
    0
  • The late Charlemagne romances originated the legends, in English form, of Sowdone of Babylone, Sir Otnel, Sir Fieumbras and Huon of Bordeaux (in which Oberon, the king of the fairies, the son of Julius Caesar and Morgan the Fay, was first made known to England).
    0
    0
  • He succeeded in escaping and lived for a time in Strassburg, Paris - where for several months he was Heine's secretary - and Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Towards the middle of the 4th century we have Decimus Magnus Ausonius, a professor of Bordeaux and afterwards consul (379), whose style is as little like that of classical poetry as is his prosody.
    0
    0
  • During his confinement there was found among his papers a criticism upon the Jesuits, which was printed after his death as Discursus de erroribus qui in forma gubernationis societatis Jesu occurrunt (Bordeaux, 1625), and was reprinted by order of Charles III.
    0
    0
  • In 1371 the Black Prince came back to England with broken health, and in 1373 John of Lancaster marched to little purpose through France, from Calais to Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • By it the only important possessions remaining in English hands were Calais, Bordeaux, Bayonne and Brest.
    0
    0
  • At Bordeaux his Universal Tables on Dialling were constructed; and in London he was admitted to the meetings of Robert Boyle, Robert Hooke and other learned and scientific men.
    0
    0
  • Appointed president of the parlement of Bordeaux in 1630, he soon resigned to accept an embassy to Italy, where he was one of the signatories of the treaty of Cherasco and of the treaties with the duke of Savoy (1631-1632).
    0
    0
  • From 1858 to 1863 there were many importations of American vines for grafting purposes to Bordeaux, Roquemaure and other parts of France, England, Ireland, Germany, Portugal, &c. It is practically certain that the deadly phylloxera was imported on these plants.
    0
    0
  • In 1866 a second centre of infection made its appearance near Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • The wars of Charlemagne with his vassals are described in Girart de Roussillon, Renaus de Montauban, recounting the deeds of the four sons of Aymon, Huon de Bordeaux, and in the latter part of the Chevalerie Ogier, which belong properly to the cycle connected with Doon of Mayence.
    0
    0
  • He studied law, and at the outbreak of the Revolution was an advocate of the parlement of Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Cremieux published a Recueil of his political cases (1869), and the Actes de la delegation de Tours et de Bordeaux (2 vols., 1871).
    0
    0
  • He finally forced his way with provisions and reinforcements into Rennes, which he successfully defended till June 1357, when the siege was raised in pursuance of the truce of Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Grand and Little Bassam are in regular communication by steamer with Bordeaux, Marseilles, Liverpool, Antwerp and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Montaigne is not far from Bordeaux, with which the Eyquem family had for some time been connected.
    0
    0
  • Pierre Eyquem, Montaigne's father, had been engaged in commerce (a herring-merchant Scaliger calls him, and his grandfather Ramon had certainly followed that trade), had filled many municipal offices in Bordeaux, and had served under Francis I.
    0
    0
  • These details of his education (which, like most else that is known about him, come from his own mouth) are not only interesting in themselves, but remind the reader how, not far from the same time, Rabelais, the other leading writer of French during the Renaissance, was exercising himself, though not being exercised, in plans of education almost as fantastic. At six years old Montaigne was sent to the college de Guienne at Bordeaux, then at the height of its reputation.
    0
    0
  • In 1548 he was at Bordeaux during one of the frequent riots caused by the gabelle, or salt-tax.
    0
    0
  • Six years afterwards, having attained his majority, he was made a counsellor in the Bordeaux parlement.
    0
    0
  • In 1565 he married Frangoise de la Chassaigne, whose father was, like himself, a member of the Bordeaux parlement.
    0
    0
  • There he received news of his election as mayor of Bordeaux with a peremptory royal endorsement enjoining residence, and after some time journeyed homewards.
    0
    0
  • It was his business, if not exactly his duty, to preside at the formal election of his successor, the marechal de Matignon; but there was a severe pestilence in Bordeaux, and Montaigne writes to the jurats of that town, in one of the few undoubtedly authentic letters which we possess, to the effect that he will leave them to judge whether his presence at the election is so necessary as to make it worth his while to expose himself to the danger of going into the town in its then condition, "which is specially dangerous for men coming from a good air, as he does."
    0
    0
  • He was buried, though not till some months after his death, in a church in Bordeaux, which after some vicissitudes became the chapel of the college.
    0
    0
  • Mme de Montaigne gave her a copy of the edition of 1588 annotated copiously; at the same time, apparently, she bestowed another copy, also annotated by the author, on the convent of the Feuillants in Bordeaux, to which the church in which his remains lay was attached.
    0
    0
  • But when she had got this to press she sent the proofs to Bordeaux, where a poet of some note, Pierre de Brach, revised them with the other annotated copy.
    0
    0
  • Buzot was outlawed, and fled to the neighbourhood of Bordeaux, and committed suicide in the woods of St Emilion on the 18th of June 1794.
    0
    0
  • Incidentally they prove, too, that the sentiment of France was for the time against the Girondists, who were proscribed even in their chief centre, the city of Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Some remnants of the Boii are mentioned as dwelling near Bordeaux; but Mommsen inclines to the opinion that the three groups (in Bordeaux, Bohemia and the Po districts) were not really scattered branches of one and the same stock, but that they are instances of a mere similarity of name.
    0
    0
  • On the dissolution of the Assembly in November, he was arrested and banished to France, where he lived in exile near Bordeaux till, in 1829, he was permitted to return to Brazil.
    0
    0
  • The general state of learning in this century is illustrated by Ausonius (c. 310-393), the grammarian and rhetorician of Bordeaux, the author of the Mosella, and the probable inspirer of the memorable decree of Gratian (376), providing for the appointment and the payment of teachers of rhetoric and of Greek and Latin literature in the principal cities of Gaul.
    0
    0
  • An interest in Latin literature lived longest in Gaul, where schools of learning flourished as early as the 1st century at Autun, Lyons, Toulouse, Nimes, Vienne, Narbonne and Marseilles; and, from the 3rd century onwards, at Trier, Poitiers, Besancon and Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • The Gallic leuga, or league, is a different unit, being 1.59 British miles by the very concordant itinerary of the Bordeaux pilgrim.
    0
    0
  • The utility of such logarithms was first pointed out by Leonelli in a book entitled Supplement logarithmique, printed at Bordeaux in the year XI.
    0
    0
  • These and other early monographs on the Tertiary shells of the Paris basin, of the environs of Bordeaux, and of the sub-Apennine formations of Italy, brought out the striking distinctness of these faunas from each other and from other molluscan faunas.
    0
    0
  • Thus, in a French pseudo-historic romance, Les Faits des Romains (c. 1223), he receives the honour of a bishopric. His name was not usually associated with the marvellous, and the trouvere of Huon de Bordeaux outstepped the usual sober tradition when he made Oberon the son of Julius Caesar and Morgan la Fay.
    0
    0
  • Here also he wrote a long poem against commerce, which he produced as an exposition of his opinions when, on his return to England, his father announced his intention of placing him in a commercial house at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • The statement that he was nominated archbishop of Bordeaux during the last year of life is unauthenticated by documentary evidence and is in itself extremely improbable.
    0
    0
  • Mares, Lourdes et ses environs (Bordeaux, 1894); Fourcade, L'Apparition de la grotte de Lourdes (Paris, 1862) and L'Apparition consideree au point de vue de fart chretien (Bordeaux, 1862); Boissarie, Lourdes, histoire medicale (Paris, 1891); Bertrin, Hist.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux [2], iv.
    0
    0
  • He was for many years principal of the Guienne College at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • His great work is his Commentarii in Organum Logicum Aristotelis (Bordeaux, 1618); the copy in the British Museum contains a number of highlyeulogistic poems in honour of Balfour, who is described as Graium aemulus acer.
    0
    0
  • He is said to have forced a British schooner, probably a privateer, which attacked him when on his way from Bordeaux to St Thomas, to strike, but he did not take possession.
    0
    0
  • On realizing the truth he hastily abdicated in favour of his grandson, the duke of Bordeaux (comte de Chambord), and appointed Louis Philippe, duke of Orleans, lieutenant-general of the kingdom (July 30th).
    0
    0
  • Peace being proclaimed, Wellington took leave of his army at Bordeaux, and returned to England, where he was received with extraordinary honours, created duke of Wellington, and awarded a fresh grant of £400,000.
    0
    0
  • He delivered a course of sermons at Angers, and in the next year passed to Bordeaux, where he formed a famous friendship with Montaigne.
    0
    0
  • In 1601 Charron published at Bordeaux his third and most remarkable work - the famous De la sagesse, a complete popular system of moral philosophy.
    0
    0
  • Elected by nine departments to the National Assembly meeting at Bordeaux (on the 1st of March 1871) he chose to sit for Strassburg, which by the terms of the treaty about to be submitted to the Assembly for ratification was to be ceded to Prussia, and when the treaty was adopted he resigned in protest and retired to Spain.
    0
    0
  • His orations at public meetings were more effective than those delivered in the Assembly, especially that made at Bordeaux on his return, and that at Grenoble on the 26th of November 1872, in which he spoke of political power having passed to les nouvelles couches sociales.
    0
    0
  • In April 1905 a monument by Dalou to his memory at Bordeaux was unveiled by President Loubet.
    0
    0
  • In May 1832 he hastened from Paris to see the duchess of Berry on her landing in the south of France for the purpose of organizing an insurrection in favour of her son, the duke of Bordeaux, since known as the Comte de Chambord.
    0
    0
  • But the French would not give battle, and though John marched from Calais right through Champagne, Burgundy and Auvergne, it was with disastrous results; only a shattered remnant of the host reached Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • Sigebert was anxious to avenge his sister-in-law, but on the intervention of Guntram, he accepted the compensation offered by Chilperic, namely the cities of Bordeaux, Cahors and Limoges, with Beam and Bigorre.
    0
    0
  • Their capital was Burdigala (Bordeaux), even then a place of considerable importance and a wine-growing centre.
    0
    0
  • The account of the " holy places " seen in Palestine by the Bordeaux pilgrim, just mentioned, occupies twelve pages in the translation of the Palestine Pilgrims' Text Society (in whose publications the records of these early travellers can most conveniently be studied): and those twelve pages may be reduced to seven or eight as they are printed with wide margins, and have many footnotes added by the editor.
    0
    0
  • Indeed the 19th 1 This comparison is made in full realization of the fact that the Bordeaux record is a dry catalogue, and that Fabri's work is swelled by the miscellaneous gossip and " padding " which makes it one of the most delightful books ever written in the middle ages.
    0
    0
  • Baeyer in 1890, by heating alizarin with fuming sulphuric acid for 24-48 hours at 35-40° C., obtained a product, which after treatment with caustic soda gave a sulphuric acid ester of quinalizarin, and this after acidification and boiling was converted into quinalizarin (Alizarin Bordeaux) or 1.2.6.9 tetra-oxyanthraquinone.
    0
    0
  • The Bolsa (exchange), custom-house, cathedral, and Cabildo are in the old town; the Bolsa is a copy of the Bordeaux exchange.
    0
    0
  • During the 14th and 15th centuries there was a regular trade with Bordeaux and Brittany, and complaints of piracies by Dartmouth men were frequent.
    0
    0
  • The Moslems beat Odo, gained possession of Bordeaux, and overran the whole of southern Gaul nearly as far as the Loire.
    0
    0
  • Duputy, president of the parlement of Bordeaux, with whom Vergniaud became acquainted, conceived the greatest admiration and affection for him and appointed him his secretary.
    0
    0
  • This, of course, naturally leads to the production of a wine somewhat different in character to that produced before the epidemic, but this difficulty may be overcome to some extent, as it was in the Bordeaux vineyards, by grafting ancient stock on the roots of new and resistant vines.
    0
    0
  • In this respect the famous Bordeaux or Gironde district is, perhaps, more fortunate than any other part of the world.
    0
    0
  • If France is the wine-growing country, par excellence, the Bordeaux district may be regarded as the heart and centre of the French wine industry.
    0
    0
  • The Medoc consists of a tongue of land to the north of Bordeaux, bounded by the Garonne and Gironde on the east, and by the sea on the west and north.
    0
    0
  • The quality of the Medoc red wines (and this applies also to some of the finer growths of the other Bordeaux districts) is radically different from that of wines similar in type grown in other parts of the world.
    0
    0
  • It is to this relatively large amount of body and absence of an excess of acid and of tannin that the peculiarly soft effect of the Bordeaux wines on the palate is due.
    0
    0
  • Most of the wines grown on a purely gravelly soil are termed " Graves," but there is a specific district of Graves which lies south of Bordeaux and west of the river, and extends as far as Graves.
    0
    0
  • It produces wines of a decidedly bigger type than those of the Medoc, and is frequently called the Burgundy of the Bordeaux district.
    0
    0
  • The Entre-deux-Mers district forms a peninsula between the Garonne and Dordogne, comprising the arrondissements of La Reole, the south of Libourne and the east of Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • After having taught Greek in the university for twelve months, he removed to Bordeaux, where he was soon appointed a regent in the college of Bergerac. He did not remain long at Bordeaux, but accepted the offer of a chair of philosophy at Sedan, where he passed two years.
    0
    0
  • He then returned to Bordeaux, and in the beginning of 1604 he was nominated one of the students of divinity who were maintained at the expense of the church, and who for the period of four years were at liberty to prosecute their studies in any Protestant seminary.
    0
    0
  • The same year he was recalled to Bordeaux, where he was appointed the colleague of Dr Primrose; and when Francis Gomarus was removed to Leiden, Cameron, in 1618, was appointed professor of divinity at Saumur, the principal seminary of the French Protestants.
    0
    0
  • He, however, was forced to leave Le Mans, and went probably to Poitiers and afterwards to Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • On several occasions St Bernard was begged to fight the innovator on the scene of his exploits, and in 1145, at the instance of the legate Alberic, cardinal bishop of Ostia, he set out, passing through the diocese of Angouleme and Limoges, sojourning for some time at Bordeaux, and finally reaching the heretical towns of Bergerac, Perigueux, Sarlat, Cahors and Toulouse.
    0
    0
  • At the age of eighteen he entered a business at Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • He probably came from Aginnum (Agen), in the south of France, in the territory of the Nitiobriges, and received his education in the rhetorical school of Burdigala (Bordeaux).
    0
    0
  • During this time Dunois in Guienne was taking Bordeaux and Bayonne.
    0
    0
  • Bordeaux capitulated on the 9th of October, and the Hundred Years' War was terminated by the expulsion of the English, who were by this time so fully occupied with the Wars of the Roses as to be unable to take the offensive against France anew.
    0
    0
  • Wine of fine quality is grown in the district and is the chief source of the commerce of the town, which is mainly carried on with Libourne and Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • The means of mitigating the damage done by this disease are (i) the selection of varieties found to resist its attacks; (2) the collection and destruction of diseased tubers so that none are left in the soil to become a menace to future crops; (3) care that no tubers showing traces of the disease are planted; (4) spraying with Bordeaux mixture at intervals from midsummer onwards.
    0
    0
  • The parasite may be held in check by spraying with Bordeaux mixture early in the season.
    0
    0
  • Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540-1609), the greatest scholar of modern times, was the tenth child and third son of Julius Caesar Scaliger and Andiette de Rogues Lobejac. Born at Agen in 1540, he was sent when twelve years of age, with two younger brothers, to the college of Guienne at Bordeaux, then under the direction of Jean Gelida.
    0
    0
  • Here they found Marc Antoine Muretus, who, when at Bordeaux and Toulouse, had been a great favourite and occasional visitor of Julius Caesar at Agen.
    0
    0
  • Thus were created successively the parlements of Toulouse, Grenoble, Bordeaux, Dijon, Rouen, Aix, Rennes, Pau, Metz, Douai,.
    0
    0
  • After the war of 1870-71 he was returned to the Bordeaux assembly by his old department - the Haute Vienne.
    0
    0
  • The pietra Jura work belongs to the Persian school; and the common belief that it was designed by Austin de Bordeaux, a French architect in the service of Shah Jahan, is probably incorrect.
    0
    0
  • On Clotaire's death in 561 his estates were divided between his sons, Charibert receiving Paris as his capital, together with Rouen, Tours, Poitiers, Limoges, Bordeaux and Toulouse.
    0
    0
  • In 1879 he became a professor at Bordeaux and in 1889 professor of medieval history at the Sorbonne; in 1895 he became a member of the Academie des sciences morales et politiques, where he obtained the Jean Reynaud prize just before his death on the 14th of November 1908.
    0
    0
  • Montluc's eminence above other soldiers of his day is due to his Commentaires de Messire Blaise de Montluc (Bordeaux, 1592), in which he described his fifty years of service (1521-1574).
    0
    0
  • The red wines of Moldavia, especially the brand known as Piscul Cerbului, resemble Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • About 1875-1876 he was at Rotterdam and Bordeaux.
    0
    0
  • That great bird'seye vision of Bordeaux which is in the Luxembourg dates from these years, and in these years he was at Rotterdam, the companion of Jongkind, with whom he had so much in common, but whose work, like his, free and fearless and unconventional, can never be said with accuracy to have seriously influenced his own.
    0
    0
  • He succeeded in escaping, first to Caen, where he organized the civil war, then to Saint-Emilion near Bordeaux, where he wrote his Memoires, which were published in 1822 by his son, and re-edited in 1866.
    0
    0
  • Discovered, he attempted to shoot himself, but was only wounded, and was taken to Bordeaux, where he was guillotined when his identity was established.
    0
    0
  • The kings of England were yet to reign at Bordeaux and Bayonne for two hundred and fifty years.
    0
    0
  • It was a different thing for John and his successors to undertake the long voyage to Bordeaux, around the stormy headlands of Brittany and across the Bay of Biscay.
    0
    0
  • Gascony being, as usual, out of hand, he crossed to Bordeaux in 1286, and abode in Guienne for no less than three years, reducing the duchy to such order as it had never known before, settling all disputed border questions with the new king of France, Philip IV., founding many new towns, and issuing many useful statutes and ordinances.
    0
    0
  • Its cause was simple; France was incomplete as long as the English king ruled at Bordeaux and Bayonne, and far up the valleys of the Garonne and the Adour.
    0