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borax

borax

borax Sentence Examples

  • Ruthenium sulphides are obtained when the metal is warmed with pyrites and some borax, and the fused mass treated with hydrochloric acid first in the cold and then hot.

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  • Among the principal varieties are those which contain carbolic acid and other ingredients of coal tar, salicylic acid, petroleum, borax, camphor, iodine, mercurial salts, sulphur and tannin.

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  • The deposits consist of soda, potash, borax and common salt.

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  • The dark product obtained is washed with water, hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid, and finally calcined again with the oxide or with borax, being protected from air during the operation by a layer of charcoal.

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  • Borax marshes are numerous in the west and south-west, but they are no longer commercially productive.

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  • Useful combinations are: borax 10%, carbolic acid 5%, ichthyol 5%, sublimed sulphur 10%, thymol 22%, &c.

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  • By the Nepal, Kumaon and Ladak routes go borax, gold and ponies.

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  • In borax (of which California's output in 1904 was 45,647 tons) and structural materials San Bernardino has a long lead.

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  • From a supersaturated aqueous solution of borax, the pentahydrate, Na2B407.5H20, is deposited when evaporation takes place at somewhat high temperatures.

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  • Cobalt salts may be readily detected by the formation of the black sulphide, in alkaline solution, and by the blue colour they produce when fused with borax.

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  • BORON (symbol B, atomic weight ii), one of the non-metallic elements, occurring in nature in the form of boracic (boric) acid, and in various borates such as borax, tincal,.

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  • Boron nitride BN is formed when boron is burned either in air or in nitrogen, but can be obtained more readily by heating to redness in a platinum crucible a mixture of one part of anhydrous borax with two parts of dry ammonium chloride.

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  • The atomic weight of boron has been determined by estimating the water content of pure borax (J.

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  • The methods of chemical analysis may be classified according to the type of reaction: (I) dry or blowpipe analysis, which consists in an examination of the substance in the dry condition; this includes such tests as ignition in a tube, ignition on charcoal in the blowpipe flame, fusion with borax, microcosmic salt or fluxes, and flame colorations (in quantitative work the dry methods are sometimes termed " dry assaying "); (2) wet analysis, in which a solution of the substance is treated with reagents which produce specific reactions when certain elements or groups of elements are present.

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  • Heat the substance with a bead of microcosmic salt or borax on a platinum wire in the oxidizing flame.

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  • Borax >>

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  • The trade of the city is principally in Bolivian products - mineral ores, alpaca wool, &c. - but it also receives and exports the products of the neighbouring Peruvian provinces, and the output of the borax deposits in the neighbourhood.

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  • The empire is rich in minerals, including gold, silver, lead, copper, iron, coal, mercury, borax, emery, zinc; and only capital is needed for successful exploitation.

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  • The borate, Pb 2 B 6 0 1 u 4H20, is obtained as a white precipitate by adding borax to a lead salt; this on heating with strong ammonia gives PbB2044H2.

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  • It may be obtained as jet black octahedra (isomorphous with thoria) by fusion with borax.

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  • Analysis.-A borax bead dissolves uranium oxides in the reducing flame with a green, in the oxidizing flame with a yellow, colour.

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  • From his committee he reported in April 1888 the "Mills Bill," which provided for a reduction of the duties on sugar, earthenware, glassware, plate glass, woollen goods and other articles, the substitution of ad valorem for specific duties in many cases, and the placing of lumber (of certain kinds), hemp, wool, flax, borax, tin plates, salt and other articles on the free list.

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  • Within these limits are to be found most of the minerals known - gold, silver, quicksilver, copper, lead, zinc, iron, manganese, wolfram, bismuth, thorium, vanadium; mica, coal, &c. On or near the coast are coal, salt, sulphur, borax, nitrates and petroleum.

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  • Sulphur deposits exist in the Sechura desert region, on the coast, and extensive borax deposits have been developed in the department of Arequipa.

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  • The mountainous region is rich in minerals, and there is a valuable deposit of borax near the capital, Arequipa.

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  • The nitrate and borax deposits are extensive and productive, and common salt is a natural product of large areas in the elevated desert regions of the Andes.

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  • The exports include copper and silver and their ores, nitrate of soda, borax, guano and other minerals in small quantities.

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  • The precipitated gold is washed, treated with salt and sulphuric acid to remove iron salts, roughly dried by pressing in cloths or on filter paper, and then melted with salt, borax and nitre in graphite crucibles.

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  • The precipitate is collected in a filter-press, and then roasted in muffle furnaces with nitre, borax and sodium carbonate.

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  • Zirconia can be obtained crystalline, in a form isomorphous with cassiterite and rutile, by fusing the amorphous modification with borax, and dissolving out with sulphuric acid.

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  • For sodium nitrite see Nitrogen; for sodium nitrate see Saltpetre; for the cyanide see Prussic Acid; and for the borate see Borax.

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  • The junction of the edges of the silver and copper-blend was treated with a flux of borax and the whole was submitted to the heat of a furnace until the silver was seen to be melting, when it was instantly removed, care being taken to avoid pressing upon the upper or lower surfaces, as the liquid silver in that case would have been squeezed out from between the two enclosing plates and the operation ruined.

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  • Glass and other sands and gravel ($13,270,032), lime ($11,091,186), phosphate rock ($10,653,558), salt ($7,553,632), natural mineral waters ($7,287,269), sulphur ($6,668,215, almost wholly from Louisiana), slate ($6,316,8 I7), gypsum ($4,138,560), clay ($2,599,986), asphalt ($1,888,881), talc and soapstone ($1,401,222), borax ($975,000, all from California), and pyrite ($857,113) were the next most important products in 1908.

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  • Chromium and its salts may be detected by the fact that they give a deep green bead when heated with borax, or that on fusion with sodium carbonate and nitre, a yellow mass of an alkaline chromate is obtained, which, on solution in water and acidification with acetic acid, gives a bright yellow precipitate on the addition of soluble lead salts.

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  • Like the other provinces of this region, Antofagasta produces for export copper, silver, silver ores, lead, nitrate of soda, borax and salt.

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  • It was first prepared by Wilhelm Homberg (1652-1715) from borax, by the action of mineral acids, and was given the name sal sedativum Hombergi.

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  • The free acid is found native in certain volcanic districts such as Tuscany, the Lipari Islands and Nevada, issuing mixed with steam from fissures in the ground; it is also found as a constituent of many minerals (borax, boracite, boronatrocalcite and colemanite).

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  • In small quantities, it may be prepared by the addition of concentrated sulphuric acid to a cold saturated solution of borax.

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  • The most important of the borates is sodium pyroborate or borax (q.v.).

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  • Borax and boracic acid are feeble but useful antiseptics.

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  • Borax taken internally is of some value in irritability of the bladder, but as a urinary antiseptic it is now surpassed by several recently introduced drugs, such as urotropine.

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  • Should now try non-decomposing bodies, as solid nitre, nitrate of silver, borax, glass, &c., whilst solid, to see if any internal state induced, which by decomposition is destroyed, i.e.

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  • Salt and borax exist in abundance in the western lake regions.

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  • The exportation of borax to India is only limited by the comparatively small demand.

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  • Borax is very frequently employed; it melts to a clear liquid and dissolves silica and many metallic oxides.

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  • Besides having a considerable share in the commerce of the port of New York, Bayonne is an important manufacturing centre; among its manufactures are refined petroleum, refined copper and nickel (not from the ore), refined borax, foundry and machine-shop products, tubular boilers, electric launches and electric motors, chemicals (including ammonia and sulphuric and nitric acids), iron and brass products, wire cables and silk goods.

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  • It is an amorphous white powder; but it may also be obtained in crystals isomorphous with cassiterite by heating the amorphous form with borax to a very high temperature.

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  • They may be recognized by the brownish violet colour they impart to a borax bead when heated in an oxidizing flame.

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  • Enormous quantities of borax, already exploited, and of nitrate of soda, are known to be present in the surrounding country, the former as almost pure borate of lime in Tertiary lake sediments.

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  • Gold, petroleum, copper, borax and its products, clays, quicksilver and silver lead, in order of importance, representing some fourfifths of the total.

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  • A crystalline form was obtained by Debray as olive-green prisms by igniting a mixture of sodium tungstate and carbonate in a current of hydrochloric acid gas, and by Nordenskjold by heating hydrated tungstic acid with borax.

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  • The water is bitter and undrinkable, being largely impregnated with carbonate and sulphate of soda with some borax.

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  • A solution of borax to act as a flux was brushed over the metal plate and thoroughly worked into its incised lines.

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  • Extensive deposits of borax and common salt have been found in the same region, which with several other products of these saline deposits, such as iodine, add considerably to its exports.

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  • 30, 1889) Baron Julius de Reuterin consideration of giving up the rights which he held by his concession obtained in I873became the owner of a concession for the formation of a Persian State Bank, with exclusive rights of issuing bank-notes and working the mines of iron, copper, lead, mercury, coal, petroleum, manganese, borax, and asbestos in Persia.

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  • BORAX (sodium pyroborate or sodium biborate), Na2B407, a substance which appears in commerce under two forms, namely "common" or prismatic borax, Na 2 B 4 O 7.10H 2 O, and "jewellers'" or octahedral borax, Na 2 B 4 O 7.5H 2 O.

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  • It is to be noted that the term "borax" was used by the alchemists in a very vague manner, and is therefore not to be taken as meaning the substance now specifically known by the name.

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  • The supply of borax is, however, mainly derived from the boric acid of Tuscany, which is fused in a reverberatory furnace with half its weight of sodium carbonate, and the mass after cooling is extracted with warm water.

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  • An alternative method is to dissolve sodium carbonate in lead-lined steamheated pans, and add the boric acid gradually; the solution then being concentrated until the borax crystallizes.

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  • Borax is also prepared from the naturally occurring calcium borate, which is mixed in a finely divided condition with the requisite quantity of soda ash; the mixture is fused, extracted with water and concentrated until the solution commences to crystallize.

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  • The same hydrate can be prepared by dissolving borax in water until the solution has a specific gravity of 1.246 and then allowing the solution to cool.

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  • The pentahydrate is deposited between 79° C. and 56° C.; below this temperature the decahydrate or'ordinary borax,Na2B407.10H20, is deposited.

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  • Crystals of ordinary borax swell up to a very great extent on heating, losing their water of crystallization and melting to a clear white glass.

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  • The crystals of octahedral borax fuse more easily than those of the prismatic form and are less liable to split when heated, so that they are preferable for soldering or fluxing.

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  • Fused borax dissolves many metallic oxides, forming complex borates which in many cases show characteristic colours.

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  • Its use in soldering depends on the fact that solder only adheres to the surface of an untarnished metal, and consequently a little borax is placed on the surface of the metal and heated by the soldering iron in order to remove any superficial film of oxide.

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  • Boric acid (q.v.) being only a weak acid, its salts readily undergo hydrolytic dissociation in aqueous solution, and this property can be readily shown with a concentrated aqueous solution of borax, for by adding litmus and then just sufficient acetic acid to turn the litmus red, the addition of a large volume of water to the solution changes the colour back to blue again.

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  • The Tibetan mineral deposits have been known since very early times, and formerly the crude material was exported to Europe, under the name of tincal, for the preparation of pure borax and other boron salts.

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  • The most westerly of the Tibetan deposits are in the lake-plain of Pugha on the Rulangchu, a tributary of the Indus, at an elevation of 15,000 ft.: here the impure borax (sohaga) occurs over an area of about 2 sq.

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  • Deposits of purer material (chic 'sale or water borax) occur at the lakes of Rudok, situated to the east of the Pugha district; also still farther to the east at the great lakes Tengri Nor, north of Lhasa, and several other places.

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  • The deposits formed by evaporation from these lakes and marshes or salines, are mixtures of borates, various alkaline salts (sodium carbonate, sulphate, chloride), gypsum, &c. In the mud of the lakes and in the surrounding marshy soil fine isolated crystals of borax are frequently found.

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  • in length and weighing a pound each have been found in large numbers at Borax Lake in Lake county, and at Borax Lake in San Bernardino county, both in California.

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  • In 1927 a very large deposit of relatively pure Borax was discovered at what is now Boron, CA, in the Mojave Desert.

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  • Virtually all other Borax mining operations stopped when this mine opened, including the main source of Borax at the time in Death Valley.

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  • This mine and a major mine in Turkey, which rose to prominence in the 1990s, now supply nearly all the world's borax.

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  • Borax crystallizes with ten molecules of water, the composition of the crystals being Na2B407+10H20.

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  • The optical characters are interesting, because of the striking crossed dispersion of the optic axes, of which phenomenon borax affords the best example.

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  • The optic figure seen in convergent polarized light through a section cut parallel to the plane of symmetry of a borax crystal is symmetrical only with respect to the central point.

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  • In the .scorification method the ore is mixed in the scorifier (a shallow dish of burned clay) with from ten to twenty times its weight of granulated metallic lead (test lead) and a little borax glass, and heated in a muffle, the front of which is at first closed.

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  • 3 Powdered borax.

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  • Boric acid only belongs partially to this group, as it and its compound borax have certain specific actions in addition.

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  • - This includes caustic potash, caustic soda, solution of ammonia, their carbonates and bicarbonates, borax, soaps, lithium carbonate and citrate, quicklime, slaked lime, chalk, magnesia and magnesium carbonate.

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  • Caustic potash and caustic soda are locally very irritating, and destroy the tissues, but lose this quality when combined with acids as in the case of their carbonates, bicarbonates and borax.

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  • Gum arabic is not precipitated from solution by alum, stannous chloride, sulphate or nitrate of copper, or neutral lead acetate; with basic lead acetate it forms a white jelly, with ferric chloride it yields a stiff clear gelatinoid mass, and its solutions are also precipitated by borax.

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  • Its solution is not thickened by borax, and is precipitated by neutral lead acetate; and dilute sulphuric acid converts it into d-glucose.

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  • Part of it only is soluble in water, and that resembles gummic acid in being precipitated by alcohol and ammonium oxalate, but differs from it in giving a precipitate with neutral lead acetate and none with borax.

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  • In the seventh shot, plumes of white cloud billow out from a factory at a borax mine, out of sight below.

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  • Borax supplies nearly half the world's demand for refined borates and serves customers in nearly 100 countries.

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  • Those at left were mounted in a concentrated borax solution (sodium borate ).

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  • Some products cause the workers to destroy their own nest, for example sugar based liquid bait containing borax.

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  • Our manufacturer does not use any borax or emulsifiers in our skincare range.

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  • Please note: domestic borax and ordinary sanitizing powders should not be used on Velcro or waterproof fabrics.

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  • borax solution to equal parts of the glue solution.

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  • borax mine, out of sight below.

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  • Dry flowers head down in 2 parts cornmeal and 1 part borax.

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  • Cobalt salts may be readily detected by the formation of the black sulphide, in alkaline solution, and by the blue colour they produce when fused with borax.

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  • BORON (symbol B, atomic weight ii), one of the non-metallic elements, occurring in nature in the form of boracic (boric) acid, and in various borates such as borax, tincal,.

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  • The dark product obtained is washed with water, hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid, and finally calcined again with the oxide or with borax, being protected from air during the operation by a layer of charcoal.

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  • Boron nitride BN is formed when boron is burned either in air or in nitrogen, but can be obtained more readily by heating to redness in a platinum crucible a mixture of one part of anhydrous borax with two parts of dry ammonium chloride.

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  • The atomic weight of boron has been determined by estimating the water content of pure borax (J.

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  • Berzelius), also by conversion of anhydrous borax into sodium chloride (W.

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  • Borax marshes are numerous in the west and south-west, but they are no longer commercially productive.

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  • Among the principal varieties are those which contain carbolic acid and other ingredients of coal tar, salicylic acid, petroleum, borax, camphor, iodine, mercurial salts, sulphur and tannin.

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  • Useful combinations are: borax 10%, carbolic acid 5%, ichthyol 5%, sublimed sulphur 10%, thymol 22%, &c.

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  • Ruthenium sulphides are obtained when the metal is warmed with pyrites and some borax, and the fused mass treated with hydrochloric acid first in the cold and then hot.

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  • The methods of chemical analysis may be classified according to the type of reaction: (I) dry or blowpipe analysis, which consists in an examination of the substance in the dry condition; this includes such tests as ignition in a tube, ignition on charcoal in the blowpipe flame, fusion with borax, microcosmic salt or fluxes, and flame colorations (in quantitative work the dry methods are sometimes termed " dry assaying "); (2) wet analysis, in which a solution of the substance is treated with reagents which produce specific reactions when certain elements or groups of elements are present.

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  • Heat the substance with a bead of microcosmic salt or borax on a platinum wire in the oxidizing flame.

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  • The trade of the city is principally in Bolivian products - mineral ores, alpaca wool, &c. - but it also receives and exports the products of the neighbouring Peruvian provinces, and the output of the borax deposits in the neighbourhood.

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  • The empire is rich in minerals, including gold, silver, lead, copper, iron, coal, mercury, borax, emery, zinc; and only capital is needed for successful exploitation.

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  • The borate, Pb 2 B 6 0 1 u 4H20, is obtained as a white precipitate by adding borax to a lead salt; this on heating with strong ammonia gives PbB2044H2.

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  • It may be obtained as jet black octahedra (isomorphous with thoria) by fusion with borax.

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  • Analysis.-A borax bead dissolves uranium oxides in the reducing flame with a green, in the oxidizing flame with a yellow, colour.

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  • From his committee he reported in April 1888 the "Mills Bill," which provided for a reduction of the duties on sugar, earthenware, glassware, plate glass, woollen goods and other articles, the substitution of ad valorem for specific duties in many cases, and the placing of lumber (of certain kinds), hemp, wool, flax, borax, tin plates, salt and other articles on the free list.

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  • Within these limits are to be found most of the minerals known - gold, silver, quicksilver, copper, lead, zinc, iron, manganese, wolfram, bismuth, thorium, vanadium; mica, coal, &c. On or near the coast are coal, salt, sulphur, borax, nitrates and petroleum.

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  • Sulphur deposits exist in the Sechura desert region, on the coast, and extensive borax deposits have been developed in the department of Arequipa.

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  • The mountainous region is rich in minerals, and there is a valuable deposit of borax near the capital, Arequipa.

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  • The nitrate and borax deposits are extensive and productive, and common salt is a natural product of large areas in the elevated desert regions of the Andes.

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  • The exports include copper and silver and their ores, nitrate of soda, borax, guano and other minerals in small quantities.

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  • The precipitated gold is washed, treated with salt and sulphuric acid to remove iron salts, roughly dried by pressing in cloths or on filter paper, and then melted with salt, borax and nitre in graphite crucibles.

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  • The precipitate is collected in a filter-press, and then roasted in muffle furnaces with nitre, borax and sodium carbonate.

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  • Zirconia can be obtained crystalline, in a form isomorphous with cassiterite and rutile, by fusing the amorphous modification with borax, and dissolving out with sulphuric acid.

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  • For sodium nitrite see Nitrogen; for sodium nitrate see Saltpetre; for the cyanide see Prussic Acid; and for the borate see Borax.

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  • The junction of the edges of the silver and copper-blend was treated with a flux of borax and the whole was submitted to the heat of a furnace until the silver was seen to be melting, when it was instantly removed, care being taken to avoid pressing upon the upper or lower surfaces, as the liquid silver in that case would have been squeezed out from between the two enclosing plates and the operation ruined.

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  • Glass and other sands and gravel ($13,270,032), lime ($11,091,186), phosphate rock ($10,653,558), salt ($7,553,632), natural mineral waters ($7,287,269), sulphur ($6,668,215, almost wholly from Louisiana), slate ($6,316,8 I7), gypsum ($4,138,560), clay ($2,599,986), asphalt ($1,888,881), talc and soapstone ($1,401,222), borax ($975,000, all from California), and pyrite ($857,113) were the next most important products in 1908.

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  • Chromium and its salts may be detected by the fact that they give a deep green bead when heated with borax, or that on fusion with sodium carbonate and nitre, a yellow mass of an alkaline chromate is obtained, which, on solution in water and acidification with acetic acid, gives a bright yellow precipitate on the addition of soluble lead salts.

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  • Like the other provinces of this region, Antofagasta produces for export copper, silver, silver ores, lead, nitrate of soda, borax and salt.

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  • It was first prepared by Wilhelm Homberg (1652-1715) from borax, by the action of mineral acids, and was given the name sal sedativum Hombergi.

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  • The free acid is found native in certain volcanic districts such as Tuscany, the Lipari Islands and Nevada, issuing mixed with steam from fissures in the ground; it is also found as a constituent of many minerals (borax, boracite, boronatrocalcite and colemanite).

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  • In small quantities, it may be prepared by the addition of concentrated sulphuric acid to a cold saturated solution of borax.

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  • The most important of the borates is sodium pyroborate or borax (q.v.).

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  • Borax and boracic acid are feeble but useful antiseptics.

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  • Borax taken internally is of some value in irritability of the bladder, but as a urinary antiseptic it is now surpassed by several recently introduced drugs, such as urotropine.

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  • Should now try non-decomposing bodies, as solid nitre, nitrate of silver, borax, glass, &c., whilst solid, to see if any internal state induced, which by decomposition is destroyed, i.e.

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  • The deposits consist of soda, potash, borax and common salt.

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  • Salt and borax exist in abundance in the western lake regions.

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  • The exportation of borax to India is only limited by the comparatively small demand.

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  • By the Nepal, Kumaon and Ladak routes go borax, gold and ponies.

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  • Borax is very frequently employed; it melts to a clear liquid and dissolves silica and many metallic oxides.

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  • borax, may be used.

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  • Besides having a considerable share in the commerce of the port of New York, Bayonne is an important manufacturing centre; among its manufactures are refined petroleum, refined copper and nickel (not from the ore), refined borax, foundry and machine-shop products, tubular boilers, electric launches and electric motors, chemicals (including ammonia and sulphuric and nitric acids), iron and brass products, wire cables and silk goods.

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  • It is an amorphous white powder; but it may also be obtained in crystals isomorphous with cassiterite by heating the amorphous form with borax to a very high temperature.

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  • They may be recognized by the brownish violet colour they impart to a borax bead when heated in an oxidizing flame.

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  • Enormous quantities of borax, already exploited, and of nitrate of soda, are known to be present in the surrounding country, the former as almost pure borate of lime in Tertiary lake sediments.

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  • Gold, petroleum, copper, borax and its products, clays, quicksilver and silver lead, in order of importance, representing some fourfifths of the total.

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  • In borax (of which California's output in 1904 was 45,647 tons) and structural materials San Bernardino has a long lead.

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  • More than nine-tenths of the borax product of the country comes from about Death Valley.

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  • A crystalline form was obtained by Debray as olive-green prisms by igniting a mixture of sodium tungstate and carbonate in a current of hydrochloric acid gas, and by Nordenskjold by heating hydrated tungstic acid with borax.

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  • The water is bitter and undrinkable, being largely impregnated with carbonate and sulphate of soda with some borax.

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  • A solution of borax to act as a flux was brushed over the metal plate and thoroughly worked into its incised lines.

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  • For the borax beads and the qualitative separation of copper from other metals, see Chemistry: Analytical.

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  • Extensive deposits of borax and common salt have been found in the same region, which with several other products of these saline deposits, such as iodine, add considerably to its exports.

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  • 30, 1889) Baron Julius de Reuterin consideration of giving up the rights which he held by his concession obtained in I873became the owner of a concession for the formation of a Persian State Bank, with exclusive rights of issuing bank-notes and working the mines of iron, copper, lead, mercury, coal, petroleum, manganese, borax, and asbestos in Persia.

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  • BORAX (sodium pyroborate or sodium biborate), Na2B407, a substance which appears in commerce under two forms, namely "common" or prismatic borax, Na 2 B 4 O 7.10H 2 O, and "jewellers'" or octahedral borax, Na 2 B 4 O 7.5H 2 O.

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  • It is to be noted that the term "borax" was used by the alchemists in a very vague manner, and is therefore not to be taken as meaning the substance now specifically known by the name.

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  • Prismatic borax is found widely distributed as a natural product (see below, Mineralogy) in Tibet, and in Canada, Peru and Transylvania, while the bed of Borax Lake, near Clear Lake in California, is occupied by a large mass of crystallized borax, which is fit for use by the assayer without undergoing any preliminary purification.

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  • The supply of borax is, however, mainly derived from the boric acid of Tuscany, which is fused in a reverberatory furnace with half its weight of sodium carbonate, and the mass after cooling is extracted with warm water.

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  • An alternative method is to dissolve sodium carbonate in lead-lined steamheated pans, and add the boric acid gradually; the solution then being concentrated until the borax crystallizes.

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  • Borax is also prepared from the naturally occurring calcium borate, which is mixed in a finely divided condition with the requisite quantity of soda ash; the mixture is fused, extracted with water and concentrated until the solution commences to crystallize.

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  • From a supersaturated aqueous solution of borax, the pentahydrate, Na2B407.5H20, is deposited when evaporation takes place at somewhat high temperatures.

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  • The same hydrate can be prepared by dissolving borax in water until the solution has a specific gravity of 1.246 and then allowing the solution to cool.

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  • The pentahydrate is deposited between 79° C. and 56° C.; below this temperature the decahydrate or'ordinary borax,Na2B407.10H20, is deposited.

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  • Crystals of ordinary borax swell up to a very great extent on heating, losing their water of crystallization and melting to a clear white glass.

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  • The crystals of octahedral borax fuse more easily than those of the prismatic form and are less liable to split when heated, so that they are preferable for soldering or fluxing.

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  • Fused borax dissolves many metallic oxides, forming complex borates which in many cases show characteristic colours.

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  • Its use in soldering depends on the fact that solder only adheres to the surface of an untarnished metal, and consequently a little borax is placed on the surface of the metal and heated by the soldering iron in order to remove any superficial film of oxide.

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  • Boric acid (q.v.) being only a weak acid, its salts readily undergo hydrolytic dissociation in aqueous solution, and this property can be readily shown with a concentrated aqueous solution of borax, for by adding litmus and then just sufficient acetic acid to turn the litmus red, the addition of a large volume of water to the solution changes the colour back to blue again.

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  • The Tibetan mineral deposits have been known since very early times, and formerly the crude material was exported to Europe, under the name of tincal, for the preparation of pure borax and other boron salts.

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  • The most westerly of the Tibetan deposits are in the lake-plain of Pugha on the Rulangchu, a tributary of the Indus, at an elevation of 15,000 ft.: here the impure borax (sohaga) occurs over an area of about 2 sq.

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  • Deposits of purer material (chic 'sale or water borax) occur at the lakes of Rudok, situated to the east of the Pugha district; also still farther to the east at the great lakes Tengri Nor, north of Lhasa, and several other places.

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  • The deposits formed by evaporation from these lakes and marshes or salines, are mixtures of borates, various alkaline salts (sodium carbonate, sulphate, chloride), gypsum, &c. In the mud of the lakes and in the surrounding marshy soil fine isolated crystals of borax are frequently found.

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  • in length and weighing a pound each have been found in large numbers at Borax Lake in Lake county, and at Borax Lake in San Bernardino county, both in California.

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  • In 1927 a very large deposit of relatively pure Borax was discovered at what is now Boron, CA, in the Mojave Desert.

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  • Virtually all other Borax mining operations stopped when this mine opened, including the main source of Borax at the time in Death Valley.

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  • This mine and a major mine in Turkey, which rose to prominence in the 1990s, now supply nearly all the world's borax.

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  • Borax crystallizes with ten molecules of water, the composition of the crystals being Na2B407+10H20.

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  • The optical characters are interesting, because of the striking crossed dispersion of the optic axes, of which phenomenon borax affords the best example.

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  • The optic figure seen in convergent polarized light through a section cut parallel to the plane of symmetry of a borax crystal is symmetrical only with respect to the central point.

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  • In the .scorification method the ore is mixed in the scorifier (a shallow dish of burned clay) with from ten to twenty times its weight of granulated metallic lead (test lead) and a little borax glass, and heated in a muffle, the front of which is at first closed.

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  • 3 Powdered borax.

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  • Boric acid only belongs partially to this group, as it and its compound borax have certain specific actions in addition.

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  • - This includes caustic potash, caustic soda, solution of ammonia, their carbonates and bicarbonates, borax, soaps, lithium carbonate and citrate, quicklime, slaked lime, chalk, magnesia and magnesium carbonate.

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  • Caustic potash and caustic soda are locally very irritating, and destroy the tissues, but lose this quality when combined with acids as in the case of their carbonates, bicarbonates and borax.

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  • Gum arabic is not precipitated from solution by alum, stannous chloride, sulphate or nitrate of copper, or neutral lead acetate; with basic lead acetate it forms a white jelly, with ferric chloride it yields a stiff clear gelatinoid mass, and its solutions are also precipitated by borax.

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  • Its solution is not thickened by borax, and is precipitated by neutral lead acetate; and dilute sulphuric acid converts it into d-glucose.

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  • Part of it only is soluble in water, and that resembles gummic acid in being precipitated by alcohol and ammonium oxalate, but differs from it in giving a precipitate with neutral lead acetate and none with borax.

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  • Add Borax, baking soda, or tea tree oil to cut down on odors.

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  • Borax: Use when vaginal discharge resembles egg whites and flows like water.

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  • Borax can be used in a couple of different ways to clean and disinfect tiles and grout.

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  • One way is to add a half cup of Borax to a gallon of hot water.

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  • Another way to use Borax as a way to keep grout clean is to add 2 Tablespoons of it and a quarter cup of lemon juice to 2 cups of hot water.

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  • You can also mix two parts of borax to one part of flour and sprinkle it around the foundation of your home.

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  • Borax is toxic if ingested by people or pets so be careful.

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  • To clean outside upholstery make a solution of ½ cup borax and 2 cups of hot water.

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  • Try to find the 20 Mule Team Borax, both for its quality and its large size (76 ounces).

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  • For the simplest recipe found above, you simply shave one whole bar of soap, and stir it together with a half cup of each the Borax and washing soda.

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  • Prepare a solution mixing equal parts of dishwashing soap and borax with one quart of warm water.

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  • Pour hot mixture into a large, clean bucket and add the Borax and washing soda.

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  • In a bucket, pour in 2.5 gallons of hot water, then add melted soap mixture, washing soda, borax and glycerin.

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  • Add melted soap, washing soda and Borax.

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  • Most homemade laundry detergent recipes call for bar soap, Borax and baking or washing soda, as well as plain tap water.

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  • Pour the melted soap and water combination into the hot water along with the Borax and the washing soda.

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  • Use a yardstick or other long stick to stir until the Borax and washing soda powders are completely dissolved.

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  • Place the grated soap, borax, washing soda and baking soda into a large tub or other container that can be sealed.

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  • As you learn and discover more about soap making, you will find out about glycerin, castor oil, sodium hydroxide, borax, hot process soap making and many more terms and techniques.

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  • Silly putty is easy to make with borax (which you will find on the laundry aisle at your grocery store) and diluted white glue.

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  • The basic recipe is to mix equal parts water and glue and then mix them with the borax in a four-to-one ratio.

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  • For example you could mix half a cup of glue and half a cup of water, then add a quarter of a cup of borax.

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  • borax, may be used.

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  • More than nine-tenths of the borax product of the country comes from about Death Valley.

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