How to use Books in a sentence

books
  • Read books that are true.

    142
    37
  • There are many new books in the library.

    75
    31
  • I looked for your books in the library, Miss Turnbull, but we couldn't find them.

    84
    49
  • What did the books say to do in this situation?

    51
    33
  • I took the greatest delight in these German books, especially Schiller's wonderful lyrics, the history of Frederick the Great's magnificent achievements and the account of Goethe's life.

    24
    12
    Advertisement
  • The counter was stacked with books, and there was a single chair behind the stand for him to sit and sign.

    12
    2
  • Its trade also in books, hops, horses, and cloth is considerable, and a large banking and exchange business is done here.

    43
    33
  • He had died by the time I read that passage in one of his books, so I couldn't write him, as is my normal practice when an author's words puzzle me.

    22
    12
  • Xander was everywhere, from posters on the wall, stacks of books he'd allegedly written, even a red carpet entrance flanked by adoring female fans and photographers.

    20
    11
  • Books were very scarce and very precious, and only a few men could read them.

    15
    6
    Advertisement
  • Since it debuted selling books in 1995, Amazon has expanded to sell all kinds of products.

    8
    1
  • I read a couple of books today.

    13
    8
  • Dropping to one of the benches, she opened one of the books and leafed through the colorful pages, pausing when she recognized a plant.

    7
    2
  • Seeing even his books standing rigidly at attention made her uncomfortable.

    8
    3
  • Posing provocatively for pictures, signing books, small talk.

    16
    11
    Advertisement
  • There remained a second rope, various books on the sport of ice climbing and a few pitons.

    9
    5
  • Gabriel.s small cottage was lit by a single candle that cast light on a collection of weapons along one wall and a few books on a bookshelf on another.

    3
    0
  • There appeared to be no such thing as a do-it-yourself manual for seeing the future, but the books had a few good—if bizarre—anecdotal stories that gave her ideas.

    5
    3
  • I got here early and was reading the highlighted portions of one of your psychology books.

    3
    1
  • In study hours she had to look up new words for me and read and reread notes and books I did not have in raised print.

    4
    2
    Advertisement
  • Roger rose and went to the front of Diversions and returned with one of Ouray's many history books.

    1
    0
  • He pushed open the fourth door, walking into a large room stacked from floor to ceiling with ancient tablets, manuscripts, and books.

    1
    0
  • He jabbed his thumb toward the wall behind him, where she made out the slender nickel doorknob in the space between two shelves of ancient books.

    1
    0
  • It contained a sofa, two wing chairs, a queen size bed, a fully stocked wet bar, kitchenette, bathroom, wide screen TV, books, and magazines.

    1
    0
  • The morning light was too bright for his eyes, and he turned to face shelves of antique books.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • It was right out of one of his books.

    1
    0
  • It happens in all your books.

    1
    0
  • No wonder I couldn't find them in any mug books.

    2
    1
  • She snorted at the strange assortment of books.

    2
    1
  • She found herself admiring his body and forced her attention on reading one of the books she'd picked up during a trip to stretch her legs earlier.

    5
    4
    Advertisement
  • Stuttgart is the centre of the publishing trade of south Germany, and it has busy industries in everything connected with the production of books.

    1
    0
  • His confinement was strict and injured his health, but he was allowed the use of books.

    1
    0
  • The work includes the thirteenth book by Mapheus Vegius; and each of the thirteen books is introduced by a prologue.

    1
    0
  • Nor was he a commoner in college at Winchester or at New College, as his name does not appear in the Hall books, or lists of those dining in hall, at either college.

    1
    0
  • Only Pecock's books and not the heretic were burnt.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The poems of Propertius, as they have come down to us, consist of four books containing 4046 lines of elegiac verse.

    1
    0
  • It may be assigned to 25 B.C. The dates of the publication of the rest are uncertain, but none of them was published before 24 B.C., and the, last not before 16 B.C. The unusual length of the second one (1402 lines) has led Lachmann and other critics to suppose that it originally consisted of two books, and they have placed the beginning of the third book at ii.

    1
    0
  • The four-book numbering is now the current one and is adopted in this article though there is little doubt that there were originally four books besides the Cynthia.

    1
    0
  • They will be forgotten, and their books will not be read.

    2
    1
  • These minute insects are found amongst old books and furniture.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The twenty-six books De Animalibus of Albertus Magnus (Groot), printed in 1478, are founded mainly on Aristotle.

    1
    0
  • The enormous labour required for this work seems scarcely to have been appreciated, though it remains to this day one of the most useful books in an ornithologist's library.

    1
    0
  • Pithou wrote a great number of legal and historical books, besides preparing editions of several ancient authors.

    1
    0
  • In 1635 Fra Fortunato Olmo found in a room over the great door of St Mark's a number of books which he supposed to be Petrarch's gift.

    1
    0
  • It is very doubtful whether these books really belonged to Petrarch.

    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • In 1278 his books were condemned by Jerome de Ascoli, general of the Franciscans, afterwards Pope Nicholas IV., and he himself was thrown into prison for fourteen years.

    1
    0
  • Several of his books have passed into new and revised editions and have been translated into English.

    1
    0
  • The nine books were subsequently expanded to twelve (Leipzig, 1874).

    1
    0
  • According to the story of the legists who wrote these books - e.g.

    1
    0
  • Many books dealing with South Africa generally have chapters relating to Basutoland, e.g.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Books on Marguerite and her court are also many.

    1
    0
  • The best of his books after this date are those written expressly for boys, the favourites being Masterman Ready (1841), The Settlers in Canada (1844), and The Children of the New Forest (1847).

    1
    0
  • He indulged in costly experiments in farming, so that in spite of the large income earned by his books he was not a rich man.

    1
    0
  • Weak health, however, caused him from early days to devote himself to research, mainly on church history in the later middle ages, and his literary reputation rests on the important books he produced on this subject.

    1
    0
  • On the 1st of October Loisy published three new books, Autour d'un petit livre, Le Quatrieme Evangile and Le Discours sur la Montagne.

    1
    0
  • In 1546 the council of Trent adopted the canon of Augustine, declaring " He is also to be anathema who does not receive these entire books, with all their parts, as they have been accustomed to be read in the Catholic Church, and are found in the ancient editions of the Latin Vulgate, as sacred and canonical."

    1
    0
  • The whole of the books in question, with the exception of 1st and 2nd Esdras, and the Prayer of Manasses, were declared canonical at Trent.

    1
    0
  • Only after the public grew weary of this did printers go off in search of completely new books, called novels to mark their newness.

    9
    8
  • All books are being scanned.

    8
    7
  • Circumscribed as my life was in so many ways, I had to look between the covers of books for news of the world that lay outside my own.

    1
    0
  • I never could understand the fondness some people have for confusing their minds by dwelling on mystical books that merely awaken their doubts and excite their imagination, giving them a bent for exaggeration quite contrary to Christian simplicity.

    10
    9
  • What had prompted Keaton to bring the books?

    0
    0
  • A few species, however, like the common British forms Chelifer cancroides and Chiridium museorum, frequent human dwellings and are found in books, old chests, furniture, &c.; others like Ganypus littoralis and allied species may be found under stones or pieces of coral between tide-marks; while others, which are for the most part blind, live permanently in dark caves.

    0
    0
  • The want of books and scientific apparatus at Cassel induced him to resort frequently to Gottingen, where he became betrothed to Therese Heyne, the daughter of the illustrious philologist, a clever and cultivated woman, but illsuited to be Forster's wife.

    0
    0
  • Maximilian was also a writer of books, and his writings display his inordinate vanity.

    0
    0
  • He carried few books to Holland with him, but a Bible and the Summa of Thomas Aquinas were amongst them.'

    0
    0
  • His friend Beeckman lent him a copy of Galileo's work, which he glanced through in his usual manner with other men's books; he found it good, and " failing more in the points where it follows received opinions than where it diverges from them."

    0
    0
  • But his education was not all from books.

    0
    0
  • The books give a number of their "cities" reduced by Alexander - walled mountain villages which can in some cases be identified more or less certainly with places where the clans are established to-day.

    0
    0
  • It is a Latin poem in ten books of hexameters, and contains a curious admixture of Biblical history.

    0
    0
  • The ritual books of our Pentateuch were not then in existence, and the sacrificial cult might be treated with contempt as not authoritative.

    0
    0
  • In such moments of baffled inquiry he would leave his books, perform the requisite ablutions, then hie to the mosque, and continue in prayer till light broke on his difficulties.

    0
    0
  • It includes five books; of which the first and second treat of physiology, pathology and hygiene, the third and fourth deal with the methods of treating disease, and the fifth describes the composition and preparation of remedies.

    0
    0
  • In recent years attempts have been made by Albanians resident abroad to propagate the national idea among their compatriots at home; committees have been formed at Brussels, Bucharest, Athens and elsewhere, and books, pamphlets and newspapers are surreptitiously sent into the country.

    0
    0
  • These officials, at the command of the senate, consulted the Sibylline books in order to discover, not exact predictions of definite future events, but the religious observances necessary to avert extraordinary calamities (pestilence, earthquake) and to expiate prodigies in cases where the national deities were unable, or unwilling, to help. Only the interpretation of the oracle which was considered suitable to the emergency was made known to the public, not the oracle itself.

    0
    0
  • It would appear that this title-page was to be substituted for the title-page of the Descriptio of 1614 by those who bound the two books together.

    0
    0
  • The Annales, which are in seven books, deal with the history of Bavaria in conjunction with general history from the earliest times to 1460, and the author shows a strong sympathy for the Empire in its struggle with the Papacy.

    0
    0
  • Aventinus, who has been called the "Bavarian Herodotus," wrote other books of minor importance, and a complete edition of his works was published at Munich (188'- 1886).

    0
    0
  • In some of the early books of order a few forms of prayer were given, but their use was not compulsory.

    0
    0
  • Having the moderator and clerks from the assembly of 1837, they retained the books and papers.

    0
    0
  • Thietmar wrote a Chronicon in eight books, which deals with the period between 908 and 1018.

    0
    0
  • Other buildings of note are the massive episcopal palace (1470-1500), afterwards a royal palace, and the old gymnasium founded by Gustavus Adolphus in 1627, which contains the valuable library of old books and manuscripts belonging to the diocese and state college, and collection of coins and antiquities.

    0
    0
  • The chief articles of import are apparel and textiles, machinery and hardware, stimulants, narcotics, explosives, bags and sacks, books and paper, oils and tea.

    0
    0
  • Whilst under the first of these tutors, in nine months he read all Thucydides, Sophocles and Sallust, twelve books of Tacitus, the greater part of Horace, Juvenal, Persius, and several plays of Aeschylus and Euripides.

    0
    0
  • He also studied the first six books of Euclid and some algebra, besides reading a considerable quantity of Hebrew and learning the Odes of Horace by heart.

    0
    0
  • Apellicon's chief pursuit was the collection of rare and important books.

    0
    0
  • Rathenau published various books, pamphlets and articles, on social and economic questions, some of which attracted world-wide attention, especially his Von kommenden Dingen (1920).

    0
    0
  • It is divided into three books, the first containing his proofs of the divine existence, and the remaining two the theological and philosophical arguments for immortality based on that postulate.

    0
    0
  • There followed a campaign against the idols whose temples and books were destroyed.

    0
    0
  • Besides this work Theodoret has also left us a church history in five books, from 324 to 429, which was published shortly before the council of Chalcedon.

    0
    0
  • Nothing else is known of his life except that he was the author of a Historia Hierosolymitanae expeditionis, or Chronicon Hierosolymitanum de bello sacro, a work in twelve books, written between 1125 and 1150.

    0
    0
  • It was well known during the middle ages, and was largely used by William, archbishop of Tyre, for the first six books of his Belli sacri historic. In modern times its historical value has been seriously impugned, but the verdict of the best scholarship seems to be that in general it forms a true record of the events of the first crusade, although containing some legendary matter.

    0
    0
  • The Calvinist ministers were expelled; Protestant books were confiscated and destroyed; the acts of Protestant lawyers and officials were declared invalid.

    0
    0
  • The geography of Northern Italy is described in several popular guide books.

    0
    0
  • Martinengo Cesarescos Liberation of Italy (London, 1895) is to be strongly recommended, and is indeed, for accuracy, fairness and synthesis, as well as for charm of style, one of the very best books on the subject in any language; Bolton Kings History of Italian Unity (2 vols., London, 1899) is bulkier and less satisfactory, but contains a useful bibliography.

    0
    0
  • Article 8 prohibited the seizure or examination of any ecclesiastical papers, documents, books or registers of purely spiritualcharacter.

    0
    0
  • Although these annals were no doubt destroyed at the time of the burning of Rome by the Gauls, they were restored as far as possible and continued until the pontificate of P. Mucius Scaevola, by whom they were finally published in eighty books.

    0
    0
  • Claudius Quadrigarius (about 80 B.C.) wrote a history, in at least twenty-three books, which began with the conquest of Rome by the Gauls and went down to the death of Sulla or perhaps later.

    0
    0
  • Valerius Antias, a younger contemporary of Quadrigarius, wrote the history of Rome from the earliest times, in a voluminous work consisting of seventy-five books.

    0
    0
  • He wrote twenty-three books on the period between the Social War and the dictatorship of Sulla.

    0
    0
  • He is best known for his famous supplements to Quintus Curtius and Livy, containing the missing books written by himself.

    0
    0
  • For the history of Pali before the canonical books were composed we have no direct evidence.

    0
    0
  • A description of the contents of all these books in the canon is given in Rhys Davids's American Lectures, PP. 44-86.

    0
    0
  • A certain amount of progress has been made in the historical criticism of these books.

    0
    0
  • It seems probable that the Vinaya and the four Nikayas were put substantially into the shape in which we now have them before the council at Vesali, a hundred years after the Buddha's death; that slight alterations and additions were made in them, and the miscellaneous Nikaya and the Abhidhamma books completed, at various times down to the third council under Asoka; and that the canon was then considered closed.

    0
    0
  • No evidence has yet been found of any alterations made, after that time, in Ceylon; but there were probably before that time, in India, other books, now lost, and other recensions of some of the above.

    0
    0
  • Professor Takakusu has shown the possibility of several complete books belonging to it being still extant in Chinese translations,' and we may yet hope to recover original fragments in central Asia, Tibet, or Nepal.

    0
    0
  • At p. 66 of the Gandha Vamsa, a modern catalogue of Pali books and authors, written in Pali, there is given a list of ten authors who wrote Pali books in India, probably southern India.

    0
    0
  • We may conclude that these books are still extant in Burma, where the catalogue was drawn up. Two only of these ten authors are otherwise known.

    0
    0
  • The whole of these Pali books composed in India have been lost there.

    0
    0
  • These scholars (most of them members of the Buddhist Order, but many of them laymen) not only copied and recopied the Indian Pali books, but wrote a very large number themselves.

    0
    0
  • Authors refer, in the prefaces to their books, to the Great Minster as the source of their knowledge.

    0
    0
  • A very excellent edition of the twentyseven canonical books has been recently printed there, and there exist in our European libraries a number of Pali MSS.

    0
    0
  • The works on religion and philosophy especially will be of as much service for the history of ideas in these later periods as the publication of the canonical books has already been for the earlier period to which they refer.

    0
    0
  • The Pali books written in Ceylon, Burma and Siam will be our best and oldest, and in many respects our only, authorities for the sociology and politics, the literature and the religion, of their respective countries.

    0
    0
  • More soberly true is the statement that he went on long walks with enthusiastic disciples, whom he taught without books.

    0
    0
  • Early in 1850 Ayala removed his name from the university books, and settled in Madrid with the purpose of becoming a professional dramatist.

    0
    0
  • His Commentarii grammatici in at least 29 books was an ill-arranged collection of linguistic, grammatical and antiquarian notes.

    0
    0
  • The first book, of fourteen short chapters, is concerned with the general properties of the globe; the remaining six books treat in considerable detail of the countries of Europe and of the other continents.

    0
    0
  • It is distinguished from other English geographical books of the period by confining attention to the principles of geography, and not describing the countries of the world.

    0
    0
  • Such books were in fact not geography, but merely compressed travel.

    0
    0
  • Besides the university library, there is the Ohio state library occupying a room in the capitol and containing in 1908 126,000 volumes, including a "travelling library" of about 36,000 volumes, from which various organizations in different parts of the state may borrow books; the law library of the supreme court of Ohio, containing complete sets of English, Scottish, Irish, Canadian, United States and state reports, statutes and digests; the public school library of about 68,000 volumes, and the public library (of about 55,000), which is housed in a marble and granite building completed in 1906.

    0
    0
  • He is celebrated as a collector of paintings, books, gems and sculptures, his "Arundel marbles" being given by his grandson in 1667 to the University of Oxford.

    0
    0
  • He was one of the first to see that for Biblical exegesis it was necessary to reconstruct the social environment of olden times, and he skilfully applied his practical knowledge of statecraft to the elucidation of the books of Samuel and Kings.

    0
    0
  • There were no doubt in the earliest times popular songs orally transmitted and perhaps books - of annals and laws, but except in so far as remnants meat- of them are embedded in the biblical books, they have Scrip- entirely disappeared.

    0
    0
  • To the same period belong the book of Micah, the earlier parts of the books of Samuel, of Isaiah and of Proverbs, and perhaps some Psalms. In 722 B.C. Samaria was taken and the Northern kingdom ceased to exist.

    0
    0
  • A few years later (about 600) the two Pentateuchal documents J and E were woven together, the books of Kings were compiled, the book of Habakkuk and parts of the Proverbs were written.

    0
    0
  • In the exile, but probably after 50o B.C., an important section of the Hexateuch, usually called the Priest's Code (P), was drawn up. At various times in the same century are to be placed the book of Job, the post-exilic parts of Isaiah, the books of Joel, Jonah, Malachi and the Song of Songs.

    0
    0
  • The Pentateuch (or Hexateuch) was finally completed in its present form at some time before 400 B.C. The latest parts of the Old Testament are the books of Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah (c. 330 B.C.), Ecclesiastes and Esther (3rd century) and Daniel, composed either in the 3rd century or according to some views as late as the time of Antiochus Epiphanes (c. 168 B.C.).

    0
    0
  • The inclusion of other books in the Canon was gradual, and was effected only after centuries of debate.

    0
    0
  • The Jews have always been, however, an intensely literary people, and the books ultimately accepted as canonical were only a selection from the literature in existence at the beginning of the Christian era.

    0
    0
  • The rejected books receiving little attention have mostly either been altogether lost or have survived only in translations, as in the case of the Apocrypha.

    0
    0
  • For the other books, the recognized Targum on the Prophets is that ascribed to Jonathan ben Uzziel (4th century ?), which originated in Palestine, but was edited in Babylonia, so that it has the same history and linguistic character as Onkelos.

    0
    0
  • During the period which followed the later canonical books, not only was translation, and therefore exegesis, cultivated, but even more the amplification of the Law.

    0
    0
  • Many apparent puerilities, such as the counting of letters and the marking of the middle point of books, had a practical use in enabling copyists of MSS.

    0
    0
  • Yet he contrived to write his great commentary on the Pentateuch and other books of the Bible, treatises on philosophy (as the Yesodh mora), astronomy, mathematics, grammar (translation of Ilayyu j), besides a Diwan.

    0
    0
  • In the East, Tanhum ben Joseph of Jerusalem was the author of commentaries (not to be confounded with the Midrash Tanhuma) on many books of the Bible, and of an extensive lexicon (Kitab al-Murshid) to the Mishnah, all in Arabic.

    0
    0
  • Books in the British Museum (London, 1867; continued by van Straalen, London, 1894).

    0
    0
  • In the first, the Periplus of the Outer Sea, in two books, in which he proposed to give a complete description of the coasts of the eastern and western oceans, his chief authority is Ptolemy; the distances from one point to another are given in stades, with the object of rendering the work easier for the ordinary student.

    0
    0
  • A few fragments remain of an epitome by Marcianus of the eleven books of the Geographumena of Artemidorus of Ephesus.

    0
    0
  • But when Greek deities were introduced into Rome on the advice of the Sibylline books (in 495 B.C., on the occasion of a severe drought), Demeter, the Greek goddess of seed and harvest, whose worship was already common in Sicily and Lower Italy, usurped the place of Ceres in Rome, or rather, to Ceres were added the religious rites which the Greeks paid to Demeter, and the mythological incidents which originated with her.

    0
    0
  • He married in 1895 Helen Dendy, herself the author of books on social problems. During 1903-8 he was professor of moral philosophy at St.

    0
    0
  • In later usage it describes those of the New Testament books which have obtained a doubtful place in the Canon.

    0
    0
  • This work is divided into five books.

    0
    0
  • The 4th and 5th books, though still mixed with fable, contain much valuable information, and become more authentic the more nearly they approach the author's own time.

    0
    0
  • Besides these five books, Fordun wrote part of another book, and collected materials for bringing down the history to a later period.

    0
    0
  • Her festival at Rome, the Floralia, instituted 2 3 8 B.C. by order of the Sibylline books and at first held irregularly, became annual after 173.

    0
    0
  • Later chroniclers indulged in the fictitious and the marvellous, and it is almost exclusively from his own books that trustworthy information can be obtained.

    0
    0
  • The work of Boetius is in five books and is a very complete exposition of the subject.

    0
    0
  • He published the Ars Geometriae, in two books, as given in these manuscripts; but critics are generally inclined to doubt the genuineness even of these.

    0
    0
  • This famous work consists of five books.

    0
    0
  • It is not impossible, however, that Boetius may have been brought up a Christian, and that in his early years he may have written some Christian books.

    0
    0
  • Basilides wrote an exegetical work in twenty-four books on "his" gospel, but which this was is not known.

    0
    0
  • That is known only to God, and perhaps to wisemen learned in books."

    0
    0
  • During the Russian Dark Ages certain clerical errors had crept into the liturgical books Reforms a nd certain peculiarities had been adopted in the ritual.

    0
    0
  • The department is authorized, on receipt of such report, to direct an inquiry to be made into the cause of any accident so reported, and the inspector appointed to make the inquiry is given power to enter any railway premises for the purposes of his inquiry, and to summon any person engaged upon the railway to attend the inquiry as a witness, and to require the production of all books, papers and documents which he considers important for the purpose.

    0
    0
  • Power was also given to prescribe uniform systems of accounts for all classes of carriers, and to employ special examiners to inspect the books and accounts.

    0
    0
  • The enormous influence of the collection, with its added Gude and Godlie Ballatis, on Scottish reform, is attested by the penalties enacted against the authors and printers of these books.

    0
    0
  • Besides numerous contributions to the Proceedings of the Royal and the Royal Astronomical Societies, he published several books, both explanatory and speculative.

    0
    0
  • Mr English, one of his secretaries, has furnished a picture of him at this period seated in a study lined on two sides with books and darkened by green screens and curtains of blue muslin, which required readjustment with almost every cloud that passed across the sky.

    0
    0
  • As a philosopher, Favorinus belonged to the sceptical school; his most important work in this connexion appears to have been Hvppwvetot rpoiroc (the Pyrrhonean Tropes) in ten books, in which he endeavours to show that the methods of Pyrrho were useful to those who intended to practise in the law courts.

    0
    0
  • The figures are no longer abstractions; they are concrete examples of the folly of the bibliophile who collects books but learns nothing from them, of the evil judge who takes bribes to favour the guilty, of the old fool whom time merely strengthens in his folly, of those who are eager to follow the fashions, of the priests who spend their time in church telling "gestes" of Robin Hood and so forth.

    0
    0
  • He has left an amusing acccunt of his employments in the country, where his love of study was at once inflamed by a large and unwonted command of books and checked by the necessary interruptions of his otherwise happy domestic life.

    0
    0
  • This law remained on the statute books until 1898, when it was formally repealed.

    0
    0
  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.

    0
    0
  • At the desire of Leo (then archdeacon of Rome) he wrote against Nestorius his De Incarnatione Domini in seven books.

    0
    0
  • He rapidly acquired a considerable practice, his fee books shewing that for the first three years he charged fees in 1185 cases.

    0
    0
  • Wollaston's Religion of Nature, which falls between Clarke's Discourse of the Unchangeable Obligations of Natural Religion and Butler's Sermons, was one of the popular philosophical books of its day.

    0
    0
  • An anathema was accordingly issued from Schmalkald against Schwenkfeld (together with Sebastian Franck); his books were placed on the Protestant "index"; and he himself was made a religious outlaw.

    0
    0
  • From that time he was hunted from place to place, though his wide connexions with the nobility and the friendship of his numerous followers provided for him secure hiding-places and for his books a large circulation.

    0
    0
  • His life was devoted almost entirely to his teaching and his books.

    0
    0
  • His family had been distinguished for piety and exegetical skill, but though he was known in the Jewish community by commentaries on certain books of the Bible, he never seems to have accepted any rabbinical post.

    0
    0
  • Instead of reading Aristotle and other naturalists, people went for information to commonplace books like those of Aelian, in which scraps of folk-lore, travellers' tales and fragments of misapprehended science were set forth in an elegant style.

    0
    0
  • At a later period, when the Church had learnt to look with suspicion upon devotional books likely to provoke the scoffing of some and lead others into heresy, a work of this kind could hardly meet with her approval.

    0
    0
  • It was composed in three parts, each containing six books.

    0
    0
  • At all events, two quite distinct views seem to underlie the opening books of the Old Testament.

    0
    0
  • Both Israel and Judah had their own annals, brief excerpts from which appear in the books of Samuel, Kings and Chronicles, and they are supplemented by fuller narratives of distinct and more popular origin.

    0
    0
  • Similarly the thread of the Judaean annals in Kings is also found in 2 Samuel, although the supplementary narratives in Kings are not so rich or varied as the more popular records in the preceding books.

    0
    0
  • Those in Israel who remembered the previous war between 1 Careful examination shows that no a priori distinction can be drawn between " trustworthy " books of Kings and " untrustworthy books " of Chronicles.

    0
    0
  • Its treatment of the monarchy is only part of a great and now highly complicated literary undertaking (traceable in the books Joshua to Kings), inspired with the thought and coloured by language characteristic of Deuteronomy (especially the secondary portions), which forms the necessary introduction.

    0
    0
  • To a certain extent it would seem that even as Chronicles (q.v.) has passed through the hands of one who was keenly interested in the Temple service, so the other historical books have been shaped not only by the late priestly writers (symbolized in literary criticism by P), but also by rather earlier writers, also of priestly sympathies, but of " southern " or half-Edomite affinity.

    0
    0
  • Maintaining that the position of the Pentateuch alone explains the books which follow, conservative writers concede that it is composite, has had some literary history, and has suffered some revision in the post-exilic age.

    0
    0
  • But even he reckoned the books of Daniel and Esther as canonical, and these were dangerous food for men who did not realize the full power of Rome.

    0
    0
  • The result of this decision was that the synagogue at Caesarea was insulted on a Sabbath and the Jews left the city taking their books of the Law with them.

    0
    0
  • Other canons treat of intercourse with heretics, admission of penitent heretics, baptism, fasts, Lent, angel-worship (forbidden as idolatrous) and the canonical books, from which the Apocrypha and Revelation are wanting.

    0
    0
  • The Japanese have produced few books of importance, and their compositions are chiefly remarkable as being lighter and more secular than is usual in Asia, but the older Chinese works take high rank both for their merits and the effect they have had.

    0
    0
  • It even appears from a study of the Greek text that some copies of the books of Samuel incorporated narratives which other copies did not acknowledge.

    0
    0
  • This treatment of history can be at once corrected by the books of Samuel, but it is only from a deeper study of the internal evidence that these, too, appear to give expression to doubtful and conflicting views.

    0
    0
  • It cannot be doubted that the three types of David, represented by the books of Samuel, of Chronicles, and the superscriptions of the Psalms, are irreconcilable, and that they represent successive developments of the original traditions.

    0
    0
  • The Books devoted by Malory to Lancelot are also drawn from this latter section of the romance; there is no sign that the English translator had any of the earlier part before him.

    0
    0
  • The most useful modern books are Louis and Charles de Lomenie, Les Mirabeau (5 vols., 1878 and 1889); Alfred Stern, Das Leben Mirabeaus (1889).

    0
    0
  • The Arithmetica, the greatest treatise on which the fame of Diophantus rests, purports to be in thirteen Books, but none of the Greek MSS.

    0
    0
  • The missing books were apparently lost early, for there is no reason to suppose that the Arabs who translated or commented on Diophantus ever had access to more of the work than we now have.

    0
    0
  • His works can scarcely be entitled original compositions, his labour having consisted chiefly in the arrangement of his materials, but on this very account they are of considerable value as convenient books of reference, easier of access and almost as trustworthy as the original documents.

    0
    0
  • He was able to gather around him a group of congenial friends and pupils, such as the Mills, the Austins and Bowring, with whom he could discuss the problems upon which he was engaged, and by whom several of his books were practically rewritten from the mass of rough though orderly memoranda which the master had himself prepared.

    0
    0
  • The museum includes 3300 books, many being of the 15th and 16th centuries, a department of engravings, a Virginia Room with portraits and relics, some tapestries, an excellent collection of casts and valuable American archaeological specimens.

    0
    0
  • A complete translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses (he had published six books with the Heroic Epistles some years previously) followed in 1697.

    0
    0
  • In addition, he was the author of a number of books and articles.

    0
    0
  • While his great systematic works were in progress, Mill wrote very little on events or books of the day.

    0
    0
  • His little cottage was filled with books and newspapers; the beautiful country round it furnished him with a variety of walks; he read, wrote, discussed, walked, botanized.

    0
    0
  • In addition to this, Helen has built me a herbarium, a little room fitted up with closets for my plants, shelves for my botanical books, and a great table whereon to manipulate them all.

    0
    0
  • His generosity in assisting poor students exhausted a considerable fortune, and at his death he left nothing but his books and clothes.

    0
    0
  • The Wealth of Nations is one of the great books of the world, many of the sayings of which are likely to be more frequently quoted in the future than they have been in the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • The the few people who write books on the history of economic theory.

    0
    0
  • This may serve to show that the ideals of our youth were not without justification; but the younger generation, which does not care about our ideals, and looks to the future rather than the past, will not read annotated editions of old books, however eminent their authors.

    0
    0
  • Much suggestive work on this subject of a general character is incorporated in economic books of the present day, but there is room for a whole series of careful monographs on a question of such fundamental importance.

    0
    0
  • It is true that at present very little work of this kind has been done in England, but innumerable books, many of them about England, have been written by thoroughly competent economists, in French, German and other languages.

    0
    0
  • Other books dealing with special subjects are likely to take a very high place in economic literature.

    0
    0
  • These books are generally regarded as typical of the best English work of recent years in economic investigation.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently recovering, he turned to the study of mind and the relations between body and mind, giving public lectures on the subjects of which his books treat.

    0
    0
  • The most important parts are the homilies on Jeremiah, the books of Moses, Joshua and Luke, and the commentaries on Matthew, John and Romans.

    0
    0
  • The principal apologetic work of Origen is his book Kara KeXuov (eight books), written at Caesarea in the time of Philip the Arabian.

    0
    0
  • The ten books of Stromata (in which Origen compared the teaching of the Christians with that of the philosophers, and corroborated all the Christian dogmas from Plato, Aristotle, Numenius and Cornutus) have all perished, with the exception of small fragments; so have the tractates on the resurrection and on freewill.2 6.

    0
    0
  • For our knowledge of their doctrinal system, however, we still depend chiefly upon the sacred books already mentioned, consisting of fragments of very various antiquity derived from an older literature.8 Of these the largest and most important is the Sidra' rabbd (" Great Book"), known also as Ginza - ("Treasure"), consisting of two unequal parts, of which the larger is called yamina (to the right hand) and the smaller s'znala (to the left hand), because of the manner in which they are bound together.

    0
    0
  • Primal Life, who is properly speaking the Mandaean god, has the same predicates as the primal spirit, and every prayer, as well as every section of the sacred books, begins by invoking him.

    0
    0
  • It consists of seventy-five Theses, followed by a Confarmatio in six books, and an appendix of letters to Erastus by Bullinger and Gualther, showing that his Theses, written in 1568, had been circulated in manuscript.

    0
    0
  • He was made tutor to Prince Edward of Windsor (afterwards Edward III.), and, according to Dibdin, inspired him with some of his own love of books.

    0
    0
  • It is to be supposed that Richard de Bury sometimes brought undue pressure to bear on the owners, for it is recorded that an abbot of St Albans bribed him to secure his influence for the house by four valuable books, and that de Bury, who procured certain coveted privileges for the monastery, bought from him thirty-two other books, for fifty pieces of silver, far less than their normal price.

    0
    0
  • He gives an account (chapter viii.) of the unwearied efforts made by himself and his agents to collect books.

    0
    0
  • In the eighteenth chapter he records his intention of founding a hall at Oxford, and in connexion with it a library of which his books were to form the nucleus.

    0
    0
  • He even details the rules to be observed for the lending and care of the books, and he had already taken the preliminary steps for the foundation.

    0
    0
  • The opening words of the Philobiblon and the Epistolae as given by Bale represent those of the Philobiblon and its prologue, so that he apparently made two books out of one treatise.

    0
    0
  • The twentythird of these books is De Avibus, and therein a great number of birds' names make their earliest appearance, few of which are without interest from a philologist's if not an ornithologist's point of view, but there is much difficulty in recognizing the species to which many of them belong.

    0
    0
  • Far better both as draughtsman and as authority was George Edwards, who in 1 743 began, under the same title as Albin, a series of plates with letterpress, which was continued by the name of Gleanings in Natural History, and finished in 1760, when it had reached seven parts, forming four quarto volumes, the figures of which are nearly always quoted with approval.4 The year which saw the works of Edwards completed was still further distinguished by the appearance in France, where little had been done since Belon's days,' in six quarto volumes, of the Ornithologie of MathurinJacques Brisson - a work of very great merit so far as it goes, for as a descriptive ornithologist the author stands even now unsurpassed; but it must be said that his knowledge, according to internal evidence, was confined to books and to the external parts of birds' skins.

    0
    0
  • Its line to some extent may be partly made out - very clearly, for the matter of that, so far as its details have been published in the series of papers to which reference has been given - and some traces of its features are probably preserved in his Catalogue of the specimens of birds in the museum of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, which, after several years of severe labour, made its appearance at Calcutta in 1849; but, from the time of his arrival in India, the onerous duties imposed upon Blyth, together with the want of sufficient books of reference, seem to have hindered him from seriously continuing his former researches, which, interrupted as they were, and born out of due time, had no appreciable effect on the views of systematisers generally.

    0
    0
  • This method, which in process of time was dignified by the title of a Physiological Arrangement, was insisted upon with more or less pertinacity by the author throughout a long series of publications, some of them separate books, some of them contributed to the memoirs issued by many scientific bodies of various European countries, ceasing only at his death, which in July 1857 found him occupied upon a Conspectus, Generum Avium, that in consequence remains unfinished.

    0
    0
  • They hold in their hands books turned upside down, and pretend to read through spectacles in which for glass have been substituted bits of orange-peel."

    0
    0
  • In addition to the books mentioned above he published a number of books which had a remarkable circulation in England and America, such as Speaking to the Heart (1862); The Way to Life (1862); Man and the Gospel (1865); The Angel's Song (1865); The Parables (1866); Our Father's Business (1867); Out of Harness (1867); Early Piety (1868); Studies of Character from the Old Testament (1868-1870); Sundays Abroad (1871).

    0
    0
  • Inside the fortress lies the old Protestant burying-ground, with tombs of Sackville, of John Murray, of Sir Francis Vincent, last ambassador but one from Great Britain to the republic, of Consul Smith, whose collection of books forms the nucleus of the King's library in the British Museum, and of Catherine Tofts, the singer, Smith's first wife.

    0
    0
  • The library is said to owe its origin to Petrarch's donation of his books to the republic. Most of these have now disappeared.

    0
    0
  • Bessarion had intended to bequeath his books to the Benedictines of San Giorgio Maggiore, but Pietro Morosini, Venetian ambassador at Rome, pointed out the inconvenience of housing his library on an island that could not easily be reached.

    0
    0
  • Some of his books have been translated into French, and several have gone through two or more editions.

    0
    0
  • He published Aristoteles fiber die Farben (1849), Aristoteles' acht Blcher der Physik (1857), and numerous minor articles on smaller points, such as the authenticity of the thirty-eight books of the Problems. The work by which he is best known is the Geschichte der Logik im Abendland (Leipzig, 1855-1870).

    0
    0
  • His chief books on chemistry were six volumes of Experiments and Observations on different Kinds of Air, published between 1774 and 1786; Experiments on the Generation of Air from Water (1793) Experiments and Observations relating to the Analysis of Atmospheric Air, and Considerations on the Doctrine of Phlogiston established and that of the Composition of Water refuted (1800).

    0
    0
  • For thirty years (1842-1872) Pittsfield was the home of the Rev. John Todd (1800-1873), the author of numerous books, of which Lectures to Children (1834; 2nd series, 1858) and The Student's Manual (1835) were once widely read.

    0
    0
  • This, the longest of his works, added much to existing knowledge, especially as to the relations between England and the continent, but it lacked something of the freshness of his earlier books; he was over seventy when it was completed, and he was never quite at home in dealing with the parliamentary foundations of English public life.

    0
    0
  • They laboured carefully in copying books, being instant continually in sacred study and devout meditation.

    0
    0
  • The authorities for the Crusades have been collected in Bongars, Gesta Dei per Francos (Hanover, 1611) (incomplete); Michaud, Bibliotheque des croisades (Paris, 1829) (containing translations of select passages in the authorities); the Recueil des historiens des croisades, published by the Academie des Inscriptions (Paris, 1841 onwards) (the best general collection, containing many of the Latin, Greek, Arabic and Armenian authorities, and also the text of the assizes; but sometimes poorly edited and still .incomplete); and the publications of the Societe de l'Orient Latin (founded in 1875), especially the Archives, of which two volumes were published in 1881 and 1884, and the volumes of the Revue, published yearly from 1893 to 1902, and containing not only new texts, but articles and reviews of books which are of great service.

    0
    0
  • He knew Greek and Arabic; and he was well acquainted with the affairs of Constantinople, to which he went at least twice on political business, and with the history of the Mahommedan powers, on which he had written a work (now lost) at the command of Amalric. It was Amalric also who set him to write the history of the Crusades which we still possess (in twenty-two books, with a fragment of a twentythird) - the Historia rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum.

    0
    0
  • It has fallen to the lot of no other patron of literature to have his name associated with works of such lasting interest as the Georgics of Virgil, the first three books of Horace's Odes, and the first book of his Epistles.

    0
    0
  • Evanson rejected most of the books of the New Testament as forgeries, and of the four gospels he accepted only that of St Luke.

    0
    0
  • Other of the Biblical Wisdom books (Job, Proverbs) are compilations - why not this ?

    0
    0
  • It is not certain that it is quoted in the New Testament, but it appears to be included in Josephus' list of sacred books.

    0
    0
  • The best Malay books are the Hikayat Hang Tuak, Bestamam and the Hikayat Abdullah.

    0
    0
  • It consists of three books, an introduction and an autobiography.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the Old Testament the Therapeutae had books by the founders of their sect on the allegorical method of interpreting Scripture.

    0
    0
  • The subjects are taken from the Buddhist sacred books, more especially from the accounts given in them of the life of the Buddha in his last or in his previous births.

    0
    0
  • Possibly this is one of the books about gold and silver of which Diocletian decreed the destruction about A.D.

    0
    0
  • Much bibliographical and other information about the later writers on alchemy is contained in Bibliotheca Chemica (2 vols., Glasgow, 1906), a catalogue by John Ferguson of the books in the collection of James Young of Kelly (printed for private distribution).

    0
    0
  • Problems in artillery occupy two out of nine books; the sixth treats of fortification; the ninth gives several examples of the solution of cubic equations.

    0
    0
  • This cloistered edifice may be identified with the library of Hadrian mentioned by Pausanias; the books were, perhaps, stored in a square building which occupied a portion of the central area.

    0
    0
  • He gradually became interested in these books, and a mental struggle began.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes he would pass hours thinking of a certain illustrious lady, devising means of seeing her and of doing deeds that would win her favour; at other times the thoughts suggested by the books got the upper hand.

    0
    0
  • The Book of the Spiritual Exercises has been one of the world-moving books.

    0
    0
  • The Carnegie Institute in the decade increased the extent of its service to the community; its central library, with 464,313 volumes, had 8 branches, 16 stations, 128 school stations, 10 club stations and 8 playground stations, with a circulation of 1,363,365 books; both the scientific museum and the art department added greatly to their collections; in the school of technology the enrolment grew from 2,102 students in 1909 to 4,982 students in 1920, including those in the departments of science and engineering, arts, industries and the Margaret Morrison school for women.

    0
    0
  • In 1857 he undertook with other scholars a Theologisch-homiletisches Bibelwerk, to which he contributed commentaries on the first four books of the Pentateuch, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Matthew, Mark, Revelation.

    0
    0
  • Among the books written by Sir William Ramsay, who was created K.C.B.

    0
    0
  • He was one of the first Muscovites who diligently collected foreign books, and we hear of as many as sixty-nine Latin works being sent to him at one time from abroad.

    0
    0
  • In 182 2 he was sent to the Kreuzschule at Dresden, where he did so well that, four years later, he translated the first twelve books of the Odyssey for amusement.

    0
    0
  • Wagner was always an omnivorous reader, and books were then, as now, both cheaper than music and easier to read.

    0
    0
  • Most of his matchless odes were composed in honour of the Maulawi dervishes, and even his opus magnum, the Mathnawi (Mesnevi), or, as it is usually called, The Spiritual Mathnawi (mathnawi-i-ma`nawi), in six books or daf tars, with 30,000 to 40,000 double-rhymed verses, can be traced to the same source.

    0
    0
  • A great friend of Erasmus, whom he invited to Cambridge, whilst earnestly working for a reformation of abuses, he had no sympathy with those who attacked doctrine; and he preached at Paul's Cross (12th of May 1521) at the burning of Luther's books.

    0
    0
  • Of course, generally speaking, less advance was made than in many previous decades, owing to the interregnum caused by the World War, when all British, French, German, and Austrian work was held up, and only the Americans and to a lesser degree the so-called " Egyptian " Service of Antiquities (manned by French and English) did any digging at all; while in all the European countries the energies of all the archaeologists who were not superannuated were transferred to the field of war, and there was no time left to write little papers, still less big books.

    0
    0
  • This is in three books and deals with Frankish history from the fabulous reign of Pharamond, king of the Franks, to A.D.

    0
    0
  • The two earlier books are scarcely more than a copy of the Gesta regum Francorum, but the third book, which deals with the period from 814 to 1028, is of considerable historical importance.

    0
    0
  • These accessories are indispensable if it be proposed to solve the problems usually propounded in books on the " use of the globes," but can be dispensed with if the globe is to serve only as a map of the world.

    0
    0
  • Accepting the Jewish apocalypses as sacred books of venerable antiquity, they read them eagerly, and transferred their contents bodily to Christianity.

    0
    0
  • The result was that these books became "Christian" documents; it is entirely to Christian, not to Jewish, tradition that we owe their preservation.

    0
    0
  • Under the general law against heresy their books were burnt by the hangman, they were searched for signs of witchcraft, they were imprisoned for five weeks and then sent away.

    0
    0
  • Joseph Smith's Descriptive Catalogue of Friends' Books (London, 1867) gives the information which its title promises; the same author has also published a catalogue of works hostile to Quakerism.

    0
    0
  • Another son, James (1786-1869), was a physician, and author of various books, such as Philosophy of the Human Voice (1827) and Analysis of the Human Intellect (1865).

    0
    0
  • William Law's books produced a great impression on Wesley, and on his advice the young tutor began to read mystic authors, but he saw that their tendency was to make good works appear mean and insipid, and he soon laid them aside.

    0
    0
  • No man in the 18th century did so much to create a taste for good reading and to supply it with books at the lowest prices.

    0
    0
  • Omar, on hearing the request of his general, is said to have replied that if those books contained the same doctrine with the Koran, they could be of no use, since the Koran contained all necessary truths; but if they contained anything contrary to that book, they ought to be destroyed; and therefore, whatever their contents were, he ordered them to be burnt.

    0
    0
  • Without taking a degree he removed his name from the college books in April 1798, as a protest against the inquisitorial examination of the political views of the students conducted by Lord Clare as chancellor of the university.

    0
    0
  • At Montevecchio he lived contentedly among his books, in the neighbourhood of his two friends, Pico at Querceto, and Poliziano at Fiesole, cheering his solitude by playing on the lute, and corresponding with the most illustrious men of Italy.

    0
    0
  • Gherardo, however, did not say, as has been supposed, that Joachim's books were the new gospel, but merely that the Calabrian abbot had supplied the key to Holy Writ, and that with the help of that intelligentia mystica it would be possible to extract from the Old and New Testaments the eternal meaning, the gospel according to the Spirit, a gospel which would never be written; as for this eternal sense, it had been entrusted to an order set apart, to the Franciscan order announced by Joachim, and in this order the ideal of the third age was realized.

    0
    0
  • It ' Preger is the only writer who has maintained that the three books in their primitive form date from 1254.

    0
    0
  • Under the Empire its use must have been extensive, for not only was it required for the production of books, but it was universally employed for domestic purposes, correspondence and legal documents.

    0
    0
  • It ceased, however, to be used for books sooner than for documents.

    0
    0
  • Should the evil and the good be equally balanced, the soul passes into an intermediary stage of existence (the Hamestakans of the Pahlavi books) and its final lot is not decided until the last judgment.

    0
    0
  • The circumstances of his minority are not recorded, nor is anything related of the Scythian inroads which occurred in the latter half of the 7th century B.C., although some passages in the books of Jeremiah and Zephaniah are supposed to refer to the events.

    0
    0
  • The inscription confirms in every respect the Buddhist story, and makes it certain that, at the time when it was put up, the tradition now handed down in the books was current at the spot.

    0
    0
  • The works of Raoul Rochette display a comprehensive knowledge of the whole subject, extensive reading, and a thorough acquaintance with early Christian art so far as it could be gathered from books, but he was not an original investigator.

    0
    0
  • His only means for gratifying his eager desire for books was the small library founded in his native town by Benjamin Franklin and consisting principally of histories and treatises on theology.

    0
    0
  • These and similar statements favouring the doctrines of the New Testament made many Kabbalists of the highest position in the synagogue embrace the Christian faith and write elaborate books to win their Jewish brethren over to Christ.

    0
    0
  • In the poetical and prophetic books it is referred to in connexion with the products for which it was noted.

    0
    0
  • The boundaries of Bashan may to some extent be deduced from the indications afforded in the earlier historical books.

    0
    0
  • The class of sages to whom we owe the Wisdom Books did not arise till a change had come over the national fortunes and life.

    0
    0
  • The extant writings of the Jewish sages are contained in the books of Job, Proverbs, Psalms, Ben-Sira, Tobit, Ecclesiastes, Wisdom of Solomon, 4th Maccabees, to which may be added the first chapter of Pirke Aboth (a Talmudic tract giving, probably, pre-Christian material).

    0
    0
  • In all the Wisdom books virtue is conceived of as conterminous with knowledge.

    0
    0
  • And he held that such association should be the voluntary act of the working men, the government merely reserving the right to examine the books of the various societies.

    0
    0
  • In the Moslem schools, which, in 1905, comprised 855 mektebs or primary schools, and 41 madrasas or high schools, instruction is usually given in Turkish or Arabic; while in Orthodox schools the books are printed in Cyrillic characters.

    0
    0
  • Law's mystic tendencies divorced him from the practical minded Wesley, but in spite of occasional wild fancies the books are worth reading.

    0
    0
  • During his second stay abroad (1906-17) Lenin published several pamphlets and books which attracted a good deal of attention.

    0
    0
  • Fraser, The Short Cut to India (London, 1909); with the books cited under Turks and in articles on the separate divisions of the empire and on Mahommedan law, institutions and religion.

    0
    0
  • The poem was one continuous work, but was divided into seven books by a grammarian of a later age.

    0
    0
  • In 5802 she published the first of her really noteworthy books, the novel of Delphine, in which the "femme incomprise" was in a manner introduced to French literature, and in which she herself and not a few of her intimates appeared in transparent disguise.

    0
    0
  • The abundant documents in the hands of her descendants, the families of Broglie and Haussonville, have indeed furnished material for books and papers, but these are almost wholly on the social aspect of Mme de Stael, not on her literary merit.

    0
    0
  • Her books are seen to be in large part merely clever reflections of other people's views or views current at the time.

    0
    0
  • Her two best books, Corinne and De l'Allemagne, are in all probability almost wholly unoriginal, a little sentiment in the first and a little constitutionalism in the second being all that she can claim.

    0
    0
  • The Paedagogue is divided into three books.

    0
    0
  • The work was in eight books.

    0
    0
  • It was a short commentary on all the books of Scripture, including some of the apocryphal works, such as the Epistle of Barnabas and the Revelation of Peter.

    0
    0
  • He quotes all the books of the Old Testament except Ruth and the Song of Solomon, and amongst the sacred writings of the Old Testament he evidently included the book of Tobit, the Wisdom of Solomon and Ecclesiasticus.

    0
    0
  • He is equally full in his quotations from the New Testament, for he quotes from all the books except the epistle to Philemon, the second epistle of St Peter, and the epistle of St James, and he quotes from The Shepherd of Hermas, and the epistles of Clemens Romanus and of Barnabas, as inspired.

    0
    0
  • It is needless to say that his books well deserve study; but vi.

    0
    0
  • But he is temperate in his opinions; and the practical advices in the second and third books of the Paedagogue are remarkably sound and moderate.

    0
    0
  • Its library includes the Salesbury collection of books relating to Wales.

    0
    0
  • The library is especially rich in books and MSS.

    0
    0
  • A catalogue of the printed books in the Welsh department, which soon became a standard work of reference, was published in 1898, while a calendar of the Welsh MSS.

    0
    0
  • The books (manuscripts) are generally formed of palmleaves upon which the characters are traced by means of a style.

    0
    0
  • In 1882 appeared Familiar Studies of Men and Books and New Arabian Nights.

    0
    0
  • In September 1894 was published The Ebb Tide, the latest of his books which he saw through the press.

    0
    0
  • That he was the most attractive figure of a man of letters in his generation is admitted; and the acknowledged fascination of his character was deepened, and was extended over an extremely wide circle of readers, by the publication in 1899 of his Letters, which have subdued even those who were rebellious to the entertainment of his books.

    0
    0
  • Schlozer's activity was enormous, and he exercised great influence by his lectures as well as by his books, bringing historical study into touch with political science generally, and using his vast erudition in an attempt to solve practical questions in the state and in society.

    0
    0
  • He cut the wood blocks for the books which he printed in Tirgovishtea, Ramnicu, Snagov and Bucharest.

    0
    0
  • A dramatic version of the "Alice" books by Mr Savile Clarke was produced at Christmas, 1886, and has since enjOyed many revivals.

    0
    0
  • Though the fact of his authorship of the "Alice" books was well known, he invariably stated, when occasion called for such a pronouncement, that "Mr Dodgson neither claimed nor acknowledged any connexion with the books not published under his name."

    0
    0
  • In the same neighbourhood is the Johanneum, erected in 1834 and in which are preserved the town library of about 600,000 printed books and 5000 MSS.

    0
    0
  • The red hangings of the Holy Table, usual where the liturgical colours are not used, are also - like the cushions to support the service books - supposed to be a survival of the Sarum use.

    0
    0
  • His powers of organization were strongly exhibited in the Pastors' College, the Orphanage (at Stockwell), the Tabernacle Almshouses, the Colportage Association for selling religious books, and the gratuitous book fund which grew up under his care.

    0
    0
  • In the Inikurti mine, Nellore, "books" of mica measuring 10 ft.

    0
    0
  • In dressing mica the "books" are split along the cleavage into sheets of the required thickness, and the sheets trimmed into rectangles with a sharp knife, shears or guillotine, stained and damaged portions being rejected.

    0
    0
  • In addition to many other researches besides those here mentioned, he wrote or edited various books on chemistry and chemical technology, including Select Methods of Chemical Analysis, which went through a number of editions; and he also gave a certain amount of time to the investigation of psychic phenomena, endeavouring to effect some measure of correlation between them and ordinary physical laws.

    0
    0
  • On the r4th of February Mgr Amette, the new archbishop of Paris, prohibited his diocesans to read or defend the two books, which "attack and deny several fundamental dogmas of Christianity," under pain of excommunication.

    0
    0
  • The best known of the Anglican books is Jeremy Taylor's Ductor Dubitantium (1660).

    0
    0
  • This event is related in a Norman-French transcript of an old French chanson de geste, the Chancun de Willame - which only was brought to light in 1901 at the sale of the books of Sir Henry Hope Edwardes - in the Covenant Vivien, a recension of an older French chanson and in Aliscans.

    0
    0
  • Literature - modern as well as ancient - occupied his attention; one of his works was a translation of four parts of Clarissa; and translations of some of the then current English paraphrases on biblical books manifested his sympathy with a school which, if not very learned, attracted him by its freer air.

    0
    0
  • We shall therefore enter at once on a short account of the origin of this literature in Judaism, of its adoption by early Christianity, of the various meanings which the term " apocryphal " assumed in the course of its history, and having so done we shall proceed to classify and deal with the books that belong to this literature.

    0
    0
  • Such esoteric books are apocryphal in the original conception of the term.

    0
    0
  • Thus though it insisted on the exclusive canonicity of the 24 books, it claimed the possession of are oral law handed down from ivloses, and just as the apocryphal books overshadowed in certain instances the canonical scriptures, so often the oral law displaced the written in the regard of Judaism.

    0
    0
  • For writings that stood wholly without the pale of sacred books such as the books of heretics or Samaritans they used the designation Hisonim, Sanh.

    0
    0
  • Now the current religious literature of Judaism outside the canon was composed of apocryphal books, the bulk of which bore an apocalyptic character, and dealt with the coming of the Messianic kingdom.

    0
    0